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FAQs - Gaming
 
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Gaming

(Click on questions below, the relevant answer will appear at the top of your screen):
Excluded Persons and Gambling Related Harm
How do I exclude myself from gambling?
If I think someone I know has a gambling problem, what do I do?
How do I exclude someone from my gaming premises who I think has a gambling problem?
If I see someone gambling in my premises who I know is excluded, what do I do?
Exclusions Database Questions
What is the Exclusions Database?
Do venue staff have to use the database?
What kind of computer equipment do venues need?
Where do venues get photos from to place in a folder or on a notice board?
How do venues get exclusion information across to all gaming staff?
Minor Gaming
What is “minor gaming”?
What is a minor gaming permit?
Who can apply for a minor gaming permit?
What is an authorised game?
What is a charitable purpose?
How long must I keep records?
Gratuitous Gaming – Casino Fun Nights
Do I need a permit to hold a casino fun night as a fundraiser? Am I able to charge admission or an entry fee for the games?
Margin Tickets
What if the winning margin of an event is greater than 100 points?
Raffles
Do I need a permit to conduct a raffle?
Can I draw the winners in reverse order, that is to draw the major prize winner last?
My child is participating in a mainland sporting event. Can I conduct a raffle to help cover expenses?
Lucky Envelopes
As an hotelier, can I recover administrative expenses from the proceeds of sale of lucky envelopes?
What returns are required by hoteliers?
Trade Promotions
Do I need a permit to conduct a trade promotion?
General Gaming Enquiries
How many gaming machines are there in Tasmania and where are they located?
Are there restrictions on the number of gaming machines in Tasmania?
Responsible Conduct of Gambling training
What are my requirements as a Gambling Operator in relation to Responsible Conduct of Gambling training?


Gaming Enquiries - Answers
Excluded Persons and Gambling Related Harm - Answers
How do I exclude myself from gambling?

Meet with a counsellor who will arrange the exclusion and who can help with other things (like making sure that gambling does not become a problem again and managing finances). Click here for a list of support services and their contact details.

Call the Gambling Helpline Tasmania on (24 hour) 1800 858 858, which is a counselling and referral service.

Ask staff at the gaming premises to exclude you.
If I think someone I know has a gambling problem, what do I do?

This is often difficult, and will depend on your relationship with the person about whom you are concerned. Call the Gambling Helpline Tasmania on (24 hour) 1800 858 858, which is a counselling and referral service. Click here for more information, including fact sheets and brochures for gamblers and those affected by gambling.
How do I exclude someone from my gaming premises who I think has a gambling problem?

Premises staff may exclude a person for any gaming related reason. It usually occurs if a person is causing a disturbance or damage to property, or if their behaviour affects their own welfare or the welfare of others. A person may be excluded from playing gambling activities which include gaming machines, Taskeno, TOTE, table gaming, or from the entire premises.

There is a form that needs to be completed, with a copy given to the excluded person and the Tasmanian Gaming Commission. Venue operators can access the necessary forms here.
If I see someone gambling in my premises who I know is excluded, what do I do?

As a member of staff you must do your best to ensure that they stop gambling and leave the gambling area or premises, depending on their exclusion arrangements. If the person will not leave despite your efforts to persuade them, you must not use physical force to remove them. In the event that physical force is the only way that the person will leave, contact Tasmania Police for assistance.

Always contact us to let us know about the incident. We will need to know the name of the excluded person, the venue where the incident occurred and the date of the incident. We will then remind the excluded person of their responsibilities.
What is the Exclusions Database?

The exclusions database is part of the Tasmanian Gambling Exclusion Scheme. The database allows venue operators, counsellors and Liquor and Gaming Branch staff to access information about people who have excluded themselves from gambling.

Access to the database is via a secure internet connection providing up to the minute information.
Do venue staff have to use the database?

Yes. It replaced the old system where venues received information about excluded people through the mail.

Only a small number of venues do not have online access.
What kind of computer equipment do venues need?

You need a computer that is connected to the internet at your venue. You also need a printer to print your venue photos from the database.

Each venue will differ slightly in the way they use the database in their daily business. Ideally, the computer should be located where staff can access it freely, but away from those people who should not see exclusion information.
Where do venues get photos from to place in a folder or on a notice board?

You can print a list of excluded persons, including their photos, from the database. The list can be printed in different ways, for example by postcode, by date or alphabetically.

You can make the photos bigger on screen if you are having difficulty identifying a person.
How do venues get exclusion information across to all gaming staff?

Gaming staff can be given access to the database and view the information daily on the computer. This is the ideal situation.

If this is not possible, it may suit your venue to have one or two of your staff access the database and collate the information for others. Some venues display excluded information in a folder or on a notice board, out of view of the public or non gaming staff.
Minor Gaming - Answers
What is “minor gaming”?

Minor gaming is gaming where the proceeds are used for a not-for-profit organisation or for charitable reasons (such as education, welfare, sport and recreation), and not for the private gain or benefit of any person, except by way of charity.
What is a minor gaming permit?

A minor gaming permit is a permit issued by the Tasmanian Gaming Commission that enables an organisation or person to conduct authorised games. A minor gaming permit has effect, unless sooner cancelled or surrendered, for a period of one or two years (unless a shorter period is specified in the permit).
Who can apply for a minor gaming permit?

The Commission must not grant a minor gaming permit to a person unless satisfied that the proceeds from conducting authorised games are to be used for the lawful purposes of a not-for-profit organisation or a charitable purpose and not for the private gain or benefit of any person except by way of charity.

You must be at least 18 years old and a responsible person to hold a minor gaming permit. Click here to find out more.
What is an authorised game?

The Tasmanian Gaming Commission determines which games are to be authorised under Section 76ZZK of the Gaming Control Act 1993. Currently the list of authorised games includes:
  • Raffles
  • Lucky Envelopes
  • Bingo
  • Calcutta Sweepstakes
  • Instant Draw Bingo
  • Dancing Dollars
  • Tassie’s Best Punter
What is a charitable purpose?

Charitable purpose includes the following purposes:
  • religious purposes;
  • educational purposes;
  • benevolent purposes;
  • welfare purposes;
  • providing medical treatment or attention;
  • promoting or encouraging literature, art or science;
  • establishing, managing or beautifying a community centre or park or other community premises or place;
  • recreational or sporting purposes; or
  • a purpose approved by the Commission generally or in a particular case.
How long must I keep records?

All records relating to the conduct of minor gaming must be retained for seven years. Specific information to be recorded and retained is contained within the rules and conditions for each authorised game. Remember, a minor gaming operator must, upon request, provide records for inspection at any time. Heavy penalties may apply for non-compliance.
Do I need a permit to hold a casino fun night as a fundraiser? Am I able to charge admission or an entry fee for the games?

It is no longer necessary to obtain a permit to hold a gratuitous gaming function provided that the game(s) is conducted gratuitously and played strictly for fun. That is, there can be no cost whatsoever for participants to play the games and that entry into each game is entirely free of charge.
What if the winning margin of an event is greater than 100 points?

Typically margin tickets are numbered 1 to 100. In order that each ticket has an equal chance of winning, the number on the ticket should represent a margin within the range of 1 to 100, 101 to 200, 201 to 300, and so on. That is, a ticket with a number of 5 will represent a margin of 5, 105, 205, and so on. Ticket number 100 may also represent a drawn contest. The rules regarding what margin(s) the ticket number represents should be made clear to participants at the time of purchase.
Do I need a permit to conduct a raffle?

A permit is required where the retail value of the prizes exceeds $5 000. For raffles where the total prize value is $5 000 or less, the rules and conditions for conducting a raffle must still be adhered to. That is, tickets must be printed and results must be published etc. In all instances raffle proceeds must be used exclusively for the lawful purposes of a not-for-profit organisation or a charitable purpose and not for the private gain or benefit of any person. Please refer to the rules and conditions for more information.
Can I draw the winners in reverse order, that is to draw the major prize winner last?

No. The method of the draw must allow each ticket in the draw a random and equal chance of being drawn. If there is more than one prize being offered the first ticket drawn must win first prize and so on. Reverse Draws are prohibited, however the rules and conditions for raffles do not stipulate the order in which prize winners may be announced.
My child is participating in a mainland sporting event. Can I conduct a raffle to help cover expenses?

Raffle proceeds must not be for the private gain or benefit of any person. You may however conduct a raffle for the benefit of a sporting club or organisation connected with your child’s sport provided that you have the club’s or organisation’s permission to do so.
As an hotelier, can I recover administrative expenses from the proceeds of sale of lucky envelopes?

Yes, hoteliers may retain a site fee of up to 5% of gross proceeds from the sale of each box of lucky envelopes. The site fee if retained must be to cover administrative expenses only. A minor gaming activity must not be conducted for private gain or benefit. You may be required to produce records to justify the retention of a site fee.
What returns are required by hoteliers?

As from 1 October 2007 hoteliers that hold a minor gaming permit and conduct the game of lucky envelopes must submit a “Return of Sales” form within 14 days of the anniversary of issue of the permit. The return form must list the number of each type of ticket sold during the year and the name and amount paid to each beneficiary organisation. Remember, the total net profit is still to be distributed quarterly and must not be accrued.
Do I need a permit to conduct a trade promotion?

You do not need a minor gaming permit to conduct a trade promotion in Tasmania, but certain conditions apply. Click here to find out more.
General Gaming Enquiries - Answers
How many gaming machines are there in Tasmania and where are they located?

Click here for a list of premises in Tasmania that are licensed to operate gaming machines and/or keno. The list includes number of machines and local government area.
Are there restrictions on the number of gaming machines in Tasmania?

Yes. The Gaming Control Act 1993 sets limits on gaming machine numbers in Tasmania. The maximum numbers allowed are:
  • 3 680 total in the State;
  • 2 500 total in hotels and clubs;
  • no more than 30 in each hotel; and
  • no more than 40 in each club.

The Tasmanian Gaming Commission monitors these limits closely and has authority to take disciplinary action for a breach of the Act.
What are my requirements as a Gambling Operator in relation to Responsible Conduct of Gambling training?

Gambling Operators must ensure that employees are training in the responsible conduct of gambling.

In line with the Responsible Gambling Mandatory Code of Practice in relation to Responsible Conduct of Gambling training, from 1 March 2013 at least one person who has completed the enhanced Responsible Conduct of Gambling training course must be on duty at all times in each area where gaming machines operate.

As specified in the Rules for specific gaming and wagering license types, a register must be maintained by a Gambling Operator and include the details of all totalisator employees or special employee licence holders employed by the Gambling Operator. A copy of each employee’s most current RCG certificate is to be kept by the operator.

Click on the links for a Fact Sheet which provides further guidance on the use of the Register or for additional copies of the Register.

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