4     Department of Health and Human Services

Agency Outline

The Department of Health and Human Services is responsible for purchasing and delivering integrated services that maintain and improve the health and wellbeing of Tasmanians. The Department coordinates the delivery of its services across Tasmania through a network of facilities, community services and home‑based care; and it reports to the Minister for Health, Hon Michael Ferguson MP, and the Minister for Human Services, Hon Jacquie Petrusma MP.

Service delivery is achieved through direct provision of services by the Department or through service agreements or contracts with provider organisations. The Tasmanian Health Service (THS) is funded to provide public hospital services and a broad range of community health services. The Minister for Health, supported by the Government, will enter into a Service Agreement for 2017‑18 with the THS and monitor performance against this agreement in accordance with the Tasmanian Health Organisations Act 2011.

The principal responsibilities of the Department include:

·       planning and purchasing high quality, safe and efficient health services through the public hospital system; primary and community health services, including mental health, oral health and correctional health services; and ambulance services;

·       delivering health protection through emergency management, environmental health, chronic diseases prevention and other health improvement services;

·       funding care for Tasmanians under 65 years of age, as well as support and assistance to enable them to remain living independently in their own homes;

·       funding a network of alcohol and drug abuse prevention and treatment services;

·       funding a range of accommodation and support services aimed at enhancing the quality of life for people with disability;

·       statutory responsibilities for vulnerable children and young people in relation to child protection and youth justice;

·       funding a wide range of community services for children and their families, including early intervention, family support services and child health services; and

·       delivering and funding secure, affordable housing and support to low income Tasmanians, as well as accommodation and support for people experiencing homelessness.

This chapter provides the Department's financial information for 2017‑18 and over the Forward Estimates period (2018‑19 to 2020‑21). Further information about the Department is provided at www.dhhs.tas.gov.au.


 

Key Deliverables

Table 4.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimate allocations for key deliverables within the Department.

Table 4.1:       Key Deliverables Statement

 

2017‑18

2018‑19

2019‑20

2020-21

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

Affordable Housing Strategy1

15 000

20 000

....

....

Autism Continuum of Care

300

....

....

....

Building a Joined Up Human Services Support System

 550

 350

....

....

Campbell Town Ambulance Station

....

 140

 1 180

 1 640

Children and Youth Services (CYS) Client Information System Project2

300

....

....

....

Children, Young People and Families Investment

120

120

....

....

Community Sector Organisations ‑ Additional Funding

2 500

....

....

....

Disability ‑ Additional Support

500

....

....

....

Elder Abuse3

 150

....

....

....

Equal Remuneration Order (ERO) Costs4

24 180

31 786

34 409

36 929

Frontline Staffing Costs - Supplementation5

3 600

3 600

3 600

3 600

Health ICT Priority Infrastructure Program6

....

....

....

....

Health Transport and Coordination Infrastructure

5 270

....

....

....

Healthy Tasmania7

1 242

 685

 573

....

Housing Tasmania Property Modification Program

2 000

....

....

....

Ice and Other Drugs Strategy8

1 300

1 306

....

....

Investing in Ambulance Tasmania9

5 081

5 476

5 476

5 476

John L Grove Rehabilitation Centre5,10

5 000

5 000

5 000

5 000

Launceston General Hospital Ward Upgrades ‑ Ward 4K Upgrades

1 350

4 400

1 900

....

Launceston General Hospital - Ward 4D Boost5,10

2 140

2 140

2 140

2 140

Medical Cannabis Controlled Access Scheme - Paediatric Epilepsy5

 990

 920

 920

 920

Mental Health Priorities - Additional Funding

 750

 750

 750

 750

Mental Health Service Delivery Priorities - 2017‑18 Budget

3 429

4 204

4 204

4 204

Mersey Community Hospital

78 140

80 880

83 710

86 640

Mersey Community Hospital Capital Upgrades

....

....

15 000

20 000

Moonah Youth Facility

 800

 800

 800

 800

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

18 811

61 338

56 900

42 645

Neighbourhood Houses

 495

....

....

....

Nurses Graduates ‑ Additional Transition to Practice Placements5

2 610

1 135

....

....

One Health System ‑ Additional Investment5

7 500

7 000

7 000

7 000

One Health System - New Services5,10

….

….

8 450

8 450

Out of Home Care - Additional Support

6 550

6 750

7 100

7 100

Patient Transport to Support One Health System

4 363

4 000

4 000

4 000

Table 4.1:       Key Deliverables Statement (continued)

 

2017‑18

2018‑19

2019‑20

2020-21

 

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Patients First5

1 350

1 350

1 350

1 350

Patients First - Stage 2 - New Hospital Beds and Staff5

 

 

 

 

North

6 800

6 800

6 800

6 800

North‑West

3 000

3 000

3 000

3 000

South

8 300

6 600

6 600

6 600

Repatriation Hospital Capital10

7 000

....

….

….

Royal Hobart Hospital Pharmacy Redevelopment

 150

1 000

2 611

....

Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment

180 000

180 000

28 704

....

Royal Hobart and Repatriation Hospital Support Package5,10

11 360

11 360

12 910

12 910

Securing a Second Medical and Police Search and Rescue Helicopter

1 800

2 400

2 400

2 400

Sheffield Family Support

125

63

....

....

St Helens Hospital Redevelopment11

2 750

4 921

3 765

....

Statewide Hospital Critical Facility Upgrades

 700

3 200

6 600

....

Statewide Operations and Command Centre5,10

1 500

1 500

1 500

1 500

Statewide Rural Health Facility Infrastructure Upgrades

....

....

2 500

2 200

Streets Ahead and Homeshare - Additional Investment12

....

....

....

....

Strong Families, Safe Kids

5 031

4 322

4 098

3 898

TasCOSS

63

....

....

....

THS Infrastructure Upgrades

....

....

 720

1 160

Youth Justice ‑ Save the Children Bail Program and Post‑Detention Transition Program13

 600

 600

 600

 600

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   In 2016‑17, $25 million of the Affordable Housing allocation will be utilised to progress initiatives, with the remaining $35 million to be spent in 2017‑18 and 2018‑19 to complete Action Plan projects.

2.   $300 000 in 2017‑18 has been allocated in Finance‑General to commence detailed requirements for this new system. A provision of $6 million has been made in the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program in Finance‑General for future project costs.

3.   A further allocation of $150 000 is provided in the 2017‑18 Budget to continue the Elder Abuse Strategy.

4.   Of the $36.9 million in 2020‑21, additional funding of $2.5 million has been allocated in the 2017‑18 Budget, with the remaining $34.4 million allocated in prior years.

5.   This initiative will be delivered by the THS.

6.   A provision of $18 million has been made in the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program to address this critical program of work. Estimates and program deliverables will be progressed through the Structured Infrastructure Investment Review Process (SIIRP).

7.   This key deliverable is funded from additional funding of $1.6 million provided in the 2016‑17 Budget, with the remainder sourced from existing funding.

8.   The 2017‑18 Budget includes a Section 8A(2) Carry forward of $150 000 for this initiative.

9.   A further allocation of $2.1 million in 2017‑18 and $2.5 million per annum thereafter is provided in the 2017‑18 Budget, in addition to the existing allocation.

10. Funding for this initiative is allocated within Finance-General.

11. A further allocation of $3.6 million is provided in the 2017‑18 Budget in addition to the existing allocation of $8.1 million. In addition, $414 000 has been allocated in 2016‑17, bringing the total project cost to $12.1 million.

12. Funding of $1.1 million previously provided for Tasmanian Affordable Housing Limited (TAHL) has been redirected to fund this program.

13. A further allocation of $600 000 per annum is provided in the 2017‑18 Budget.

 

Affordable Housing Strategy

Tasmania's Affordable Housing Strategy 2015‑2025 sets the key outcomes to measure the success of the Government's strategies over the next decade to improve housing affordability in Tasmania, including a decrease in the proportion of low income Tasmanians experiencing housing stress and a decrease in the proportion of Tasmanians experiencing homelessness.

Additional funding of $60 million over three years was provided in the 2016‑17 Budget to implement the Government's priorities under Tasmania's Affordable Housing Action Plan 2015‑2019. The Government's target is to provide 1 600 vulnerable Tasmanian households with support over the four year term of the Action Plan, including construction of 941 new homes and support to access affordable homes in the private market.

In 2016‑17, $25 million of this allocation will be utilised to progress initiatives, with the remaining $35 million to be spent in 2017‑18 and 2018‑19 to complete action plan projects.

This investment is supported by the Housing ‑ New Projects funding and Housing capital program, and has built on the $13.5 million allocated to the Action Plan in 2015‑16.

Autism Continuum of Care

This 2014 election commitment provided $1 million over four years to kick‑start a longer‑term strategy to provide best practice autism care to Tasmanians.

Building a Joined Up Human Services Support System

The Government's election commitment A Hand up for Vulnerable Tasmanians articulated the need to work on a long‑term plan in partnership with the community sector to deliver improvements to the human services system, including a common approach to assessment for Government and community delivered services, and a system for appointing a lead worker for individuals with complex needs.

The 2017‑18 Budget allocates additional funding of $900 000 over two years to support the trial of the Lead Support Coordination Service under the project. This program will provide coordinated services and support for clients with multiple and complex needs who are currently engaged with human services, community based alcohol and other drugs or mental health services.

This allocation is in addition to the 2015‑16 Budget allocation of $1.2 million over two years to commence the project and implement five high priority initiatives.

Campbell Town Ambulance Station

Additional funding of $3.0 million has been allocated to construct a new Ambulance Station at Campbell Town. The new Station will deliver a contemporary ambulance station on a green field site at the southern end of Campbell Town. The project will include accommodation for relieving paramedics.


 

Children and Youth Services (CYS) Client Information System Project

Funding of $300 000 in 2017‑18 has been allocated to the CYS Client Information System Project within Finance‑General to progress this project.

This funding will be utilised to develop a robust business case and development of requirements for the replacement of the Child Protection Information System. The replacement of this system will require significant investment, but will be designed to improve efficiency and minimise the administrative burden on frontline child protection staff.

A provision for $6 million in estimated project funding has been made in the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program in Finance‑General for future implementation costs. The project will be progressed as a priority through the SIIRP to finalise estimates once design work is complete.

Children, Young People and Families Investment

This 2014 election commitment included investment of $300 000 over three years into short‑term preventative support care, to help keep families together, and investment of $360 000 over three years into a pre‑placement program.

Community Sector Organisations ‑ Additional Funding

This 2014 election commitment provided additional funding of $9 million to the community sector over four years. This additional funding is being used to support increasing costs and sector capacity building.

Disability ‑ Additional Support

This 2014 election commitment provided additional funding of $2 million over four years for disability services to assist those on waiting lists, who are not eligible for funding from the NDIS. This funding will provide approximately 12 000 additional hours of support.

Elder Abuse

Funding of $450 000 over three years was provided to support the Elder Abuse Strategy election commitment. The 2017‑18 Budget provides additional funding of $150 000 to continue initiatives and services implemented under the Strategy.

Equal Remuneration Order (ERO) Costs

Additional funding of $2.5 million is provided in 2020‑21, bringing the total ERO supplementation in 2020‑21 to $36.9 million. The ERO is being implemented in ten instalments over nine years; 2020‑21 will be year nine of the ERO. This funding will enable community sector organisations to fully meet their obligations and requirements under the Fair Work Australia ERO.

The funding supplementation included in this Budget is in addition to the $148.7 million reported in the 2016‑17 Budget for the first eight years of the ERO. In total, the Tasmanian Government has committed $185.6 million to funding the ERO. This funding represents the total cost of the ERO in Tasmania, less contributions by the Australian Government. The Australian Government commitment is reflected in payments made to the State and paid directly to the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA). Under the NDIS funding arrangements, a proportion of the State funded ERO will be included as part of the State contribution to the NDIS as eligible grants and clients are transitioned.

Frontline Staffing Costs ‑ Supplementation

Additional funding of $3.6 million per annum is provided to meet the nursing and midwifery costs in the THS. This funding is provided to support the implementation of a better career structure and allowances for nurses.

Health ICT Priority Infrastructure Program

A provision of $50 million within Finance‑General has been made over the Budget and Forward Estimates to fund implementation of several critical digital transformation projects once initial design work and costings are confirmed through the Treasury Structured Infrastructure Investment Review Process (SIIRP). This includes provisions of $18 million for Health ICT Priority Infrastructure.

This allocation represents current estimates. The estimated cost of projects and the timing of project expenditure will be finalised during the detailed planning stage of each project.

Health Transport and Coordination Infrastructure

Funding of $10 million was provided in the 2015‑16 Budget for health transport infrastructure projects, of which $5.3 million is anticipated to be spent in 2017‑18. These funds will be used for investment in improved infrastructure associated with changes to patient coordination, transport and accommodation arising from the One Health System reforms.

Investment will target capital upgrades to support patients that need to travel for services, staff that may need to travel to provide outreach services to patients, or strategies that limit the need for patients or staff to travel in order to provide or receive services under a single statewide Tasmanian health system.

This investment is in conjunction with the recurrent funding provided under the Patient Transport to Support One Health System key deliverable.

Healthy Tasmania

The 2016‑17 Budget provided additional funding of $1.6 million over four years to fund initiatives under the Healthy Tasmania policy. In addition, the Department reallocated existing funding of $1 million over the same period.

This funding has been profiled over four years to align with the implementation of initiatives identified in the Government's Healthy Tasmania Five Year Strategic Plan targeted at key areas of smoking and obesity.

Housing Tasmania Property Modification Program

Additional funding of $2.0 million in 2017‑18 is provided for Housing Tasmania to undertake window modifications to ensure that all Housing Tasmania properties comply with recent changes to the Residential Tenancy Act 1997 regarding ventilation.

Ice and Other Drugs Strategy

The 2015‑16 Budget allocated funding of $4.8 million over four years to tackle the problem of Ice and other drugs in Tasmania. This included $1.4 million reallocated from the Department's existing budget. This funding will be used to implement recommendations from the review into drug use in the North West, which was released in November 2014.


 

Specific initiatives include:

·       the opening of 12 new residential rehabilitation beds in the North West for clients from across the State;

·       employment of new specialist consultation liaison staff within Alcohol and Drug Services (ADS) to work across the North and North West (these staff will work with the broader health system and community services);

·       new transport options to improve access for North and North West clients to the southern specialist Inpatient Withdrawal Unit when appropriate; and

·       supporting communities and current service providers, including assistance for health promotion, prevention and early intervention strategies, such as raising community awareness and improving health and health policy literacy.

Investing in Ambulance Tasmania

Funding of $21.5 million is provided over four years to meet costs associated with the Tasmanian Ambulance Service Award work value claim, as well as to support Ambulance Tasmania to continue to implement changes to meet the contemporary needs of patients in Tasmania.

This includes $3.0 million per annum provided in the 2016‑17 Budget.

John L Grove Rehabilitation Centre

Additional funding of $5.0 million per annum is provided for four years for the continued operation of the John L Grove Rehabilitation Centre in Launceston.

Launceston General Hospital Ward Upgrades ‑ Ward 4K Upgrades

The 2016‑17 Budget provided $7.9 million over four years to upgrade Ward 4K at the Launceston General Hospital. This ward is the current children and paediatrics ward which is not appropriately configured to support young people suffering from a mental illness. The expansion of Ward 4K will enable young people suffering from a mental illness to be treated in a clinically appropriate environment.

Launceston General Hospital ‑ Ward 4D Boost

Additional funding of $2.1 million per annum is provided for four years to open a further four permanent beds on Ward 4D, bringing the total number of beds opened to 19.

Medical Cannabis Controlled Access Scheme ‑ Paediatric Epilepsy

This initiative will provide funding of $3.8 million over four years to fund a screening and assessment program for children with severe refractory epilepsy. The program will include a controlled access scheme for medical cannabis as a treatment where it is deemed clinically suitable.

Mental Health Priorities ‑ Additional Funding

The 2016‑17 Budget provided additional funding of $750 000 per annum from 2016‑17 to support the implementation of a number of priority actions under the Government's Rethink Mental Health Plan 2015‑2025 and the Government's strategies for suicide prevention released in March 2016, including the Tasmanian Suicide Prevention Strategy 2016‑2020, Youth Suicide Prevention Plan for Tasmania 2016‑2020 and Suicide Prevention Workforce Development and Training Plan for Tasmania 2016‑2020.

This funding will assist with the development of an integrated mental health system that will provide support in the right place, at the right time and with clear signposts about where and how to get help, and to deliver targeted suicide prevention initiatives.

Mental Health Service Delivery Priorities ‑ 2017‑18 Budget

Additional funding of $3.4 million in 2017‑18, increasing to $4.2 million per annum from 2018‑19 is provided to continue vital mental health services, including:

·       packages of care for children, young people and adults previously funded by the Australian Government;

·       funding to Rural Alive and Well;

·       grassroots mental health support;

·       additional mental health advocacy; and

·       early intervention referral pathways as part of the Suicide Prevention Strategy.

Mersey Community Hospital

Funding of $329.4 million is provided over the 2017‑18 Budget and Forward Estimates period for the continued operation of the Mersey Community Hospital, following transfer of ownership from the Australian Government to Tasmania, which is expected to occur by 30 June 2017.

The Tasmanian Government is continuing to implement new services at the Mersey, Tasmania's Dedicated Elective Surgery Centre, to deliver better health outcomes on the North West Coast and across the State as part of the One Health System Reforms.

In 2017‑18, the Tasmanian Government will deliver increased access to subacute services at the Mersey, including rehabilitation, pain management services, palliative and geriatric care. The Government will also increase access to specialist and subspecialist care through the provision of an increased range of outpatient clinics. 

Mersey Community Hospital Capital Upgrades

Additional funding of $35 million over two years is provided to deliver a significant capital upgrade of the Mersey Community Hospital in 2019‑20 and 2020‑21. This upgrade will support the new service profile being implemented as part of the One Health System reforms.

Moonah Youth Facility

This initiative provides funding of $800 000 per annum to operate the Moonah Youth Response Centre where young people will have access to trauma informed multi‑disciplinary services. The operation of this facility is a priority under the Government's Youth at Risk Strategy. The construction of this facility is funded through the Affordable Housing Strategy.

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is a major Australian and State Government initiative which provides support, including individualised funding, to eligible people with disability which they can use to suit individual needs. The NDIS provides reasonable and necessary supports and provides people with more choice and control over how, when and where their supports are provided, and provides certainty about the support a person needs over their lifetime. It also focuses on early intervention and investment where getting early supports can reduce the impact of disability on the individual.

On 11 December 2015, the Tasmanian and Australian Governments signed a Bilateral Agreement committing to rolling out the NDIS to full Scheme from 2016‑17 to 2018‑19. Around 10 600 Tasmanians with disability are expected to benefit from the NDIS when fully implemented in July 2019.

Based on current transition cost estimates and anticipated full scheme costs, the Department will contribute over $750 million in cash and in‑kind contributions to the NDIS over the 2017‑18 Budget and Forward Estimates period. Of this total funding contribution, $179.7 million is additional funding specifically allocated for the State Contribution to the NDIS.

Neighbourhood Houses

The 2016‑17 Budget provided additional funding of $990 000 allocated over two years for Neighbourhood and Community Houses. This additional funding will provide each neighbourhood house with a further injection of $30 000 over two years.

Nurses Graduates ‑ Additional Transition to Practice Placements

This 2014 election commitment provided $5.4 million over four years for additional Transition to Practice Placement for nursing graduates. This will enable the employment of up to 85 additional graduate nurses across the State over four years. Funding has been profiled in the 2017‑18 Budget to align with anticipated intake dates in 2017 and 2018.

One Health System ‑ Additional Investment

The 2016‑17 Budget provided ongoing funding to support One Health System reforms. The 2017‑18 Budget allocation of $7.5 million in 2017‑18 will support high priority service reconfiguration as identified in the White Paper and Clinical Services Profile (CSP) Implementation Plan.

Actions funded under this investment include:

·       consolidation of clinical services into sites that are equipped and capable of delivering services safely and efficiently;

·       consolidation of all birthing and inpatient maternity services for the North West region into a single site;

·       refocusing of the Mersey Community Hospital (MCH) towards sub‑acute services and continuing its role as an elective surgery centre; and

·       improving and growing hospital services to deliver optimal benefits to patients and improve efficiency.

One Health System ‑ New Services

Additional funding of $16.9 million is provided over two years in 2019‑20 and 2020‑21, to support high priority service reconfiguration as identified in the White Paper and CSP Implementation Plan.

This is in addition to funding allocated for this purpose in the 2016‑17 Budget as part of the One Health System ‑ Additional Investment initiative.

Out of Home Care - Additional Support

This initiative provides additional funding of $27.5 million over four years to support the needs of children in out of home care in Tasmania. This investment reflects the Government's commitment to ensure that when children enter care their individual needs can be met and supported with appropriate and tailored therapeutic supports. Targeted investment to support individual needs is designed to not only meet increasing demand but improve outcomes for some of Tasmania's most vulnerable children.

A component of this additional funding will be utilised to address the recommendations in the Commissioner for Children and Young People's Children and Young People in Out of Home Care in Tasmania Report.

The ongoing implementation of the Strong Families, Safe Kids initiatives is tied to this additional investment. The comprehensive redesign of Child Protection in Tasmania is a long‑term commitment. This investment ensures that the needs of children in out of home care can be met.

Patient Transport to Support One Health System

The Patient Transport to Support One Health investment is directed to improve patient transport and coordination under the Government's One Health System reforms.

Recurrent funding for this initiative is being directed towards the following priorities:

·       enhancing retrieval and referral services;

·       extending non‑emergency patient transport;

·       patient and family hospital transport service between North and North West hospitals;

·       additional emergency ambulance services in the Devonport region;

·       extended care paramedics in the Launceston region; and

·       travel avoidance education and telehealth.

This investment is in conjunction with the capital provided under the Health Transport and Coordination Infrastructure key deliverable.

Patients First

The 2016‑17 Budget provided funding of $1.4 million per annum for the Patients First initiative to support the implementation of actions to ensure patients receive more timely care in emergency departments (ED) at the Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH) and the Launceston General Hospital. This additional funding allocation supports the Patients First actions, including:

·       the employment of Clinical Initiative Nurses (CINs) to actively monitor and provide advice to patients and their families while they are in an ED waiting room, including developing plans of care for patients in consultation with ED doctors;

·       the continuation of Psychiatric Emergency Nurses (PEN) at the Royal Hobart Hospital, following the cessation of Australian Government funded PEN positions; and

·       the deployment of Extended Care Paramedics and First Intervention Vehicle in the Southern region through Ambulance Tasmania to reduce ED admissions and preserve emergency ambulance response capacity.

Patients First ‑ Stage 2 ‑ New Hospital Beds and Staff

Additional funding of $67.3 million is provided over four years to deliver the second stage of the Patients First initiative. Funding for Patients First ‑ Stage 2 is focused on increasing hospital bed capacity across all regions as a direct response to increasing demand. Actions delivered under this initiative will include:

·       permanently opening 12 beds in Ward 4D and constructing three new single rooms, for three additional beds, for vulnerable patients at the Launceston General Hospital;

·       opening eight new beds at the North‑West Regional Hospital, including four ED stay beds and four surgical beds for elective surgery patients who need overnight stays; and

·       supporting the Royal Hobart Hospital in delivering 27 additional beds, including beds in the Intensive Care Unit and beds at other facilities across the Southern Region.

Repatriation Hospital Capital

Work is being undertaken regarding the refurbishment and opening of ward space at the Repatriation Hospital to facilitate the recommencement of services to improve patient flow at the Royal Hobart Hospital. A provision of $7 million in capital funding has been included within Finance‑General in 2017‑18 to fund the required capital works following finalisation of the redevelopment plans, which will be progressed through the Structured Infrastructure Investment Review Process (SIIRP).

Recurrent funding to support the operation of the redeveloped wards is provided in the Royal Hobart and Repatriation Hospital Support Package.

Royal Hobart Hospital Pharmacy Redevelopment

The 2016‑17 Budget provided additional funding of $3.8 million for the Royal Hobart Hospital Pharmacy Redevelopment project. This project will deliver a new, purpose built sterile pharmaceutical production facility at the Royal Hobart Hospital. This facility will be a contemporary, safe, high‑capacity sterile production suite that is able to meet patient throughput needs for chemotherapy and elective surgery, and other services as required.

Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment

The $689 million Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment is Tasmania's largest ever health infrastructure project and will deliver a modern health facility for future generations. This project is jointly funded by the Australian and Tasmanian Governments.

In December 2015, a Guaranteed Construction Sum was accepted by the Government. This milestone meant that the construction of a new inpatient facility known as K‑Block could proceed.

The approved K‑Block will now be built with important additions including:

·       a safer construction methodology allowing key acute services to stay on site but away from the day to day disruption of construction and still have access to critical medical facilities and security;

·       a fully costed decanting and refurbishment plan including the construction of the temporary facility in Liverpool Street;

·       an improved design that will increase the floor area of levels 2 and 3 by an additional 1 400mē, allowing increased space for mental health services including more outdoor recreational space;

·       an improved design for the maternity ward that will increase the number of single bed rooms for women who have had caesareans or complex births;

·       the addition of a helipad for emergency aero‑medical retrievals; and

·       the accelerated replacement of the hyperbaric chamber.

It is anticipated the new K‑Block will be completed in mid‑2019.

The total $689 million cost of this project includes $469 million from the Capital Investment Program project identified in Table 4.10 and funds from the completed Special Capital Investment Fund, Women's and Children's Precinct and Cancer Centre phases of the project.

Royal Hobart and Repatriation Hospital Support Package

Additional funding of $48.5 million is provided to support measures to improve patient flow and access to the Royal Hobart Hospital including: providing more bed space; better use of the transit lounge; additional allied health staff; extended pharmacy opening hours; and recruitment of additional staff at the Tolosa Street Mental Health facility.

Funding allocated will also support the opening of an additional ward at the Repatriation Hospital in 2018‑19.

Securing a Second Medical and Police Search and Rescue Helicopter

This initiative will increase the capacity of Ambulance Tasmania's Aero‑Medical and Retrieval Service to address ongoing and increasing demand.

Additional funding will secure the continued use of two BK117 helicopters across the Aero‑Medical and Retrieval Service and Police Search and Rescue. The availability of two medically equipped helicopters will allow for increased capacity for medical retrievals and transfers.

This initiative is delivered in conjunction with the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management.

Sheffield Family Support

This 2014 election commitment provided $500 000 for the Family Support Centre in Sheffield. The Centre is managed by Glenhaven Family Care, a community sector organisation in partnership with the Kentish Council and the community.

St Helens Hospital Redevelopment

The construction of a new St Helens Hospital will achieve a modern and accessible environment for patients, clients, staff and community members in the Break O'Day region into the future. A further allocation of $3.6 million is provided in the 2017‑18 Budget which, in addition to the existing allocation of $8.1 million and an additional allocation of $414 000 in 2016‑17, brings the total cost of the redevelopment to $12.1 million.

Practical completion for the construction program of the St Helens Hospital Redevelopment project is anticipated in December 2018. Payments will extend beyond that period to reflect equipment purchases and final payments made following the completion of the defects period.

Statewide Hospital Critical Facility Upgrades

Additional funding of $10.5 million over three years is provided for critical upgrades at hospital facilities across the State. This includes $2.2 million for the new dedicated Nurse Training facilities at the North‑West Regional Hospital, which will replace a substandard demountable facility.

The new on‑site facility will support better education and skills building that is paramount to achieving excellent patient care.

Statewide Operations and Command Centre

Additional funding of $6.0 million is provided over four years to implement a Statewide Operations and Command Centre in the THS. This Centre will have regional hubs that are systems driven, to ensure effective communication and allow for safe, efficient and effective management of public hospitals.

The Centre will support clinicians to deliver better care, with improved patient flow within and between Tasmania's major public hospitals, providing improved patient outcomes and more anticipatory, patient‑centred care delivery.

Statewide Rural Health Facility Infrastructure Upgrades

Funding of $4.7 million over two years is provided for high priority infrastructure upgrades required in rural health facilities across the State. Investment will be primarily dedicated to roof upgrades and heating, ventilation and air‑conditioning units across the State that are in urgent need of upgrade and replacement.

Streets Ahead and Homeshare ‑ Additional Investment

This initiative redirects existing funding of $1.1 million previously provided to Tasmanian Affordable Housing Limited (TAHL) for the Streets Ahead and Homeshare programs. These programs have been demonstrated to deliver effective support through high take‑up rates and directly align with the priorities of Tasmania's Affordable Housing Strategy 2015‑2025.

Strong Families, Safe Kids

Strong Families, Safe Kids is the first stage of a holistic redesign of child protection services in Tasmania aimed at delivering better outcomes for children and their families. The delivery of this redesign will fundamentally change the way in which government and non‑government agencies work collaboratively to deliver services to improve the wellbeing of all Tasmanian children.

The 2016‑17 Budget provided one‑off funding and ongoing funding to support the implementation of actions under five strategies identified in the Strong Families, Safe Kids Implementation Plan. This investment is delivered across the Department and the Department of Education.

TasCOSS

This 2014 election commitment provided $250 000 over four years to TasCOSS to assist in building a joined up human services support system in partnership with the Government.

THS Infrastructure Upgrades

This funding allocation provides $1.9 million over two years for significant infrastructure upgrades and replacements in the THS in addition to the Essential Maintenance program already undertaken across the Department and THS.

Youth Justice - Save the Children Bail Program and Post‑Detention Transition Program

This initiative provides funding of $600 000 per annum to continue the 2014 election commitment providing one‑on‑one support through both the Supporting Young People on Bail Program and the Post‑Detention Transition Program.

Output Restructures

·       The former Output Group 8 Independent Children's Review Service has been renamed Independent Children's and Young Persons' Review Service.

·       The former Output 8.1 Office of the Commissioner for Children has been renamed Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People.

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of Health and Human Services are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 ‑ Health Services System Management;

·       Output Group 2 ‑ Tasmanian Health Service;

·       Output Group 3 ‑ Statewide Services;

·       Output Group 4 ‑ Human Services System Management;

·       Output Group 5 ‑ Human Services;

·       Output Group 6 ‑ Children Services System Management;

·       Output Group 7 ‑ Children Services; and

·       Output Group 8 ‑ Independent Children's and Young Persons' Review Service.

Table 4.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department.


 

Table 4.2:       Output Group Expense Summary

 

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

 

Budget)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020-21)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Health Services System Management

 

 

 

 

 

1.1  Health Services System Management1

 144 879)

 160 194)

 164 117)

 169 033)

 174 419)

 

 144 879)

 160 194)

 164 117)

 169 033)

 174 419)

Output Group 2 - Tasmanian Health Service

 

 

 

 

 

2.1  Tasmanian Health Service2

 672 950)

 804 858)

 801 590)

 847 049)

 843 229)

 

 672 950)

 804 858)

 801 590)

 847 049)

 843 229)

Output Group 3 - Statewide Services

 

 

 

 

 

3.1  Ambulance Services3

 71 837)

 74 208)

 74 881)

 75 596)

 76 704)

3.2  Public Health Services4

 28 579)

 30 201)

 28 645)

 29 538)

 26 221)

 

 100 416)

 104 409)

 103 526)

 105 134)

 102 925)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program5

 5 051)

 18 340)

....)

 579 911)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special Capital Investment Funds5

....)

 21 000)

 6 500)

 24 000)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Human Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 - Human Services System Management

 

 

 

 

 

4.1  Human Services System Management6

 3 130)

 4 497)

 4 244)

 4 042)

 3 980)

 

 3 130)

 4 497)

 4 244)

 4 042)

 3 980)

Output Group 5 - Human Services

 

 

 

 

 

5.1  Community Services

 24 434)

 25 730)

 25 863)

 25 762)

 26 567)

5.2  Disability Services7

 217 468)

 231 287)

 283 012)

 235 551)

 225 168)

5.3  Housing Services8

 134 947)

 131 961)

 132 818)

 133 698)

 135 153)

 

 376 849)

 388 978)

 441 693)

 395 011)

 386 888)


 

Table 4.2:       Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

 

Budget)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020-21)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 6 - Children Services System Management

 

 

 

 

 

6.1  Children Services System Management9

 3 957)

 3 029)

 3 027)

 2 742)

 2 607)

 

 3 957)

 3 029)

 3 027)

 2 742)

 2 607)

Output Group 7 - Children Services

 

 

 

 

 

7.1  Children Services10

 120 256)

 114 216)

 114 617)

 114 826)

 115 849)

 

 120 256)

 114 216)

 114 617)

 114 826)

 115 849)

Output Group 8 - Independent Children's and Young Persons' Review Service

 

 

 

 

 

8.1  Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People11

  957)

  928)

  937)

  947)

  956)

 

  957)

  928)

  937)

  947)

  956)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

 3 350)

 2 325)

 1 325)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special Capital Investment Funds

 1 157)

 1 236)

 1 278)

  970)

  463)

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

1 432 952)

1 624 010)

1 642 854)

2 243 665)

1 631 316)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The increase in the Health Services System Management Output primarily reflects: the provision of additional funding in the 2017‑18 Budget for priority mental health services; the recognition of the continuation of a number of significant Commonwealth Own Purpose Expenditure programs including Rural Health Outreach Fund and Medical Outreach Indigenous Chronic Disease Program; and the reallocation of costs across the Department to more accurately reflect activity.

2.   The increase in the Tasmanian Health Service Output in 2017‑18 reflects the changed funding arrangements for the Mersey Community Hospital and additional funding provided to the THS for 2017‑18 Budget initiatives. From 1 July 2017, funding for the Mersey Community Hospital will be provided through the Department's Consolidated Fund Appropriation to the THS. The decrease in 2018‑19 primarily reflects the completion of the Rebuilding Health Services ‑ Elective Surgery Program. The increase in 2019‑20 reflects additional funding from the State towards the cost of the 27th pay in the THS.

3.   The increase in the Ambulance Services Output primarily reflects additional funding provided in the 2017‑18 Budget to Secure a Second Medical and Police Search and Rescue Helicopter and the Investing in Ambulance Tasmania initiative.

4.   The movement in the Public Health Services Output primarily reflects the timing of expenditure of funding provided under the Essential Vaccines National Partnership Agreement and the delivery of initiatives under Healthy Tasmania.

5.   The movements in Capital Investment Program (CIP) and Special Capital Investment Funds (SCIF) primarily reflect the transfer of completed infrastructure assets to the THS. The Department undertakes capital works on behalf of the THS and transfers the assets to the THS. The transfer appears as an accrual expense within the Department and as accrual revenue within the THS.

6.   The movements in the Human Services System Management Output primarily reflect additional funding provided for the Building a Joined Up Human Services Support System and a redistribution of allocations across Human Services outputs.

7.   The movements in Disability Services primarily reflect Tasmania's contribution towards the NDIS and Australian Government funding during the NDIS transition as specified in the Bilateral Agreement. The decreases from 2019‑20 reflect the cessation of the Disability Specific Purpose Payment (SPP); the expiry of the NPA on Pay Equity for the Social and Community Services Sector; and cessation of funding from the Australian Government under the transition to the NDIS for older people in specialist disability services provided by the State. From 2019, all older people in specialist disability services will have transitioned to the NDIS.

8.   The decrease in the Housing Services Output primarily reflects revisions to rental receipts and associated costs based on current and anticipated Housing Tasmania stock profiles.

9.   The movements in the Children Services System Management Output primarily reflect a redistribution of allocations across Human Services outputs.

10. The decrease in the Children Services Output primarily reflects the transfer of the Child Health and Parenting Service to the THS on 1 January 2017, partially offset by additional funding provided for 2017‑18 Budget initiatives including Out of Home Care ‑ Additional Support.

11. The decrease in Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People in 2017‑18 reflects the utilisation of one‑off funding in 2016‑17 and minor adjustments to overhead allocations across outputs.

Output Group 1:   Health Services System Management

1.1 Health Services System Management

This Output provides a number of functions including the provision of support for corporate services, policy, planning, regulation, funding, monitoring and service improvement across health services. This Output also provides support to the Secretary in establishing output priorities, including service improvement and supporting the THS to develop consistent, collaborative models of care particularly for chronic and complex conditions.

This Output includes:

·       grants provided to non‑government organisations in relation to mental health services, home and community health services, population health and alcohol and drugs;

·       funding held centrally for health‑related expenses including payments to nationally funded centres, the National Blood Authority and the Post Graduate Medical Council;

·       funding for shared services functions delivered by the Department on behalf of the THS;

·       the Department's contribution to the Australian Government for older people receiving basic community care to reflect the additional cost to the Australian Government to offset the net additional financial responsibilities taken on as part of the National Health Reform Agreement; and

·       centralised functions in relation to the delivery of Statewide Mental Health Services.

Table 4.3:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2014‑15 Actual

2015‑16 Actual

2016‑17 Target

2017‑18 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Implementation of Government reform agenda goals achieved within published timeframe1

%

100

75

100

100

Service Agreements developed and administered in accordance with the THO Act, and policy settings endorsed by the Minister for Health2

Number

3

1

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The health reform goals in 2015‑16 were those specified in the Government's 365 Day Plan and Agenda 2016. The target of 100 per cent was not achieved due to timeframes regarding the demolition of 'B Block' and 'B Fan' as part of the Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment.

2.   In 2014‑15, all three THO service agreements were finalised within the required legislative timeframe. The performance of all THOs against the requirements of the agreements was monitored and managed in accordance with the processes outlined in the 2014‑15 THO Service Agreement Performance Framework. A single Service Agreement commenced in 2015‑16 with the establishment of the THS on 1 July 2015.

Output Group 2:   Tasmanian Health Service

2.1 Tasmanian Health Service

This Output provides admitted acute, non‑admitted acute, emergency department, forensic medicine, community and aged care, oral health and mental health services to patients through Tasmania's major public and rural hospitals, residential aged care and community health based services. The State contribution to the THS is included in this Output.

Performance Information Comments

Performance information relating to the THS is provided in chapter 25 of this Budget Paper.

Output Group 3:   Statewide Services

3.1 Ambulance Services

This Output provides integrated pre‑hospital emergency and medical services, health transport, aero‑medical and medical retrieval services to the Tasmanian community. It provides these services through a system of paramedics, doctors, patient transport officers, volunteer officers and the support and partnership of independent non‑government services around the State.

3.2 Public Health Services

This Output protects and improves the health of Tasmanians by enabling Tasmanians to make positive health choices and live in safe environments. Public Health Services provides two service streams:

·       Health Protection, which monitors and enforces legislation to manage and help prevent disease, illness and injury; and

·       Health Improvement, which develops and implements evidence based policies and programs to improve health outcomes and prevent or reduce risk factors that lead to chronic conditions.

The scope of Health Protection is defined by the Public Health Act 1997, Poisons Act 1971, Fluoridation Act 1968, Food Act 2003 and the Radiation Protection Act 2005. The scope of Health Improvement practice is to positively influence the health service and community service sectors in the State, working closely with key partners in the implementation of programs and specifically targeted interventions within populations that have been identified as having higher risk. This work is closely aligned with the Government's strategy for preventive health, the Healthy Tasmania Five Year Strategic Plan.


Table 4.4:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2014‑15 Actual

2015‑16 Actual

2016‑17 Target

2017‑18 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ambulance Services

 

 

 

 

 

Total Ambulance Responses1

Number

78 743

81 409

93 784

97 535

Emergency Ambulance Responses2

Number

47 795

49 644

51 630

51 695

Satisfaction with Ambulance Services

%

98

98

98

98

Median Emergency Response Times (Statewide)3

Mins

12.3

12.9

12.3

11.6

Median Emergency Response Times (Hobart)3

Mins

11.5

11.9

11.3

10.7

Median Emergency Response Times (Launceston)3

Mins

11.0

11.7

11.1

10.6

Median Emergency Response Times (Devonport)3

Mins

10.2

10.5

10.0

9.5

Median Emergency Response Times (Burnie)3

Mins

9.8

10.1

9.6

9.4

Ambulance Services expenditure per person4

$

133.6

133.8

135.2

136.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Health Services

 

 

 

 

 

Radiation Protection

 

 

 

 

 

Radiation Management Plan ‑ Notifying of a review5

%

82.0

78.0

98.0

98.0

Radiation Source Certification ‑ Recertified prior to expiry

%

60.0

 

98.0

 

100.0

 

100.0

Immunisation

 

 

 

 

 

Vaccine coverage in children aged 12‑15 months

%

89.8

92.9

92.5

92.5

Vaccine coverage in children aged 24‑27 months

%

90.5

89.7

92.5

92.5

Move Well Eat Well

 

 

 

 

 

Primary School Program Membership

%

77.8

80.1

82.0

82.0

Primary School Program Awarded

%

22.2

24.0

33.0

33.0

Early Childhood Program Membership6

%

80.0

84.0

85.0

90.0

Early Childhood Program Awarded6

%

20.0

23.0

25.0

30.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The number of vehicles dispatched (responses) is one measure of the Ambulance Service's workload and an indicator of the demand for ambulance services in Tasmania. This measure includes emergency, urgent and non‑urgent responses (cases managed by Ambulance Tasmania's Health Transport Service are excluded ‑ these include scheduled bookings for Non‑Emergency Patient Transport Service patients). This indicator is a measure of demand rather than performance. As such, the figure presented here is the actual figure for 2014‑15 and 2015‑16 and target figures for 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 are presented based on the expected 4 per cent increase in response or extrapolation of data previously provided to the Report on Government Services.

2.   An emergency incident is one requiring at least one immediate Ambulance response under lights and sirens. This measure is a subset of the figure reported as Total Ambulance Responses but for emergency incidents only.

3.   The ambulance emergency response time is the difference in time between an emergency 000 call being received at the Ambulance Tasmania Communications Centre and the first vehicle arriving at the location to treat the sick or injured patient. The Median Emergency Response Time (MERT) is the middle time value when all the response times are ordered from the shortest to the longest. The MERT can be broadly interpreted as the time within which approximately 50 per cent of the first responding ambulance resources arrive at the scene of an emergency. Note that in 2015‑16 the methodology used by Ambulance Tasmania to calculate the emergency response time changed to conform with National standards. The 2014‑15 emergency response time figures have been updated from the previous years' reported figures to reflect this change.

4.   These figures are as published in the annual Report on Government Services and may differ from those in previous reports due to statistical parameter adjustments.

5.   Radiation Management Plans are required for licences which have the dealing of 'possession'. The plan is approved when the licence is issued. Plans do not have an expiry date and only need re‑approving if there are changes to the licensees' radiation safety practices. Practices are reminded to review their plans and to notify that the review has been conducted.

6.   These measures are new in the 2017‑18 Budget.

Performance Information Comments

Ambulance Services

There is a direct correlation between increased calls for help and slower ambulance response times as the same number of vehicles become busier.

There are a variety of factors which affect ambulance response times in Tasmania including:

·       demand for service against the available resource base;

·       the ageing population as a primary driver of demand;

·       a relatively high proportion of the population living in rural and remote areas;

·       hilly terrain and ribbon urban development along the Derwent and Tamar rivers; and

·       a high reliance on Volunteer Ambulance Officers.

The demand for Ambulance Services in 2015‑16 was 81 409 responses, an increase of 2 666 ambulance responses or 3.4 per cent on the previous year.

The 2015‑16 median emergency response time for Tasmania is 12.9 minutes. Approximately 50 per cent of all Tasmanian emergency calls were responded to within that timeframe. The increase in demand for services has a direct relationship to the median emergency response time experienced.

Ambulance response times in Tasmania are affected by the wide dispersal of the population. Tasmania has the greatest proportion of people living in rural areas of all states. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics Estimated Resident Population by Remoteness publication, the proportion of Tasmania's population living in rural and remote areas is three times the national figure.

Strategies to reduce the impact of demand are a high priority for Ambulance Tasmania. Initiatives being progressed include public education campaigns and community announcements, and improvements in technology.

Public Health Services

Radiation Protection

Practices holding licences under the Radiation Protection Act 2005 are required to have a current and approved radiation management plan. Radiation sources (x‑ray, laser and radioactive materials) require a certificate of compliance. Maintaining continuity of currency of management plans and retesting and certification of radiation sources prior to expiry is a key to radiation protection.

Immunisation

Children are considered fully immunised if they have received vaccines for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTPa), polio, Haemophilus influenza type b, hepatitis B and pneumococcal for 12 to 15 month and 24 to 27 month age groups; and meningococcal C and measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (MMRV) for the 24 to 27 month age group.


 

Tasmania's 12 to 15 month age cohort rate increased 3.1 per cent to 92.9 per cent which is slightly above the national average of 92.7 per cent for this group. There has been a decrease in the 24 to 27 month cohort. The primary reason for the drop in reported coverage for the 24 to 27 month age cohort is due to the impact of new and additional vaccines on the National Immunisation Program. It is expected that these children will catch up by their fourth birthday when they present for their next scheduled vaccination. It is anticipated that the No Jab, No Pay Program will have increased immunisation coverage rates from 2016.

Move Well Eat Well

The Move Well Eat Well Award Program is offered to all Tasmanian schools with a primary enrolment and all early childhood education and care services.

This program works actively with schools and early childhood services to take a sustainable and strategic approach to promoting healthy eating and physical activity as a regular part of every child's day.

Membership of the program includes a professional learning session for the whole school and early childhood staff. This enables staff to orientate the program, receive available resources and arrange program support. Schools and services then strengthen and embed health promotion requirements and messages in policies, curriculum and procedures for staff, children and families with the aim of achieving consistent and sustained health behaviours within the setting. Once the school or service meets the requirements of the program criteria they receive the Move Well Eat Well Award, which is reviewed every two years.

The data in Table 4.4 show the total at end of each period and are cumulative from one reporting period to the next. Data are calculated as a percentage of current number of Tasmanian schools with a primary enrolment as of time of reporting (n=221 as of March 2016) and current number of Tasmanian long day care services (n=113 as of March 2016). Schools and services that have been 'closed' at the time of reporting (March 2016) have been excluded from this data, regardless of their previous Move Well Eat Well membership status.

Output Group 4:   Human Services System Management

4.1 Human Services System Management

This Output provides a number of complementary functions including the provision of support for corporate services, policy, planning, regulation, funding, monitoring and service improvement across human services. This Output also provides support to the Secretary in establishing Output priorities.


 

Table 4.5        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2014‑15 Actual

2015‑16 Actual

2016‑17 Target

2017‑18 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Organisations receiving a Quality and Safety Review within relevant timeframes

 

%

 

42.5

 

31.3

 

33.0

 

33.0

Target Population transferred to NDIS trial within agreed timeframes1

 

%

 

100.0

 

100.0

 

na

 

na

Proportion of the NDIS eligible population transitioned to the NDIS full scheme2

 

%

 

na

 

na

 

21.2

 

46.0

Social Housing owned and/or managed by the Community Sector

 

%

 

42.7

 

42.4

 

42.4

 

42.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The NDIS trial concluded on 30 June 2016 with the implementation of the NDIS full scheme transition commencing 1 July 2016.

2.   The NDIS full scheme Bilateral Agreement between the Tasmanian and the Australian Governments specifies the number of clients existing and new who are expected to enter the NDIS in a 12 month period. As a result, the 2016‑17 Target is based on the estimated intake of clients in the Bilateral Agreement and the total clients expected to be eligible for the NDIS.

Performance Information Comments

Quality and Safety

Through their funding agreements with the Department, community sector organisations are required to demonstrate compliance with the DHHS Quality and Safety Framework (the Framework), including having effective systems and processes in place to support continuous quality improvement. The Department monitors compliance with the Framework as a collective function shared between Funding Agreement Managers in the DHHS Program Areas, as well as an expert team of quality and safety staff within the Community Sector Relations Unit.

The performance measure relating to Organisations receiving a Quality and Safety Review within relevant timeframes refers to only the review function performed by the Community Sector Relations Unit where a three yearly quality and safety review is undertaken. In addition to these reviews, funding Agreement Managers visit funded community organisations annually. These annual site visits discuss a range of matters, one of which is the systems and processes organisations have in place to meet the requirements of the Framework.

The Department is committed to working with the community sector to support the delivery of safe and quality services to Tasmania. Accordingly, through the progression of the transition to the NDIS, this performance measure will be reviewed and revised as the Department will further enhance its processes for managing and monitoring funding to community sector organisations, including quality and safety monitoring and compliance. The 2016‑17 target has been revised in recognition of these factors.


 

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

As Tasmania had already undertaken significant reform of the specialist disability service system, the State submitted a proposal, which was accepted, to be included as a trial site for the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) from 1 July 2013. The cohort of young people aged 15 to 24 was chosen for the trial, as this was considered an opportunity to address some of the long standing transitional issues for young people moving from school to employment or vocational options and for those young people moving out of State care.

At the end of the trial on 30 June 2016, 1 139 young people were NDIS participants, exceeding the bilateral target for trial of the NDIS.

A Bilateral Agreement for transition was signed by the Tasmanian and Australian Governments on 11 December 2015. The full scheme transition is expected to see around 10 600 Tasmanians become participants of the NDIS by 30 June 2019.

In the first six months of transition (July 2016 to December 2016) 483 additional participants had approved plans. In 2016‑17 it is expected that 1 117 Tasmanians aged from 12 to 28 years will become participants in the NDIS. During 2017‑18 it is expected that 2 632 Tasmanians aged between four years and 34 years will become participants in the NDIS.

Social Housing

Tasmania is leading the nation in regard to reform of social housing. Around 3 900 properties (almost 35 per cent of the State's social housing portfolio) have been transferred for management by the community sector under the Better Housing Futures initiative. This innovative model provides access to Commonwealth Rent Assistance (CRA) and GST savings.

In addition, stock owned by the Director of Housing is used to deliver a range of housing programs that are managed by non‑government organisations. The largest proportion of the stock managed by non‑government organisations is community housing overseen by Better Housing Futures providers. Non‑government managed housing also includes community tenancies and supported accommodation. This has contributed to 42.4 per cent of Director owned stock managed by the community sector in June 2016.

The management of social housing by the community sector results in many positive outcomes including flexibility in supporting tenants with special needs, leveraging from supply and further investment, greater investment in maintenance, ability to provide a social mix of tenants and a range of community initiatives.

Housing Tasmania will build on this initiative through the Tasmanian Affordable Housing Action Plan 2015‑19 that has sought innovative proposals to leverage supply from the existing social housing portfolio under the Community Housing Stock Leverage Program. The target in the Action Plan for this initiative is to supply around 150 new affordable homes. This is in addition to 321 new dwellings that will be delivered under existing arrangements with Better Housing Futures. These initiatives will provide additional borrowing capacity and recurrent financial incentives for the community housing organisations to construct additional houses that will be targeted to priority applicants.


 

Output Group 5:   Human Services

5.1 Community Services

This Output provides services relating to planning, developing and managing family and community support services throughout the State. This includes funding for the neighbourhood house program, integrated family support services, gambling support program and a range of other counselling and support services. All of these services are provided by community sector organisations.

5.2 Disability Services

This Output provides services relating to planning, developing and managing specialist disability services throughout the State. This includes all functions relating to funding and monitoring specialist disability service delivery in both community based settings and to individuals; the delivery of a multidisciplinary allied health support to people with disability and the sector; and the implementation and support of legislative and regulatory requirements for the delivery of those services under the Disability Services Act 2011. Since signing the NDIS transition bilateral agreement, Disability Services is primarily responsible for the transition of state‑funded specialist disability services to the NDIS.

5.3 Housing Services

This Output provides services relating to planning, developing and managing affordable housing and homelessness programs throughout the State. This includes all functions relating to the delivery and management of public housing, capital development, housing reform, community housing, specialist homelessness services, new homelessness initiatives, private rental assistance and the management of community sector organisations providing outsourced services.


 

Table 4.6:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 5

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2014‑15 Actual

2015‑16 Actual

2016‑17 Target

2017‑18 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disability Services

 

 

 

 

 

Accommodation support clients1

Number

1 221

1 209

1 107

682

Community access clients2

Number

1 070

1 079

1 007

834

Supported accommodation waiting list3

Number

93

91

93

64

Community access waiting list3

Number

76

93

89

75

 

 

 

 

 

 

Housing Tasmania4

 

 

 

 

 

Public Housing occupancy rate

%

98.3

98.2

98.0

98.0

Applicants housed5,6

Number

1 085

926

1 000

1 000

New allocations to those in greatest need4

%

80.5

91.3

80.0

80.0

Households assisted through Private Rental Assistance6

Number

3 666

3 544

3 600

3 600

Applicants on Housing Register6

Number

2 771

3 573

3 800

3 800

Average wait time for people who are housed

Weeks

42.2

47.7

41.5

41.5

Average time to house priority applicants7

Weeks

na

43.0

36

36

Net recurrent cost per dwelling4,8

$

8 585

8 498

8 400

8 400

Turnaround time9

Days

21.5

20.3

28.0

28.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 targets are based upon the 2014‑15 actual figure less clients expected to transition to the NDIS during the 2016‑17 financial year as specified by the NDIS transition bilateral agreement between Tasmania and the Australian Government.

2.   There is no community access transition target specified in the NDIS transition Bilateral agreement between Tasmania and the Australian Government. As a result, the 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 waiting list targets are based on the 2015‑16 year to date average of the number of clients on the supported accommodation and community access waiting lists less any clients that are expected to transition to the NDIS during the 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 financial years.

3.   The 2017‑18 waiting list targets are based on the 2015‑16 actual less any clients that are expected to transition to the NDIS during the 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 financial years.

4.   Housing Tasmania data is provided from the Report on Government Services (ROGS).

5.   This indicator includes applicants housed into public or community housing from the Housing Register.

6.   Targets have been revised to reflect recent trends.

7.   This indicator commenced due to the introduction of the new Housing Assessment Prioritisation System (HAPS).

8.   Figures from 2014‑15 have been updated to reflect real rather than nominal expenditure.

9.   A national review of turnaround time is taking place due to discrepancies in jurisdictions' reporting of ROGS data. Therefore Housing Tasmania's data has been used for this indicator.

Performance Information Comments

Disability Services

Disability Services continues to operate in an environment where demand for services outstrips supply. Whilst an increase in demand for services is consistent with national trends, the commencement of the transition to the NDIS has begun to address this issue.

In terms of services delivered, there was a decrease in the total number of clients receiving accommodation support and community access, reflecting the age cohort transition to the NDIS trial during 2014‑15 and 2015‑16.

Housing Tasmania

Housing Tasmania has continued to perform well on efficiency indicators: net recurrent cost per dwelling, occupancy rate and turnaround time. This demonstrates that the entity is doing well in allocating properties that become vacant to people with the greatest housing need.

There continues to be high demand for housing assistance and occupancy rates remain high in the public and private rental market. In September 2015, the Tasmanian Government introduced Tasmania's Affordable Housing Strategy 2015‑2025 and Action Plan 2015‑2019 to provide a comprehensive approach to prevent, intervene and respond to housing affordability issues and help those most vulnerable to housing stress and homelessness. The achievements over the four years will result in improved outcomes for those experiencing homelessness and housing stress.

Public housing occupancy rates remain high at 98.2 per cent for 2015-16. Demand for public housing remains high and turnover is low as people remain in safe, affordable and stable housing. Whilst this level of occupancy is expected to continue, there are initiatives to ensure that people who remain in public housing are the people most in need. New sections of the Residential Tenancy Act 1997 were introduced on 1 October 2014 to deliver a fairer public housing system including grounds for ending a tenancy. This includes people above income and asset thresholds that will be assisted to access more appropriate housing and free up social housing for people with the highest needs.

Turnaround times from when public housing properties become vacant to the time the property is let, have declined. This shows improved efficiency in housing people in need. Tasmania performs very well with an average turnaround time of 20.3 days, compared to a national target of 28.0 days.

The number of applicants from the Housing Register housed in both public and community housing has decreased slightly from 1 085 in 2014‑15 to 926 in 2015‑16. This reflects the high occupancy rates as people remaining in stable, affordable housing.

Housing Tasmania continues to perform well in housing people most in need. In 2015‑16, the national average was that 75.1 per cent of allocations were to people in greatest need, whereas Tasmania achieved 91.3 per cent. This demonstrates that new allocations to public housing continue to be highly targeted to people with the highest needs.

From 2013, the Housing Register has been increasing; there were 3 573 applicants at the end of June 2016. The introduction of the Affordable Housing Strategy and new Housing Connect model has encouraged more people to seek assistance. People now have a greater range of housing choices across public and community housing.

The average time that people are waiting to be housed has increased from 42.2 weeks in 2014‑15 to 47.7 weeks in 2015‑16. This is associated with the increase in applicants with the introduction of Housing Connect and the low turnover of social housing properties.

The net recurrent costs per dwelling continued to decrease in 2015‑16 to $8 498. This reflects transfer of management of social housing stock to the community sector as well as greater efficiencies in managing public housing.


 

The number of people receiving financial Private Rental Assistance has decreased from 3 666 households in 2014‑15 to 3 544 households in 2015‑16. The reduction is likely to be associated with low vacancy rates in the private rental market, and lack of affordable rentals for people on low incomes. There appears to be less movement within the private rental market with people 'staying in place'. Private rental assistance is an important tool to assist people into accommodation and reduce the need for social housing and homelessness assistance. Under the Action Plan, Housing Tasmania will examine options and introduce new initiatives to improve the way that private rental assistance is provided and how it can best assist vulnerable people to access safe and affordable housing.

Output Group 6:   Children Services System Management

6.1 Children Services System Management

This Output provides a number of complementary functions including the provision of support for corporate services, policy, planning, regulation, funding, monitoring and service improvement across children services. This Output also provides support to the Secretary in establishing Output priorities.

Table 4.7:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 6

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2014‑15 Actual

2015‑16 Actual

2016‑17 Target

2017‑18 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planned strategic projects with milestones achieved

%

59

71

100

100

Planned regular operational performance reviews completed addressing key issues within the remit of Children Services

%

100

100

 

 

100

100

Planned quality appraisals completed within relevant timeframes

%

100

100

 

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Performance Information Comments

Strategic projects are undertaken by the Program Support, Learning and Development, Out of Home Care (OOHC) Reform, and Information Management units. In 2015‑16, five of seven strategic projects were either completed or scheduled milestones were achieved. These projects included the Family Violence Action Plan, Strong Families – Safe Kids, implementation of legislative amendments to the Youth Justice Act 1997, the Out of Home Care Reform Project and the Youth at Risk Project.

Performance information dashboards are updated daily by the Performance and Evaluation Unit and are routinely accessed throughout Children Services. In addition, review of performance in relation to specific issues is undertaken on an as needs basis. During 2015‑16, five such reviews were scheduled and completed.

Quality appraisals are undertaken by staff in the Quality Improvement and Workforce Development Unit for practice issues arising in relation to Child Protection Services, Youth Justice Services and the Ashley Youth Detention Centre. Key drivers for service quality are determined by applying a combined understanding of research techniques, performance information, and practice knowledge to identify issues to be addressed through workforce development strategies.


 

Output Group 7:   Children Services

7.1 Children Services

This Output provides services to children, young people and their families through a range of programs including child protection services, out of home care, adoptions and permanency services, family violence counselling and support service, and community and custodial youth justice. Child Health and Parenting Services (CHaPS) transferred to the THS on 1 January 2017.

During 2016‑17, Children and Youth Services focused on the consolidation and strengthening of services through a range of priorities focused on:

·       Practice Development, comprising the development of a service delivery framework and online manuals; embedding the Signs of Safety approach in all programs, commencing with child protection; modernising the child health system; and building practice leadership skills in managers;

·       Leadership, Workforce Development and Accountability, including collaborating with staff to develop a shared set of service values and principles; working in partnership with Human Resources to develop a DHHS human services capability framework; strengthening the learning and development framework; building improved recruitment, selection and induction processes; and providing support and skills development for the foster carer network; and

·       Reform of the Out of Home Care system to provide a needs‑led, quality assured, safe and outcomes‑focused response to children who cannot live at home.

In August 2015, the Minister for Human Services announced a comprehensive redesign of child protection services in Tasmania. In March 2016, The Redesign project delivered a comprehensive strategy to redesign the Child Protection System in Tasmania and a supporting implementation plan which outlines areas of investment and major initiatives to be undertaken as part of the implementation of the Strong Families, Safe Kids report.

The theory behind Strong Families, Safe Kids is a more integrated and professionally capable system for the protection of children, with a strong focus on building strength in children and families. It emphasises the need to protect children at high risk, but also ensures a range of integrated government and community support and intervention services to build support for families and children experiencing adverse circumstances to prevent adverse impacts.

In the 2016‑17 Budget, the Tasmanian Government committed $20.6 million over four years as part of the implementation of the Strong Families, Safe Kids initiative. In the 2017‑18 Budget, the Government has allocated $27.5 million over four years to support the needs of children in out of home care in Tasmania.


 

Table 4.8:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 71

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2014‑15 Actual

2015‑16 Actual

2016‑17 Target

2017‑18 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children Services

 

 

 

 

 

Children in notifications (per 1 000 of population)2,3,4

Rate

77.3

86.4

77.0

53.0

Average daily children in active transition at Response

Number

15.5

65.5

 

65.5

45.0

Investigation outcome determined within 28 days3

%

34.7

19.7

40.0

40.0

Children who were the subject of a substantiation during the previous year, who were the subject of a subsequent substantiation within 12 months3

%

18.5

24.2

17.0

17.0

Average daily children in out of home care2

Number

1 046.2

1 110.6

1 200.0

1 220.0

Children with approved case and care plans3

%

68.3 

55.2

75.0

75.0

Foster care households with five or more foster children3

%

5.2

5.0

 

3.9

3.9

Children in out of home care who had 3+ non‑respite placements in the last 12 months

%

4.5

4.2

 

4.0

4.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Custodial Youth Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Average daily young people in Youth Justice detention2

Number

10.3

9.2

 

9.5

9.5

Distinct number of young people in Youth Justice detention2

Number

52

33

 

42

42

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Youth Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Average daily young people in Community Youth Justice2

Number

242.7

229.5

 

200.0

200.0

Distinct number of young people in Community Youth Justice2

Number

523

475

 

400

400

Community Service Orders completed before the statutory expiry date

%

86.4

91.7

 

90.0

90.0

Youth Justice Community conferences held within six weeks of receipt of referral for conference

%

86.2

84.1

 

85.0

87.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Some 2016‑17 targets in this table have been amended from 2016‑17 Budget information to reflect a more accurate end of year outcome.

2.   The 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 targets are projections rather than targets, reflecting the different processes used to produce this value.

3.   The 2015‑16 actuals are preliminary and may differ from figures published in publications such as the Report on Government Services 2017 or Child Protection Australia 2015‑16.

4.   From February 2016, any notification to Child Protection Services Tasmania finalised under Section 17(2)(a) of the Children, Young Persons and Their Families Act 1997 (i.e. the notification was based on information or observations that were not sufficient to constitute reasonable grounds for the belief or suspicion contained in the notification) was classified as a child concern report for the purpose of national and state level reporting and was not counted as a notification.

 

Performance Information Comments

Child Protection Services

Child Safety Services (CSS) aims to finalise investigations of child abuse or neglect within 28 days of receipt of notification. The proportion of investigation outcomes determined within 28 days decreased from 34.7 per cent during 2014‑15 to 19.7 per cent during 2015‑16. The timeframe for determination of matters for investigation is influenced by a number of factors including the increasing complexity of cases referred and the receipt of information from other agencies.  The expected improvement in performance is outlined in the 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 Targets. These reflect the anticipated long-term benefits of Strong Families, Safe Kids.

During 2015‑16, a daily average number of 65.5 children were in active transition from Intake to Response. CSS remains committed to keeping the number of children in active transition low. However, nationally the number of children notified to child safety services has continued to increase. The 2016‑17 Target reflects the increase in complex cases which often require multiple interventions before a final court order is sought, while the 2017‑18 Target reflects the improvements expected under Strong Families, Safe Kids.

Strong Families, Safe Kids will refocus current intake services to an advice and referral service that is connected to the broader government and non‑government service network and improve the ability of the State to manage the 'front door' of the system. As part of this refocus of the service, new performance measures will be developed to align with key performance improvement objectives of the reforms.

Out of Home Care Services

Out of Home Care services provide care for children placed away from their parents for protective or other reasons related to safety and wellbeing. The daily average number of children in Out of Home Care in Tasmania increased to 1 110.6 during 2015‑16 and has continued into the first half of 2016‑17. A continued focus on the out of home care system will seek to deliver improved support for the increasing proportion of children in care with complex needs due to prior trauma.

CSS is also working to improve the number of children with approved case and care plans as reflected in the 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 Targets.

During 2015‑16, 4.2 per cent of children in care had three or more non‑respite placements compared to 4.5 per cent the previous year. The proportion of foster care households with five or more children decreased to 5.0 per cent in 2015‑16, compared to 5.2 per cent in 2014‑15. Carer availability is a critical factor for improving the quality and stability of care and an anticipated increase in the number of available carers through Phase 2 of the Out of Home Care reforms will assist in minimising unnecessary movements in placement.

Youth Justice

A continuing decline in the reported number of clients of Custodial Youth Justice has been observed in recent years. The daily average number of young people in detention decreased from 10.3 reported in 2014‑15 to 9.2 during 2015‑16. The total number of custodial clients has also decreased slightly. During 2015‑16, there were 33 distinct young people in detention compared to 52 during the previous year.

Similarly, the daily average number of young people in Community Youth Justice decreased during the same period, from 242.7 in 2014‑15 to 229.5 in 2015‑16. There was also a reduction in the total number of community clients, from 523 distinct young people during 2014‑15 to 475 during 2015‑16.


 

The number of young people engaged with Community or Custodial Youth Justice Services is predominantly influenced by external services. The factors affecting activity levels include referral practices and diversionary programs implemented by Tasmania Police, as well as the effectiveness of prosecutions and sentencing options selected by the Courts.

Output Group 8:   Independent Children's and Young Persons' Review Service

8.1 Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People

Activities provided in this Output include promoting the rights and wellbeing of children and young people and examining the policies, practices and services provided for children and any law affecting the health, welfare, care, protection and development of children. The Commissioner for Children and Young People Act 2016 commenced on 1 July 2016 and repealed the limited provisions for the Commissioner in the previous Children and Young Persons and Their Families Act 1997, expanding the legislative framework for the Commissioner by providing new focus, duties and responsibilities.

Performance Information Comments

The Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People is an independent, statutory office responsible to the Parliament of Tasmania. Details of the Commissioner for Children and Young People's activities are available in the Commissioner's Annual Reports, which can be accessed from its website at www.childcomm.tas.gov.au.


 

Special Capital Investment Funds

Table 4.9 identifies expenditure by the Department from the Government's Special Capital Investment Funds.

Table 4.9:       Special Capital Investment Fund (SCIF) Allocations

 

Estimated)

Total)

Cost)

2017‑18)

)

Budget)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020-21)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hospitals Capital Fund

 

 

 

 

 

Mersey Hospital Upgrade

1 900

1 360

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infrastructure Tasmania Fund - Health Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

Glenorchy Health Centre1

21 000

6 698

….

….

….

Kingston Health Centre1

6 500

4 134

1 686

….

….

 

 

 10 832

1 686

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Human Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Housing Fund

 

 

 

 

 

Housing Fund

60 000

 1 236

 1 278

  970

  897

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total SCIF Allocations

 

 13 428

 2 964

  970

  897

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.   These projects were formerly known as the Glenorchy ‑ Tier Three Community Health Services Facility and Kingston ‑ Tier Three Community Health Services Facility.

 

Hospitals Capital Fund

The Hospitals Capital Fund (HCF) was established in 2007‑08 to provide capital funding for hospitals around the State. In 2017‑18, $1.4 million has been allocated from the HCF for the upgrade of the Mersey Community Hospital. This is anticipated to be the final allocation from this Fund.

Infrastructure Tasmania Fund ‑ Health Infrastructure

The Infrastructure Tasmania Fund ‑ Health Infrastructure was established in 2008‑09, to implement a series of capital investment projects. Expenditure in 2017‑18 of $10.8 million will include redevelopment of the Glenorchy Health Centre ($6.7 million) and redevelopment of the Kingston Health Centre ($4.1 million).

Housing Fund

The Housing Fund was established in 2007‑08 with an allocation of $60 million for the purpose of increasing the supply of affordable housing. In 2016‑17, it is anticipated that $1.2 million will be spent from the Housing Fund towards the continuation of support for the National Rental Affordability Scheme (NRAS), with funding towards the development of up to 1 500 properties under NRAS Stage 4.

Capital Investment Program

Table 4.10 provides financial information for the Department's Capital Investment Program. This table details cash payments only, and does not include the accrual transfers of capital assets. More information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget, Budget Paper No 1.

Table 4.10:     Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated)

Total)

Cost)

2017‑18)

 

Budget)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020-21)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Health

 

 

 

 

 

Campbell Town Ambulance Station1

2 960

....)

  140)

 1 180)

 1 640)

Health Transport and Coordination Infrastructure1

10 000

 5 270)

....)

....)

....)

Hospital and Health Centre Maintenance

8 340

  790)

....)

....)

....)

Launceston General Hospital Ward Upgrades - Ward 4K Upgrades1

7 850

 1 350)

 4 400)

 1 900)

....)

Mersey Community Hospital Capital Upgrades1

35 000

....)

....)

 15 000)

 20 000)

National Health and Hospitals Network Reforms: Emergency Department

9 340

  160)

....)

....)

....)

Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment1

469 200

 180 000)

 180 000)

 28 704)

....)

Royal Hobart Hospital Pharmacy Redevelopment1

3 761

  150)

 1 000)

 2 611)

....)

St Helens Hospital Redevelopment1

12 100

 2 750)

 4 921)

 3 765)

....)

Statewide Hospital Critical Facility Upgrades1

10 500

  700)

 3 200)

 6 600)

....)

Statewide Rural Health Facility Infrastructure Upgrades1

4 700

....)

....)

 2 500)

 2 200)

THS Infrastructure Upgrades1

1 880

....)

....)

  720)

 1 160)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Human Services

 

 

 

 

 

Affordable Housing Strategy1

60 000

 15 000)

 20 000)

....)

....)

Housing - New Projects

Ongoing

 10 440)

 9 441)

 12 527)

 11 191)

Non-Works Housing

Ongoing

 7 776)

 7 915)

 8 017)

 8 123)

North West Youth Accommodation and Training Facility

6 000

 4 500)

....)

....)

....)

Northern Suburbs Community Centre (incl Rocherlea Neighbourhood House)

1 660

 1 000)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

 229 886)

 231 017)

 83 524)

 44 314)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.   A description of this project is included in the Key Deliverables section at the commencement of this chapter.

 

Hospital and Health Centre Maintenance

Funding of $8.3 million over three years was allocated from 2015‑16 for hospital and health centre infrastructure maintenance. This funding is being used to support the sustainable delivery of safe and efficient health care services across the State and to fund the maintenance, replacement or upgrade of existing hospital and health centre infrastructure, including at the Hobart Private Hospital, Launceston General Hospital (LGH), Flinders Island Hospital, Launceston Ambulance Station and at rural hospital locations.

National Health and Hospitals Network Reforms: Emergency Department

Remaining funding of $160 000 will be utilised in 2017‑18 to complete projects funded for National Health and Hospitals Network (NHHN) Funding from the Australian Government. This funding will be used to finalise the purchase of a critical ICT system.

Housing ‑ New Projects

Funding of $10.4 million is allocated in 2017‑18 for Housing Tasmania's capital program, including the purchase and construction of public housing. The Housing ‑ New Projects allocation also incorporates $1.5 million of the total $2 million allocation under the Family Violence Action Plan as a contribution towards the establishment of Women's Crisis Accommodation. In addition, projects under Housing ‑ New Projects will support projects and actions in the Affordable Housing Action Plan.

Further details of the Housing capital program are provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Non‑Works Housing

A Non‑Works Housing allocation of $7.8 million is allocated in 2017‑18. This is for the repayment of loans from the Australian Government under the former Commonwealth‑State Housing Agreement.

North West Youth Accommodation and Training Facility

In the 2015‑16 Budget, funding of $6 million was allocated over two years to build a supported accommodation facility in Devonport with specialist support services for youth. The Youth Accommodation and Training Facility will deliver around 25 units of accommodation for low income young people in the Devonport area, who are homeless, or at risk of homelessness. The facility will also include safe and secure accommodation options and support services suitable for young people living with a disability.

Northern Suburbs Community Centre

The Northern Suburbs Community Centre (including Rocherlea Neighbourhood House) will replace the existing Northern Suburbs Community Centre in Rocherlea with a new purpose built facility situated in a more appropriate location to enable easier community access. Total funding of $1.7 million over three years was allocated in the 2015‑16 Budget for this project.


 

Detailed Budget Statements

Table 4.11:     Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

 

Budget)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020-21)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - recurrent1

1 244 616)

1 401 006)

1 458 462)

1 485 030)

1 475 196)

Appropriation revenue - works & services2

 33 887)

 152 501)

 141 877)

 34 276)

 25 000)

Other revenue from government3

  990)

 2 610)

....)

....)

....)

Revenue from Special Capital Investment Funds2

 18 470)

 13 428)

 2 964)

  970)

  897)

Grants2

 143 635)

 97 955)

 107 954)

 46 074)

 13 068)

Sales of goods and services4

 68 985)

 68 172)

 68 524)

 69 282)

 70 307)

Interest

  15)

  8)

  8)

  8)

  8)

Other revenue

 48 738)

 48 251)

 48 411)

 49 020)

 49 437)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

1 559 336)

1 783 931)

1 828 200)

1 684 660)

1 633 913)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits5

 196 385)

 190 503)

 187 709)

 185 845)

 185 373)

Depreciation and amortisation6

 29 695)

 27 468)

 26 500)

 26 319)

 25 544)

Supplies and consumables7

 146 345)

 165 089)

 163 258)

 164 827)

 166 158)

Grants and subsidies8

1 045 758)

1 226 528)

1 251 079)

1 852 653)

1 240 552)

Borrowing costs

 8 062)

 7 727)

 7 383)

 7 032)

 6 677)

Other expenses

 6 707)

 6 695)

 6 925)

 6 989)

 7 012)

Total expenses from transactions

1 432 952)

1 624 010)

1 642 854)

2 243 665)

1 631 316)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

 126 384)

 159 921)

 185 346)

(559 005)

 2 597)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

Net gain/(loss) on non-financial assets

 11 750)

 11 785)

 11 785)

 11 785)

 11 785)

Other gains/(losses) from other economic flows

  708)

  708)

  700)

  700)

  700)

Total other economic flows included in net result

 12 458)

 12 493)

 12 485)

 12 485)

 12 485)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

 138 842)

 172 414)

 197 831)

(546 520)

 15 082)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 4.11:     Statement of Comprehensive Income (continued)

 

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

 

Budget)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020-21)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows - other non-owner changes in equity

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

 25 636)

 32 248)

 32 927)

 33 606)

 34 323)

Total other economic flows - other non-owner changes in equity

 25 636)

 32 248)

 32 927)

 33 606)

 34 323)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

 164 478)

 204 662)

 230 758)

(512 914)

 49 405)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The movements in Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent reflect additional funding provided in the 2017‑18 Budget for Health and Human Services initiatives; provision of additional funding in 2019‑20 for the 27th pay; and the changed funding arrangements for the Mersey Community Hospital where funding will be provided through the Department to the THS from 1 July 2017.

2.   The movements in Appropriation revenue ‑ works & services, Revenue from Special Capital Investment Funds and Grants reflect movements in capital project funding from CIP and SCIF, including those components of CIP that are funded by the Australian Government.

3.   Other revenue from Government in 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 reflects the utilisation of funds carried forward under Section 8A(2) of the Public Account Act 1986.

4.   The decrease in Sales of goods and services in 2017‑18 primarily reflects revisions to estimated Housing Tasmania rental receipts to align anticipated rental receipts with the anticipated Housing Stock profile over the 2017‑18 Budget and Forward Estimates period.

5.   The movements in Employee Benefits primarily reflect the transfer for Child Health and Parenting Services (CHaPS) to the THS on 1 January 2017 and the anticipated employee profile during the transition to the NDIS.

6.   The movements in Depreciation and amortisation primarily reflect the Department's anticipated depreciation schedules based on current asset balances and anticipated purchases of non-financial assets over the Budget and Forward Estimates period.

7.   The increase in Supplies and consumables in 2017‑18 primarily reflects additional funding provided for Out of Home Care ‑ Additional Support, the Housing Tasmania Property Modification Program and the Securing a Second Medical and Police Search and Rescue Helicopter initiatives.

8.   The increase in Grants and subsidies from 2017‑18 primarily reflects funding for the Mersey Community Hospital which will be provided through the Department from 1 July 2017 and additional funding provided to the THS in 2019‑20 for the 27th pay. Movements throughout the Forward Estimates primarily reflect the transfer of completed assets from the Department to the THS. The Department undertakes capital works on behalf of the THS and transfers these assets to the THS once completed.

 


 

Table 4.12:     Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

 

Budget)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020-21)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Health Services System Management

 

 

 

 

 

1.1  Health Services System Management1

 115 990)

 129 612)

 135 746)

 141 432)

 145 213)

 

 115 990)

 129 612)

 135 746)

 141 432)

 145 213)

Output Group 2 - Tasmanian Health Service

 

 

 

 

 

2.1  Tasmanian Health Service2

 672 950)

 804 858)

 801 590)

 847 049)

 843 229)

 

 672 950)

 804 858)

 801 590)

 847 049)

 843 229)

Output Group 3 - Statewide Services

 

 

 

 

 

3.1  Ambulance Services3

 57 881)

 61 291)

 62 994)

 65 409)

 64 525)

3.2  Public Health Services4

 15 239)

 14 575)

 13 471)

 13 990)

 14 084)

 

 73 120)

 75 866)

 76 465)

 79 399)

 78 609)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

 10 780)

 132 001)

 121 877)

 34 276)

 25 000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 862 060)

1 010 336)

1 013 801)

1 067 880)

1 067 051)

Works and Services

 10 780)

 132 001)

 121 877)

 34 276)

 25 000)

 

 872 840)

1 142 337)

1 135 678)

1 102 156)

1 092 051)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Human Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 - Human Services System Management

 

 

 

 

 

4.1  Human Services System Management5

 1 734)

 2 173)

 2 011)

 1 844)

 1 740)

 

 1 734)

 2 173)

 2 011)

 1 844)

 1 740)

Output Group 5 - Human Services

 

 

 

 

 

5.1  Community Services

 20 866)

 22 189)

 22 227)

 22 908)

 23 717)

5.2  Disability Services6

 201 341)

 212 713)

 264 510)

 233 178)

 222 767)

5.3  Housing Services7

 40 894)

 43 794)

 43 689)

 44 592)

 45 605)

 

 263 101)

 278 696)

 330 426)

 300 678)

 292 089)

Output Group 6 - Children Services System Management

 

 

 

 

 

6.1  Children Services System Management8

 3 276)

 2 539)

 2 535)

 2 577)

 2 539)

 

 3 276)

 2 539)

 2 535)

 2 577)

 2 539)

Output Group 7 - Children Services

 

 

 

 

 

7.1  Children Services9

 113 525)

 106 362)

 108 780)

 111 111)

 110 850)

 

 113 525)

 106 362)

 108 780)

 111 111)

 110 850)

Table 4.12:     Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

 

Budget)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020-21)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 8 - Independent Children's and Young Persons' Review Service

 

 

 

 

 

8.1  Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People10

  920)

  900)

  909)

  940)

  927)

 

  920)

  900)

  909)

  940)

  927)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

 23 107)

 20 500)

 20 000)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 382 556)

 390 670)

 444 661)

 417 150)

 408 145)

Works and Services

 23 107)

 20 500)

 20 000)

....)

....)

 

 405 663)

 411 170)

 464 661)

 417 150)

 408 145)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Health and Human Services

 

 

 

 

 

Total Recurrent Services

1 244 616)

1 401 006)

1 458 462)

1 485 030)

1 475 196)

Total Works and Services

 33 887)

 152 501)

 141 877)

 34 276)

 25 000)

 

1 278 503)

1 553 507)

1 600 339)

1 519 306)

1 500 196)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Carried Forward

  990)

 2 610)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

1 279 493)

1 556 117)

1 600 339)

1 519 306)

1 500 196)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

1 279 493)

1 556 117)

1 600 339)

1 519 306)

1 500 196)

 

1 279 493)

1 556 117)

1 600 339)

1 519 306)

1 500 196)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The increase in the Health Services System Management Output primarily reflects the provision of additional funding in the 2017‑18 Budget for priority mental health services and the reallocation of costs across the Department to more accurately reflect activity.

2.   The increase in the Tasmanian Health Service Output in 2017‑18 reflects the changed funding arrangements for the Mersey Community Hospital and additional funding provided to the THS for 2017‑18 Budget initiatives. From 1 July 2017, funding for the Mersey Community Hospital will be provided through the Department's Consolidated Fund Appropriation to the THS. The increase in 2019‑20 reflects additional funding from the State towards the cost of the 27th pay in the THS. The decrease in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Rebuilding Health Services ‑ Elective Surgery Program.

3.   The increase in the Ambulance Services Output primarily reflects additional funding provided in the 2017‑18 Budget to Secure a Second Medical and Police Search and Rescue Helicopter and the Investing in Ambulance Tasmania initiative.

4.   The decrease in Public Health Services in 2017‑18 primarily reflects the reallocation of costs across the Agency to more accurately reflect activity. The decrease from 2017‑18 to 2018‑19 primarily reflects the completion of 2014 election commitment funding.

5.   The movements in the Human Services System Management Output primarily reflect additional funding provided for the Building a Joined Up Human Services Support System and a redistribution of allocations across Human Services outputs.

6.   The movements in the Disability Services Output primarily reflect funding provided as part of Tasmania's contribution towards the transition to the NDIS full scheme. The decreases from 2019‑20 reflect the cessation of the Disability SPP upon completion of transition to full scheme.

7.   The increase in the Housing Services Output in 2017‑18 primarily reflects the provision of additional funding for the Housing Tasmania Property Modification Program.

8.   The movements in the Children Services System Management Output primarily reflect redistribution of allocations across Human Services outputs.

9.   The decrease in the Children Services Output primarily reflects the transfer of the Child Health and Parenting Service to the THS on 1 January 2017, partially offset by additional funding provided for Out of Home Care – Additional Support.

10. The decrease in Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People in 2017‑18 reflects minor adjustments to overhead allocations across outputs. The increase in 2019‑20 reflects additional funding towards the cost of the 27th pay.

 


 

Table 4.13:     Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2017)

 

Budget)

2018)

 

Budget)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020)

Forward)

Estimate)

2021)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

 54 317)

 87 884)

 84 494)

 79 868)

 75 206)

Investments2

 1 427)

 1 033)

  733)

  433)

  133)

Receivables1

 11 108)

 6 250)

 6 529)

 4 917)

 4 562)

Equity investments3

 26 649)

 26 539)

 30 601)

 34 663)

 37 391)

Other financial assets

 5 435)

 4 402)

 4 402)

 4 423)

 4 449)

 

 98 936)

 126 108)

 126 759)

 124 304)

 121 741)

Non-financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories4

 3 485)

 5 470)

 5 472)

 5 486)

 2 318)

Property, plant and equipment5

1 880 232)

1 985 069)

2 207 908)

1 686 250)

1 732 409)

Infrastructure6

 5 000)

 10 000)

 10 000)

 10 000)

 10 000)

Heritage and cultural assets1

  405)

  208)

  208)

  208)

  208)

Intangibles

 11 186)

 11 297)

 10 331)

 9 365)

 8 426)

Other assets1

 4 650)

 2 786)

 2 788)

 2 820)

 2 797)

 

1 904 958)

2 014 830)

2 236 707)

1 714 129)

1 756 158)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

2 003 894)

2 140 938)

2 363 466)

1 838 433)

1 877 899)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables1

 14 466)

 11 394)

 11 404)

 11 506)

 11 441)

Interest bearing liabilities7

 173 295)

 165 517)

 157 602)

 149 585)

 141 462)

Employee benefits8

 42 469)

 50 510)

 50 443)

 46 404)

 44 606)

Superannuation1

 14 879)

 19 337)

 19 076)

 18 884)

 18 904)

Other liabilities9

 29 356)

 16 144)

 16 147)

 16 174)

 16 201)

Total liabilities

 274 465)

 262 902)

 254 672)

 242 553)

 232 614)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

1 729 429)

1 878 036)

2 108 794)

1 595 880)

1 645 285)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Reserves

1 898 503)

1 930 489)

1 963 416)

1 997 022)

2 031 345)

Accumulated funds10

(175 168)

(58 547)

 139 284)

(407 236)

(392 154)

Other equity

 6 094)

 6 094)

 6 094)

 6 094)

 6 094)

Total equity

1 729 429)

1 878 036)

2 108 794)

1 595 880)

1 645 285)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The movements in the 2018 estimates of Cash and deposits, Receivables, Heritage and cultural assets, Other assets, Payables and Superannuation reflect more accurate estimates based on the 30 June 2016 outcome.

2.   The movement in Investments over the Budget and Forward Estimates period reflects the estimated balance of Home Ownership Assistance Program and Purchase Contract portfolios, due to anticipated client loan repayments over time.

3.   The profile of Equity investments reflects an increase in home ownership support activity through the HomeShare Program as a result of: the Government's decision to change the eligibility criteria to make the program accessible to more Tasmanians; additional investment under the Government's Affordable Housing Strategy; and the redirection of existing Housing Tasmania funding to supplement the HomeShare Program.

4.   The increase in Inventories in 2018 reflects a more accurate estimate based on the 30 June 2016 outcome. The decrease in Inventories in 2021 reflects the expiry of the current Essential Vaccines NPA and associated inventories funded by the program. The movements in the Forward Estimates period do not pre‑empt a new agreement with the Australian Government on the future of the program.

5.   The movement in Property, plant and equipment over the Budget and Forward Estimates period reflects the timing of anticipated expenditure in key capital projects, including the Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment Project, and the transfer of completed assets to the THS, including the Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment.

6.   The increase in Infrastructure in 2018 reflects additional funding provided under the Health Transport and Coordination Infrastructure project.

7.   The decrease in Interest bearing liabilities reflects the repayment of borrowings under the Commonwealth‑State Housing Agreement.

8.   The increase in Employee benefits in 2018 reflects a more accurate estimate based on the 30 June 2016 outcome. The decreases in 2020 and 2021 reflects that the Department will have a 27th pay in 2019‑20 and the anticipated employee profile following the transition to the NDIS.

9.   The decrease in Other liabilities in 2018 primarily reflects the anticipated value of Section 8A(2) Carry Forwards as at 30 June 2017.

10. The movement in Accumulated funds primarily reflects the timing of CIP and SCIF assets to the THS. The Department undertakes capital works on behalf of the THS and transfers applicable assets to the THS when projects are completed or assets are operational.

 


 

Table 4.14:     Statement of Cash Flows

 

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

 

Budget)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020-21)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - recurrent1

1 244 616)

1 401 006)

1 458 462)

1 485 030)

1 475 196)

Appropriation receipts - capital2

 33 887)

 152 501)

 141 877)

 34 276)

 25 000)

Receipts from Special Capital Investment Funds2

 18 470)

 13 428)

 2 964)

  970)

  897)

Grants2

 143 635)

 97 955)

 107 954)

 46 074)

 13 068)

Sales of goods and services3

 69 358)

 68 164)

 68 524)

 69 244)

 70 261)

GST receipts4

 51 525)

 62 489)

 66 375)

 48 517)

 42 452)

Interest received

  15)

  8)

  8)

  8)

  8)

Other cash receipts

 48 738)

 48 251)

 48 411)

 49 020)

 49 437)

Total cash inflows

1 610 244)

1 843 802)

1 894 575)

1 733 139)

1 676 319)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits5

(173 527)

(168 200)

(165 601)

(166 914)

(164 334)

Superannuation

(22 145)

(22 682)

(22 435)

(23 168)

(22 814)

Borrowing costs

(8 062)

(7 727)

(7 383)

(7 032)

(6 677)

GST payments4

(51 711)

(63 441)

(66 654)

(46 867)

(42 051)

Grants and subsidies6

(1 040 707)

(1 187 188)

(1 244 579)

(1 248 742)

(1 240 552)

Supplies and consumables7

(146 292)

(164 985)

(163 252)

(164 774)

(163 032)

Other cash payments

(6 638)

(6 837)

(6 922)

(6 983)

(7 012)

Total cash outflows

(1 449 082)

(1 621 060)

(1 676 826)

(1 664 480)

(1 646 472)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

 161 162)

 222 742)

 217 749)

 68 659)

 29 847)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non-financial assets8

(166 671)

(230 901)

(221 947)

(73 991)

(36 443)

Proceeds from the disposal of non-financial assets

 11 750)

 11 785)

 11 785)

 11 785)

 11 785)

Equity injections and cash flows from restructuring

(4 619)

(4 062)

(4 062)

(4 062)

(2 728)

Net advances paid

  471)

  339)

  300)

  300)

  300)

Net receipts/(payments) for investments

  708)

  708)

  700)

  700)

  700)

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(158 361)

(222 131)

(213 224)

(65 268)

(26 386)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 4.14:     Statement of Cash Flows (continued)

 

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

 

Budget)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020-21)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings

(7 616)

(7 776)

(7 915)

(8 017)

(8 123)

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

(7 616)

(7 776)

(7 915)

(8 017)

(8 123)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(4 815)

(7 165)

(3 390)

(4 626)

(4 662)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

 59 132)

 95 049)

 87 884)

 84 494)

 79 868)

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

 54 317)

 87 884)

 84 494)

 79 868)

 75 206)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The movements in Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent reflect additional funding provided in the 2017‑18 Budget for Health and Human Services initiatives; provision of additional funding in 2019‑20 for the 27th pay; and the changed funding arrangements for the Mersey Community Hospital where funding will be provided through the Department to the THS from 1 July 2017.

2.   The movement in Appropriation receipts ‑ capital, Receipts from Special Capital Investment Funds and Grants reflects movements in capital project funding from CIP and SCIF, including those components of CIP that are funded by the Australian Government.

3.   The decrease in Sales of goods and services in 2017‑18 primarily reflects revisions to estimated Housing Tasmania rental receipts to align anticipated rental receipts with the anticipated Housing Stock profile over the 2017‑18 Budget and Forward Estimates period.

4.   The movement in GST receipts and GST payments primarily reflects the timing of purchases associated with the Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment.

5.   The movements in Employee benefits primarily reflect the transfer for Child Health and Parenting Services (CHaPS) to the THS on 1 January 2017; the timing of the 27th pay for the Department in 2019‑20; and the anticipated employee profile during the transition to the NDIS.

6.   The increase in Grants and subsidies from 2017‑18 primarily reflects that funding for the Mersey Community Hospital will be provided through the Department from 1 July 2017 and additional funding provided to the THS in 2019‑20 for the 27th pay.

7.   The increase in Supplies and consumables in 2017‑18 primarily reflects additional funding provided for Out of Home Care ‑ Additional Support, the Housing Tasmania Property Modification Program and the Securing a Second Medical and Police Search and Rescue Helicopter initiatives.

8.   The movement in Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets primarily reflects the anticipated timing of expenditure on major capital projects, including the Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment project.