7    Assets and Liabilities

Key Issues

·       General Government Net Worth is estimated to be $10 249.2 million as at 30 June 2017. Net Worth is estimated to increase over the Forward Estimates period to $11 159.4 million by 30 June 2020.

·       General Government Net Debt is estimated to be negative $301.3 million as at 30 June 2017, an improvement of $48.7 million on the 2015‑16 Budget estimate of negative $252.6 million as at 30 June 2016. General Government Net Debt is expected to remain negative over the Forward Estimates period (as relevant assets continue to exceed liabilities) to 30 June 2020.

·       The Government continues to meet the cash cost of the defined benefit superannuation schemes on an emerging basis ($271 million in 2016‑17). The present value of superannuation liabilities is particularly sensitive to discount rate movements, although these movements do not impact on the cash costs that require funding. During the development of the 2016‑17 Budget, the discount rate has been reviewed by Treasury, having regard to sustained low yields on Australian Government bonds. This has resulted in a 75 basis point reduction to a discount rate of 4.75 per cent, which has primarily led to an increase in the estimate of the superannuation liability as at 30 June 2017 ($6 345.5 million). While forecast to be manageable, a key ongoing Budget risk is that the cost to the Budget will increase significantly in the coming years, with cash payments anticipated to increase over the next 13 years, peaking in 2029‑30 ($451.6 million).

·       The successful implementation of the Government's Fiscal Strategy is critical to improving the State's financial position, supporting essential community services and managing risks such as superannuation liabilities.


Balance Sheet

The Balance Sheet presented in this chapter provides assets and liabilities estimated as at 30 June 2016 to 2020 and reports key indicators for the same period. By providing information on the nature of assets and liabilities held by the Government, this Statement gives an indication of the State's financial strength.

The key measures presented in the Balance Sheet are Net Worth, Net Financial Worth, Net Financial Liabilities and Net Debt.

Table 7.1 details the estimated General Government Sector Balance Sheet as at 30 June from 2016 to 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 7.1:          General Government Balance Sheet as at 30 June

 

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

 

Budget)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$m)

$m)

$m)

$m)

$m)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and Deposits

889.3)

880.8)

769.5)

768.8)

773.1)

Investments

64.5)

54.2)

56.2)

58.3)

60.4)

Equity Investment in PNFC & PFC Sectors

4 515.0)

4 482.8)

4 474.1)

4 500.8)

4 586.5)

Other Equity Investments

20.0)

27.4)

31.4)

33.4)

34.0)

Receivables

331.5)

316.6)

315.3)

311.2)

306.3)

Other Financial Assets

661.4)

847.0)

861.3)

882.5)

897.1)

 

6 481.7)

6 608.9)

6 507.8)

6 555.0)

6 657.4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-Financial Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Land and Buildings

5 969.2)

6 098.6)

6 412.6)

6 616.2)

6 698.5)

Infrastructure

4 668.9)

4 779.3)

4 972.1)

5 186.3)

5 445.5)

Plant and Equipment

253.5)

224.6)

204.5)

193.4)

188.2)

Heritage and Cultural Assets

490.6)

502.4)

514.6)

526.9)

539.2)

Investment Property

19.0)

3.0)

3.3)

3.6)

3.9)

Intangibles

45.4)

51.8)

50.2)

48.7)

44.9)

Assets Held for Sale

7.0)

4.7)

3.8)

3.1)

2.9)

Other Non-Financial Assets

30.7)

31.5)

30.7)

30.2)

26.9)

 

11 484.2)

11 696.0)

12 191.8)

12 608.3)

12 950.1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Assets

17 965.9)

18 304.9)

18 699.6)

19 163.3)

19 607.4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Borrowings

701.3)

633.7)

651.6)

770.5)

671.4)

Superannuation

5 470.5)

6 345.5)

6 462.2)

6 564.4)

6 652.8)

Employee Entitlements

549.9)

583.0)

589.3)

598.8)

621.5)

Payables

108.4)

134.9)

136.4)

137.6)

139.7)

Other Liabilities

376.6)

358.7)

360.5)

362.1)

362.6)

Total Liabilities

7 206.7)

8 055.7)

8 199.9)

8 433.3)

8 448.0)

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET ASSETS

10 759.2)

10 249.2)

10 499.7)

10 730.0)

11 159.4)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 7.1:            General Government Balance Sheet as at 30 June (continued)

 

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

 

Budget)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$m)

$m)

$m)

$m)

$m)

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated Funds

5 712.1)

5 293.3)

5 266.7)

5 199.7)

5 301.1)

Asset Revaluation Reserve

5 047.1)

4 955.9)

5 233.0)

5 530.3)

5 858.3)

Total Equity

10 759.2)

10 249.2)

10 499.7)

10 730.0)

11 159.4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET WORTH1

10 759.2)

10 249.2)

10 499.7)

10 730.0)

11 159.4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET FINANCIAL WORTH2

(725.0)

(1 446.7)

(1 692.1)

(1 878.3)

(1 790.6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET FINANCIAL LIABILITIES3

5 240.0)

5 929.6)

6 166.2)

6 379.1)

6 377.1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET DEBT4

(252.6)

(301.3)

(174.1)

(56.6)

(162.0)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Net Worth represents Total Assets less Total Liabilities.

2.   Net Financial Worth represents Financial Assets less Total Liabilities.  

3.   Net Financial Liabilities represents Total Liabilities less Financial Assets, excluding Equity Investment in the PFC & PNFC sectors.

4.   Net Debt represents Borrowings less the sum of Cash and Deposits and Investments.

Assets

Total Assets are estimated to be $18 304.9 million as at 30 June 2017, an increase of $339.0 million from the 2015‑16 Budget estimate of $17 965.9 million as at 30 June 2016. The increase primarily reflects an increase in Land and Buildings, Infrastructure and Other Financial Assets, partially offset by decreases in Investments and Plant and Equipment. Total assets are estimated to increase across the Forward Estimates period from $18 304.9 million as at 30 June 2017 to $19 607.4 million as at 30 June 2020.

Equity Investment in PNFC and PFC Sectors

This item consists of the Government's investment in the net assets of the Public NonFinancial Corporations (PNFC) and Public Financial Corporations (PFC) sectors.

The Government's equity investment is estimated to be $4 482.8 million as at 30 June 2017, a minor decrease of $32.2 million from the 2015‑16 Budget estimate of $4 515.0 million as at 30 June 2016. The decrease primarily reflects a decrease in Net Assets for Hydro Tasmania, Tasmanian Networks Pty Ltd and TT‑Line Company Pty Ltd.


 

Chart 7.1 illustrates the components of the Government's Equity Investment holdings.

Chart 7.1:            Equity Investment in PNFC and PFC Sectors as at 30 June 2017

Title: Equity Investment in PNFC and PFC Sectors as at 30 June 2017 - Description: This chart shows that the largest component of the Government’s Equity Investment holdings is in the Electricity sector (69.6%), followed by the Financial sector (10.4%) and the Transport sector (9.8%).

Other Financial Assets

Other Financial Assets primarily includes Income Tax Equivalents Receivable and Prepayments. Other Financial Assets is estimated to be $847.0 million as at 30 June 2017, an increase of $185.6 million on the 2015‑16 Budget estimate of $661.4 million as at 30 June 2016. The increase primarily reflects revised income tax equivalent estimates and the impact of actual 2015 balances.

Table 7.2 provides a summary of Other Financial Assets.


 

Table 7.2:          Other Financial Assets as at 30 June

 

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

 

Budget)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020)

Forward)

Estimate)

$m)

$m)

$m)

$m)

$m)

Income Tax Equivalents Receivable1

639.2)

820.1)

834.2)

855.2)

869.6)

Prepayments

21.1)

27.0)

27.1)

27.3)

27.5)

Other Financial Assets

1.2)

.... )

.... )

.... )

.... )

661.4)

847.0)

861.3)

882.5)

897.1)

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.   Income Tax Equivalents Receivable is an asset held by the General Government Sector that mirrors the Income Tax Liabilities held by Government Business Enterprises and State‑owned Companies within the PNFC and PFC sectors. The receivable reflects timing differences in the payment of income tax equivalents in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards. The increase in Income Tax Equivalents Receivable reflects revised tax estimates.

Non‑Financial Assets

Non‑Financial Assets include the value of Crown Land and other land holdings, including national parks and conservation areas, schools, hospitals and other buildings held by the Government for the provision of goods and services. Non‑Financial Assets also includes Intangibles, Assets Held for Sale and Other Non‑Financial Assets.

Land and Buildings is estimated to be $6 098.6 million as at 30 June 2017, an increase of $129.4 million on the 2015‑16 Budget estimate of $5 969.2 million as at 30 June 2016. Land and Buildings is estimated to increase by $600 million to $6 698.5 million as at 30 June 2020.

Infrastructure is estimated to be $4 779.3 million as at 30 June 2017, an increase of $110.4 million on the 2015‑16 Budget estimate of $4 668.9 million as at 30 June 2016. Infrastructure is estimated to increase by $666 million to $5 445.5 million as at 30 June 2020.

The increase in Land and Buildings and Infrastructure over the 2016‑17 Budget and Forward Estimates period partly reflects the implementation of the Government's $1.8 billion infrastructure investment program. Further information regarding Infrastructure Investment is provided in chapter 6 of this Budget Paper.

Liabilities

Total Liabilities is estimated to be $8 055.7 million as at 30 June 2017, increasing over the Forward Estimates period, with estimated Total Liabilities of $8 448.0 million as at 30 June 2020.

The estimated Borrowings of $633.7 million as at 30 June 2017 include an estimated end of year borrowing of $417.7 million to be undertaken on 30 June 2017. The end of year borrowing has no impact on the Government’s Net Debt as the same amount will be borrowed and invested overnight on 30 June with the Tasmanian Public Finance Corporation, grossing up the amount of cash held and borrowings. Borrowings in 2016‑17 and over the Forward Estimates period are higher compared to those published in the 2015‑16 Budget. This increase is primarily due to a deterioration in the Consolidated Fund position.

Payables is estimated to be $134.9 million as at 30 June 2017, an increase of $26.5 million, on the 2015‑16 Budget estimate of $108.4 million. The increase primarily reflects the impact of 2015 actual balances that were not known at the time of preparing the 2015‑16 Budget.

Other Liabilities (which includes Tasmanian Risk Management Fund liabilities) is estimated to be $358.7 million as at 30 June 2017, a decrease of $17.9 million compared to the 2015‑16 Budget of $376.6 million as at 30 June 2016. The decrease primarily reflects the impact of 2015 actual balances that were not known at the time of preparing the 2015‑16 Budget.

General Government Superannuation Liability

The Government's superannuation liability is an estimate of the obligations of the State with respect to liabilities arising from the current and former members of unfunded or partially funded Public Sector defined benefit superannuation schemes, which were closed to new members with effect from May 1999.

The superannuation liability is an estimate of the Net Present Value of the Government's share of meeting current and future benefit payments for scheme members. The superannuation liability differs from many other financial liabilities, such as Borrowings, which can be called on for repayment in full at any point in time.

The superannuation liability has arisen over many decades because benefits are funded on an emerging basis when scheme members become entitled to a pension or lump sum benefit. That is, the Government's portion of the final benefit is paid when it falls due, with the remaining part of the benefit being funded from the scheme's assets. The major schemes currently operating in the General Government Sector that have an unfunded liability are those established under the Retirement Benefits Act 1993, the former Parliamentary Superannuation Act 1973, the former Parliamentary Retiring Benefits Act 1985 and the Judges' Contributory Pensions Act 1968.

While these schemes have been closed to new members, because of the long‑term nature of superannuation benefits, the superannuation liability continues to increase as existing members accrue additional years of service as they approach retirement age. The liability is projected to increase until 2022‑23 and then gradually decline over the following five or six decades.

The estimated General Government Superannuation Liability as at 30 June 2017 is $6 345.5 million, which is comprised of the estimated present value of the liability of $7 958.3 million less the estimated fair value of plan assets of $1 612.8 million. The primary reason for the increase in the superannuation liability as at 30 June 2017 compared to the 2016 Budget estimate ($5 470.5 million) is the application of a revised discount rate to better reflect the sustained reduction in Australian Government bond rates.


 

Table 7.3:          General Government Superannuation Liability as at   30 June

 

 

2017)

 

)Budget)

2018)

Forward) Estimate)

2019)

Forward) Estimate)

2020)

Forward) Estimate)

 

 

$m)

$m)

$m)

$m)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Present Value of Superannuation Liability

 

7 958.3 

8 046.5 

8 116.6 

8 167.8

Fair Value of Plan Assets

 

(1 612.8)

(1 584.4)

(1 552.2)

(1 515.0)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

6 345.5 

6 462.2 

6 564.4 

6 652.8 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chart 7.2 projects the General Government Superannuation Liability (net of plan assets) over the total life of the defined benefit schemes.

Chart 7.2:            General Government Superannuation Liability Projection, 30 June 2017 to 30 June 2084

Title: General Government Superannuation Liability Projection, 30 June 2017 to 30 June 2084 - Description: The chart shows that the General Government Superannuation Liability is predicted to grow until 2022 23 and then gradually declining over the following six decades to 2084.

 

 


 

Independent actuarial assessments are prepared by the State Actuary to provide reporting and disclosure information, relating to the General Government Superannuation Liability, in respect of current and former employees who have defined benefits arising from membership of the closed defined benefit superannuation schemes.

The actuarial assumptions are used for the variables that will determine the ultimate cost of providing long‑term superannuation benefits. Actuarial assumptions must be unbiased (i.e. neither imprudent nor excessively conservative) and should reflect the economic relationships between factors such as inflation, rates of salary increase, the return on scheme assets and discount rates.

Key assumptions used by the State Actuary in preparing the most recent actuarial estimate of the General Government Superannuation Liability are:

·       Discount Rate ‑ 4.75 per cent (5.5 per cent in the 2015‑16 Budget);

·       Salary Increase Rate ‑ 3.0 per cent (no change);

·       Pension Increase Rate ‑ 2.5 per cent (no change); and

·       Investment Earnings ‑ 4.75 per cent (5.5 per cent in the 2015‑16 Budget).

It is important to recognise that the actuarial estimate is a snapshot of a scheme's estimated financial position at a particular point in time, and that the actuarial results do not predict a scheme's future financial position or its ability to pay benefits in the future. Over time, a scheme's total cost will depend on a number of factors, including the amount of benefits the scheme pays, the number of people paid benefits (for example mortality and marital status are estimated), scheme expenses and the amount earned on any assets invested to pay the benefits. These variables will change over the life of the liability. The variables are uncertain at the valuation date and are estimated by the State Actuary.

The Superannuation Liability is particularly sensitive to discount rate movements. Since 2009‑10, due to the volatility of the bond market and the long‑term nature of the liability, the Budget projections of the Superannuation Liability do not use the current Australian Government long‑term bond rate. From 2009‑10 to 2012‑13, the Budget projections were based on an average discount rate of 6.0 per cent. From 2013‑14 to 2015‑16, the Budget projections of the Superannuation Liability were based on a discount rate of 5.5 per cent.

As part of the Budget development process, the discount rate is reviewed by Treasury. The review is based on the average of historical rates published by the Reserve Bank of Australia, specifically the midpoint rate of the longest term Australian Government bonds. As a result of Treasury's review, a 75 basis point reduction has been utilised as a representation of the decline in the average bond rate over the long‑term duration of the superannuation liability. This results in a long‑term trend rate of 4.75 per cent. The 2016‑17 Budget projections are therefore based on a discount rate of 4.75 per cent.

There is a strong inverse relationship between the discount rate and the valuation of the liability. Chart 7.3 shows the impact of an increase or decrease of one per cent in the average discount rate used to value the General Government Superannuation Liability. The base rate column represents the estimated Present Value of the Superannuation Liability (Gross) as at 30 June in each year valued by the State Actuary using a discount rate of 4.75 per cent.


 

Chart 7.3:            Sensitivity Analysis of the General Government Superannuation Liability as at 30 June

Title: Sensitivity Analysis of the General Government Superannuation Liability as at 30 June - Description: This chart demonstrates that there is a strong inverse relationship between the discount rate and the valuation of the liability and shows the impact of an increase or decrease of one per cent in the average discount rate used to value the General Government Superannuation Liability.

 

Currently, the emerging cash cost of defined benefit superannuation payments is met from the Consolidated Fund, funded partly by agency contributions and by a Reserved by Law contribution, which comprises the balance of the Government's share of pension and lump sum benefit costs.


 

Chart 7.4 shows the estimated employer contribution payments, made up of both pension and lump sum benefit costs, over the total life of the defined benefit schemes.

Chart 7.4:            Defined Benefit Superannuation Costs, 2016‑17 to 2083‑84

Title: Defined Benefit Superannuation Costs, 2016-17 to 2083-84 - Description: The chart shows that estimated employer contribution payments are predicted to peak in 2029 30 and then gradually decline over the following six decades to 2084.

 

A key budget risk is that the cost to the Budget will increase significantly in coming years, increasing by 67 per cent over the next 13 years and peaking in 2029‑30. The estimated cost to the Budget is based on the most recent actuarial estimates. The change from the projections in the 2015‑16 Budget reflects a 3.4 per cent increase in the expected peak cost to $451.6 million ($436.8 million in the 2015‑16 Budget).

In 2016‑17, defined benefit superannuation costs are estimated to be 4.7 per cent of Cash Receipts from Operating Activities in the General Government Sector. Defined benefit superannuation costs, as a percentage of General Government cash receipts, is estimated to increase to 5.5 per cent within five years (by 2021‑22) and peak at 5.9 per cent in 2024‑25, followed by a decrease to 4.6 per cent in 15 years (2031‑32) and to 3.6 per cent in 20 years (2036‑37).

While movements in discount rates have a significant impact on the valuation of the superannuation liability at any point of time, those discount rate movements do not impact on the nominal cash flows required to meet the emerging cost of benefits paid to members.


 

Table 7.4 shows the estimated nominal cash flows required to meet the emerging cost of superannuation benefits payable to members. This represents the estimated total cost of benefits payable and includes the General Government share, together with the share of benefits that are funded from scheme assets.

Table 7.4:            Undiscounted Defined Benefit Obligations Payable to Employees of the General Government Sector

 

2016 

 

Estimate 

 

$m 

Estimated total benefit payments to be made in the period

 

No later than 1 year

390

Later than 1 year and no later than 2 years

409

Later than 2 years and no later than 5 years

1 311

Later than 5 years and no later than 10 years

2 523

Later than 10 years and no later than 15 years

2 710

Later than 15 years and no later than 20 years

2 711

Later than 20 years and no later than 25 years

2 577

Later than 25 years and no later than 30 years

2 291

Later than 30 years and no later than 35 years

1 902

Later than 35 years and no later than 40 years

1 435

Later than 40 years and no later than 45 years

946

Later than 45 years and no later than 50 years

521

 

 

Undiscounted defined benefit obligation

19 726

 

 

After 50 years there is expected to be a reducing level of cash for a further 25 years totalling approximately:

 

295

 

 

 

 


 

Total State Superannuation Liability

The estimated Total State Superannuation Liability as at 30 June 2017 is $6 992.2 million, which is comprised of the estimated present value of the liability of $8 762.3 million less the estimated fair value of plan assets of $1 770.0 million. Total State includes Government Business Enterprises and State‑owned Companies.

Table 7.5:          Total State Superannuation Liability as at 30 June

 

 

2017)

 

) Budget)

2018)

Forward) Estimate)

2019)

Forward) Estimate)

2020)

Forward) Estimate)

 

 

$m)

$m)

$m)

$m)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Present Value of Superannuation Liability

 

8 762.3 

8 860.0 

8 937.5 

8 994.1 

Fair Value of Plan Assets

 

(1 770.0)

(1 739.0)

(1 703.6)

(1 662.7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

6 992.2 

7 121.0 

7 233.8 

7 331.4 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chart 7.5 shows the impact of an increase or decrease of one per cent in the discount rate used to value the Total State Superannuation Liability. The base rate column represents the estimated Present Value of the Superannuation Liability (Gross) as at 30 June in each year valued by the State Actuary using a discount rate of 4.75 per cent.

Chart 7.5:            Sensitivity Analysis of the Total State Superannuation Liability as at 30 June

Title: Sensitivity Analysis of the Total State Superannuation Liability as at 30 June - Description: This chart demonstrates that there is a strong inverse relationship between the discount rate and the valuation of the liability and shows the impact of an increase or decrease of one per cent in the average discount rate used to value the General Government Superannuation Liability.


Table 7.6 shows the estimated nominal cash flows required to meet the emerging cost of superannuation benefits payable to members. This represents the estimated total cost of benefits payable and includes the Total State share, together with the share of benefits that are funded from scheme assets.

Table 7.6:            Undiscounted Defined Benefit Obligations Payable to Employees of the Total State Sector

 

2016 

 

Estimate 

 

$m 

Estimated total benefit payments to be made in the period

 

No later than 1 year

429

Later than 1 year and no later than 2 years

450

Later than 2 years and no later than 5 years

1 442

Later than 5 years and no later than 10 years

2 777

Later than 10 years and no later than 15 years

2 983

Later than 15 years and no later than 20 years

2 985

Later than 20 years and no later than 25 years

2 839

Later than 25 years and no later than 30 years

2 524

Later than 30 years and no later than 35 years

2 097

Later than 35 years and no later than 40 years

1 582

Later than 40 years and no later than 45 years

1 043

Later than 45 years and no later than 50 years

574

 

 

Undiscounted defined benefit obligation

21 725

 

 

After 50 years there is expected to be a reducing level of cash for a further 25 years totalling approximately:

 

325

 

 

 


 

Tasmanian Risk Management Fund

Purpose of the Fund

The Tasmanian Risk Management Fund was established on 1 January 1999 to provide a whole‑of‑government approach to funding and managing the insurable risks of inner‑Budget agencies.

Agencies are covered for the majority of insurable risks to which they are exposed or for which they choose to accept responsibility and the Fund agrees to cover, including:

·       personal injury (including workers' compensation and personal accident);

·       property (including buildings and contents, business interruption, motor vehicles, machinery, marine hull, transit and fraud);

·       liability (including public and products, professional, and directors' and officers' liability);

·       medical liability; and

·       travel.

All classes are self‑insured by the Fund apart from marine hull, travel, and some property claims, which are insured through the private sector, as this is more cost-effective than self‑insurance for these categories of risk. From 1 July 2015, catastrophe insurance has been purchased in the external market to provide cover for property claims above $5 million.

Performance of the Fund

The Fund operates on a cost recovery basis with all inner Budget agencies making contributions each year in order to build up reserves to meet current and emerging costs. Contributions are based on advice from an independent actuary and are adjusted over time according to the claims experience of agencies. Overall, total agency contributions are expected to increase from $56.2 million in 2015‑16 to $56.7 million in 2016‑17.

The expected overall increase in contributions for 2016‑17 is mainly due to an anticipated increase in both workers' compensation and medical liability expenses. The increase in workers' compensation contributions and expenses is primarily as a result of anticipated higher claim payments. Medical liability contributions and expenses have increased moderately over 2015‑16, reflecting the continuing increase in the number of large claims in the medical risk portfolio. These increases have been offset to a large extent by a significant decrease in property contributions and expenses, which is mainly due to continued favourable claims experience over the past year, as well as the finalisation of the Dunalley bushfire claim ($4.9 million in 2015‑16). Contributions and anticipated expenses for liability and motor vehicles have also decreased moderately.

The Fund's Actuary takes into account the level of assets and liabilities in each risk category when determining annual contributions. The aim is to match assets and liabilities over time.


 

Table 7.7:            Financial Position of the Tasmanian Risk Management Fund as at 30 June

 

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

 

Estimated Outcome

Budget

Forward Estimate

Forward Estimate

Forward Estimate

 

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Carried Forward Cash Equivalent Balance1

224.8

229.8

236.4

243.2

249.1

Receivables

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

 

225.8

230.8

237.4

244.2

250.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities2

 

 

 

 

 

Personal Injury

89.5

92.6

96.0

99.2

101.8

Property

1.4

1.4

1.5

1.5

1.6

Motor Vehicle

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Liability

8.5

8.9

9.1

9.4

9.6

Medical

116.7

119.9

124.2

128.6

132.6

Payables

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

 

217.0

223.7

231.7

239.6

246.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Assets

8.8

7.1

5.7

4.6

3.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Carried Forward Cash Equivalent Balance includes the estimated balance from the previous year with adjustments for expected return on investments.

2    Liabilities are calculated by the Fund's actuary as at 31 December 2015.