9 Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Agency Outline

The Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment is responsible for the sustainable management, sensible development, promotion, use and protection of the State's natural resources and cultural heritage, for the benefit of the Tasmanian community.

The Department's objectives are to:

       improve access to, and condition of, Tasmania's natural resources;

       promote and facilitate sensible and sustainable development within Tasmania's natural assets;

       help to grow Tasmania's primary industries and food sectors;

       ensure a healthy environment for all Tasmanians;

       sustainably manage Tasmania's national parks and reserve system;

       support the recognition, protection and management of Tasmania's Aboriginal heritage;

       support the recognition, protection and management of Tasmania's historic heritage;

       build on and protect the Tasmanian brand credentials;

       maintain the security of land tenure in Tasmania;

       provide ready access to accurate and meaningful land and resource information; and

       drive the integrity and animal welfare priorities of the racing industry.

The Department reports to the Minister for Primary Industries and Water, and the Minister for Racing, Hon Jeremy Rockliff MP and the Minister for Environment, Parks and Heritage, Hon Matthew Groom MP.

This chapter provides the Department's financial information for 2015‑16 and the Forward Estimates period (2016‑17 to 2018‑19). Further information on the Department is provided at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au.


Key Deliverables

Table 9.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimate allocations for key deliverables within the Department.

Table 9.1: Key Deliverables Statement

 

2015‑16

 

Budget

2016‑17

Forward

Estimate

2017‑18

Forward

Estimate

2018‑19

Forward

Estimate

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur Pieman Tracks

150

150

....

....

Ben Lomond Ski Patrol

15

15

....

....

Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture Policy ‑ Implementation

1 795

1 540

1 275

....

Development of Woolmers Estate Visitor Centre

438

438

438

....

Dip Falls Bridge

70

....

....

....

Highfield House

430

....

....

....

Increasing Biosecurity Capability

1 000

1 000

.

.

Increasing Biosecurity Services with Detector Dog Teams

500

500

500

500

Industry development contribution to the Tasmanian Abalone Council Ltd

200

200

200

200

Inland Fisheries Office on North West Coast

40

40

40

40

Matching industry contribution to the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation

350

350

 

350

 

350

Meander Falls Access Bridges

450

....

....

....

Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure

4 000

4 000

.

.

Racing Integrity

230

230

230

230

Rock Lobsters Policy ‑ Implementation

115

100

100

....

Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens General Infrastructure

100

....

....

....

South Coast Track

1 000

250

250

....

Supporting a World Class Tasmanian Fisheries and Seafood Sector ‑ Implementation

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Shellfish Quality Assurance Program

200

200

....

....

IMAS Research Funding

167

167

166

....

Tasmanian Forests Agreement ‑ Resource Management

3 500

3 500

3 500

3 500

Three Capes Track

10 525

....

....

....

Three Capes Track ‑ Additional

2 500

1 000

500

....

West Coast Trails Projects

880

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur Pieman Tracks

The Government will invest $300 000 to undertake rehabilitation and erosion protection works in the Arthur‑Pieman Conservation Area.

Ben Lomond Ski Patrol

Ben Lomond is the State's premier ski field and requires the services of a ski patrol. This initiative is funding a midweek ski patroller for the Ben Lomond Ski Patrol.

Public consultation for the new draft Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan (365 Day Plan)

Public consultation has been completed with a large number of representations being received reflecting the level of community interest in the management of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. The Director of National Parks and Wildlife will now consider and review all representations to provide advice and recommendations to the Tasmanian Planning Commission (TPC). The TPC may hold public hearings on the representations and will develop a report for consideration by the Minister for Environment, Parks and Heritage. The Minister will recommend a final management plan to the Governor for approval.

Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture Policy ‑ Implementation

This major set of initiatives is collectively supporting Agrivision 2050, which is directed towards the long‑term growth of the Tasmanian agricultural sector. Some initiatives are being delivered by or in cooperation with other agencies. The initiatives (which commenced in 2014‑15) include $2 million to support the enhancement of irrigation benefits; $900 000 to strengthen biosecurity; $1.4 million for additional agricultural research, development and extension and improved farm productivity; $1 million for farm forestry development and improved returns from residues; $885 000 towards skills development and improved farm safety; and $250 000 towards a farmer loan scheme in conjunction with industry. Small grants will support key organisations in the rural community (e.g. Women in Agriculture and Rural Youth Tasmania).

Development of Woolmers Estate Visitor Centre

This initiative, which commenced in 2014‑15, is funding the development of a multi‑purpose Visitor Centre at Woolmers Estate to present the World Heritage and other historic heritage values of the Brickendon‑Woolmers World Heritage Site. The Government's contribution will be matched by private philanthropic contributions as part of a $3.5 million investment.

Dip Falls Bridge

Dip Falls is a Forest Reserve that transferred to the Parks and Wildlife Service in December 2013. The Parks and Wildlife Service is working with the Circular Head Council and the Circular Head Tourism Association to undertake agreed works to improve the visitor experience at the site.

Fuel Reduction Program

This represents the continued implementation of the Government's significant investment in fuel reduction burning to mitigate the risks to people and property posed by wildfire. The project is being funded through the Parks and Wildlife Service, which is working in cooperation with the Tasmania Fire Service, Forestry Tasmania and other agencies, as relevant. It is delivering a tenure‑blind, risk‑based program of burns to reduce fuel in the areas that pose the greatest risk to the Tasmanian community. The budgeted expenditure is $6.5 million in 2015‑16, increasing to $9 million per annum in 2016‑17 and 2017‑18.

Highfield House

Highfield House plays an important part in the economy and tourism sector of the Circular Head region and is increasingly popular as a venue for functions and weddings. This funding will provide for the development of a commercial kitchen to increase the site's capacity as an event venue, as well as essential works to safeguard the structures of the Chapel and the Threshing Barn.

Increasing Biosecurity Capability

The Government has committed $2 million towards the upgrade and development of biosecurity infrastructure and operating systems. The funding will be utilised to upgrade and develop ageing laboratory equipment and information systems; improve the State's post‑border biosecurity hygiene infrastructure; and upgrade communications including signage at border entry points.

This commitment will ensure that Tasmania continues to meet its state, national and international diagnostic responsibilities and standards. This funding is in addition to the Government's commitment of $900 000 to strengthen Tasmania's biosecurity protection, which commenced in the 2014‑15 State Budget. The improved capabilities will enhance Tasmania's biosecurity system and build on the capability and capacity to protect Tasmania's primary industries, natural environment and social amenity.

Increasing Biosecurity Services with Detector Dog Teams

The Government has committed $500 000 per annum to increase frontline biosecurity services with dog detector teams at border entry points. This initiative will increase the number of detector dogs and handlers where biosecurity risks are identified as being the highest. This funding is in addition to the Government's commitment of $900 000 to strengthen Tasmania's biosecurity protection, which commenced in the 2014‑15 Budget. This increase to frontline biosecurity services will enhance Biosecurity Tasmania's capabilities to protect Tasmania's primary industries, natural environment and social amenity from biosecurity risks.

Industry development contribution to the Tasmanian Abalone Council Ltd

This funding is provided to the Tasmanian Abalone Council Ltd to undertake a number of industry development projects to assist with developing new markets, to leverage additional resource sustainability funding from national research funding bodies and to undertake further economic analysis, given changes in the world market over recent years.

Inland Fisheries Office on North West Coast

The Inland Fisheries Service (IFS) faces challenges in the enforcement of its legislation on the North West Coast, particularly in relation to the poaching of whitebait and freshwater lobster. This funding is assisting the IFS to maintain a permanent presence in the area.

Introduce legislation to streamline the process for dam works approval (365 Day Plan)

In accordance with its election commitment, the Government is simplifying and further streamlining the dam works approval process, including abolishing the Assessment Committee for Dam Construction. This will require the passage of an amendment Bill providing for the new dam works approval process. The legislation is expected to commence on 1 January 2016.

Introduce the Industrial Hemp Bill (365 Day Plan)

The Government is responding to the Inquiry into the Industrial Hemp Industry in Tasmania report. Specific purpose Tasmanian legislation is now being drafted in collaboration with key industry stakeholders. The Bill will establish a sensible and appropriate regulatory framework based on a licensing scheme to be administered by the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment.

Matching industry contribution to the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation

This funding supports matching industry contributions to the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, leveraging national research funding to support sustainable marine research projects delivered by the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies.

Meander Falls Access Bridges

The Government's investment of $500 000 over two years, beginning in 2014‑15, will be used to re‑establish two‑wheel drive access to the Meander Falls Track by replacing two vehicle bridges that were washed away in 2011. Planning and design works are now complete in preparation for construction to be undertaken in 2015‑16.

Parks ‑ Expressions of Interest (365 Day Plan)

The Government is committed to allowing exciting new tourism experiences that are complemented by sensitive and appropriate tourism infrastructure. The first round of Expressions of Interest has seen 25 participants invited into Stage Two. This process is being managed jointly between the Department and the Office of the Coordinator‑General. Consistent with the Government's 365 Day Plan, a further round of calls for Expressions of Interest is planned for the last quarter of 2015.

Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure

The Government is committing $8 million over two years aimed at high priority maintenance and infrastructure renewal in Parks and Reserves. The Department will undertake consultation with local councils and other identified stakeholder groups to identify priority asset projects which can improve visitation and community benefit.

Racing Integrity

The Government has committed $230 000 per annum to establish additional integrity positions within the Office of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Services Tasmania, with the new name to take effect 1 July 2015). The increase in integrity service capabilities will allocate appropriate resources to animal welfare from a policy, education and compliance perspective to ensure there is a robust system within the Tasmanian racing industry. These positions were a recommendation in the Review of Arrangements for Animal Welfare in the Tasmanian Greyhound Racing Industry report by the Chief Veterinary Officer and the Director of Racing.


 

Rock Lobsters Policy ‑ Implementation

This three year funding builds on the success of an existing industry‑managed translocation program operating on the West Coast. The expansion will allow the inclusion of the East Coast. The main project is funded for $100 000 a year for three years. The initiative also includes $15 000 in 2015‑16 to fund a pilot project by the recreational sector. This initiative aims to increase the biomass of rock lobster on the East Coast to augment the biomass rebuilding strategy.

Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens General Infrastructure

The Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens is receiving specific funding for the maintenance and improvement of its facilities. The focus is on heritage maintenance works.

South Coast Track

The Government has committed $2 million towards upgrading the South Coast Track (from Melaleuca to Cockle Creek) to improve access to this spectacular natural asset. The funding is being used to upgrade existing infrastructure, complete minor rerouting where the established tracks have become difficult to access, and provide safe access to beach areas. Work to date has included significant planning and design works, and the commencement of construction on new track sections including the Deadmans Bay to Turua Beach section of the Track.

Supporting a World Class Tasmanian Fisheries and Seafood Sector ‑ Implementation

Funding under this initiative is helping to underpin the future of the seafood industry. Remaining commitments over the next three years are $500 000 to the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies for salmon industry research, and a further $400 000 to supplement the Tasmanian Shellfish Quality Assurance Program.

Tasmanian Forests Agreement ‑ Resource Management

This funding provides additional recurrent funding to support the increased forest estate in reserves and Crown land that is being managed by the Parks and Wildlife Service, arising from the Tasmanian Forests Agreement process, the commencement of the Forest Management Act 2013 and the Government's new forestry legislation.

Three Capes Track

Work on the Three Capes Track will continue in 2015‑16. When complete this will be a world class coastal walking experience taking in the dramatic cliff top vistas of the Tasman National Park and will complement other iconic walks such as the Overland Track. The first two stages of the Track are expected to open to the public in November 2015, providing an easy four day/three night experience with hut‑based accommodation, commencing with a short boat journey from Port Arthur and finishing at Fortescue Bay via Cape Pillar and Cape Hauy. The walk will support the growth of tourism on the Tasman Peninsula and throughout the State.

Three Capes Track ‑ Additional

The Government has also committed additional funding of $4 million towards construction of Stage Three of the track which, once completed, will provide access to the third cape, Cape Raoul. The Government is seeking support from the Australian Government to assist in funding the finalisation of Stage Three.

West Coast Trails Projects

The Government committed a total of $1.7 million to three projects over 2014‑15 and 2015‑16, being the Horsetail Falls Walking Trail, the Mountain Bike Project and the Granite Creek Bridge Replacement. Planning and design for the Horsetail Falls walking trail and dramatic viewing platform project are complete, with works planned to commence in 2015‑16. The Mountain Bike Project has seen work largely completed on the Montezuma Falls Trail, Heemskirk Trail and the North East Dundas Trail.

These projects have utilised West Coast labour forces to clear and restore existing old tram lines into a condition suitable for mountain bike use. Construction works for Stage Two of the Mountain Bike Project, on the Heemskirk loop extension, which will involve more technical mountain bike track construction, are planned to commence in the summer of 2015‑16. The replacement of the Granite Creek Bridge is now complete.

Output Restructure

In 2014‑15, the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment completed an Output structure review and has implemented the following Output restructures as part of the 2015‑16 Budget:

       the former Service Tasmania Output within the Department, Output 1.3 Service Tasmania, has been transferred into the existing Service Tasmania Output within the Department of Premier and Cabinet to reflect the consolidation of operations under a single agency to take effect from 1 July 2015. Output Group 1 has also been renamed Land Tasmania;

       the former Output Group 3 Resource Management and Conservation has been renamed Natural and Cultural Heritage and the following changes have been made:

-  the former Output 3.2 Conservation of Tasmania's Flora and Fauna has been consolidated into Output 3.1 which has been renamed Resource Management and Conservation from Land Management Services;

-  the former Output 9.1 Historic Heritage Services has been transferred to Output Group 3 and becomes Output 3.2 Historic Heritage Services;

-  the former Output 9.2 Aboriginal Heritage has been transferred to Output Group 3 and becomes Output 3.3 Aboriginal Heritage; and

-  the former Output 9.3 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens has been transferred to Output Group 3 and becomes Output 3.4 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens;

       the former Output 4.2 Water Resource Assessment has been consolidated into Output 4.1 Water Resource Management; and

       the Office of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Services Tasmania) has been transferred from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment and becomes Output 9.1 Racing Regulation and Policy under Output Group 9 Racing Regulation and Policy. As detailed above, the former Output Group 9 Heritage and its Outputs have been transferred to Output Group 3 Natural and Cultural Heritage.

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment are provided under the following Output Groups:

       Output Group 1 - Land Tasmania;

       Output Group 2 - Primary Industries;

       Output Group 3 - Natural and Cultural Heritage;

       Output Group 4 - Water Resources;

       Output Group 5 - Policy;

       Output Group 6 - Biosecurity Tasmania;

       Output Group 7 - Environment Protection and Analytical Services;

       Output Group 8 - Parks and Wildlife Management; and

       Output Group 9 - Racing Regulation and Policy.

Table 9.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment.

Performance Measures - Update

During 2014‑15, the Department undertook a partial review of the performance measures reported in the Budget chapter, resulting in some changes to performance measures. In some cases the measures were no longer relevant, such as measures tied to completed programs. In most other cases, the information is or will be readily available through the Department's website. Wherever changes have occurred in an Output Group, they are summarised in the first note below the relevant performance information table, and are detailed in the notes specific to the measures concerned.


 

Table 9.2: Output Group Expense Summary

 

2014-15)

 

Budget)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Land Tasmania1

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

11 748)

11 358)

11 626)

11 857)

12 066)

1.2 Valuation Services

5 527)

5 143)

5 292)

5 394)

5 500)

 

17 275)

16 501)

16 918)

17 251)

17 566)

Output Group 2 - Primary Industries

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 AgriGrowth Tasmania2

7 524)

6 733)

6 584)

6 430)

5 520)

2.2 Marine Resources

10 819)

10 642)

10 820)

10 798)

10 737)

 

18 343)

17 375)

17 404)

17 228)

16 257)

Output Group 4 - Water Resources

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Water Resource Management3

9 195)

8 365)

7 883)

7 908)

7 993)

 

9 195)

8 365)

7 883)

7 908)

7 993)

Output Group 5 - Policy

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Policy Advice4

2 303)

2 046)

2 096)

2 141)

2 181)

 

2 303)

2 046)

2 096)

2 141)

2 181)

Output Group 6 - Biosecurity Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Biosecurity5

18 816)

18 991)

19 294)

19 175)

19 278)

6.2 Product Integrity6

2 058)

2 171)

2 221)

2 069)

2 102)

 

20 874)

21 162)

21 515)

21 244)

21 380)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

6 158)

6 156)

6 156)

6 156)

6 156)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment, Parks and Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 - Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Resource Management and Conservation7

17 961)

15 175)

14 556)

14 353)

14 579)

3.2 Historic Heritage Services8

3 234)

3 384)

3 218)

3 219)

2 834)

3.3 Aboriginal Heritage

1 936)

2 100)

2 078)

2 126)

2 175)

3.4 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

2 726)

2 684)

2 665)

2 749)

2 828)

 

25 857)

23 343)

22 517)

22 447)

22 416)


 

Table 9.2: Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2014-15)

 

Budget)

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 7 - Environment Protection and Analytical Services

 

 

 

 

 

7.1 Environmental Management and Pollution Control

14 029)

13 915)

14 162)

14 471)

14 762)

7.2 Analytical Services

4 355)

4 685)

4 832)

4 882)

4 961)

 

18 384)

18 600)

18 994)

19 353)

19 723)

Output Group 8 - Parks and Wildlife Management

 

 

 

 

 

8.1 Parks and Wildlife Management9

56 572)

60 784)

60 722)

61 350)

52 958)

8.2 Crown Land Services

11 572)

11 288)

11 451)

11 537)

11 574)

 

68 144)

72 072)

72 173)

72 887)

64 532)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

3 395)

3 496)

3 629)

3 767)

3 895)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program10

556)

1 436)

556)

556)

556)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Racing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 9 - Racing Regulation and Policy11

 

 

 

 

 

9.1 Racing Regulation and Policy

3 380)

3 225)

3 288)

3 367)

3 426)

 

3 380)

3 225)

3 288)

3 367)

3 426)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

29 231)

29 699)

30 175)

30 175)

30 175)

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

223 095)

223 476)

223 304)

224 480)

216 256)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. Output 1.3 Service Tasmania has been transferred into the existing Service Tasmania Output within the Department of Premier and Cabinet to take effect from 1 July 2015. The 2015‑16 Budget and Forward Estimates are available within chapter 8 of Government Services Budget Paper No 2.

2. The decrease in AgriGrowth Tasmania in 2015‑16 reflects the cessation of the Assistance Package to King Island Beef Producers initiative. The decrease in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture Policy ‑ Implementation initiative.

3. The decrease in Water Resource Management in 2015‑16 and 2016‑17 reflects a reduction in Australian Government funding for the Compliance Project under the Water for the Future program.

4. The decrease in Policy Advice in 2015‑16 reflects the implementation of 2014‑15 Budget Saving Strategies.

5. The increase in Biosecurity in 2015‑16 reflects additional funding received for the Increasing Biosecurity Services with Detector Dog Teams initiative and a reassessment of corporate overhead costs to better reflect the provision of expenditure for this Output. This is partially offset by the cessation of the Intensive Animal Farming Industry Development initiative.

6. The increase in Product Integrity in 2015‑16 reflects the transfer of funding for the Tasmanian Shellfish Quality Assurance Program from Output 2.2 Marine Resources. The decrease in 2017‑18 reflects the cessation of funding for the Tasmanian Shellfish Quality Assurance Program.

7. The decrease in Resource Management and Conservation in 2015‑16 reflects the cessation of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan funding, a reduction in Australian Government funding for the Save the Tasmanian Devil program and a reassessment of corporate overhead costs to better reflect the provision of expenditure for this Output.

8. The decrease in Historic Heritage Services in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Development of Woolmers Estate Visitor Centre initiative.

9. The increase in Parks and Wildlife Management in 2015‑16 is primarily due to an increase in funding for the Fuel Reduction Program. The decrease in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Fuel Reduction Program.

10. The increase in Capital Investment Program in 2015‑16 reflects additional funding for the West Coast Trails Projects initiative. The decrease in 2016‑17 reflects the cessation of the West Coast Trails Projects initiative.

11. Output Group 9 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy has been transferred to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment from the Department of State Growth to take effect from 1 July 2015.

 


 

Output Group 1: Land Tasmania

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

This Output provides a secure land titling system; an effective policy and legislative framework for land administration; and services that underpin land management and support the development of Tasmania's spatial data infrastructure. This Output also produces, maintains and integrates a wide range of land information data sets, which are easily accessible through the Land Information System Tasmania (LIST) web interface and TASMAP products.

1.2 Valuation Services

This Output provides an authoritative valuation service for Government on acquisition, purchase, sale and rental of property, including quality control of statutory property valuations. Supplementary valuation services for municipal areas in Tasmania are also either undertaken by the Office of the Valuer‑General or subcontracted to valuation firms in some instances.

This Output also administers and delivers a uniform and consistent valuation system to support rating and taxing in Tasmania.

Table 9.3: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality of Tasmania's land survey and valuation services

 

 

 

 

 

Complying surveys lodged2

%

na

na

na

90

Objections resulting in an amended valuation3

%

0.46

0.24

<2.00

<2.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of land registration processes

 

 

 

 

 

Sealed plans lodged under the Early Issue Scheme registered within 10 working days of lodgement of the original plan4

%

92

86

75

80

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of quality land information to support decision making

 

 

 

 

 

Number of land related data sets available via the LIST5

Number of data sets

788

880

920

1 020

Number of land related data sets available under open data provisions6

Number of data sets

na

na

na

50


 

Table 9.3: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1 (continued)

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level of government, industry and public use of LIST web service6

Number of total requests

'000

na

na

na

3 000

Level of government, industry and public use of LIST web site6

Number total sessions

'000

na

na

na

800

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. Apart from the performance measures relating to Service Tasmania, now moved to the Department of Premier and Cabinet, one measure has been deleted. Of the seven current measures in the Output Group, one is unchanged, two are new and four are modified.

2. This is a new performance measure. The revised Surveyors Act 2002 and Surveyors Regulations 2014 have enabled the Surveyor‑General to replace a general audit program with a targeted program.

3. This performance measure represents the percentage of total valuation notices issued in a financial year that have an amended valuation following the lodgement of an objection. It reflects the quality and consistency of valuations completed. The 2013‑14 actual has been adjusted from 0.21 to 0.24 per cent to reflect amendments to valuations made as a result of an objection to the issue of a Notice of Valuation. Four applications are yet to be determined for 2012‑13. The measure may be adjusted in future reports.

4. The revised wording of this performance measure more accurately describes the activity being assessed.

5. This measure has been retitled. The target for 2015‑16 has increased due to the addition of the Oil Response Atlas data.

6. These performance measures are new or have been revised to more accurately capture usage of the redeveloped LIST.

Output Group 2: Primary Industries

2.1 AgriGrowth Tasmania

This Output supports the Government's commitment to grow the value of the agricultural sector in Tasmania tenfold to $10 billion by 2050. It oversees the delivery of Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture. The majority of the agricultural research, development and extension services delivered via the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA) are reflected in this Output.

2.2 Marine Resources

This Output supports the orderly and sustainable development of the Tasmanian marine farming industry and develops and implements management policies and plans for Tasmania's wild fisheries to ensure that both commercial and recreational fishing are sustainable. This Output also includes advice and direction to the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) to assist aquaculture and fisheries research.


 

Table 9.4: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value of primary industries sector1

 

 

 

 

 

Gross value of agricultural and fish production

 

 

 

 

 

Wild fisheries2

$ million

154.0

154.0

155.0

194

Aquaculture3

$ million

539.9

559.5

589.0

630

Agriculture4

$ million

1 190.3

na

1 300

1 350

Food production value added5

$ million

3 110.2

na

3 300

3 500

Exports of food, agriculture and fisheries

 

 

 

 

 

Overseas exports6

$ million

514.5

576.5

530.0

620

Interstate food trade7

$ million

1 874.4

na

2 045.0

2 150

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of fishers' licensing processes

 

 

 

 

 

Fishers' licensing transaction times8

% completed

95

97

97

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

External funds leveraged from Government investment in primary industries research9

 

 

 

 

 

External funds received by TIA10

$ million

10.4

11.0

9.0

9.0

External funds received by IMAS‑SMRA (formerly TAFI)11

$ million

8.8

9.1

na

8.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of information to support farmers to run their businesses12

 

 

 

 

 

Links to external websites provided via the FarmPoint website

Number

780

760

760

760

Level of public use of FarmPoint

Pages '000

75

76

75

75

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. The first three measures provide information about the gross value of the primary industries sector to the Tasmanian economy. The 2013‑14 agricultural data is not yet available.

2. The outcome for 2014‑15 is expected to be substantially above the target, due to strong prices and the depreciation of the Australian dollar. However, there remains a high level of uncertainty regarding future beach prices and market conditions for rock lobster and abalone. The target for 2015‑16 assumes conformity with long‑term production trends and no significant appreciation in the value of the Australian dollar. (Note that targets for this measure are based on the total allowable commercial catches. These are set for the relevant licensing years, which generally do not coincide with the financial year. Similarly, actuals relate to the licensing year ending in the relevant financial year.)

3. The increase in the 2015‑16 target reflects continued growth across all aquaculture sectors, in particular the salmonid industry. The figures for 2012‑13 and 2013‑14 have been revised upwards due to revised information on salmonid production. However, the figure for 2013‑14 is an estimate only as the value of shellfish production for that year is yet to be finalised.

4. The 2015‑16 target assumes average seasonal conditions and conformity with the long‑term trend.

5. This measure is calculated by the Department based on the quantity of agricultural and seafood produce data, sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the Department and in consultation with major food producers such as brewery and dairy manufacturers. The value of production is based on wholesale price estimates and export data. The 2013‑14 value for this indicator is not yet available as the sourcing and analysis of additional data results in this measure being subject to a lag.


 

6. This measure is derived from ABS overseas export data and incorporates meat, dairy, fish, and fruit and vegetables. The above‑trend growth in exports in 2013‑14 reflects depreciation of the Australian dollar and a substantial increase in the value of dairy exports, largely as a result of high commodity prices. The figure for 2012‑13 has been revised down slightly (from $520 million) as a result of normal full analysis of all the source data. The impact of the continued depreciation of the Australian dollar was not clear when the 2014‑15 target was set. The 2015‑16 target assumes conformity with long‑term production trends and no significant appreciation in the value of the Australian dollar.

7. The Department produces the Tasmanian Food and Beverage Industry Scorecard, which calculates the net value of interstate trade. It includes the four categories of overseas food exports reported by the ABS together with beverages and confectionery. ABS and industry data are used as the basis for the calculations. ABS data are adjusted to reflect further information gained from the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service. The 2013‑14 value for this indicator is not yet available as the sourcing and analysis of additional data results in this measure being subject to a lag.

8. This measure reflects the percentage of transactions completed within three days.

9. The funds received by the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA) and the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration Agreement (IMAS‑SMRA) are calculated on a calendar year; for example, 2013‑14 refers to the total amount of funds received during the 2013 calendar year. These measures exclude the contribution by the University of Tasmania.

10. Leverage is only one measure of the success of the Joint Venture Agreement with TIA. The TIA Strategic Plan 2012‑16 identifies the priorities for the Institution, including supporting the Government's vision of increasing the contribution of agriculture to the Tasmanian economy. The slight reduction in the leverage predicted for 2015‑16 will still see the funds invested in TIA leveraged at approximately 50 per cent, a substantial return on investment.

11. Minor revisions have been made to the 2012‑13 and 2013‑14 actuals to reflect accounting improvements. The outcome in any year is difficult to predict and the 2015‑16 target is based on averaging recent years' results.

12. The FarmPoint website provides easy access to information required by farmers to run their business.

Output Group 3: Natural and Cultural Heritage

3.1 Resource Management and Conservation

This Output provides for the conservation and sustainable use of Tasmania's natural values and land resources.

It provides for the sustainable management of the State's geoheritage and soils, and supports the administration of Tasmania's Natural Resource Management (NRM) Framework.

This Output develops policy and regulatory frameworks and manages conservation assessment processes to support the sustainable development and conservation of the State's biodiversity. The Output also provides advice on the management, protection and rehabilitation of natural values on public and private land, including voluntary private land conservation programs.

This Output manages the State's wildlife, including game species, and delivers programs to reduce the impacts of browsing animals on primary industries.

3.2 Historic Heritage Services

This Output aims to recognise, protect and ensure the sound statutory management of places of historic cultural heritage of significance to the whole of Tasmania and to facilitate their sustainable use and development. It does this by providing advice on the identification, protection, conservation and promotion of historic cultural heritage, by supporting the Tasmanian Heritage Council to implement the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995, and by addressing the needs of heritage property owners, site managers, developers, planning authorities, the private and public sectors and the wider community. It also works to recognise and promote the importance of heritage places and precincts.


 

3.3 Aboriginal Heritage

This Output aims to protect, conserve and promote Tasmania's unique Aboriginal heritage. It seeks to increase community understanding and valuing of that heritage by providing training, education and interpretation materials. Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania provides regulatory advice to the Director of National Parks and Wildlife and the Minister as part of the assessment and permitting process under the Aboriginal Relics Act 1975. The Output supports organisations and individuals in fulfilling their responsibilities, both culturally and environmentally. Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania provides administrative support to the Minister's non‑statutory advisory body, the interim Aboriginal Heritage Council.

3.4 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

This Output represents the Government's contribution towards the operation of the Gardens and supports the management, conservation and enhancement of the Gardens in accordance with the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens Act 2002. The Gardens aim to increase community understanding of the importance of plants and to enrich Tasmania's social and cultural environment by providing relevant programs in plant collections and displays, tourism and recreation, cultural heritage and research and learning, for Tasmania and the broader community. Further information on the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens is provided in chapter 23 of Government Services Budget Paper No 2.

Table 9.5: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of Tasmanian land reserved

 

 

 

 

 

Land protected either by legislation or by contract in conservation reserves, under covenant or heritage regimes2

%

50.2

50.4

50.5

50.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extent of integration of conservation of natural diversity into private land management

 

 

 

 

 

Private land covered by voluntary binding conservation agreements3

Hectares

'000

91.1

102.7

105.0

105.0

Private land covered by property‑based game wildlife management plans4

Number

3 715

3 715

3 715

3 715

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of information to support natural resource management and development decisions

 

 

 

 

 

Level of use of the Natural Values Atlas5

Pages '000

1 917

116

120

125

Percentage of threatened species covered by a listing statement6

 

%

42.5

44.3

46.0

47.7


 

Table 9.5: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3 (continued)

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in status of threatened species

 

 

 

 

 

Threatened species showing a decline in status7

Number

3

.

5

4

Threatened species showing an improved status7

Number

6

.

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Genetic diversity of the Tasmanian devil

 

 

 

 

 

Extent of genetic diversity of the Tasmanian devil insurance population8

%

99

99

>95

>95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management of the wild Tasmanian devil population

 

 

 

 

 

Number of devils within secure meta (wild) population9

Number

13

28‑40

na

70‑90

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historic Heritage Services

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of places on the Tasmanian Heritage Register likely to meet at least one registration criterion10

%

na

70

na

>85

Places on the Tasmanian Heritage Register actively managed11

%

6.5

7.7

7.0

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

Permit recommendations provided to the Director of National Parks and Wildlife within 20 working days12

%

96.5

100

100

100

Permit recommendations provided to the Director of National Parks and Wildlife that include evidence of community engagement

%

100

100

100

100

Response to applicant or their consultant within 10 working days in relation to Aboriginal Heritage Search or Desktop Assessment13

%

na

na

na

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens (RTBG)

 

 

 

 

 

RTBG total visitors

Number

'000

417

391

410

412

Tasmanian Seed Conservation Centre, number of collections held in seed store14

Number

1 311

1 416

1 490

1 575

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. In this Output Group, which now includes Outputs formerly included in Output Group 9, four of the previous measures have been deleted. Of the 16 current measures in the Output Group, 12 are unchanged, three are new and one is modified.


 

2. The total land area of Tasmania used is 6.8 million hectares, based on the mean high‑water mark. This includes Macquarie Island and other Tasmanian offshore islands. Only the terrestrial portion of reserves is reported on. The use of the preliminary Tasmanian Reserve Estate layer may result in slight variances in the annual figures quoted as they are subject to revision based on the final reserve data.

3. Voluntary binding conservation agreements include both conservation covenants and management agreements. The measure represents the cumulative total for reservation.

4. A large proportion of the properties in this measure are individual forestry coupes.

5. The Natural Values Atlas (NVA) provides a web interface allowing access to authoritative and comprehensive natural values information. This measure refers to the number of requests for pages from the NVA website. Figures from 2012‑13 are inflated because they are inclusive of automated requests. Figures from 2013‑14 onwards reflect legitimate page requests.

6. This measure indicates the availability of information to support decisions about threatened species management and recovery. This measure includes approved Listing Statements and draft Listing Statements that await comment from the Threatened Species Scientific Advisory Committee and the Threatened Species Community Review Committee and final approval by the Secretary of the Department.

7. Changing the status of threatened species requires the completion of the formal process detailed in the Threatened Species Protection Act 1995. Significant work has been undertaken on a number of species during 2013‑14. The targets for 2014‑15 and 2015‑16 reflect the number of species for which the formal process is expected to be completed in those periods.

8. This performance measure is aimed at assessing the extent of genetic variation within the devil insurance population. Maintaining 95 per cent genetic diversity is considered desirable to minimise the likelihood of inbreeding within the population and to ensure that it remains fit for release at a later date, as and if required. The assessment is undertaken on an annual basis following the breeding season. It examines the genetic characteristics of the insurance population compared with the founder insurance animals. Further information can be found on the Program's website www.tassiedevil.com.au.

9. This is a new performance measure developed to provide information on the progress of implementing wild populations that are free from the Devil Facial Tumour Disease. The number of Tasmanian devils in the secure wild populations in the period 2014‑15 (40‑70) relates to the population established on Maria Island. Future reporting will also include a new population that is being established on the Tasman and Forestier Peninsulas.

10. This is a new performance measure, replacing the measure 'Number of places on the Tasmanian Heritage Register'. It provides an indicator of register integrity based on the extent to which entries on the register satisfy the criteria of the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995.

11. This is a modified performance measure that reflects the percentage of places on the Tasmanian Heritage Register for which a development application or an application for a certificate of exemption has been granted; any places that received a grant managed by Heritage Tasmania during the year; any new entries that have been provisionally or permanently entered on the Register; and any existing entries that have been amended, replaced or removed. The measure provides a more comprehensive indicator of the tasks undertaken to administer the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995.

12. The Department provides permit advice directly to the Director of National Parks and Wildlife for consideration by the Minister in accordance with the Aboriginal Relics Act 1975.

13. This is a new performance measure aimed at assessing the Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania (AHT) response time for providing relevant Aboriginal heritage site information to the applicant or their consultant prior to any field investigations, or providing determinations regarding the need for an Aboriginal cultural heritage assessment.

14. It is expected that the 2014‑15 Tasmanian Seed Conservation Centre collection target will be exceeded due to a very good seed production season for Tasmania's endemic conifers, which is also reflected in the estimated target for 2015‑16.


 

Output Group 4: Water Resources

4.1 Water Resource Management

This Output develops and implements a range of legislation and policies for water management to ensure the equitable, efficient and sustainable allocation and use of surface and ground water resources and the safety of dams. It supports the development and coordination of policies relating to the regulation of the urban water and sewerage industry. It also provides services to assess, monitor, report and provide advice on the health, condition and state of Tasmania's water resources for the community, industry and government.

Table 9.6: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amount of water available for irrigation

 

 

 

 

 

Total volume of water licensed for irrigation2

Mega litres (ML) '000

652

709

720

735

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level of farm water development

 

 

 

 

 

New dam works permits approved per annum3

Number

44

40

35

40

Storage Capacity approved pa

ML

24 218

11 394

10 000

14 000

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of dam permit processing

 

 

 

 

 

Average time for processing applications for dam works permit approvals4

Days

78

79

84

84

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality of water information

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of streamflow sites that meet quality assurance standards5

%

na

na

na

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. In this Output Group, four of the measures have been deleted. Of the five current measures in the Output Group, three are unchanged, one is new and one is modified.

2. This measure refers to the total volume of water licensed and should be read as a cumulative total. The target for 2015‑16 reflects the potential for future dam development.

3. The number of dam approvals has been trending down as the rate of new development applications is declining. Whilst future trends are hard to predict it is expected that a slight increase will occur next year.

4. The statutory timeframe for processing dam applications under the Water Management Act 1999 is 84 days. Interpretation of this measure needs to take account of the introduction of an integrated process for dealing with environmental issues at proposed dam sites. Dam proponents are no longer required to obtain additional authorisations for their dam works after gaining a dam permit. In addition, the trend towards larger and more complex dams has impacted on the level of complexity of applications to be assessed.

5. This is a new measure developed to provide more accurate streamflow information. The nationally accepted benchmark for this indicator is 95 per cent of total sites and this will be used as the target for the 2015‑16 year.


 

Output Group 5: Policy

5.1 Policy Advice

This Output provides policy advice on cross departmental issues and supports projects of strategic importance to the Department. In addition the Output coordinates a number of department‑wide programs, including the Department's Right to Information, Legislative and Internal Audit programs. It also facilitates the Ministerial processes for the Department ensuring delivery of accurate and timely information to Ministerial Offices.

Table 9.7: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 5

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Progress with projects of strategic importance

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic projects with significant milestones achieved1

Number

16

22

15

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stakeholder satisfaction

 

 

 

 

 

Stakeholder satisfaction with quality of service2

%

85

86

85

85

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. These are projects designated as major projects of strategic importance to the Department. The measure identifies the number of projects where significant milestones, including completion, are achieved. The reduced target reflects changes in the way the Government now manages major projects. In addition, some of the policy projects in previous years related to forestry issues, which are now all managed by the Department of State Growth.

2. An annual survey of key stakeholder satisfaction is undertaken, focusing on the delivery of strategic projects and services relevant to this Output Group, as a measure of the quality of policy information provided.

 

Output Group 6: Biosecurity Tasmania

6.1 Biosecurity

This Output supports the Tasmanian Biosecurity Strategy, providing scientific risk‑based systems to exclude, eradicate or effectively manage exotic pests and diseases that jeopardise the relative pest and disease free status of Tasmania. The Output delivers diagnostic services to support sustainable pest and disease control measures and to validate the State's relative pest and disease free status with scientific evidence. This Output also ensures animal welfare practices are consistent with legislative requirements and community expectations.

6.2 Product Integrity

This Output provides a framework to regulate and manage food safety in the primary production and processing sector and to identify and trace the movement of livestock. This Output also includes services aimed at ensuring that agricultural chemical use is consistent with legislative requirements and community expectations.

Table 9.8: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 6

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriateness of import requirements for plants and animals

 

 

 

 

 

Current and relevant import requirements in place for plants and plant products2

%

100

100

100

100

General authorities and conditions for animals and animal products reviewed3

%

na

na

na

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Responses to notifications of weeds, pests and diseases are undertaken in accord with State and national protocols

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of notifications requiring further regulatory action - weeds4

%

na

na

na

<10

Proportion of notifications followed up - pests and diseases5

%

na

na

na

100

Compliance with response protocols6

%

na

na

na

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effectiveness of Diagnostic Services

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with the relevant International Standard as applied to veterinary and plant testing laboratories7

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barrier inspections conducted to appropriate standards

 

 

 

 

 

Effective systems for targeting and undertaking quarantine inspections8

%

na

na

na

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effective Approved Quarantine Premises

 

 

 

 

 

Fully compliant Approved Quarantine Premises9

%

na

na

na

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with food safety standards by primary producers and processors

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety quality assurance plans/programs approved annually by DPIPWE for eligible producers/processors

Number

123

142

175

210

Audits of high risk food safety areas without significant findings10

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with animal welfare standards

 

 

 

 

 

Audits of high risk animal use undertaken without significant findings11

%

na

na

na

100

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 9.8: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 6 (continued)

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support for GMO Moratorium12

 

 

 

 

 

Former GM canola sites remediated (cumulative)

Number

4

4

7

4

Former GM canola sites with substantial progress towards remediation (cumulative)

Number

6

6

10

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with chemical usage legislation

 

 

 

 

 

Audits of agricultural and veterinary chemical usage without significant findings

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. In this Output Group, 12 of the measures have been deleted. Of the 14 current measures in the Output Group, five are unchanged, six are new and three are modified.

2. This measure has been retitled. The requirements are reviewed within three years.

3. This is a new measure to include animals and animal products.

4. This is a new measure. The target is calculated on the number of regulatory follow‑ups (e.g. requirement notices, infringement notices) that are needed after a landowner has been formally notified that they have a declared weed on their property and should commence action to control it. The lower the percentage of required follow‑ups, the higher the level of compliance.

5. This is a new measure and includes invasive animals. It relates to the proportion of notifications coming to the Department that are followed up with appropriate action, so the target is 100 per cent.

6. This is a new measure. Plant and animal biosecurity response protocols apply at state and national levels and are used in the event of a detection of a quarantine plant pest or disease for assessing the need for a response and conducting one if needed. After‑incident reviews of a response determine the level of compliance.

7. This measure has been modified; previously it applied only to veterinary laboratories. For plant health laboratories, this measure currently applies only to the plant virology laboratory. The entomology, plant pathology and molecular laboratories are working towards meeting the relevant International Standard.

8. This is a new measure to report on the overall border inspection regime. It replaces the previous measure that reported on the amount of confiscated material over time, based on a survey each April, however results were variable and difficult to interpret. Variations could reflect changes in passenger numbers, changes to processes, changes to laws / import requirements, targeting of certain (heavier or lighter) risk material, improved passenger/importer education and awareness and improved officer awareness / skills. Some key inspection activities and systems with critical hazard points are currently being determined and will be audited on an annual basis to assess their overall effectiveness.

9. This is a new measure. Approved Quarantine Premises are registered under the Plant Quarantine Act 1997 to receive imported plant material. Biosecurity Tasmania conducts regular audits of these premises to ensure compliance with conditions of registration, with a focus on managing the biosecurity risks these premises create through their import activities.

10. High risk areas relate to aspects of primary food production that, if not controlled adequately by the operator, are likely to present a food safety risk to consumers.

11. This measure has been amended to make it consistent with other compliance measures. High risk animal use refers to intensive farming activities that, if not controlled adequately and in accordance with standards, can present an animal welfare risk.

12. An audit program was implemented approximately 12 years ago to monitor compliance with the permits and assess the sites for release from management under permit. Remediated sites are those that have been released as monitoring evidence suggested that each could be considered clear of canola. Figures are cumulative i.e. total number of remediated sites as at the end of the financial year. The effectiveness of the audit program is currently being reviewed to identify process improvements.


 

Output Group 7: Environment Protection and Analytical Services

7.1 Environmental Management and Pollution Control

This Output undertakes activities to: develop high quality, contemporary policies and strategies for the protection of the environment; ensure development proposals meet appropriate guidelines and standards; regulate, via a risk based approach, environmental impacts of large industrial and municipal activities and monitor environmental performance.

7.2 Analytical Services

This Output focuses on providing a range of scientific and analytical services in order to support the delivery of best practice environmental management and the management of environmental incidents.

Table 9.9: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 7

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hobart

Exceeds PM10 Standards

 

 

....

1

<5

<5

Launceston

Exceeds PM10 Standards

1

4

<5

<5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment and Regulation of Activities

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Environmental Management Plan (EMP) reviews completed (including annual and triennial EMPs)2

Number

69

119

120

120

Number of Environment Protection Notices and Contaminated Sites Notices issued3

Number

100

62

60

60

Percentage of assessments undertaken within statutory timeframe

%

96

90

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analytical Services Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

Number of analyses performed4

'000

276.3

299.4

290

320

Jobs reported on time

%

55.9

62.4

70

70

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. These measures refer to performance against the National Environment Protection Measure (NEPM) PM10 measure that counts the number of days per year that exceed the national standard of 50 micrograms per cubic metre of air. The NEPM goal set for this measure is no more than five exceedences of the standard per year. Consistent with the reporting requirements for the NEPM, the data is calculated on a calendar year basis; for example 2013‑14 refers to performance against the standard during the 2013 calendar year.


 

2. The number of Environmental Management Plans (EMPs) reviewed each year is subject to variability depending on when industries provide these plans for review. The preferred approach in recent years has been to require issue‑specific management plans to target particular issues, for example odour management plans, waste management plans, monitoring plans. The focus on more onerous and wide ranging triennial and five yearly EMPs has therefore diminished, as a risk based approach to review is adopted.

3. This measure identifies the number of key types of notices issued under the Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994. These notices are issued as required and the target figure therefore represents an expected number based on current practice rather than a desirable target.

4. This measure relates to activity that is driven by client demand, which is subject to large variation and cannot be predicted accurately. It is anticipated that the number of analyses performed in 2015‑16 will increase as Analytical Services Tasmania is currently experiencing an increase in analyses submitted due to rising demand for, in particular, water quality analysis.

 

Output Group 8: Parks and Wildlife Management

8.1 Parks and Wildlife Management

This Output aims to protect, promote and manage Tasmania's world‑renowned parks and reserve system. These areas provide significant environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits and experiences. This Output provides for their sustainable use through maintenance, appropriate infrastructure, high‑quality visitor experiences and a culture that promotes visitor safety. It also manages significant biodiversity restoration programs complemented by the development and implementation of enhanced biosecurity measures.

8.2 Crown Land Services

This Output manages Crown land, ensuring its suitable use and development. It also provides specialist Crown property‑related advice to government and the private sector.

Table 9.10: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 8

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management Plans

 

 

 

 

 

Reserves covered by management plans1

Number

59

59

82

82

Protected land covered by approved management plans2

%

67

60

65

65

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic fire management3

 

 

 

 

 

Fuel reduction burns - reserved land

Number

20

39

36

45

Area covered by fuel reduction burns:

 

 

 

 

 

Reserved land

Hectares

6 650

13 400

10 000

18 000

Other land4

Hectares

.

.

17 000

24 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level of volunteer support5

 

 

 

 

 

Registered volunteer partner organisations

Number

90

100

100

100

WILDCARE Inc. registered members

Number

5 688

6 039

6 000

6 000


 

Table 9.10: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 8 (continued)

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visitor numbers6,7

 

 

 

 

 

Mt Field

'000

100

141

148

155

Freycinet

'000

191

217

228

239

Cradle Mountain

'000

170

182

186

200

Lake St Clair

'000

71

69

72

76

Gordon River

'000

67

69

72

76

Mole Creek Caves

'000

44

49

51

54

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crown Land Services

 

 

 

 

 

Value of sales completed per year8

$ million

.

0.06

.

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. This measure refers to public land reserves (in whole or in part) under the Nature Conservation Act 2002. All but three of the reserves are managed by PWS. It does not include private sanctuaries or private nature reserves. Protected land includes both reserved inland and marine waters. As at 30 April 2015, there were approximately 805 reserves managed by PWS (the total number of reserves is largely unchanged from June 2014). As in 2014‑15, the 2015‑16 target is set on the basis that there will be a new approved management plan for the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.

2. The figure for 2013‑14 has been reviewed and revised down from 62 per cent to take account of the fact that land which forms part of extensions of reserves with existing management plans is not covered by those plans. As in 2014‑15, the 2015‑16 target is set on the basis that there will be a new approved management plan for the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.

3. These measures provide information about the strategic Fuel Reduction Program, which is statewide and 'tenure blind', including fuel reduction burns conducted on reserved and private land. Planned burning is undertaken in support of three possible objectives: asset protection, strategic fuel management and ecological burning (which also has fuel reduction benefits). The measure only includes burns that have fuel reduction benefit. The program's funding builds up over four years, and there is also a need to develop the relevant capabilities and resources. The level of activity can be impacted by weather.

4. The planned burning of private land is integrated into the statewide burning program. The burning completed on Forestry Tasmania land, where it is specifically related to Fuel Reduction Program activity only, is also included in this 'Other land' category.

5. These measures provide information on volunteer activity. Volunteers and volunteer organisations contribute around 200 000 hours of time annually to the PWS, with an estimated value of approximately $6 million. This includes support provided through WILDCARE Inc., the PWS volunteer management partner. Volunteerism supports the development of a high level of community engagement with, and the sustainable use of, Tasmania's parks and reserve system.

6. Visitor numbers are collated by ongoing monitoring at selected sites including:

1. Mt Field, estimated from vehicle counts and bus passengers;

2. Freycinet, estimated from vehicle counts and bus passengers;

3. Cradle Mountain, estimated from vehicle counts, shuttle bus and bus passengers. The figure for 2013‑14 has been revised upwards slightly to reflect confirmed results for the full financial year;

4. Lake St Clair, estimated from vehicle counts and bus passengers;

5. Gordon River, visitors to Tasmania only (does not include Tasmanians). Source: Tasmanian Visitor Survey (Tourism Tasmania). The figure for 2012‑13 has been revised downward slightly on a review of the data; and

6. Mole Creek Caves, estimated from cave ticket sales.

7. Visitor number targets have been set to reflect the target set by the Government for the tourism industry in general.

8. Sales revenue fluctuates depending on market conditions. Properties prepared for sale may be held back due to oversupply or lack of demand in particular areas or properties placed on the market may fail to sell.


 

Output Group 9: Racing Regulation and Policy

9.1 Racing Regulation and Policy

This Output delivers probity and integrity services to the Tasmanian racing industry. This is achieved by:

       registering race clubs;

       licensing and registering industry participants and racing animals;

       providing handicapping and grading services;

       providing stipendiary stewards;

       enforcing national and local rules of racing for each racing code;

       registering and regulating on‑course bookmakers and their agents;

       setting the integrity conditions applicable to all Tasmanian race field information publication approvals;

       providing administrative support to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board;

       undertaking high‑level research and analysis on a range of issues relating to the Tasmanian racing industry;

       developing, implementing and evaluating racing policy in Tasmania, with reference to local and national developments in the sector;

       representing the State and the local racing industry on national bodies and in national forums, in relation to racing integrity and related matters; and

       ensuring compliance with the requirements of the Racing Regulation Act 2004.

Table 9.11: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 9

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Swabs taken by stewards

Number

3 534

3 695

3 700

3 750

Positive swabs to swabs taken

%

0.14

0.38

0.27

0.27

Suspensions, disqualifications and fines imposed by stewards on licensed persons

Number

 

444

 

462

 

450

 

450

Suspensions, disqualifications and fines appealed to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board

Number

 

23

 

18

 

19

 

14

Appeals to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board where conviction quashed

Number

 

6

 

6

 

4

 

4

Number of licensed persons

Number

2 338

2 278

2 300

2 300

Licence applications not referred to Licensing Panel approved within 14 days

%

 

100

 

100

 

100

 

100

Appeals to the Integrity Assurance Board1

Number

2

3

4

....


 

Table 9.11: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 9 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2012‑13

Actual

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Target

2015‑16

Target

Races handicapped2

Number

766

759

770

770

Races handicapped requiring a redraw due to errors3

Number

....

2

8

....

Races graded2

Number

1 651

1 615

1 650

1 650

Races graded requiring a redraw due to errors3

Number

....

....

9

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. The Integrity Assurance Board will be amalgamated with the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board, effective from 1 July 2015.

2. The number of races conducted is determined by Tasracing.

3. The number of redraws after the fields have been published.

 


 

Capital Investment Program

Table 9.12 provides financial information for the Department's Capital Investment Program. For more information on the Capital Investment Program, see chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 9.12: Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated)

Total)

Cost)

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing Biosecurity Capability

2 000)

1 000)

1 000)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment, Parks and Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur Pieman Tracks

300)

150)

150)

....)

....)

Crown Land Services - Structural Asset Upgrades

Ongoing)

556)

556)

556)

556)

Dip Falls Bridge

70)

70)

....)

....)

....)

Georges Bay Walkway

500)

250)

....)

....)

....)

Meander Falls Access Bridges

500)

450)

....)

....)

....)

Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure

8 000)

4 000)

4 000)

....)

....)

South Coast Track

2 000)

1 000)

250)

250)

....)

Three Capes Track1

25 300)

10 525)

....)

....)

....)

Three Capes Track - Additional

4 000)

2 500)

1 000)

500)

....)

West Coast Trails Projects

1 695)

880)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

21 381)

6 956)

1 306)

556)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1. Funding for this project includes $12.5 million provided by the Australian Government.

Increasing Biosecurity Capability

The Government has committed $2 million towards the upgrade and development of biosecurity infrastructure and operating systems. The funding will be utilised to upgrade and develop ageing laboratory equipment and information systems; improve the State's post‑border biosecurity hygiene infrastructure; and upgrade communications including signage at border entry points. This commitment will ensure that Tasmania continues to meet its state, national and international diagnostic responsibilities and standards. This funding is in addition to the Government's commitment of $900 000 to strengthen Tasmania's biosecurity protection, which commenced in the 2014‑15 State Budget. The improved capabilities will enhance Tasmania's biosecurity system and build on the capability and capacity to protect Tasmania's primary industries, natural environment and social amenity.

Arthur Pieman Tracks

The Government will invest $300 000 to undertake rehabilitation and erosion protection works in the Arthur‑Pieman Conservation Area.

Crown Land Services ‑ Structural Asset Upgrades

Ongoing funding is provided for the removal or remediation of physical structures and land that present public liability risks, for statutory maintenance and for essential and preventive maintenance to buildings.

Dip Falls Bridge

Dip Falls is a Forest Reserve that transferred to the Parks and Wildlife Service in December 2013. The Parks and Wildlife Service is working with the Circular Head Council and the Circular Head Tourism Association to undertake agreed works to improve the visitor experience at the site.

Georges Bay Walkway

The Government is investing $250 000 in 2014‑15 and 2015‑16 to mitigate landslide impacts in the Parnella Heights Area through emergency capital construction works. Work to date has been focused on inspection, planning and engineering design. The implementation of on ground works will be the focus for 2015‑16.

Meander Falls Access Bridges

The Government's investment of $500 000 over two years will be used to re‑establish two‑wheel drive access to the Meander Falls Track by replacing two vehicle bridges that were washed away in 2011. Planning and design works are now complete in preparation for construction to be undertaken in 2015‑16.

Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure

The Government is committing $8 million over two years aimed at high priority maintenance and infrastructure renewal in Parks and Reserves. The Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment will undertake consultation with local councils and other identified stakeholder groups to identify priority asset projects which can improve visitation and community benefit.

South Coast Track

The Government has committed $2 million towards upgrading the South Coast Track (from Melaleuca to Cockle Creek) to improve access to this spectacular natural asset. The funding is being used to upgrade existing infrastructure, complete minor rerouting where the established tracks have become difficult to access, and provide safe access to beach areas. Work to date has included significant planning and design works, and the commencement of construction on new track sections including the Deadmans Bay to Turua Beach section of the Track.

Three Capes Track

Work on the Three Capes Track will continue in 2015‑16. When complete this will be a world class coastal walking experience taking in the dramatic cliff top vistas of the Tasman National Park and will complement other iconic walks such as the Overland Track. The first two stages of the Track are expected to open to the public in November 2015, providing an easy four day/three night experience with hut‑based accommodation, commencing with a short boat journey from Port Arthur and finishing at Fortescue Bay via Cape Pillar and Cape Hauy. The walk will support the growth of tourism on the Tasman Peninsula and throughout the State.


 

Three Capes Track ‑ Additional

The Government has also committed additional funding of $4 million towards construction of Stage Three of the track which, once completed, will provide access to the third cape, Cape Raoul. The Government is seeking support from the Australian Government to assist in funding the finalisation of Stage Three.

West Coast Trails Projects

The Government committed a total of $1.7 million to three projects over 2014‑15 and 2015‑16, being the Horsetail Falls Walking Trail, the Mountain Bike Project and the Granite Creek Bridge Replacement. Planning and design for the Horsetail Falls walking trail and dramatic viewing platform project are complete, with works planned to commence in 2015‑16. The Mountain Bike Project has seen work largely completed on the Montezuma Falls Trail, Heemskirk Trail and the North East Dundas Trail. These projects have utilised West Coast labour forces to clear and restore existing old tram lines into a condition suitable for mountain bike use. Construction works for Stage Two of the Mountain Bike Project, on the Heemskirk loop extension, which will involve more technical mountain bike track construction, are planned to commence in the summer of 2015‑16. The replacement of the Granite Creek Bridge is now complete.


Detailed Budget Statements

Table 9.13: Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2014‑15)

 

Budget1)

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - recurrent2

120 468)

127 921)

127 338)

129 521)

120 940)

Appropriation revenue - works & services3

8 536)

18 906)

6 956)

1 306)

556)

Other revenue from government4

2 555)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Grants5

15 382)

11 466)

7 081)

6 532)

6 532)

Sales of goods and services

19 006)

20 876)

21 185)

21 290)

21 402)

Fees and fines

8 624)

8 807)

8 906)

8 832)

8 916)

Interest6

487)

591)

601)

593)

590)

Other revenue7

1 607)

636)

636)

636)

636)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

176 665)

189 203)

172 703)

168 710)

159 572)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

98 684)

98 536)

99 095)

100 273)

101 726)

Depreciation and amortisation

14 299)

14 396)

13 896)

13 896)

13 896)

Supplies and consumables

45 965)

43 781)

40 859)

41 399)

42 050)

Grants and subsidies8

21 201)

24 292)

26 402)

25 896)

15 317)

Other expenses9

4 162)

3 120)

3 092)

2 918)

3 041)

Total expenses from transactions

184 311)

184 125)

183 344)

184 382)

176 030)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

(7 646)

5 078)

(10 641)

(15 672)

(16 458)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

Net gain/(loss) on non-financial assets

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

Total other economic flows included in net result

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

(5 332)

7 392)

(8 327)

(13 358)

(14 144)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows - other non-owner changes in equity

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

6 621)

6 581)

6 603)

6 603)

6 603)

Other movements taken directly to equity10

....)

1 592)

....)

....)

....)

Total other economic flows - other non-owner changes in equity

6 621)

8 173)

6 603)

6 603)

6 603)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

1 289)

15 565)

(1 724)

(6 755)

(7 541)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. The 2014‑15 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Service Tasmania from the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment to the Department of Premier and Cabinet and the transfer of the Office of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Services Tasmania) from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2014‑15 figures for this Department will differ from those published in 2014‑15 Budget.

2. The movements in Appropriation revenue - recurrent over the Budget and Forward Estimates include the cash flows associated with the Fuel Reduction Program.

3. The movements in Appropriation revenue - works & services reflects additional funding for the Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure initiative, cash flow movements for the State Government contribution to the Three Capes Track, additional funding for the West Coast Trails Projects and additional funding for the Increasing Biosecurity Capability initiative.

4. Other revenue from government in 2015‑16 reflects the utilisation of funding carried forward under section 8A(2) of the Public Account Act 1986 for the Intensive Animal Farming Industry Development initiative, Assistance Package to King Island Beef Producers initiative, Cockle Creek Bridge Project and Macquarie Island Pest Eradication Project.

5. The decrease in Grants in 2015‑16 reflects reduced Australian Government National Partnership Payments for the Three Capes Track Project, Macquarie Island Pest Eradication Project and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan. The decrease in 2016‑17 reflects reduced Australian Government funding for the Three Capes Track Project, the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program and the Macquarie Island Pest Eradication Project.

6. The increase in Interest in 2015‑16 reflects revised estimates of Special Deposit and Trust Fund account balances that attract interest.

7. The decrease in Other revenue in 2015‑16 reflects a reduction in estimates for the reimbursement of expenditure received by the Department.

8. The increase in Grants and subsidies in 2015‑16 reflects an increase in grant expenditure in relation to the Fuel Reduction Program and a reclassification of Fisheries Research and Development Corporation payments from Other expenses. The decrease in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Fuel Reduction Program.

9. The decrease in Other expenses in 2015‑16 reflects the reclassification of Fisheries Research and Development Corporation payments to Grants and subsidies.

10. The Other movements taken directly to equity in 2015‑16 reflects the transfer of net assets and liabilities to the Department of Premier and Cabinet as a result of the consolidation of Service Tasmania.

 


 

Table 9.14: Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2014‑15)

 

Budget)

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - recurrent1

38 784)

39 351)

39 960)

40 098)

40 226)

Sales of goods and services

15 453)

16 205)

16 378)

16 702)

17 135)

Fees and fines

17 731)

17 995)

18 282)

18 602)

19 053)

Other revenue

7 313)

7 318)

7 322)

7 322)

7 322)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

79 281)

80 869)

81 942)

82 724)

83 736)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies1

38 784)

39 351)

39 960)

40 098)

40 226)

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

40 497)

41 518)

41 982)

42 626)

43 510)

Total expenses from transactions

79 281)

80 869)

81 942)

82 724)

83 736)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1. The Office of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Services Tasmania) has been transferred to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment from the Department of State Growth to take effect from 1 July 2015. The 2014‑15 Budget estimate has been recast to reflect this transfer for comparative purposes.

 


 

Table 9.15: Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2014‑15)

 

Budget)

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Land Tasmania1

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

9 773)

9 836)

9 801)

10 022)

10 218)

1.2 Valuation Services

4 229)

4 262)

4 255)

4 343)

4 430)

 

14 002)

14 098)

14 056)

14 365)

14 648)

Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 AgriGrowth Tasmania2

6 289)

6 609)

6 334)

6 180)

5 270)

2.2 Marine Resources

4 941)

4 936)

4 902)

4 984)

4 805)

 

11 230)

11 545)

11 236)

11 164)

10 075)

Output Group 4 ‑ Water Resources

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Water Resource Management

7 016)

7 036)

6 914)

7 027)

7 109)

 

7 016)

7 036)

6 914)

7 027)

7 109)

Output Group 5 ‑ Policy

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Policy Advice

2 263)

2 074)

2 059)

2 104)

2 144)

 

2 263)

2 074)

2 059)

2 104)

2 144)

Output Group 6 ‑ Biosecurity Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Biosecurity3

14 337)

15 881)

15 849)

16 226)

16 329)

6.2 Product Integrity4

2 058)

2 126)

2 124)

1 972)

2 005)

 

16 395)

18 007)

17 973)

18 198)

18 334)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

6 158)

6 156)

6 156)

6 156)

6 156)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program5

....)

1 000)

1 000)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

57 064)

58 916)

58 394)

59 014)

58 466)

Works and Services5

....)

1 000)

1 000)

....)

....)

 

57 064)

59 916)

59 394)

59 014)

58 466)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 9.15: Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2014‑15)

 

Budget)

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment, Parks and Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Resource Management and Conservation

11 799)

11 001)

10 945)

11 183)

11 374)

3.2 Historic Heritage Services6

3 029)

3 193)

3 116)

3 172)

2 787)

3.3 Aboriginal Heritage7

1 865)

2 073)

2 067)

2 115)

2 164)

3.4 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

2 726)

2 684)

2 665)

2 749)

2 828)

 

19 419)

18 951)

18 793)

19 219)

19 153)

Output Group 7 ‑ Environment Protection and Analytical Services

 

 

 

 

 

7.1 Environmental Management and Pollution Control

12 312)

12 828)

12 776)

13 085)

13 376)

7.2 Analytical Services7

1 579)

1 931)

1 944)

1 989)

2 043)

 

13 891)

14 759)

14 720)

15 074)

15 419)

Output Group 8 ‑ Parks and Wildlife Management

 

 

 

 

 

8.1 Parks and Wildlife Management8

31 129)

36 751)

36 820)

37 477)

29 069)

8.2 Crown Land Services7

2 301)

1 971)

2 037)

2 084)

2 121)

 

33 430)

38 722)

38 857)

39 561)

31 190)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

3 395)

3 496)

3 629)

3 767)

3 895)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program9

8 536)

17 906)

5 956)

1 306)

556)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

70 135)

75 928)

75 999)

77 621)

69 657)

Works and Services9

8 536)

17 906)

5 956)

1 306)

556)

 

78 671)

93 834)

81 955)

78 927)

70 213)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Racing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 9 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy10

 

 

 

 

 

9.1 Racing Regulation and Policy

2 822)

2 729)

2 730)

2 809)

2 868)

 

2 822)

2 729)

2 730)

2 809)

2 868)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

29 231)

29 699)

30 175)

30 175)

30 175)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

32 053)

32 428)

32 905)

32 984)

33 043)

 

32 053)

32 428)

32 905)

32 984)

33 043)


 

Table 9.15: Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2014‑15)

 

Budget)

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

 

 

 

 

 

Total Recurrent Services

159 252)

167 272)

167 298)

169 619)

161 166)

Total Works and Services

8 536)

18 906)

6 956)

1 306)

556)

 

167 788)

186 178)

174 254)

170 925)

161 722)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Carried Forward11

2 555)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

170 343)

186 178)

174 254)

170 925)

161 722)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

131 559)

146 827)

134 294)

130 827)

121 496)

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

38 784)

39 351)

39 960)

40 098)

40 226)

 

170 343)

186 178)

174 254)

170 925)

161 722)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. Output 1.3 Service Tasmania has been transferred into the existing Service Tasmania Output within the Department of Premier and Cabinet to take effect from 1 July 2015. The 2015‑16 Budget and Forward Estimates are available within chapter 8 of Government Services Budget Paper No 2.

2. The decrease in AgriGrowth Tasmania in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture Policy ‑ Implementation initiative.

3. The increase in Biosecurity in 2015‑16 reflects additional funding for the Increasing Biosecurity Services with Detector Dog Teams initiative and a reassessment of corporate overhead costs to better reflect the provision of expenditure for this Output.

4. The increase in Product Integrity in 2015‑16 reflects the transfer of funding for the Tasmanian Shellfish Quality Assurance Program from Output 2.2 Marine Resources. The decrease in 2017‑18 reflects the cessation of funding for the Tasmanian Shellfish Quality Assurance Program.

5. The increase in Capital Investment Program and Works and Services in 2015‑16 reflects additional funding for the Increasing Biosecurity Capability initiative. The decrease in 2017‑18 reflects the cessation of the Increasing Biosecurity Capability initiative.

6. The decrease in Historic Heritage Services in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Development of the Woolmers Estate Visitor Centre initiative.

7. The increase in Aboriginal Heritage and Analytical Services and decrease in Crown Land Services in 2015‑16 reflects a reassessment of corporate overhead costs to better reflect the provision of expenditure under these Outputs.

8. The increase in Parks and Wildlife Management in 2015‑16 is primarily due to an increase in funding for the Fuel Reduction Program. The decrease in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Fuel Reduction Program.

9. The increase in Capital Investment Program and Works and Services in 2015‑16 reflects additional funding for the Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure initiative, cash flow movements for the State Government contribution to the Three Capes Track and additional funding for the West Coast Trails Projects initiative. The decrease in 2016‑17 reflects the cessation of the Three Capes Track initiative and West Coast Trails Projects initiative. The decrease in 2017‑18 reflects the cessation of the Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure initiative.

10. Output Group 9 - Racing Regulation and Policy has been transferred to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment from the Department of State Growth to take effect from 1 July 2015.

11. Appropriation Carried Forward in 2015‑16 reflects the utilisation of funding carried forward under section 8A(2) of the Public Account Act 1986 for the Intensive Animal Farming Industry Development initiative, Assistance Package to King Island Beef Producers initiative, Cockle Creek Bridge Project and Macquarie Island Pest Eradication Project.

 


 

Table 9.16: Administered Revenue

 

2014‑15)

 

Budget)

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Consolidated Fund

 

 

 

 

 

Abalone Licences

4 619)

4 652)

4 685)

4 679)

4 796)

Environment Fees

4 494)

4 591)

4 706)

4 824)

4 945)

Land Information Charges

96)

90)

92)

94)

96)

Lands Titles Office Dealings1

14 269)

15 016)

15 160)

15 454)

15 856)

Marine Farms Fees and Recoveries

1 088)

1 099)

1 126)

1 154)

1 183)

Other Revenue

5 000)

5 000)

5 000)

5 000)

5 000)

Quarantine Fees

1 822)

1 834)

1 849)

1 895)

1 942)

Regulatory Fees

4 926)

5 017)

5 118)

5 232)

5 349)

Royalty Income

2 313)

2 318)

2 322)

2 322)

2 322)

Water Licence Fees

1 870)

1 901)

1 924)

1 972)

2 021)

 

40 497)

41 518)

41 982)

42 626)

43 510)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation2

38 784)

39 351)

39 960)

40 098)

40 226)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

79 281)

80 869)

81 942)

82 724)

83 736)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. The increase in Lands Titles Office Dealings in 2015‑16 reflects revised estimates of Land Titles Office revenue due to increased activity in the Tasmanian property market.

2. The Office of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Services Tasmania) has been transferred to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment from the Department of State Growth to take effect from 1 July 2015. The 2014‑15 Budget estimate has been recast to reflect this transfer for comparative purposes.

 


 

Table 9.17: Administered Expenses

 

2014‑15]

)

Budget)

2015‑16]

)

Budget)

2016‑17]

Forward)

Estimate)

2017‑18]

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19]

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution to Commonwealth, State and Industry Organisations

470)

470)

470)

470)

470)

Grant to Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies

2 605)

2 605)

2 605)

2 605)

2 605)

Grant to Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture

1 958)

1 958)

1 958)

1 958)

1 958)

Inland Fisheries Service ‑ Government Contribution

1 125)

1 123)

1 123)

1 123)

1 123)

Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority

3 285)

3 386)

3 519)

3 657)

3 785)

Tasmanian Racing Assistance1

29 231)

29 699)

30 175)

30 175)

30 175)

Wellington Park Contribution

110)

110)

110)

110)

110)

 

38 784)

39 351)

39 960)

40 098)

40 226)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Consolidated Fund

40 497)

41 518)

41 982)

42 626)

43 510)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

79 281)

80 869)

81 942)

82 724)

83 736)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1. The Office of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Services Tasmania) has been transferred to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment from the Department of State Growth to take effect from 1 July 2015. The 2014‑15 Budget estimate has been recast to reflect this transfer for comparative purposes.

 

Contribution to Commonwealth, State and Industry Organisations

This funding is the State's contribution to cost sharing arrangements as agreed at meetings of the Agriculture Ministers' Forum and in relation to nationally agreed initiatives, particularly for biosecurity programs and projects. The funding contributes to activities under Output Group 2 Primary Industries, Output Group 3 Natural and Cultural Heritage and Output Group 6 Biosecurity Tasmania.

Grant to the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies

In 2010, the Department entered into the Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration Agreement with the University of Tasmania's Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), formerly the Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute, to assist aquaculture and fisheries research. This replaces the previous Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute Joint Venture Agreement with the University of Tasmania. The Government provides its contribution to the joint venture by way of an annual grant. Activities of IMAS contribute to Output Group 2 Primary Industries.

Grant to the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture

The Department and the University of Tasmania have an Agreement in place for the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA) to undertake agricultural research, development, extension and education. The activities of TIA contribute to Output Group 2 Primary Industries and the majority of Government funding is reflected in that Output. The remaining funding is provided by way of an administered grant.

Inland Fisheries Service ‑ Government Contribution

This funding represents the community service functions of the Inland Fisheries Service in relation to the conservation, protection and management of Tasmania's native freshwater fauna and the carp management program.

Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority

This funding represents the Government's contribution to the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority to support the agreed conservation funding program for the Port Arthur, Coal Mines and Cascade Female Factory Historic Sites.

Tasmanian Racing Assistance

The Government separately funds the Tasmanian Racing Industry under a deed which provides secure funding and creates certainty for the Industry. The annual funding allocation allows Tasracing to facilitate key administration roles and functions, including the responsibility for the corporate governance, strategic direction and funding of the Tasmanian Racing Industry, as well as ratification of national rules, the making of local rules and the setting of licence standards and criteria.

Wellington Park Contribution

The allocation represents the Government's contribution to the cost of administering Wellington Park through a grant to the Wellington Park Management Trust.


 

Table 9.18: Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2015)

 

Budget)

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

67 615)

86 323)

85 124)

84 619)

84 078)

Investments

8 421)

8 798)

8 798)

8 798)

8 798)

Receivables2

2 630)

4 743)

4 829)

4 915)

5 001)

Other financial assets3

2 031)

1 545)

1 545)

1 545)

1 545)

 

80 697)

101 409)

100 296)

99 877)

99 422)

Non‑financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories

776)

843)

878)

913)

948)

Property, plant and equipment4

811 152)

917 868)

918 756)

918 969)

919 182)

Infrastructure5

164 150)

198 248)

196 950)

191 002)

184 304)

Heritage and cultural assets

2 689)

2 653)

2 878)

3 103)

3 328)

Intangibles6

2 886)

10 048)

10 208)

9 968)

9 728)

Other assets

1 674)

1 731)

1 821)

1 911)

2 001)

 

983 327)

1 131 391)

1 131 491)

1 125 866)

1 119 491)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

1 064 024)

1 232 800)

1 231 787)

1 225 743)

1 218 913)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

2 588)

2 809)

2 947)

3 085)

3 223)

Provisions

9 016)

9 243)

9 243)

9 243)

9 243)

Employee benefits

30 289)

28 176)

28 748)

29 320)

29 892)

Other liabilities

3 793)

3 947)

3 948)

3 949)

3 950)

Total liabilities

45 686)

44 175)

44 886)

45 597)

46 308)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

1 018 338)

1 188 625)

1 186 901)

1 180 146)

1 172 605)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Contributed capital7

....)

1 592)

1 592)

1 592)

1 592)

Reserves

289 075)

266 411)

273 014)

279 617)

286 220)

Accumulated funds8

90 238)

135 226)

126 899)

113 541)

99 397)

Other equity9

639 025)

785 396)

785 396)

785 396)

785 396)

Total equity

1 018 338)

1 188 625)

1 186 901)

1 180 146)

1 172 605)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. The increase in Cash and deposits in 2016 reflects an increase in the Crown Land Administration Fund which includes the sale proceeds from the parliament square precinct and a more accurate estimate based on the 30 June 2014 outcome.

2. The increase in Receivables in 2016 reflects a more accurate estimate based on the 30 June 2014 outcome.

3. The decrease in Other financial assets in 2016 reflects the sale of shares received in bequest for the conservation management of threatened species in Tasmania and a more accurate estimate of accrued revenue based on the 30 June 2014 outcome.

4. The increase in Property, plant and equipment in 2016 reflects the addition of 317 280 hectares of land and buildings now managed by the Department via the Parks and Wildlife Service as a result of the Forest Management Act 2013 and the Tasmanian Forests Agreement Act 2013.

5. The increase in Infrastructure in 2016 reflects the addition of walking tracks, roads and other infrastructure now managed by the Department via the Parks and Wildlife Service as a result of the Forest Management Act 2013 and the Tasmanian Forests Agreement Act 2013.

6. The increase in Intangibles in 2016 reflects abalone quota units transferred to the Department that have now been valued and recognised, and the capitalisation of works on the Spatial Information Foundations Project.

7. The increase in Contributed capital in 2016 reflects the net impact of the transfer of Service Tasmania to the Department of Premier and Cabinet.

8. The increase in Accumulated funds in 2016 reflects a more accurate estimate based on the 30 June 2014 outcome.

9. The increase in Other equity in 2016 reflects the additional land and infrastructure now managed by the Department via the Parks and Wildlife Service as a result of the Forest Management Act 2013 and the Tasmanian Forests Agreement Act 2013.

 


 

Table 9.19: Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June - Administered

 

2015)

 

Budget)

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits

130)

133)

133)

133)

133)

Receivables

1 664)

1 505)

1 564)

1 623)

1 682)

Other financial assets

1 881)

1 944)

1 944)

1 944)

1 944)

Total Assets

3 675)

3 582)

3 641)

3 700)

3 759)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

3 362)

3 336)

3 336)

3 336)

3 336)

Other liabilities1

313)

246)

305)

364)

423)

Total Liabilities

3 675)

3 582)

3 641)

3 700)

3 759)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Assets (liabilities)

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Equity

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1. The decrease in Other liabilities in 2016 reflects a more accurate estimate based on the 30 June 2014 outcome.

 


 

Table 9.20: Statement of Cash Flows

 

2014‑15)

 

Budget1)

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - recurrent2

120 468)

127 921)

127 338)

129 521)

120 940)

Appropriation receipts - capital3

8 536)

18 906)

6 956)

1 306)

556)

Grants4

15 382)

10 336)

7 081)

6 532)

6 532)

Sales of goods and services

19 006)

20 876)

21 185)

21 290)

21 402)

Fees and fines

8 624)

8 807)

8 906)

8 832)

8 916)

GST receipts

9 070)

9 070)

9 070)

9 070)

9 070)

Interest received5

479)

591)

601)

593)

590)

Other cash receipts6

1 538)

567)

567)

567)

567)

Total cash inflows

183 103)

197 074)

181 704)

177 711)

168 573)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

(87 850)

(89 226)

(87 264)

(88 272)

(89 461)

Superannuation

(10 513)

(11 828)

(11 510)

(11 680)

(11 944)

GST payments

(9 070)

(9 070)

(9 070)

(9 070)

(9 070)

Grants and subsidies7

(21 201)

(24 292)

(26 402)

(25 896)

(15 317)

Supplies and consumables

(46 160)

(43 976)

(41 054)

(41 594)

(42 245)

Other cash payments8

(4 112)

(3 070)

(3 042)

(2 868)

(2 991)

Total cash outflows

(178 906)

(181 462)

(178 342)

(179 380)

(171 028)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

4 197)

15 612)

3 362)

(1 669)

(2 455)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets9

(16 053)

(21 171)

(6 875)

(1 150)

(400)

Proceeds from the disposal of non‑financial assets

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

Equity injections and cashflows from restructuring10

....)

(707)

....)

....)

....)

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(13 739)

(19 564)

(4 561)

1 164)

1 914)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(9 542)

(3 952)

(1 199)

(505)

(541)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

77 157)

90 275)

86 323)

85 124)

84 619)

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

67 615)

86 323)

85 124)

84 619)

84 078)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1. The 2014‑15 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Service Tasmania from the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment to the Department of Premier and Cabinet and the transfer of the Office of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Services Tasmania) from the Department of State Growth to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2014‑15 figures for this Department will differ from those published in 2014‑15 Budget.

2. The movements in Appropriation receipts - recurrent over the Budget and Forward Estimates include the cash flows associated with the Fuel Reduction Program.

3. The increase in Appropriation receipts - capital in 2015‑16 reflects additional funding for the Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure initiative, cash flow movements for the State Government contribution to the Three Capes Track, additional funding for the West Coast Trails Projects and additional funding for the Increasing Biosecurity Capability initiative. The decrease in 2016‑17 reflects the cessation of the Three Capes Track initiative and West Coast Trails Projects initiative. The decrease in 2017‑18 reflects the cessation of the Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure initiative and the Increasing Biosecurity Capability initiative.

4. The decrease in Grants in 2015‑16 reflects Australian Government funding for the Three Capes Track Project, the Macquarie Island Pest Eradication Project and the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan. The decrease in 2016‑17 reflects Australian Government funding for the Three Capes Track Project, the Macquarie Island Pest Eradication Project and the Compliance Project under the Water for the Future Program.

5. The increase in Interest received in 2015‑16 reflects revised estimates of Special Deposit and Trust Fund account balances that attract interest.

6. The decrease in Other cash receipts in 2015‑16 reflects a reduction in estimates for the reimbursement of expenditure received by the Department.

7. The increase in Grants and subsidies in 2015‑16 reflects an increase in grant expenditure for the Fuel Reduction Program and a reclassification of Fisheries Research and Development Corporation payments from Other cash payments. The decrease in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Fuel Reduction Program.

8. The decrease in Other cash payments in 2015‑16 reflects the reclassification of Fisheries Research and Development Corporation payments to Grants and subsidies.

9. The movements in Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets reflects the capitalisation of works for the Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure initiative, Three Capes Track, the Increasing Biosecurity Capability initiative and other infrastructure‑related projects.

10. The movements in Equity injections and cashflows from restructuring reflects the transfer of net assets and liabilities to the Department of Premier and Cabinet as a result of the consolidation of Service Tasmania.

 


 

Table 9.21: Statement of Cash Flows - Administered

 

2014‑15)

 

Budget)

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

Forward)

Estimate)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - recurrent1

38 784)

39 351)

39 960)

40 098)

40 226)

Sales of goods and services

15 453)

16 205)

16 378)

16 702)

17 135)

Fees and fines

17 731)

17 995)

18 282)

18 602)

19 053)

Other cash receipts

7 313)

7 318)

7 322)

7 322)

7 322)

Total cash inflows

79 281)

80 869)

81 942)

82 724)

83 736)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies1

(38 784)

(39 351)

(39 960)

(40 098)

(40 226)

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

(40 497)

(41 518)

(41 982)

(42 626)

(43 510)

Total cash outflows

(79 281)

(80 869)

(81 942)

(82 724)

(83 736)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

130)

133)

133)

133)

133)

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

130)

133)

133)

133)

133)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1. The Office of Racing Integrity (formerly Racing Services Tasmania) has been transferred to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment from the Department of State Growth to take effect from 1 July 2015. The 2014‑15 Budget estimate has been recast to reflect this transfer for comparative purposes.