10   Department of State Growth

Agency Outline

The Department of State Growth was established on 1 July 2014 to aggressively and strategically pursue jobs, growth and opportunity for Tasmanians. The Department of State Growth actively pursues and promotes investment, facilitates major projects, supports business and industry to grow, and ensures strategic investment in infrastructure. The Department also works closely with business and industry to: address barriers to growth; reduce red tape; provide a skilled workforce; develop our creative and cultural industries; and ensure efficient and cost effective transport and logistics systems.

The Department provides portfolio support for the following Ministers:

·       Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events, Hon Will Hodgman MP;

·       Minister for State Growth and Minister for Energy, Hon Matthew Groom MP;

·       Minister for Infrastructure, Hon Rene Hidding MP;

·       Minister for Resources, Hon Paul Harriss MP;

·       Minister for the Arts, Hon Dr Vanessa Goodwin MLC;

·       Minister for Planning and Local Government, Hon Peter Gutwein MP; and

·       Minister for Information Technology and Innovation, Hon Michael Ferguson MP.

The Department also supports the Parliamentary Secretary for Small Business and Trade, Adam Brooks MP.

The Department is organised into four key areas: Industry and Business Development; Policy and Strategy; Transport Services; and Business Services.

The Department supports the Coordinator‑General's Office, Infrastructure Tasmania and the Planning Reform Taskforce and is working closely with Tourism Tasmania.

It is also supporting the AgriGrowth Division in the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment to develop the agricultural sector.

This chapter provides the Department's financial information for 2015‑16 and over the Forward Estimates period (2016‑17 to 2018‑19). Further information on the Department is provided at www.stategrowth.tas.gov.au.

Key Deliverables

Table 10.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimate allocations for key deliverables within the Department.

Table 10.1:        Key Deliverables Statement1

 

2015-16

 

Budget

2016-17

Forward

Estimate

2017-18

Forward

Estimate

2018-19

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Business Events Strategy

 100

 100

 100

 100

Business and Jobs Attraction and Population Growth Initiatives

4 000

4 000

....

....

Caterpillar Transition Taskforce

3 000

....

....

....

Forestry Reform Implementation

 150

 100

....

....

Forward Planning for Roads

....

 500

 500

 500

Growing the Visitor Economy

1 000

1 000

1 000

....

Masters Games

 250

 250

 250

....

Mining for Tasmania's Future Policy

 250

....

....

 250

National Heavy Vehicle Regulator Revenue Transfer

 227

....

....

....

Northern Cities Major Development Initiative

....

20 000

20 000

20 000

Office of the Coordinator‑General ‑ International Engagement, Investment Attraction and Facilitation, and Northern Cities Major Development Initiatives

1 500

 750

 500

 500

Premier's Literary Prizes

 40

....

 40

....

Prosser River Entrance Stabilisation ‑ Stage 1

 500

....

....

....

Public Transport Bus Services Procurement

 450

 450

 150

 100

Rail Infrastructure2

29 900

29 900

....

....

Regional Events Start-Up Program

 250

 200

 160

....

Regional Revival Fund - New Projects Investment

5 000

....

....

....

Regional Tourism Organisations

 230

 230

 230

 230

Serco Contact Centre Industry Support Package

 296

 222

....

....

St Helens Barway Stabilisation ‑ Stage 1

 589

 589

....

....

Support to Local Councils for Transport Infrastructure

2 000

....

....

....

Tasmanian Energy Strategy3

565

1 900

....

....

TMAG Building Roof Maintenance

 460

....

....

....

TMAG Operating Support Costs

 500

 250

....

....

UXC Enterprise Development Centre

 680

 400

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The Department continues to deliver election commitments funded for two or more years as detailed in chapter 10 of Government Services Budget Paper No 2, 2014‑15.

2.   Additional rail infrastructure funding partly reflects a reallocation of funding from the Government's International Shipping election commitment which is no longer required given the extension of the Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme for international exports being shipped to mainland ports.

3.   Funding reflected for the Tasmanian Energy Strategy includes funding previously associated with the Development of Bio Fuels in the Huon and Dorset regions, and Advancing the Case for a Nationally Funded Second Interconnector election commitments.

 

Business Events Strategy

Business events attract higher yielding visitors and the total annual direct economic return to Tasmania has been estimated at $112 million (Tasmania Visitor Survey 2014‑15). Additional funding of $400 000 over four years will enhance Business Events Tasmania's capacity to generate and convert more bids, target strategic opportunities and tailor sales activities for specific markets in order to build visitation.

Business and Jobs Attraction and Population Growth Initiatives (365 Day Plan)

Funding has been provided to support the Government's population and business growth agendas, including targeted activities to attract new business to Tasmania, and other measures to facilitate population growth. Finalising the Population Strategy is part of the Government's 365 Day Plan.

Caterpillar Transition Taskforce

The State Government has allocated $3 million to support activities aimed at transitioning the advanced manufacturing industries into new areas of opportunity, actively seeking new investment to grow jobs in the short, medium and long‑term, and working with the community to retain the advanced manufacturing capacity on the North West Coast.

Forestry Reform Implementation

Funding has been provided for the Minister for Resources to implement the outcomes of the Forestry Tasmania review, including costs associated with the three month stakeholder consultation process that has now commenced.

Forward Planning for Roads

The Government has provided additional funding over the Forward Estimates to facilitate forward planning of roads capital works. Forward planning funds are used to identify projects to meet future transport demand and develop project concepts, including the identification of stage cost estimates. This allows projects to be developed to the stage that future investment profiles can be determined with a high level of confidence and that projects can be funded and delivered with risks appropriately managed or mitigated.

Growing the Visitor Economy

With Tourism Tasmania now focused exclusively on marketing, supply‑side activities will be coordinated by the Department of State Growth. The allocation of $3 million over three years will enable the Tourism and Hospitality Supply‑side Unit to implement programs that accelerate the achievement of quality tourism, hospitality or events outcomes in product/experience development, improved business capability and visitor hosting capacity.

The focus of this funding will be to support initiatives and partnership programs aimed at developing strategic priorities identified in the four Regional Tourism Organisation Destination Management Plans (for example, indigenous, cycling or heritage tourism) and Tourism 21 - The Tasmanian Visitor Economy Strategy, 2015 ‑ 2020. The Tourism and Hospitality Supply‑side Unit will coordinate with key organisations working in the supply‑side to ensure the delivery of efficient and focused development activities.


 

This initiative is supported by the implementation of a free public wireless broadband network in approximately 50 locations around the state, which will not only benefit local residents but will give tourists the opportunity to create and share their experience of Tasmania online. It also allows local businesses to provide online information about attractions and opportunities in the area, encouraging tourists to fully explore what Tasmania has to offer.

Masters Games

The State Government has allocated up to $750 000 to secure the 2017 Australian Masters Games to be hosted on the North West Coast. This is contingent on funding also being provided by local councils and the Australian Government.

The Australian Masters Games has the potential to attract more than 7 000 competitors and a further 3 000 visitors to the ten day competition. Hosting the Games will create a major boost for regional tourism, with thousands of travellers boarding the Spirit of Tasmania vessels, staying in local accommodation and eating at local restaurants and cafes. It will also have a flow on effect for the surrounding areas, with many competitors and their families typically staying on to holiday after the competition.

Mining for Tasmania's Future Policy (365 Day Plan)

The Government has committed additional funding in 2015‑16 to commence the relocation of Mineral Resources Tasmania functions to Burnie, and to continue the election commitment beyond the initial four year allocation. Commencing the relocation of Mineral Resources Tasmania to Burnie is part of the Government's 365 Day Plan.

National Heavy Vehicle Regulator Revenue Transfer

Since February 2014, the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator has been Australia's independent regulator for all vehicles over 4.5 tonnes gross vehicle mass. Under an Intergovernmental Agreement, introduction of the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator requires an initial contribution from the Tasmanian Government to fund activities of the Regulator. Additional funding has been provided to the Department of State Growth from heavy vehicle motor tax receipts to fund the 2015‑16 contribution.

Northern Cities Major Development Initiative

The Northern Cities Major Development Initiative will see the Coordinator‑General working in close collaboration with Northern Tasmanian councils to help revive communities through infrastructure investment projects. Immediate projects include the Devonport Living City, the Launceston University of Tasmania campus relocation project, and the commencement of discussions regarding the enhanced presence of the University of Tasmania on the North West Coast.

The initiative is supported by a $60 million capital funding commitment for infrastructure investment projects which demonstrate community revitalisation benefits.

Office of the Coordinator-General - International Engagement, Investment Attraction and Facilitation, and Northern Cities Major Development Initiatives (365 Day Plan)

Additional funding for the Office of the Coordinator-General will help to deliver the Government's growth agenda in three specific areas: international engagement activities, investment attraction and facilitation, and the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative.

International engagement is a very important priority for the Government to leverage off current global interest in what Tasmania has to offer. Funding will support trade missions and targeted international profile activities. Funding will also support investment attraction and facilitation to create jobs, growth and opportunities for Tasmanians.

The Office of the Coordinator‑General will progress the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative that will see the Coordinator-General working in close collaboration with Northern Tasmanian councils to help revitalise communities through infrastructure investment projects in North and North West Tasmania.

Launching a second round Expression of Interest process for sensible development in Tasmania's wilderness areas is part of the Government's 365 Day Plan.

Premier's Literary Prizes

The Government has committed to the Premier's Literary Prizes, the State Government's biennial literary awards. The Prizes celebrate Tasmanian writers and those who write about Tasmania.

Prosser River Entrance Stabilisation ‑ Stage 1

Funding has been made available to Marine and Safety Tasmania (MAST) to contribute towards stabilisation of the mouth of the Prosser River. MAST and Glamorgan Spring Bay Council will provide the remainder of funds required to complete the works.

Public Transport Bus Services Procurement

Existing contracts for public transport bus services (including school buses) begin expiring in early 2018. Funding has been provided to complete a detailed review of all current services and service optimisation, (including services provided by Metro Tasmania Pty Ltd) to ensure that the most efficient and cost effective network of services is procured and opportunities for efficiencies identified.

The review will ensure the changes Tasmania has been experiencing over the last decade are captured and lays a strong foundation for growth in the decade to come. It will deliver the Government's policy objective to provide a further 5+5 contract for incumbent operators, providing key performance conditions are met and there is an ongoing need for a particular service in a particular area. It will also provide a consistent measure of performance across all bus contracts, greater incentives for operators to perform and importantly, better long‑term service delivery for Tasmanian bus passengers.


 

Rail Infrastructure

Additional funding has been provided to secure funding of $59.8 million from the Australian Government for the Freight Rail Revitalisation Program, which requires a 50 per cent co-contribution from the State. The Freight Rail Revitalisation Program, undertaken by Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd (TasRail), will raise the quality of the major lines on the Tasmanian rail network through selective re‑sleepering, upgrading old rail and bridges as well as culvert strengthening, drainage and formation work.

Regional Events Start-Up Program

The Regional Events Start‑Up Program is a new initiative to support and attract new events. The program will:

·       grow and refresh the events program by introducing new events and festivals to maintain the momentum that is currently being experienced;

·       aim to fill the remaining weeks of event inactivity, most of which are in the winter and shoulder seasons period and typically outside of Hobart;

·       reinforce Tasmania's brand positioning by locking in events that continue to evolve the brand and offer added variety to the current events program;

·       encourage visitation to regional Tasmania by the creation of new events which emerge from these areas (and enabling minor, existing community events that are staged in regional areas to go to the next level);

·       support local communities to build events that capture their essential appeal and have the capacity to enhance the attractiveness of Tasmania's regions as micro‑destinations; and

·       create triggers to travel to Tasmania by supporting events that create reasons to travel to Tasmania.

This program will provide reducing balance seed funding for new regional events over a maximum of three years. It will seek to assist unique events to establish a presence whilst recognising that diversifying future funding streams will contribute to the sustainability of regional events.

Regional Revival Fund ‑ New Projects Investment

The Government is providing additional funding to the Regional Revival Fund in order to support new investments linked to industry and jobs growth in regional areas of Tasmania. This funding is in addition to previously announced projects that are still being progressed.

The Department of State Growth will work with private investors and local councils to identify projects where support may be offered through a contribution towards total project cost. The funding is available to meet capital costs associated with new developments and there must be a clear demonstration of benefit for regional communities and relevant industries.

Regional Tourism Organisations

The provision of an additional $920 000 over four years to Tasmania's Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) strengthens the Government's commitment to the regional tourism model and recognises the important role the RTOs will play in achieving the objectives shared with industry.


 

This additional funding lifts the regional tourism core funding pool to $1.2 million per year, which will enable the RTOs to play an enhanced role in the development of new products and experiences and improving the capacity and capability of Tasmania's operators. The application of these funds will be agreed between the Department of State Growth and Tourism Tasmania.

Serco Contact Centre Industry Support Package

The Government has provided industry assistance funding for Serco's Burnie contact centre. Serco is a major employer in North West Tasmania. The retention of up to 160 FTEs will continue to provide a substantial benefit to the local community over the five year agreement.

St Helens Barway Stabilisation - Stage 1

Funding has been made available to MAST for works on the St Helens Barway in the form of training wall extensions and groynes. MAST and Break O'Day Council will provide the remainder of funds required to complete the works.

Support to Local Councils for Transport Infrastructure

Funding has been provided for the Department of State Growth to develop and implement a series of Over Size Over Mass (OSOM) vehicle networks across the Tasmanian Road Network to mitigate the pending expiry, at the end of 2015, of the pre-existing OSOM various-to-various permits, which presently provide the access mechanism for these vehicles. The creation of these networks will minimise the need for industry to apply for access prior to travel, and will also assist in the provision of sustainable and reliable infrastructure going forward. This work will involve the assessment of routes for suitability to carry vehicles under an agreed vehicle classification framework and conditions, with a particular emphasis on the structural capacity of bridges but also taking into consideration the geometrical and road safety aspects of travel.

The Government will be investing $300 000 to construct newer, safer bus stops for Tasmanian students, particularly those living in regional areas. The Department of State Growth will work with operators and local councils to identify the locations for the new bus stops and associated infrastructure.

Tasmanian Energy Strategy

The Energy Strategy is a key policy commitment for the Government. The Government has committed $4.5 million to progress a number of major initiatives identified under the Tasmanian Energy Strategy. Funding of $2.5 million over two years was provided in the 2014‑15 Budget to progress key initiatives, including preliminary work on the feasibility of a second Interconnector and strategies to increase hydro generation by 10 per cent.

In partnership with Aurora Energy Pty Ltd (Aurora), a further $2 million will be made available over the next two years to implement energy affordability programs targeting vulnerable households. It is expected that through this program Aurora will be able to increase its Your Energy Support (YES) program reach from 1 300 customers to approximately 2 500 customers.

TMAG Building Roof Maintenance

The roof of the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery's (TMAG) 1966 building requires work to protect the premium, climate controlled gallery spaces and the collection within the building from potential water damage. Funding has been provided in 2015‑16 to complete corrective action.

TMAG Operating Support Costs

Additional funding has been provided to TMAG to support the implementation of changes that will return TMAG to a sustainable budget position, securing its future as a premier cultural and tourism experience.

UXC Enterprise Development Centre

The Tasmanian Government is in discussions with UXC Limited, the largest Australian owned IT Services Company, regarding establishing a Tasmanian UXC Enterprise Development Centre in Hobart.

Output Restructure

From 1 July 2015, the Office of Racing Integrity (formerly Output Group 5 - Racing Regulation and Policy) will be transferred from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment.

As a result, from 1 July 2015 Output Group 5 has been renamed Culture and Creative Industries (formerly Output Group 6 - Cultural and Creative Industry Development) and Output Group 6 has been renamed Subsidies and Concessions (formerly Output Group 7).

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of State Growth are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 ‑ Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth;

·       Output Group 2 ‑ Infrastructure;

·       Output Group 3 ‑ Energy Policy and Advice;

·       Output Group 4 ‑ Resources Policy and Regulatory Services;

·       Output Group 5 ‑ Culture and Creative Industries; and

·       Output Group 6 ‑ Subsidies and Concessions.

Table 10.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department of State Growth.


Table 10.2:        Output Group Expense Summary

 

2014-151

 

Budget)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 - Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

 800)

 800)

 800)

 800)

 800)

2.2 Infrastructure Strategy2

 2 996)

 1 694)

 1 659)

 1 668)

 647)

2.3 Land Transport Safety2

 24 483)

 20 907)

 18 392)

 15 129)

 15 351)

2.4 Passenger Transport2

 3 400)

 3 175)

 3 223)

 2 986)

 3 005)

2.5 Traffic Management and Engineering Services2

 5 444)

 3 372)

 3 427)

 3 515)

 3 547)

 

 37 123)

 29 948)

 27 501)

 24 098)

 23 350)

Output Group 6 - Subsidies and Concessions

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies3

 12 106)

 1 036)

 1 067)

 1 100)

 1 133)

6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services

 39 956)

 41 057)

 42 192)

 43 360)

 44 563)

6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services

 22 358)

 23 029)

 23 720)

 24 432)

 25 165)

6.4 Non-Metropolitan General Access Services

 7 926)

 7 626)

 7 626)

 7 626)

 7 626)

6.5 Construction of Streets in Towns

 52)

 52)

 52)

 52)

 52)

 

 82 398)

 72 800)

 74 657)

 76 570)

 78 539)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies4

 54 670)

 81 070)

 81 291)

 47 705)

 43 997)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program5

 146 299)

 148 338)

 145 175)

 146 162)

 147 098)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Energy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 - Energy Policy and Advice

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Energy Policy and Advice2

 2 835)

 2 189)

 3 749)

 1 882)

 1 920)

 

 2 835)

 2 189)

 3 749)

 1 882)

 1 920)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Coordinator-General6

 2 687)

 4 216)

 3 469)

 3 229)

 3 229)

1.2 Industry and Business Development2,7,8

 52 485)

 65 326)

 33 381)

 25 967)

 21 463)

1.3 Skills Development2,9

 123 082)

 107 570)

 109 007)

 98 541)

 100 422)

 

 178 254)

 177 112)

 145 857)

 127 737)

 125 114)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.2:        Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2014-151

 

Budget)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 - Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Forestry Policy and Reform2

 2 304)

 1 659)

 1 074)

 1 001)

 1 022)

4.2 Mineral Resources2

 5 463)

 6 191)

 6 055)

 6 207)

 6 338)

 

 7 767)

 7 850)

 7 129)

 7 208)

 7 360)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies10

 4 415)

 2 906)

 2 964)

 3 023)

 3 086)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery2

 8 132)

 10 061)

 9 850)

 9 853)

 10 093)

5.2 Arts Industry Development2

 7 026)

 7 811)

 7 668)

 7 817)

 7 888)

5.3 Screen Industry Development2

 1 403)

 1 754)

 1 772)

 1 818)

 1 867)

 

 16 561)

 19 626)

 19 290)

 19 488)

 19 848)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies11

 3 501)

 3 527)

 3 554)

 2 962)

 2 977)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.4 Events and Hospitality2,8

 12 141)

 11 685)

 7 699)

 7 476)

 6 409)

 

 12 141)

 11 685)

 7 699)

 7 476)

 6 409)

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 545 964)

 557 051)

 518 866)

 464 311)

 459 698)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2014‑15 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Regulation and Policy) from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2014‑15 figures for this Department will differ from those published in the 2014‑15 Budget.

2.   The movements in expenses for these Outputs are primarily attributable to the cash flow of election commitments, 2014‑15 Budget savings strategies, additional FTE savings announced in October 2014, and redistribution of corporate costs resulting from the establishment of the Department of State Growth in July 2014.

3.   The decrease from 2014‑15 to 2015‑16 reflects the reallocation of funding in 2015‑16 from the Government's International Shipping election commitment which is no longer required given the extension of the Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme for international exports being shipped to mainland ports, to rail infrastructure.

4.   The movement in Grants and Subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects cash flow changes associated with the Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd (TasRail) administered item.

5.   This funding relates to expenses within the Capital Investment Program, which are primarily maintenance costs and depreciation and therefore exclude asset purchases.

6.   The increase in Coordinator‑General reflects additional funding relating to international engagement, investment attraction and facilitation, and the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative.

7.   Movements in funding against this Output reflects Budget initiative funding for several key deliverables including: Business and Jobs Attraction and Population Growth Initiatives, Caterpillar Transition Taskforce, Growing the Visitor Economy, Regional Revival Fund - New Projects Investment and UXC Enterprise Development Centre. Funding relating to ICT strategies that are the responsibility of the Minister for Information Technology and Innovation has been included within this Output.

8.   Funding relating to Tourism supply-side activities that are the responsibility of the Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events has been included within the Industry and Business Development Output.

9.   Reductions over the Forward Estimates reflect cash flow changes associated with the completion of Australian Government funding under the existing National Partnership Agreements set to cease in 2017.

10. The reduction in 2015-16 reflects a change of accounting treatment of expenditure related to the Forest Practices Authority (FPA) to create consistency in grant payments to the Statutory Authorities administered by the Department of State Growth. Payments from 2015-16 are now reflected only as a grant to FPA, rather than reflecting both a grant to FPA and subsequent expenditure of that grant by FPA - refer Table 10.13 Administered Expenses.

11. The reduction in 2017-18 reflects the Government's commitment to reduce funding for Ten Days on the Island.

 

Output Group 1:    Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

1.1 Coordinator-General

The Office of the Coordinator-General has been established to provide a single point of contact for businesses interested in investing in Tasmania, with a mandate to get things done, reduce red tape and aggressively pursue jobs and investment for Tasmania.

The Coordinator-General is empowered to deregulate the Tasmanian business environment, promote competitiveness and facilitate the assessment and approval of major investment opportunities.

1.2 Industry and Business Development

This Output focuses on maximising growth and job creation through business and industry. The Output provides a regional interface to engage directly with Tasmanian businesses and supports the State's core industries to leverage their competitive strengths.

This Output also provides a range of services that support the growth of Tasmanian business, including small business. Business Tasmania provides online tools and information on starting, running and growing a business. Business development services, including assistance through Enterprise Centres, Mentoring Services and the Digital Ready for Business Program, are delivered by the Department in partnership with the private sector.

1.3 Skills Development

Skills Tasmania is responsible for:

·       managing Tasmania's publicly funded training and workforce development system, so that the current and future capacity of the State's workforce can be developed to grow opportunities for Tasmanian enterprises;


 

·       developing operational policy and strategy relating to skills and workforce development. This work has two key components: subsidising the delivery of quality vocational education and training by TasTAFE and other Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) through Skills Tasmania's purchasing activities; and working with industry to support workforce development activities that assist Tasmanian enterprises to attract and retain skilled workers and to strategically deploy skills in the workplace to drive business productivity;

·       directing government training subsidies to training that is relevant to priority industries, employment outcomes and that will develop a stock of skills in Tasmania's population that contributes to Tasmanian productivity, innovation, economic growth and emerging industries; and

·       managing the regulation of apprenticeships and traineeships, providing support services to RTOs and for the overall management and performance monitoring of the Tasmanian training system.

Table 10.3:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1

Performance Measure1

Unit of

Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013-14

Actual

2014-15

Target

2015-16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Tape Reduction of 20 per cent2

%

na

na

na

na

Difference between the Tasmanian and national unemployment rate3

% point difference

1.8

1.8

<2

<1

Investment, exports, and import replacements facilitated

$ million

295.3

376.0

300.0

320.0

VET Graduates employed after training4

% of total

78.9

77.9

77.5

78.0

VET Graduates with improved employment status after training5

% of total

66.7

61.6

60.7

61.0

Employers using VET system6

% of total

na

56.7

na

55.0

Apprentice/Trainee commencements7

Number

6 066

6 094

na

6 400

Apprentice/Trainee in training8

Number

9 625

9 365

na

9 700

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   'na' indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced.

2.   The Government is undertaking red tape reduction in accordance with its commitment to a 20 per cent reduction over the term of the Government. Specific performance targets are being determined by the Regulation Reduction Coordinator and the Coordinator-General on a sector by sector basis in consultation with industry.

3.   The Government has committed to reducing the Tasmanian unemployment rate to the national average in its first term. The difference between the Tasmanian and national unemployment rates for the 12 months to March 2014 was two percentage points. The performance measure is that, for 2015‑16, the difference between the two rates will be less than this difference.

4.   Graduates employed after training data is sourced from National Centre for Vocational Education Research Limited (NCVER) Student Outcomes Survey 2014, released December 2014. This data relates to graduates from 2013.

5.   Graduates with improved employment status after training data is sourced from NCVER Student Outcomes Survey 2014, released December 2014. Improved employment status after training is employment status changing from not employed before training to employed after training, or employed at a higher skill level after training, or received a job related benefit as reported by the graduate.

6.   Employers using VET system data is sourced from NCVER Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System 2013, released October 2013. This survey is conducted every second year which is why the 2012-13, and 2014-15 actual is not available. External factors influence this indicator.

7.   Apprentice/Trainee commencements represents the number of Tasmanian Trainees and Apprentices who began their Apprenticeship or Traineeship in the 12 months.

8.   Apprentice/Trainee in training represents the number of Tasmanian Apprentice and Trainees undertaking training.

 

Output Group 2:   Infrastructure

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

The Tasmanian Government has established a new entity, Infrastructure Tasmania, to provide a coordinated approach to the planning and delivery of all major infrastructure in Tasmania, including rail, major roads and ports.

Infrastructure Tasmania's core functions are:

·       assessment and prioritisation of all major publicly funded infrastructure;

·       coordination of funding submissions under State and Australian Government budget processes;

·       management of Tasmania's interface with Infrastructure Australia; and

·       the completion of tasks, investigations and the provision of advice at the request of the Government that relate to the matters listed above.

Infrastructure Tasmania's initial focus is on transport infrastructure, but it will have a broader coordination, assessment and prioritisation role for major publicly‑funded infrastructure.

2.2 Infrastructure Strategy

This Output delivers effective strategic policy guidance and advice on infrastructure and transport issues affecting Tasmania. This includes the development of guiding policy frameworks, high level policy implementation tasks and the coordination of major infrastructure planning initiatives, with a focus on:

·       working with Infrastructure Tasmania to deliver advice that ensures that planning and investment in Tasmania's transport system is strategic, considered and supportive of industry and community development;

·       developing close working relationships with stakeholders to understand their transport needs, the key issues affecting Tasmania's transport system and identifying opportunities for positive change;

·       coordinating participation in the development of strategic infrastructure solutions across all levels of government;

·       developing national transport and infrastructure policy reforms;

·       developing transport infrastructure strategic policy frameworks; and

·       enhancing the safe and efficient movement of people and freight.

2.3 Land Transport Safety

This Output provides the legislation, regulatory policies and practices for the Tasmanian land transport system, with a focus on:

·       developing and supporting strategic road safety and road transport policy initiatives and providing policy advice, encouraging community involvement in the road safety effort, and supporting the work of the Road Safety Advisory Council;

·       developing and delivering road safety education and awareness programs;

·       developing and maintaining legislation, business policies, practices and procedures, providing information and delivering services relating to the registration of vehicles and licensing of drivers; and

·       developing, encouraging and enforcing compliance with regulations for roadworthiness, standards, dimensions and mass limits, loading and operation of vehicles and undertaking management of approved inspection stations and transport operation schemes.

2.4 Passenger Transport

This Output manages the regulation and delivery of passenger transport services that support the efficient, equitable and appropriate movement of people, including the administration of targeted transport assistance schemes and subsidies for students, the unemployed, aged pensioners and persons living with disability, with a focus on:

·       developing a policy, legislative and contractual framework conducive to the sustainable delivery of passenger transport services;

·       administering contracts for the delivery of regular passenger transport services in metropolitan, urban fringe, regional and rural areas; and

·       implementation of programs including those arising from the Tasmanian Urban Passenger Transport Framework.

2.5 Traffic Management and Engineering Services

This Output delivers cost‑effective safety improvements to reduce the incidence of road crashes and provides specialist, technical traffic management and engineering solutions for the Government and the community. Key projects include delivering specific projects under the auspices of the Tasmanian Road Safety Strategy 2007‑2016.

Table 10.4:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2

Performance Measure1

Unit of

Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013-14

Actual

2014-15

Target

2015-16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposals assessed by Infrastructure Tasmania within required timeframes2

%

na

na

100

100

Reviews requested by Government completed by Infrastructure Tasmania within required timeframes2

%

na

na

100

100

Provision of effective support to the Government by providing road safety and road transport policy advice and information to enable informed decision making3

Satisfaction

na

na

Satisfied

Satisfied

Motor Registry System availability

%

99

99

99

99

Transport Enquiry Service - percentage of calls answered4

%

93

95

97

….

Vehicles found to be unregistered of those checked5

%

0.62

0.63

0.75

0.70

Heavy Vehicles found overweight6

%

3.74

4.72

≤5

≤5


 

Table 10.4:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2 (continued)

Performance Measure1

Unit of

Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013-14

Actual

2014-15

Target

2015-16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Linemarking program achieved by the end of the financial year

%

67

100

100

100

Blackspot interventions in accordance with the program

%

100

100

100

100

Wheelchair accessible taxis (WATS) licensed

Number

66

65

68

75

Average Bus Age on contracted services7

Number

na

na

na

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   'na' indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced. The performance measure Provision of effective support to the Government, by providing strategic policy advice on infrastructure issues and transport and freight priorities, to enable informed decision making has been removed since the 2014‑15 Budget.

2.   Proposals are publicly-funded major economic infrastructure proposals. Timeframes will be developed once Infrastructure Tasmania has been fully established.

3.   Satisfaction and outcomes are largely measured by feedback from the Minister's Office, Secretary, relevant Deputy Secretary and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients.

4.   From June 2015, the Transport Enquiry Service provided by the Department will be transferred to the Integrated Tasmanian Government Contact Centre, managed by Service Tasmania. The 2012‑13 actual and 2014‑15 target for this measure has been revised.

5.   This measure is based upon Automatic Number Plate Recognition cameras in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding between the Department and the Motor Accidents Insurance Board (MAIB).

6.   This is a new performance measure.

7.   This performance measure has been changed to a simpler measure of the effectiveness of government strategies to ensure that the average age of buses on government contracted services is appropriate.

 

Output Group 3:   Energy Policy and Advice

3.1 Energy Policy and Advice

This Output provides policy advice and support to the Minister for Energy on matters affecting energy in Tasmania. The aim is to maintain an efficient and effective regulatory structure for the Tasmanian energy sector, for the benefit of Tasmanian energy consumers, with a focus on:

·       implementing a new Tasmanian Energy Strategy to ensure energy is well placed to contribute to, and enable, future economic growth;

·       enhancing the framework to support the affordability and sustainability of energy markets and prices in Tasmania;

·       supporting the continuing implementation of reforms to the Tasmanian electricity supply industry, including providing policy advice to the Minister to achieve benefits for Tasmanians from full retail contestability;

·       supporting the Minister in his Shareholder Minister responsibilities for the State‑owned electricity businesses;

·       advancing Tasmania's interests in National Energy Market policy reforms and developments;


 

·       monitoring the energy supply situation in Tasmania and providing advice on the management and mitigation of risks to the Director of Energy Planning and the Minister, including continuing to improve the preparedness to deal with any high impact, low probability supply emergencies in electricity, gas or petroleum products; and

·       managing programs and projects related to energy as requested by the Government.

Table 10.5:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3

Performance Measure1

Unit of

Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013-14

Actual

2014-15

Target

2015-16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Policy Advice

 

 

 

 

 

Provision of effective support to the Government by providing information and advice to enable informed decision making

Satisfaction

>4

≥4

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Energy Market Development

 

 

 

 

 

Promote and protect Tasmanian interests in national energy market developments and reforms

Outcomes

>4

>4

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emergency Preparedness

 

 

 

 

 

Maintain adequate frameworks to deal with major emergencies in electricity, gas or oil

Adequacy

>4

>4

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Projects and Programs

 

 

 

 

 

Achieve objectives within budget and time frame, achieve sponsor and client satisfaction and comply with all prudential guidelines.

Outcomes

>4

>4

4

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.   Satisfaction and outcomes are largely measured by feedback from the Minister's Office, Secretary, Director of Energy and Planning and (where appropriate) colleagues and clients using a five‑point scale where four is rated 'good'.

 

Output Group 4:   Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

4.1 Forestry Policy and Reform

This Output provides high level support on forest resource policy and management issues. It has a focus on forest policy projects of strategic importance such as the development of new land management legislation to support the Government's forest policy, review and extension of the Regional Forest Agreement, as well as delivery of specific programs to assist the development and growth of the forest industry. The Output facilitates a number of inter-agency committees relating to forest policy and programs.


 

4.2 Mineral Resources

This Output facilitates mineral exploration and mining development and fosters and encourages responsible land management in Tasmania, with a focus on:

·       improving the quality and quantity of geoscience information, essential to the encouragement of mineral exploration and responsible land management, including the continued development of the TIGER data management system and a comprehensive three dimensional geological model of the State;

·       promoting Tasmania nationally and internationally as being highly prospective for mineral exploration and mining through targeted and strategic marketing; and

·       providing information for sustainable land use planning and infrastructure development decisions through activities such as geohazard mapping, resource identification to protect against sterilisation and management and rehabilitation of abandoned mining lands.

This Output also ensures the responsible management of the State's mineral resources and a fair and sustainable return to the community when a resource of metallic, construction, industrial and fuel minerals or geothermal energy is developed. This is achieved by focusing on:

·       assessment and regulation of legal titles for mineral tenements; and

·       managing the royalty regime and collecting fees and rentals.

Under the Mining for Tasmania's Future Policy, Mineral Resources Tasmania will be relocated to Burnie to ensure it can provide the most effective contribution to managing the State's expansive minerals and petroleum resources.

Table 10.6:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013-14

Actual

2014-15

Target

2015-16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Survey regarding standards in administrative process and policy development that meet the needs of the end‑user: 1

 

 

 

 

 

Minister

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Agency - Secretary / Deputy Secretary

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Tasmania's percentage of industry's mineral exploration expenditure in Australia2

%

1.7

1.4

1.6

1.3

Area covered by modern geoscientific data collection techniques with subsequent 1:25 000 geological mapping coverage3

%

72.1

71.0

74.4

66.4

Programmed abandoned mining lands rehabilitation projects completed

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   A user satisfaction survey seeks stakeholder feedback regarding the level of satisfaction perceived on such issues as quality, equity, efficiency and openness of the consultation process.

2.   Statistics derived from the first three quarters of each financial year from ABS greenfields exploration data.

3.   The area covered by modern remote sensing data (less than 15 years old) is subject to change. The performance targets are regularly refactored based on area of modern remote sensing data available at a given point in time.

 

Output Group 5:   Culture and Creative Industries

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

Through the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG), this Output aims to increase community understanding of the cultural and natural world by collecting, conserving, interpreting and researching material evidence within the areas of humanities including visual arts, history and anthropology and the biological and physical sciences. It provides the community with opportunities to experience the past and the present, invites participation in the State's collection and offers a stimulating museum and art environment.

5.2 Arts Industry Development

This Output focuses on working with Tasmanian artists and arts organisations to grow this important industry. It aims to broaden the engagement of Tasmanians in the arts, highlight the State's diverse arts and cultural sector and build the sustainability of arts businesses. This is achieved by providing funding to individual artists, arts organisations and major Tasmanian cultural institutions to assist their planning and realisation of projects, as well as to develop and present new work. These projects generate economic activity, create employment opportunities and add to Tasmania's significant array of cultural tourist attractions. The Output also includes grant funding and professional assistance to Tasmanian museums (other than TMAG), art galleries and moveable cultural heritage organisations as a key part of the Government's ongoing support for the preservation of the State's cultural heritage.

5.3 Screen Industry Development

This Output aims to build on the success that has occurred in the sector through increased local, interstate and international screen production in this State. It also provides support for professional, project and enterprise development and promotion of screen culture activities and seeks to promote Tasmanian talent and stories to a worldwide audience. This Output also aims to position Tasmania as a centre for the creation and development of quality content in the digital media environment as an important part of the growing creative industries sector.

5.4 Events and Hospitality

This Output plays a role in stimulating events growth in Tasmania. This is achieved through the attraction and retention of a diverse range of events and through event development with international presenters and support activities that deliver a range of social, cultural, economic and environmental benefits to the Tasmanian community. This Output also includes oversight of Princes Wharf No. 1 Shed, a key event venue on the Hobart waterfront.

This Output aims to build and sustain a strong events sector, promote investment and support for the sector, and maximise the value and return on investment of events supported by the Government through major event partnerships, grant and development programs and a research program. Events Tasmania's aim is to develop a seasonally balanced events portfolio that brings people to Tasmania, gets people moving around the State, creates job opportunities and benefits communities through social inclusion as well as economic stimulus.


 

This Output also supports hospitality industry development through working closely with the Tasmanian Hospitality Association to address key issues facing the industry. This includes collaboration with Output 1.3 Skills Development to support skills and capability development, career pathways, recruitment and retention and providing consistent high quality service. This Output also supports raising the industry profile and improving profitability and sustainability.

Table 10.7:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 5

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013-14

Actual

2014-15

Target

2015-16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

 

 

 

 

 

TMAG Total Visitors1

Number

1180/day

1440/day

1125/day

1125/day

Arts Industry Development

 

 

 

 

 

Attendance at selected cultural venues2

Number

224 838

243 308

235 000

245 000

Contribution to gross state product of selected arts industries3

$ million

63.2

67.3

60.5

65.0

Participation in selected cultural activities4

%

na

28.1

28.2

28.3

Screen Industry Development5

 

 

 

 

 

Developed projects that advance into production6

Ratio

6:1

4.4:1

5:1

8:1

Investment Attracted7

Ratio

6:1

12.4:1

5:1

4:1

Leveraged spend in the State

Ratio

6:1

4.4:1

4:1

4:1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   It is typical after the one-off effect of a redevelopment opening year to see a reduction. Actual and target numbers for 2014-15 and 2015-16 are 40 per cent (325 visitors per day) above pre‑redevelopment figures, which averaged 800 visits per day.

2.   Attendance at selected cultural venues includes only those organisations receiving assistance under the Museums, Art Galleries and Heritage Organisations funding program of Arts Tasmania.

3.   Contribution to gross state product of selected arts industries in 2012‑13 has been revised downwards by the ABS in its publication 5220.0 Australian National Accounts: State Accounts. It was previously reported at $64.7 million.

4.   This is a new measure and replaces employment numbers no longer published by the ABS. Data for this measure has been gained from the ABS release Participation in Selected Cultural Activities, Australia (Cat. No. 4921.0). It compares with a national participation rate of 26.8 per cent.

5.   The performance measure Screen Industry - Production Jobs Generated is no longer a viable measure of performance due to small sample size and has been removed from this table.

6.   The industry standard ratio for developed projects advancing into production is 10:1. The ratio varies because of the time taken by some projects to go into production, and because of that time, this ratio has been taken over three years.

7.   Investment Attracted ratios vary in line with the size of production budgets. Animation and TV drama series leverage more investment and jobs than documentaries.

 

Output Group 6:   Subsidies and Concessions

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

This Output relates to payments for the provision of services for the Bruny Island Ferry, Furneaux Shipping and King Island Shipping. As part of the 2014‑15 Budget, funding was provided to this Output for the International Shipping election commitment. This funding is no longer required given the extension of the Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme for international exports being shipped to mainland ports. 2015-16 and 2016-17 funding has been reallocated to support rail infrastructure.

6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services

This Output relates to the contract funding provided to suppliers of public bus services, including school‑day‑only services in the metropolitan areas of Hobart, Launceston, Devonport and Burnie. Included in this Output is funding to Metro Tasmania of $3.3 million per annum outside of the contract for service delivery for contractors to pursue a range of priorities including:

·       purchase of new low‑emission accessible buses;

·       improvements to off‑bus infrastructure on major corridors; and

·       undertaking research and marketing initiatives.

6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services

This Output relates to contract payments to operators of rural and special needs school buses during the school year.

6.4 Non‑Metropolitan General Access Services

This Output relates to contract funding provided to suppliers of public bus services outside the metropolitan areas of Hobart, Launceston, Devonport and Burnie but includes services to, from and between the metropolitan areas.

6.5 Construction of Streets in Towns

This Output contributes to the construction of streets as provided under the Local Government (Highways) Act 1982 and the Local Government Act 1993.


Capital Investment Program

Table 10.8 provides financial information for the Department's Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program (CIP) is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 10.8:        Capital Investment Program1,2

 

Estimated)

Total)

Cost)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

Asset Management

Ongoing)

 5 321)

 5 388)

 5 529)

 5 663)

Bridge Renewal Program3

Ongoing)

 4 810)

 1 240)

 1 240)

 1 240)

Bridge Strengthening on Esk and Tasman Highways

10 000)

 500)

 500)

 4 100)

 4 900)

Brooker Highway, Elwick, Goodwood, Howard Roads3

32 000)

 12 100)

 16 600)

 1 000)

....)

Bruny Island Main Road

3 700)

 300)

....)

1 700)

1 500)

Colebrook Main Road

6 500)

 500)

1 000)

3 500)

1 500)

Contingency (Australian Government)3

600)

600)

....)

....)

....)

Domain Highway Planning3

5 000)

 4 000)

 1 000)

....)

....)

Environmental Management

Ongoing)

 545)

 556)

 571)

 585)

Esk Main Road

13 000)

 1 000)

1 000)

2 800)

7 700)

Forward Planning

1 125)

 1 125)

....)

....)

....)

Hadspen Bridge Walkway

100)

100)

....)

....)

....)

Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity3

Ongoing)

 400)

 2 700)

 850)

 850)

Highland Lakes Road

4 000)

....)

2 000)

1 900)

....)

Huon Highway / Summerleas Rd3

21 900)

 6 840)

 13 900)

 1 000)

....)

Huon Highway Upgrade - Glendevie

8 000)

....)

6 000)

1 800)

....)

Infrastructure Development

Ongoing)

128)

 132)

 942)

 968)

Infrastructure Maintenance3,4

Ongoing)

 65 229)

 66 709)

 68 360)

 70 040)

Launceston Northbank

1 350)

 675)

 675)

....)

....)

Midland Highway3,5

250 000)

 64 578)

 66 000)

 44 000)

 53 000)

Murchison Highway

8 000)

1 000)

4 000)

2 000)

....)

North East Freight Roads3

42 500)

 2 287)

 180)

....)

....)

Program Management

Ongoing)

 1 032)

 1 098)

 1 180)

 1 213)

Road Safety and Traffic Management3,5

Ongoing)

 12 659)

 12 209)

 7 366)

 7 527)

South Arm Highway/Rokeby Main Road Stage 2

15 000)

6 000)

2 000)

....)

....)

Strategic Planning and Policy

Ongoing)

 2 807)

 2 836)

 2 905)

 2 970)

Tasman Highway, St Helens Point Road

1 350)

 850)

....)

....)

....)

Tasman Ramps3

15 000)

 11 988)

....)

....)

....)


 

Table 10.8:        Capital Investment Program1,2 (continued)

 

Estimated)

Total)

Cost)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Cities Major Development Initiative6

60 000)

....)

 20 000)

 20 000)

 20 000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery Building Roof Maintenance6

460)

 460)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

 207 834)

 227 723)

 172 743)

 179 656)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The profile of funding for the CIP increases/decreases significantly from year to year due to the cash flow requirements of specific capital projects.

2.   All roads project estimates are provided at the 'P50' level. This is based on the project cost with sufficient contingency to provide a 50 per cent likelihood that this cost will not be exceeded. On this basis projects will be managed at a whole of program level to achieve a balance in cost estimating.

3.   This project includes funding from the Australian Government. For further information, refer to chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

4.   Includes a provision for investment in improved and safer cycling infrastructure.

5.   This project includes funding from the Road Safety Levy. For further information, refer to chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

6.   Funding has been provided as a 2015‑16 Budget initiative.

 

Roads Program

The Roads Program directly contributes to the achievement of the Departmental outcome of a safe, sustainable and efficient transport system that enhances economic and social development. Major Roads Program activities funded from the Capital Investment Program during 2015‑16 include:

·       continuation of significant works under the Government's Roads For Our Future Program;

·       continuation of significant works on the Midland Highway including the commencement of construction of the duplication of the Midland Highway between Perth and Breadalbane;

·       commencement of construction of the Brooker Highway, Elwick, Goodwood, and Howard Roads intersection project;

·       continued development of the Huon Highway/Summerleas Road project;

·       completion of the Community and West Coast Roads Program;

·       continuation of construction on the Tasman Ramps project;

·       ongoing road and bridge maintenance; and

·       continued implementation of the Positive Provision Cycling Policy to improve cycling access and safety.

For more information in relation to the Roads Program see chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Other Capital Projects

Other capital projects included in the Capital Investment Program are:

·       the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative that will see State Government working in close collaboration with Northern Tasmanian councils to help revive communities through infrastructure investment projects. Immediate projects include the Devonport Living City, the Launceston University of Tasmania campus relocation project, and the commencement of discussions regarding the enhanced presence and impact of the University of Tasmania on the North West Coast; and

·       roof repairs to the 1966 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery building.


Detailed Budget Statements

Table 10.9:        Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2014-15)

 

Budget1)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - recurrent2

 290 924)

 301 652)

 263 466)

 255 886)

 253 967)

Appropriation revenue - works and services3

 117 479)

 90 631)

 123 083)

 126 653)

 128 566)

Other revenue from government4

 12 195)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Grants5

 95 141)

 123 374)

 100 860)

 42 059)

 51 839)

Sales of goods and services

 2 007)

 2 007)

 2 007)

 2 007)

 2 007)

Fees and fines6

 12 815)

 12 815)

 12 815)

 5 815)

 475)

Interest

 2 480)

 2 430)

 2 380)

 2 380)

 2 380)

Other revenue

 2 690)

 2 690)

 1 972)

 1 972)

 1 972)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

 535 731)

 535 599)

 506 583)

 436 772)

 441 206)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits7

 66 675)

 58 468)

 57 812)

 58 783)

 59 786)

Depreciation and amortisation

 108 573)

 108 641)

 108 640)

 108 645)

 108 645)

Supplies and consumables8

 63 277)

 62 089)

 60 911)

 57 249)

 56 949)

Grants and subsidies9

 241 150)

 234 077)

 201 507)

 183 755)

 182 065)

Borrowing costs

 1 575)

 1 630)

 1 670)

 1 670)

 1 670)

Other expenses

 2 128)

 4 643)

 517)

 519)

 523)

Total expenses from transactions

 483 378)

 469 548)

 431 057)

 410 621)

 409 638)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

 52 353)

 66 051)

 75 526)

 26 151)

 31 568)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

Net gain/(loss) on non-financial assets

 4)

 4)

 4)

 4)

 4)

Total other economic flows included in net result

 4)

 4)

 4)

 4)

 4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

 52 357)

 66 055)

 75 530)

 26 155)

 31 572)


 

Table 10.9:        Statement of Comprehensive Income (continued)

 

2014-15)

 

Budget1)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows - other changes in equity

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

 149 706)

 149 937)

 149 947)

 149 947)

 149 947)

Other movements taken directly to equity10

(32 538)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Total other economic flows - other changes in equity

 117 168)

 149 937)

 149 947)

 149 947)

 149 947)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

 169 525)

 215 992)

 225 477)

 176 102)

 181 519)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2014‑15 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Regulation and Policy) from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2014‑15 figures for this Department will differ from those published in 2014‑15 Budget.

2.   The movements in Appropriation revenue - recurrent over the Forward Estimates are primarily attributable to the cash flow of election commitments, 2015‑16 Budget initiatives and the impact of 2014‑15 Budget Savings Strategies (including full year impacts of additional FTE savings announced in October 2014).

3.   The change in Appropriation revenue - works and services in 2015‑16 and over the Forward Estimates represents funding provided for the Capital Investment Program (CIP). The profile of funding for the CIP changes significantly from year to year due to the cash flow requirements of specific capital projects. Refer to Table 10.8 for further information on capital projects.

4.   Other revenue from government in 2014-15 relates to funding carried forward under section 8A(2) of the Public Account Act 1986 from 2013-14 to 2014-15.

5.   The profile of Grants funding over the Forward Estimates reflects cash flows for Australian Government receipts, in particular for capital works and skills development.

6.   The reduction in Fees and fines in 2017-18 reflects the existing completion date of the Road Safety Levy in December 2017 in accordance with Vehicle and Traffic (Driver Licensing and Vehicle Registration) Regulations 2010.

7.   The decrease in Employee benefits over the Forward Estimates is primarily attributable to 2014‑15 Budget Savings Strategies (including the full year impacts of additional FTE savings announced in October 2014).

8.   The decrease in Supplies and consumables over the Forward Estimates is primarily attributable to the cash flow of election commitments and incremental implementation of some 2014-15 Budget Savings.

9.   The decrease in Grants and subsidies over the Forward Estimates is primarily attributable to the cash flow of election commitments and Australian Government funding to Skills Tasmania.

10. The Other movements taken directly to equity in 2014-15 represent one-off movements resulting from the establishment of the Department of State Growth.

 


Table 10.10:      Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2014-15)

 

Budget1)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions2

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - recurrent3

 61 020)

 87 474)

 87 780)

 53 661)

 50 031)

Grants

 235)

 109)

 109)

 109)

 109)

Taxation

 36 428)

 38 184)

 39 406)

 40 667)

 42 024)

Sales of goods and services

 6 197)

 5 036)

 5 127)

 5 220)

 5 315)

Fees and fines

 11 356)

 9 801)

 9 998)

 10 200)

 10 370)

Other revenue

 26 707)

 28 032)

 28 733)

 29 451)

 30 187)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

 141 943)

 168 636)

 171 153)

 139 308)

 138 036)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions4

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits5

 983)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Depreciation and amortisation5

 1)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Supplies and consumables5

 714)

 136)

 136)

 136)

 136)

Grants and subsidies3

 60 884)

 87 367)

 87 673)

 53 554)

 49 924)

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

 79 478)

 81 133)

 83 344)

 85 618)

 87 976)

Other expenses

 4)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Total expenses from transactions

 142 064)

 168 636)

 171 153)

 139 308)

 138 036)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

(121)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

Net gain/(loss) on non-financial assets

 1)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Total other economic flows included in net result

 1)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

(120)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

(120)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2014‑15 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Regulation and Policy) from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2014‑15 figures for this Department will differ from those published in 2014‑15 Budget.

2.   Changes in Revenue and other income from transactions are detailed in Table 10.11 Revenue from Appropriation by Output and Table 10.12 Administered Revenue.

3.   Changes in Appropriation revenue - recurrent and Grants and subsidies expense over the Forward Estimates primarily relate to grant funding provided to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd (TasRail).

4.   Changes in Expenses from transactions are detailed in Table 10.13 Administered Expenses.

5.   The reduction in 2015-16 reflects a change of accounting treatment of expenditure related to the Forest Practices Authority (FPA) to create consistency in grant payments to the Statutory Authorities administered by the Department of State Growth. Payments from 2015‑16 are now reflected only as a grant to FPA, rather than reflecting both a grant to FPA and subsequent expenditure of that grant by FPA - refer Table 10.13 Administered Expenses.

Table 10.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2014-15)

 

Budget1)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 - Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

 800)

 800)

 800)

 800)

 800)

2.2 Infrastructure Strategy2

 2 476)

 1 726)

 1 599)

 1 608)

 587)

2.3 Land Transport Safety2

 16 874)

 15 585)

 13 273)

 12 310)

 12 532)

2.4 Passenger Transport2

 1 280)

 2 819)

 2 803)

 2 566)

 2 585)

2.5 Traffic Management and Engineering Services2

 5 185)

 3 249)

 3 168)

 3 256)

 3 288)

 

 26 615)

 24 179)

 21 643)

 20 540)

 19 792)

Output Group 6 - Subsidies and Concessions

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies3

 12 106)

 1 036)

 1 067)

 1 100)

 1 133)

6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services

 39 956)

 41 057)

 42 192)

 43 360)

 44 563)

6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services

 22 358)

 23 029)

 23 720)

 24 432)

 25 165)

6.4 Non-Metropolitan General Access Services

 7 926)

 7 626)

 7 626)

 7 626)

 7 626)

 

 82 346)

 72 748)

 74 605)

 76 518)

 78 487)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies4

 54 670)

 81 041)

 81 262)

 47 676)

 43 968)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

 117 479)

 90 171)

 103 083)

 106 653)

 108 566)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 163 631)

 177 968)

 177 510)

 144 734)

 142 247)

Works and Services

 117 479)

 90 171)

 103 083)

 106 653)

 108 566)

 

 281 110)

 268 139)

 280 593)

 251 387)

 250 813)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Energy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 - Energy Policy and Advice

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Energy Policy and Advice2

 2 357)

 1 733)

 3 271)

 1 404)

 1 442)

 

 2 357)

 1 733)

 3 271)

 1 404)

 1 442)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 2 357)

 1 733)

 3 271)

 1 404)

 1 442)

 

 2 357)

 1 733)

 3 271)

 1 404)

 1 442)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2014-15)

 

Budget1)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Coordinator-General5

 2 000)

 3 500)

 2 750)

 2 500)

 2 500)

1.2 Industry and Business Development2

 45 307)

 62 699)

 30 683)

 23 266)

 18 762)

1.3 Skills Development2

 97 317)

 98 625)

 97 613)

 98 698)

 100 579)

 

 144 624)

 164 824)

 131 046)

 124 464)

 121 841)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program6

....)

....)

 20 000)

20 000)

20 000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 144 624)

 164 824)

 131 046)

 124 464)

 121 841)

Works and Services

....)

....)

 20 000)

20 000)

20 000)

 

 144 624)

 164 824)

 151 046)

 144 464)

 141 841)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 - Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Forestry Policy and Reform2

 1 299)

 1 673)

 1 069)

 996)

 1 017)

4.2 Mineral Resources2

 4 954)

 5 791)

 5 546)

 5 698)

 5 829)

 

 6 253)

 7 464)

 6 615)

 6 694)

 6 846)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 2 849)

 2 906)

 2 964)

 3 023)

 3 086)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 9 102)

 10 370)

 9 579)

 9 717)

 9 932)

 

 9 102)

 10 370)

 9 579)

 9 717)

 9 932)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery2

 7 898)

 9 827)

 9 616)

 9 619)

 9 859)

5.2 Arts Industry Development2

 6 239)

 7 024)

 6 881)

 7 030)

 7 101)

5.3 Screen Industry Development2

 2 103)

 1 854)

 1 772)

 1 818)

 1 867)

 

 16 240)

 18 705)

 18 269)

 18 467)

 18 827)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies7

 3 501)

 3 527)

 3 554)

 2 962)

 2 977)


 

Table 10.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2014-15)

 

Budget1)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program8

....)

 460)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 19 741)

 22 232)

 21 823)

 21 429)

 21 804)

Works and Services

....)

 460)

....)

....)

....)

 

 19 741)

 22 692)

 21 823)

 21 429)

 21 804)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.4 Events and Hospitality2

 12 437)

 11 947)

 7 965)

 7 747)

 6 680)

 

 12 437)

 11 947)

 7 965)

 7 747)

 6 680)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 12 437)

 11 947)

 7 965)

 7 747)

 6 680)

 

 12 437)

 11 947)

 7 965)

 7 747)

 6 680)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

Total Recurrent Services

 351 892)

 389 074)

 351 194)

 309 495)

 303 946)

Total Works and Services

 117 479)

 90 631)

 123 083)

 126 653)

 128 566)

 

 469 371)

 479 705)

 474 277)

 436 148)

 432 512)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserved by Law

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution towards Construction of Streets in Towns by Municipal Councils (Local Government Act 1993)

 52)

 52)

 52)

 52)

 52)

 

 52)

 52)

 52)

 52)

 52)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Carried Forward9

 12 195)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

 481 618)

 479 757)

 474 329)

 436 200)

 432 564)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

 420 598)

 392 283)

 386 549)

 382 539)

 382 533)

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

 61 020)

 87 474)

 87 780)

 53 661)

 50 031)

 

 481 618)

 479 757)

 474 329)

 436 200)

 432 564)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2014‑15 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Regulation and Policy) from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2014‑15 figures for this Department will differ from those published in 2014‑15 Budget.

2.   The decrease in expenses for these Outputs is primarily attributable to the cash flow of election commitments, 2014‑15 Budget Savings Strategies, additional FTE savings announced in October 2014 and redistribution of corporate costs resulting from the establishment of the Department of State Growth.

3.   The decrease in Shipping and Ferry subsidies from 2014‑15 to 2015‑16 reflects the reallocation of funding in 2015‑16 from the Government's International Shipping election commitment which is no longer required given the extension of the Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme for international exports being shipped to mainland ports, to rail infrastructure.

4.   The movements in Grants and Subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily reflect cash flow changes associated with the Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd administered item.

5.   The increase in Coordinator-General in 2015‑16 reflects additional funding for three specific areas: international engagement activities, investment attraction and facilitation, and the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative.

6.   Capital funding in the Forward Estimates relates to the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative.

7.   The reduction in 2017-18 reflects the Government's commitment to reduce funding for Ten Days on the Island.

8.   The increase in capital funding in 2015‑16 reflects funding for roof repairs on the 1966 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery building.

9.   Appropriation carried forward in 2014-15 relates to funding carried forward under section 8A(2) of the Public Account Act 1986 from 2013‑14 to 2014‑15.

 


 

Table 10.12:      Administered Revenue

 

2014-15)

 

Budget1)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Consolidated Fund

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth Capital Grants

 80)

 80)

 80)

 80)

 80)

Drivers Licences2

 8 694)

 7 014)

 7 154)

 7 297)

 7 403)

Fines

 12)

 12)

 12)

 12)

 12)

MAIB Commission

 2 344)

 2 403)

 2 463)

 2 525)

 2 588)

Motor Vehicle Taxes and Fees

 36 428)

 38 184)

 39 406)

 40 667)

 42 024)

Other Revenue

 8)

 8)

 8)

 8)

 8)

Other Sales of Services

 2 149)

 2 168)

 2 188)

 2 208)

 2 229)

Personalised and Custom Plates

 422)

 432)

 443)

 454)

 465)

Photo Licence Fees

 1 536)

 1 670)

 1 720)

 1 772)

 1 829)

Regulatory Fees

 1 054)

 1 060)

 1 066)

 1 072)

 1 078)

Royalty Income

 26 674)

 28 024)

 28 725)

 29 443)

 30 179)

Sales of Goods

 33)

 33)

 33)

 33)

 33)

Vehicle Inspection Services Fees

 44)

 45)

 46)

 47)

 48)

 

 79 478)

 81 133)

 83 344)

 85 618)

 87 976)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation3

 61 020)

 87 474)

 87 780)

 53 661)

 50 031)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth Recurrent Grants4

....)

 29)

 29)

 29)

 29)

Fines5

 16)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Grants from Non-Government Sector5

 155)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Other Revenue5

 25)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Sales of Goods5

 1 249)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 1 445)

 29)

 29)

 29)

 29)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

 141 943)

 168 636)

 171 153)

 139 308)

 138 036)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2014‑15 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Regulation and Policy) from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2014‑15 figures for this Department will differ from those published in 2014‑15 Budget.

2.   Drivers licence revenue has been adjusted over the Forward Estimates to more accurately reflect anticipated receipts.

3.   The movements in Annual Appropriation over the Forward Estimates primarily reflect cash flow changes associated with the Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd administered item.

4.   The increase in Commonwealth Recurrent Grants in 2015-16 reflects the inclusion of Australian Government reciprocal receipts relating to transport access concessions.


 

5.   The reduction in 2015-16 reflects a change of accounting treatment of expenditure related to the Forest Practices Authority (FPA) to create consistency in grant payments to the Statutory Authorities administered by State Growth. Payments from 2015-16 are now reflected only as a grant to FPA, rather than reflecting both a grant to FPA and subsequent expenditure of that grant by FPA.

 

Table 10.13:      Administered Expenses

 

2014-15]

)

Budget1)

2015-16]

)

Budget)

2016-17]

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18]

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19]

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution to Marine and Safety Authority2

 1 004)

 2 092)

 1 592)

 1 003)

 1 003)

Conveyance Allowance

 1 630)

 1 630)

 1 630)

 1 630)

 1 630)

Government Contribution to the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

 1 519)

 1 519)

 1 519)

 1 519)

 1 519)

National Transport Commission (NTC): Local Government Contribution

 1 500)

 1 500)

 1 500)

 1 500)

 1 500)

Payments for Forest Practices Authority3

 2 942)

 1 416)

 1 444)

 1 473)

 1 503)

Pensioner Air Travel Subsidy

 10)

 10)

 10)

 10)

 10)

Private Forests Tasmania

 1 473)

 1 490)

 1 520)

 1 550)

 1 583)

Student-Only Passenger Services

 24 174)

 24 899)

 25 646)

 26 415)

 27 207)

Tasmanian Icon Program - Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

 500)

 500)

 500)

 500)

 500)

Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd4

 16 834)

 41 892)

 41 866)

 8 100)

 8 100)

Ten Days on the Island5

 1 304)

 1 330)

 1 357)

 765)

 780)

Theatre Royal

 178)

 178)

 178)

 178)

 178)

Transport Access Scheme

 4 518)

 4 547)

 4 547)

 4 547)

 4 547)

West Coast Wilderness Railway6

 5 000)

 4 500)

 4 500)

 4 500)

....)

 

 62 586)

 87 503)

 87 809)

 53 690)

 50 060)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Consolidated Fund

 79 478)

 81 133)

 83 344)

 85 618)

 87 976)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

 142 064)

 168 636)

 171 153)

 139 308)

 138 036)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2014‑15 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Regulation and Policy) from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2014‑15 figures for this Department will differ from those published in 2014‑15 Budget.

2.   Additional funding has been provided to Marine and Safety Tasmania (MAST) to contribute towards works associated with the Prosser River and St Helens Barway.

3.   The reduction in 2015-16 reflects a change of accounting treatment of expenditure related to the Forest Practices Authority (FPA) to create consistency in grant payments to the Statutory Authorities administered by State Growth. Payments from 2015-16 are now reflected only as a grant to FPA, rather than reflecting both a grant to FPA and subsequent expenditure of that grant by FPA.

4.   The movements in Grants and Subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily relate to additional grant funding provided to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd for the Freight Rail Revitalisation Program.

5.   The reduction from 2017-18 reflects the Government's commitment to reduce funding for Ten Days on the Island.

6.   The reduction from 2018-19 reflects the end of the Government's funding for the West Coast Wilderness Railway.

 

Contribution to Marine and Safety Authority

This contribution supports Marine and Safety Tasmania (MAST) in carrying out its functions of managing the Government's non‑commercial marine facilities and Tasmania's marine regulatory environment. Additional funding has been made available to MAST to contribute towards stabilisation of the mouth of the Prosser River and for works on the St Helens Barway in the form of training wall extensions and groynes.

Conveyance Allowance

The Department administers allowances paid to parents and guardians of students who do not have access to government subsidised public passenger transport services for travel to and from school. It is intended to assist with the cost of providing private transport to the nearest bus stop, or school. Allowances are also paid to Bass Strait Islands residents.

Government Contribution to the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

The Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra (TSO), one of the world's finest small orchestras, continues to receive State Government support. The TSO plays to audiences throughout the State and its award‑winning recordings are heard throughout the world. A versatile orchestra, the TSO is renowned for its expertise in music of the classical and early romantic periods and is recognised internationally as a champion of Australian music.

National Transport Commission (NTC): Local Government Contribution

Under the reform measures that abolished local road tolls in favour of national heavy vehicle charges, $1.5 million is provided annually from motor tax receipts to local government to compensate for loss of revenues from heavy vehicles.

Payment for Forest Practices Authority

This payment represents the Government's contribution to the Forest Practices Authority (FPA). The role of the FPA is to advance the objective of the State's forest practices system and to foster a cooperative approach towards policy implementation and management.

Pensioner Air Travel Subsidy

Aged pensioner residents of the Bass Strait Islands are entitled to an air fare subsidy when travelling between the Bass Strait Islands and Northern Tasmania. The subsidy is a 50 per cent concession on one return airfare from their Island residence to Northern Tasmania each financial year.

Private Forests Tasmania

This payment represents the Government's contribution to Private Forests Tasmania (PFT). The objective of the PFT is to facilitate and expand the development of the private forest resource in Tasmania in a manner that is consistent with sound forest land management practice.

Student‑Only Passenger Services

In accordance with Government policy, provision is made for payments to operators of contracted fare charging student‑only bus services for the difference between the fare paid by students, set by Government policy, and that which would be charged if the services were operating on a commercial basis.

Tasmanian Icon Program ‑ Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

The Tasmanian Icon Program is designed to utilise world‑class Tasmanian talent to promote the State both nationally and internationally. Currently, funded icons are the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, the Tasmanian Tigers State Cricket Team, funded through the Sport and Recreation portfolio of Department of Premier and Cabinet, and the Menzies Institute for Medical Research which is funded through the Industry and Business Development Output of the Department of State Growth.

Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd

This payment represents the Government's grant contribution to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd. The payment allows Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd to manage, maintain and operate the Tasmanian rail network on a sustainable basis and it also provides for critical annual maintenance of rolling stock assets. Additional funding has been provided to match funding of $59.8 million from the Australian Government for the Freight Rail Revitalisation Program, which requires a 50 per cent co-contribution from the State. The Freight Rail Revitalisation Program, undertaken by Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd, will raise the quality of the major lines on the Tasmanian rail network through selective re‑sleepering, upgrading old rail and bridges as well as culvert strengthening, drainage and formation work.

Ten Days on the Island

Ten Days on the Island is a biennial event that commenced in 2001. In accordance with the Government's election commitment, funding for this event has been reduced after the current deed expires in 2016-17.

Theatre Royal

The Theatre Royal is Australia's oldest continually operating theatre. The Government's commitment in funding the Theatre Royal recognises the Theatre Royal, not just as a significant piece of Tasmania's history, but a living centre for the performing arts.

Transport Access Scheme

The scheme provides for payments to operators of taxis and wheelchair accessible taxis to support fare concessions and subsidies made available to eligible persons with permanent disabilities or medical conditions that significantly restrict their personal mobility.

West Coast Wilderness Railway

The West Coast Wilderness Railway is an iconic west coast attraction and helps attract visitors to the region and Queenstown. This funding supports the implementation of capital works and the maintenance of the Railway's operations.


Table 10.14:      Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2015)

 

Budget)

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1,2

 73 429)

 51 955)

 45 141)

 44 924)

 44 147)

Investments1

 57 093)

 51 817)

 54 317)

 56 817)

 59 317)

Receivables

 4 289)

 3 947)

 3 943)

 3 939)

 3 935)

Equity investments

  773)

  770)

  795)

  820)

  845)

Other financial assets3

....)

 7 628)

 7 628)

 7 628)

 7 628)

 

 135 584)

 116 117)

 111 824)

 114 128)

 115 872)

Non-financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories

  257)

  357)

  367)

  377)

  387)

Property, plant and equipment4

 176 619)

 162 732)

 164 378)

 166 029)

 167 680)

Infrastructure4

4 385 719)

4 417 407)

4 636 863)

4 800 352)

4 969 818)

Heritage and cultural assets

 406 983)

 409 956)

 420 096)

 430 236)

 440 376)

Investment property

 9 635)

 9 943)

 10 236)

 10 529)

 10 822)

Intangibles

 7 362)

 7 055)

 6 654)

 6 243)

 5 832)

Other assets

 2 287)

 2 172)

 2 256)

 2 340)

 2 424)

 

4 988 862)

5 009 622)

5 240 850)

5 416 106)

5 597 339)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

5 124 446)

5 125 739)

5 352 674)

5 530 234)

5 713 211)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

 7 042)

 7 044)

 7 162)

 7 280)

 7 398)

Interest bearing liabilities5

 74 330)

 42 982)

 43 982)

 44 982)

 45 982)

Provisions

 8 593)

 3 280)

 3 240)

 3 200)

 3 160)

Employee benefits

 20 602)

 20 233)

 20 653)

 21 073)

 21 493)

Other liabilities

 7 667)

 8 631)

 8 591)

 8 551)

 8 511)

Total liabilities

 118 234)

 82 170)

 83 628)

 85 086)

 86 544)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

5 006 212)

5 043 569)

5 269 046)

5 445 148)

5 626 667)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Contributed capital

3 142 798)

3 173 900)

3 173 900)

3 173 900)

3 173 900)

Reserves

1 811 079)

1 848 221)

1 998 168)

2 148 115)

2 298 062)

Accumulated funds

 52 335)

 21 448)

 96 978)

 123 133)

 154 705)

Total equity

5 006 212)

5 043 569)

5 269 046)

5 445 148)

5 626 667)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Changes in Cash and deposits and Investments over the Forward Estimates are primarily due to the Farm Finance Concessional Loan Scheme funded by the Australian Government.

2.   Decreases from 2017 include the existing completion date of the Road Safety Levy in December 2017 in accordance with Vehicle and Traffic (Driver Licensing and Vehicle Registration) Regulations 2010.

3.   The increase in Other financial assets in 2016 reflects revised estimates based on the 30 June 2014 actuals.

4.   The movement in Property, plant and equipment and Infrastructure is due to asset revaluation processes and methodology.

5.   The reduction in Interest bearing liabilities primarily reflects Australian Government loans, in particular the Farm Finance Concessional Loan Scheme.

 

Table 10.15:      Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June ‑ Administered

 

2015)

 

Budget)

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits

 3 220)

 3 358)

 3 358)

 3 358)

 3 358)

Receivables

 44)

 97)

 97)

 97)

 97)

Other financial assets

 15)

 20)

 20)

 20)

 20)

 

 3 279)

 3 475)

 3 475)

 3 475)

 3 475)

Non-Financial Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Property, plant and equipment

 10)

 3)

 2)

 1)

....)

Intangibles

 3)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 13)

 3)

 2)

 1)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Assets

 3 292)

 3 478)

 3 477)

 3 476)

 3 475)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

 210)

 284)

 284)

 284)

 284)

Employee benefits

 270)

 302)

 301)

 300)

 299)

Other liabilities

 1 530)

 1 537)

 1 537)

 1 537)

 1 537)

Total Liabilities

 2 010)

 2 123)

 2 122)

 2 121)

 2 120)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Assets (liabilities)

 1 282)

 1 355)

 1 355)

 1 355)

 1 355)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity1

 

 

 

 

 

Contributed capital

 1 402)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Accumulated funds

(120)

 1 355)

 1 355)

 1 355)

 1 355)

Total Equity

 1 282)

 1 355)

 1 355)

 1 355)

 1 355)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.   Movements in Equity from 2014-15 to 2015-16 reflect accounting treatment changes relating to the Forest Practices Authority to create consistency in grants payments to the Statutory Authorities administered by the Department of State Growth.

 


Table 10.16:      Statement of Cash Flows1

 

2014-15)

 

Budget2)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - recurrent3

 290 924)

 301 652)

 263 466)

 255 886)

 253 967)

Appropriation receipts - capital3

 117 479)

 90 631)

 123 083)

 126 653)

 128 566)

Grants4

 95 141)

 123 374)

 100 860)

 42 059)

 51 839)

Sales of goods and services

 2 012)

 2 012)

 2 012)

 2 012)

 2 012)

Fees and fines5

 12 815)

 12 815)

 12 815)

 5 815)

 475)

GST receipts

 16 898)

 16 898)

 16 898)

 16 898)

 16 898)

Interest received

 2 480)

 2 430)

 2 380)

 2 380)

 2 380)

Other cash receipts

 2 690)

 2 690)

 1 972)

 1 972)

 1 972)

 Total cash inflows

 540 439)

 552 502)

 523 486)

 453 675)

 458 109)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits6

(59 270)

(53 392)

(51 396)

(52 255)

(53 153)

Superannuation6

(7 027)

(5 755)

(6 036)

(6 148)

(6 253)

Borrowing costs

(1 645)

(1 710)

(1 760)

(1 760)

(1 760)

GST payments

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

Grants and subsidies4

(241 075)

(234 002)

(201 432)

(183 680)

(181 990)

Supplies and consumables7

(63 467)

(62 295)

(61 117)

(57 455)

(57 155)

Other cash payments

(2 128)

(4 643)

(517)

(519)

(523)

Total cash outflows

(391 511)

(378 696)

(339 157)

(318 716)

(317 733)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

 148 928)

 173 806)

 184 329)

 134 959)

 140 376)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non-financial assets8

(152 550)

(166 501)

(189 647)

(133 680)

(139 657)

Proceeds from the disposal of non-financial assets

 4)

 4)

 4)

 4)

 4)

Equity injections and cash flows from restructuring

(1 960)

(100)

....)

....)

....)

Net advances paid

(12 250)

(2 500)

(2 500)

(2 500)

(2 500)

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(166 756)

(169 097)

(192 143)

(136 176)

(142 153)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings9

 32 532)

 282)

 1 000)

 1 000)

 1 000)

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

 32 532)

 282)

 1 000)

 1 000)

 1 000)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.16:      Statement of Cash Flows1 (continued)

 

2014-15)

 

Budget2)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

 14 704)

 4 991)

(6 814)

(217)

(777)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

 58 725)

 46 964)

 51 955)

 45 141)

 44 924)

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

 73 429)

 51 955)

 45 141)

 44 924)

 44 147)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Cash flow estimates include the impact of election commitments, Budget initiatives and Budget Savings Strategies, which have resulted in variations in the profile over the Forward Estimates.

2.   The 2014‑15 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Regulation and Policy) from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2014‑15 figures for this Department will differ from those published in 2014‑15 Budget.

3.   The changes in Appropriation receipts - recurrent and Appropriation receipts - capital are detailed in Table 10.11 ‑ Revenue from Appropriation by Output.

4.   The movement in Grants over the Forward Estimates reflects cash flows for Australian Government receipts, in particular for capital works and skills development.

5.   The reduction in Fees and fines in 2017-18 reflects the existing completion date of the Road Safety Levy in December 2017 in accordance with Vehicle and Traffic (Driver Licensing and Vehicle Registration) Regulations 2010.

6.   The decrease in Employee benefits and Superannuation outflows over the Forward Estimates is primarily attributable to 2014‑15 Budget Savings Strategies and full year impacts of additional FTE savings announced in October 2014.

7.   The decrease in Supplies and consumables over the Forward Estimates is primarily attributable to the completion of election commitments and incremental implementation of some 2014-15 Budget Savings.

8.   Payments for acquisition of non-financial assets primarily includes expenditure incurred for projects included in the Department's Capital Investment Program. Details on the Department's CIP program is shown in Table 10.8 Capital Investment Program.

9.   Net borrowings reflects the cash flows associated with the Farm Finance Concessional Loan program funded by the Australian Government.

 


Table 10.17:      Statement of Cash Flows ‑ Administered

 

2014-15)

 

Budget1)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - recurrent2

 61 020)

 87 474)

 87 780)

 53 661)

 50 031)

Grants3

 235)

 109)

 109)

 109)

 109)

Taxation

 36 428)

 38 184)

 39 406)

 40 667)

 42 024)

Sales of goods and services3

 6 197)

 5 036)

 5 127)

 5 220)

 5 315)

Fees and fines

 11 356)

 9 801)

 9 998)

 10 200)

 10 370)

Other cash receipts

 26 707)

 28 032)

 28 733)

 29 451)

 30 187)

Total cash inflows

 141 943)

 168 636)

 171 153)

 139 308)

 138 036)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits3

(860)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Superannuation3

(108)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Grants and subsidies4

(60 884)

(87 367)

(87 673)

(53 554)

(49 924)

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

(79 478)

(81 133)

(83 344)

(85 618)

(87 976)

Supplies and consumables

(714)

(136)

(136)

(136)

(136)

Other cash payments

(4)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Total cash outflows

(142 048)

(168 636)

(171 153)

(139 308)

(138 036)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

(105)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non-financial assets

(1)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Proceeds from the disposal of non-financial assets

 1)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(105)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

 3 325)

 3 358)

 3 358)

 3 358)

 3 358)

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

 3 220)

 3 358)

 3 358)

 3 358)

 3 358)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2014‑15 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Regulation and Policy) from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2014‑15 figures for this Department will differ from those published in 2014‑15 Budget.

2.   The changes in Appropriation receipts - recurrent are detailed in Table 10.11 Revenue from Appropriation by Output.

3.   The reduction in 2015-16 reflects a change of accounting treatment of transactions related to the Forest Practices Authority (FPA) to create consistency for Statutory Authorities administered by the Department of State Growth. Payments from 2015‑16 are now reflected only as a grant to FPA, rather than reflecting both a grant to FPA and subsequent expenditure of that grant by FPA.

4.   The movements in Grants and subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily relate to grant funding provided to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd and the reduction of funding for the West Coast Wilderness Railway in 2018‑19.