10   Department of State Growth

Agency Outline

The Department of State Growth actively and strategically pursues jobs, growth and opportunity for Tasmanians. The Department of State Growth pursues and promotes investment; facilitates major projects; supports business and industry to grow; and ensures strategic investment in infrastructure. The Department also works closely with business and industry to address barriers to growth; reduce red tape; provide a skilled workforce; develop our creative and cultural industries; and ensure efficient, cost effective transport and logistics systems. The Department is also responsible for providing strategic advice on energy policy, including energy security to the Government, and is responsible for providing advice on forestry policy and reform.

The Department provides portfolio support for the following Ministers:

·       Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events, Hon Will Hodgman MP;

·       Minister for State Growth and Minister for Energy, Hon Matthew Groom MP;

·       Minister for Infrastructure, Hon Rene Hidding MP;

·       Minister for Forestry and Minister for Planning and Local Government, Hon Peter Gutwein MP;

·       Minister for the Arts, Hon Dr Vanessa Goodwin MLC;

·       Minister for Mining, Hon Adam Brooks MP; and

·       Minister for Information Technology and Innovation, Hon Michael Ferguson MP.

The Department also supports the Parliamentary Secretary for Small Business, Guy Barnett MP.

The Department is organised into four key areas: Cultural and Tourism Development; Industry and Business Development; Transport Services; and Business Services. The Department supports the Office of the Coordinator‑General, Infrastructure Tasmania and works closely with Tourism Tasmania. It also supports the AgriGrowth Division in the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment to develop the agricultural sector.

This chapter provides the Department's financial information for 2016‑17 and over the Forward Estimates period (2017‑18 to 2019‑20). Further information on the Department is provided at www.stategrowth.tas.gov.au.


 

Key Deliverables

Table 10.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimate allocations for key deliverables within the Department.

Table 10.1:        Key Deliverables Statement1

 

2016‑17

 

Budget

2017‑18

Forward

Estimate

2018‑19

Forward

Estimate

2019‑20

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Business Enterprise Centres

200)

200)

….)

….)

Community Infrastructure Fund2

5 000)

4 462)

4 463)

….)

Congestion in Greater Hobart

500)

500)

….)

….)

Geoscience Initiative Program

350)

350)

350)

350)

Great Eastern Drive

….)

300)

3 000)

3 000)

Northern Cities Major Development Initiative3

15 000)

20 000)

20 000)

35 000)

Supporting Small Businesses with Apprenticeships and Traineeships

300)

300)

….)

….)

TAFE Training Infrastructure

….)

1 500)

1 500)

….)

Tasmanian Innovation, ICT and Science Agenda

305)

155)

155)

155)

TMAG Strategic Organisational Reform

200)

350)

150)

….)

Work Readiness for Growth Industries

450)

450)

….)

….)

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The Department continues to deliver election commitments funded for three or more years as detailed in chapter 10 of Government Services Budget Paper No 2, 2014‑15 and key deliverables funded for two or more years as detailed in chapter 10 of Government Services Budget Paper No 2, 2015‑16.

2.   This Budget provides additional funding of $5 million for this initiative, and the balance has been reallocated from the Regional Revival Fund. The Government remains committed to funding all of the Regional Revival Fund projects as the proponents are able to proceed.

3.   The 2015‑16 Budget provided $60 million for the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative. The 2016‑17 Budget provides an additional $30 million.

Business Enterprise Centres

As part of the Government's continued commitment to grow small business in Tasmania, the 2016‑17 Budget provides $200 000 per annum in 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 to support an improved state‑wide small business assistance program that enables targeted business development.

Business and Jobs Attraction and Population Program

In the 2015‑16 Budget the Government provided $8 million to support a range of investment attraction and population growth activities. This program has already secured the relocation of advanced manufacturing company, One Atmosphere, creating nearly 30 jobs and an investment of $3.2 million in a new facility.

Over the next three years, the program will continue to support a range of investment opportunities in advanced manufacturing, business events, defence, international education and population growth, with further details below.

Advanced Manufacturing

The Government proudly supports manufacturing and will continue to invest in initiatives as part of its commitment to the Advanced Manufacturing sector's long history of manufacturing innovation and achievement.

The Budget includes funding for a broad range of statewide initiatives that will be included in the Tasmanian Advanced Manufacturing Action Plan. Existing workforce development funding will be prioritised to focus on supporting existing employees and job readiness in growth areas.

Business Events Tasmania

Based on Business Events Tasmania's research, the Business Events sector contributes over $110 million to the Tasmanian economy annually, predominantly in the shoulder and winter periods. This provides important support to tourism businesses and underpins air access and overall investment in the sector.

The Budget provides funding to further support Business Events Tasmania's marketing and coordination activities, including additional resources in the North of Tasmania and increased focus on international markets.

Our Fair Share of Defence Spending

Our Fair Share of Defence Spending Strategy positions Tasmanian businesses to take advantage of opportunities associated with defence spending by attracting, enabling and building defence industries in the State; promoting Tasmania as a military supplier; and leveraging off Tasmania's status as the Southern Ocean and Antarctic Gateway.

International Education

In August 2015, the Tasmanian Government signed the Making Our Future Partnership Agreement with the University of Tasmania. One of five objectives of this Agreement is to increase the flow of international students into the Tasmanian community.

Population Growth

In September 2015, the Government released its Population Growth Strategy, which aims to increase Tasmania's population to 650 000 by 2050 and ensure Tasmania is recognised as the best place in the country to live, work, invest and raise a family. The Strategy sets 50 targeted and comprehensive actions for Government, stakeholders and the community across three key areas; job creation and workforce development, migration, and liveability.

Community Infrastructure Fund

New funding of $5 million has been allocated in 2016‑17 for the establishment of a Community Infrastructure Fund to support community infrastructure initiatives throughout Tasmania. In addition, funding previously allocated to the Regional Revival Fund for Musselroe Estate and Craggy Ridge will be incorporated into this fund to provide total funding of $13.9 million over three years. The Government remains committed to funding these projects when the proponents are able to proceed.


 

Congestion in Greater Hobart

In response to a number of serious traffic congestion events in Hobart in early 2016, the Government convened a summit with the four largest Southern Tasmanian Councils to work cooperatively on solutions.

After commissioning an expert report containing a range of recommendations on congestion-positive measures, $1 million over two years has been allocated in this Budget to progress actions to alleviate traffic congestion in Greater Hobart. Funds will be allocated to congestion-reducing measures including improvements to traffic control systems and capital investments to smooth traffic flow.

Energy Efficiency

The Government is, in partnership with Aurora Energy Pty Ltd, developing a Tasmanian Energy Efficiency Loan Scheme. This new scheme will facilitate no interest loans to support small businesses and households invest in a range of energy efficiency products. Up to $10 million in loan funding will be made available to support the scheme with the final design to be announced in coming months. In addition, the Government will support the continuation of Aurora Energy Pty Ltd's highly successful energy efficiency initiative for vulnerable customers. This initiative is delivered through the YES program and provides a grant component to the NILs network to support vulnerable customers purchasing energy efficiency products.

Energy Security

Tasmania has recently experienced one of the most significant energy security challenges since hydro industrialisation due to the unprecedented combination of record low rainfall and a prolonged Basslink outage. To ensure energy security in the short term, the Government implemented the Energy Supply Plan comprising gas generation, over 220 MW of supplementary diesel generation and major user voluntary commercial load reductions.

In order to ensure energy security over the longer term, the Government has established an Energy Security Taskforce to undertake an energy security risk assessment and provide advice on further measures to enhance energy security. Funding to support the work of the Taskforce will be provided through the funding of $3 million provided in Finance‑General (see chapter 3 of this Budget Paper) to undertake a number of important reviews.

Forestry Policy and Reform

The 2015-16 Budget provided additional funding across 2015-16 and 2016-17 for Forestry Reform Implementation. This important work continues, and involves a cross agency approach with the Department of Treasury and Finance, Forestry Tasmania and industry stakeholders. The Minister for Forestry also has responsibility for delivery of two critical Agenda 2016 deliverables: release Strategic Growth plan for Forest Industries in Tasmania, and secure a 20 year rolling extension to the Regional Forest Agreement.

To support growth in the forest industry, two new initiatives in 2016‑17 include the launch of a Wood and Fibre Processing Innovation Program, with funding of $500 000 that will augment $750 000 of existing funding commitments relating to the utilisation of biomass, and $500 000 in funding assistance for strategic marketing on a dollar for dollar basis with the industry.


 

Geoscience Initiative Program

The Geoscience Initiative is a new program of targeted geoscience projects focused on the North West and Western regions of Tasmania that compliments an enhancement of data storage and analysis capabilities at the Mineral Resources Tasmania Core Library. The program will provide Tasmania the best opportunity to attract investment as the mineral exploration and mining sectors recover.

Great Eastern Drive

To help boost regional tourism on Tasmania's East Coast, the Government named and marketed the Tasman Highway (between Orford and St Helens) as the Great Eastern Drive. Additional funding over the Forward Estimates of $6.3 million over three years has been provided to fund capital works to enhance the visitor experience on Tasmania's iconic tourist drive.

Hospitality Industry Policy Implementation

As part of its election commitments, the Government allocated funding in 2016‑17 to continue the implementation of the Hospitality Industry Policy. The hospitality sector is a critical part of the Tasmanian tourism industry and ensuring that it is appropriately supported is vital to achieving the Government's vision to grow the State's visitors to 1.5 million by 2020.

King Island Shipping Service Facilitation

The Tasmanian Government has been working closely with the King Island Council and the Island community to ensure the continuation of essential shipping services following the anticipated withdrawal of the current weekly SeaRoad Mersey service to the Port of Grassy in late 2016.

Negotiations are currently underway in relation to the future provision of the service and an announcement will be made when these negotiations are completed.

Metro Bus Fleet Initiative

Metro Tasmania Pty Ltd will be provided with four annual equity payments of $4.5 million to implement a Metro Bus Infrastructure capital initiative. This will provide the advanced manufacturing sector in Tasmania with the opportunity to bid for manufacturing, customising and fit‑out work to deliver an accelerated replacement Metro Tasmania bus fleet. This equity payment will be made by Finance‑General. For further detail please refer to chapter 3 of this Budget Paper.

North Melbourne AFL Games

The Government is currently in negotiations with North Melbourne to extend the commitment to play in Hobart. It is expected that funding arrangements will be finalised during the 2016‑17 financial year.


 

Northern Cities Major Development Initiative

A further $30 million over the Forward Estimates has been allocated by the Government to support the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative.

The initiative, announced in the 2015‑16 State Budget, will see the Coordinator‑General working in close collaboration with Northern Tasmanian councils to help revive communities through infrastructure projects, including Devonport Living City, the Launceston University of Tasmania Campus Relocation Project, and enhancing the presence of the University of Tasmania at West Park in Burnie.

Office of the Coordinator‑General

The 2015‑16 Budget provided additional funding in 2016‑17 to help deliver the Government's growth agenda in three specific areas: international engagement activities; investment attraction and facilitation; and the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative.

The Office of the Coordinator‑General also has responsibility within its funding for delivery of several critical Agenda 2016 deliverables, including: EOI Round 2 for sensitive tourism development in Tasmanian national parks and reserves; an international trade mission to India; and the release of the second Tasmanian Red Tape Audit Report.

Supporting Small Business with Apprenticeships and Traineeships

The Government has allocated $600 000 over two years to support small business with apprenticeships and traineeships. Coupled with funding assistance, the Department will work with small businesses and Group Training Organisations to make it easier for small businesses to employ an apprentice or trainee. This will enable more apprentices and trainees to successfully complete their education and for small businesses to access the skilled workers they need to grow and expand.

TAFE Training Infrastructure

Funding of $3 million has been provided to a TasTAFE Infrastructure Improvement Program. For further information refer to chapter 26 of this Budget Paper.

This funding has been provided to the Department in its role of administering grant payments to TasTAFE.

Tasmanian Innovation, ICT and Science Agenda

Funding has been provided to support initiatives promoting Tasmanian focused science, innovation and ICT skills development, including measures to optimise economic benefits, future opportunities and investment.

Items funded include participation in Australian Forum of Chief Scientists deliberations, Science Meets Parliament, Science Week initiatives and Awards, Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS), Inspiring Australia support, Code Club, and the TasICT Generations initiative.

TMAG Strategic Organisational Reform

Additional funding of $700 000 over three years has been provided to implement the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery's (TMAG) strategic organisational reform. Items funded include retraining and skills development.

Work Readiness for Growth Industries

Funding of $900 000 over two years has been allocated to support leading employers in growth industries to give young Tasmanians an opportunity to develop technical and work‑ready employability skills to ensure they can be productive and capable employees from their first day on the job. The program is founded on an already successful program and will produce work‑ready young Tasmanians and create a pathway to an apprenticeship or traineeship and will help meet the high demand for skilled labour in growth industries.

 


 

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of State Growth are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 ‑ Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth;

·       Output Group 2 ‑ Infrastructure;

·       Output Group 3 ‑ Energy Policy and Advice;

·       Output Group 4 ‑ Resources Policy and Regulatory Services;

·       Output Group 5 ‑ Culture and Creative Industries; and

·       Output Group 6 ‑ Subsidies and Concessions.

Table 10.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department of State Growth.


Table 10.2:        Output Group Expense Summary

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 ‑ Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

2.1  Infrastructure Tasmania

  800)

  800)

  800)

  800)

  800)

2.2  Infrastructure Strategy1

 1 694)

 2 109)

 1 668)

  647)

  148)

2.3  Land Transport Safety2

 20 907)

 19 165)

 16 906)

 17 118)

 17 299)

2.4  Passenger Transport3

 3 175)

 3 573)

 2 986)

 3 005)

 2 936)

2.5  Traffic Management and Engineering Services4

 3 372)

 3 928)

 4 016)

 3 548)

 3 579)

 

 29 948)

 29 575)

 26 376)

 25 118)

 24 762)

Output Group 6 ‑ Subsidies and Concessions

 

 

 

 

 

6.1  Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

 1 036)

 1 067)

 1 100)

 1 133)

 1 167)

6.2  Metropolitan General Access Services5

 41 057)

 38 942)

 40 110)

 41 313)

 42 552)

6.3  Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services

 23 029)

 23 720)

 24 432)

 25 165)

 25 920)

6.4  Non‑Metropolitan General Access Services

 7 626)

 7 626)

 7 626)

 7 626)

 7 626)

6.5  Construction of Streets in Towns

  52)

  52)

  52)

  52)

  52)

 

 72 800)

 71 407)

 73 320)

 75 289)

 77 317)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies6

 81 070)

 81 492)

 47 676)

 43 968)

 44 784)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program7

 148 338)

 148 691)

 154 141)

 152 984)

 149 002)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Energy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Energy Policy and Advice

 

 

 

 

 

3.1  Energy Policy and Advice8

 2 189)

 3 749)

 1 882)

 1 920)

 1 938)

 

 2 189)

 3 749)

 1 882)

 1 920)

 1 938)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.1  Coordinator‑General9

 4 216)

 2 739)

 2 489)

 2 489)

 2 489)

1.2  Industry and Business Development10,11

 65 326)

 55 479)

 43 336)

 38 031)

 24 473)

1.3  Skills Development12

 107 570)

 104 230)

 106 364)

 107 538)

 107 660)

 

 177 112)

 162 448)

 152 189)

 148 058)

 134 622)


 

Table 10.2:        Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.4  Events and Hospitality13,14

 11 685)

 11 055)

 11 907)

 11 037)

 10 149)

 

 11 685)

 11 055)

 11 907)

 11 037)

 10 149)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.1  Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

 10 061)

 10 050)

 10 203)

 10 243)

 10 231)

5.2  Arts Industry Development

 7 811)

 7 648)

 7 797)

 7 868)

 7 958)

5.3  Screen Industry Development

 1 754)

 1 755)

 1 784)

 1 815)

 1 828)

 

 19 626)

 19 453)

 19 784)

 19 926)

 20 017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 3 527)

 3 554)

 2 962)

 2 977)

 2 993)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Forestry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1  Forestry Policy and Reform15

 1 659)

 1 508)

 1 000)

 1 020)

 1 031)

 

 1 659)

 1 508)

 1 000)

 1 020)

 1 031)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 2 906)

 2 964)

 3 023)

 3 086)

 3 086)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Mining

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.2  Mineral Resources16

 6 191)

 7 705)

 7 857)

 6 688)

 6 771)

 

 6 191)

 7 705)

 7 857)

 6 688)

 6 771)

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 557 051)

 543 601)

 502 117)

 492 071)

 476 472)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The movements in expenses in Infrastructure Strategy reflect the cash flow of election commitments including: Development of Derwent Valley Marina, Kings Meadows Flood Protection, and Legana Boat Ramp.

2.   The decrease in expenses in Land Transport Infrastructure in 2016‑17 primarily reflects the completion of the Support to Local Council initiative, and a saving relating to the third year of the National Heavy Vehicle initiative.

3.   Movements in expenses in Passenger Transport reflect the cash flow of the Public Transport Bus Services Procurement initiative.

4.   Movements in Traffic Management and Engineering Services reflect additional funding provided in 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 for the Congestion in Greater Hobart initiative.

5.   A decrease in Metropolitan General Access Services from 2016-17 reflects the reallocation of a $3.25 million grant to an equity payment for Metro Tasmanian Pty Ltd capital works through Finance‑General.

6.   The movement in Grants and Subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects cash flow changes associated with the Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd (TasRail) administered item. Refer to Table 10.13 for further information.

7.   This funding relates to expenses within the Capital Investment Program, which are primarily maintenance costs and depreciation and therefore exclude asset purchases.

8.   The increase in Energy Policy and Advice in 2016‑17 primarily reflects the cash flow of funds remaining for the Advancing the Case for a Nationally Funded Second Interconnector election commitment. Core funding for the provision of energy security and policy advice remains consistent over the Forward Estimates period.

9.   The decrease in Coordinator‑General in 2016‑17 reflects the end of additional transitional funding relating to international engagement, investment attraction and facilitation, and the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative.

10. Movements in Industry and Business Development reflects the cash flow of election commitment and initiative funding for multiple key business growth deliverables including: Business and Jobs Attraction and Population Growth Initiatives, Caterpillar Transition Taskforce, Growing the Visitor Economy, Regional Revival Fund ‑ New Projects Investment, Academy of Creative Industries and Performing Arts (ACIPA) and UXC Enterprise Development Centre.

11. Funding relating to ICT strategies that are the responsibility of the Minister for Information Technology and Innovation have been included within this Output.

12. Movements in Skill Development reflect reductions associated with the completion of Australian Government funding under the existing National Partnership Agreements set to cease in 2017.

13. Movements in Events and Hospitality reflect the cash flow of election commitment and initiative funding including: V8 Supercars, World Cup Cricket and Hawthorn Football Club.

14. Funding relating to Tourism supply‑side activities that are the responsibility of the Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events has been included within the Industry and Business Development Output.

15. Movements in Forestry Policy and Reform reflect the cash flow of initiative funding for the Regional Forest Agreement Review and Forestry Reform Implementation. Funding for growth strategy initiatives will come from uncommitted Tasmanian Forests Agreement funding.

16. Movements in funding reflect the cash flow of the geoscience initiative and additional funding allocated in the 2015‑16 Revised Estimate Report to support the relocation of mineral resources to Burnie.

Output Group 1:   Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

1.1 Coordinator‑General

The Office of the Coordinator‑General has been established to provide a single point of contact for businesses interested in investing in Tasmania, with a mandate to get things done, reduce red tape and aggressively pursue jobs and investment for Tasmania.

The Office of the Coordinator‑General is responsible for facilitating major projects, promoting competitiveness and promoting Tasmania as a destination for direct investment. The Office is responsible for overseeing and facilitating the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative, unsolicited bids, the Expressions of Interest program for appropriate and sensitive developments in Tasmania's National Parks and reserves and with assisting proponents with major investment opportunities.

1.2 Industry and Business Development

The Industry Business and Development Output:

·       focuses on maximising growth and job creation through business and industry. The Output provides a regional interface to engage with Tasmanian businesses and supports the State's core industries to leverage their competitive strengths;

·       provides a range of services that support the growth of Tasmanian business. This includes support for small business through business development services and online tools and information on starting, running and growing a business; and

·       includes a range of international engagement functions to promote economic growth, including export support, economic diplomacy, international brand building, businesses and skilled migration promotion and Antarctic gateway development. The Trade and International Relations function works across government and industry partners to optimise Tasmania's international market development across a range of goods and services sectors.

1.3 Skills Development

Skills Tasmania is responsible for:

·       managing Tasmania's publicly funded training and workforce development system, so that the capacity of the State's workforce can be developed to increase opportunities for Tasmanian enterprises and encourage economic development;

·       developing operational policy and strategy relating to skills and workforce development. This work has two key components: subsidising the delivery of high quality vocational education and training by TasTAFE and other Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) through Skills Tasmania's purchasing activities; and working with industry to support workforce development activities that assist Tasmanian enterprises to attract and retain the skilled workers they need to grow and to strategically deploy skills in the workplace to drive business productivity;

·       directing government training subsidies to training that is relevant to key industries, delivers positive employment outcomes and develops a stock of skills in our population that contributes to Tasmanian productivity, innovation, economic growth and emerging industries; and

·       managing the regulation of apprenticeships and traineeships, providing support services to RTOs and for the overall management and performance monitoring of the Tasmanian training system.

Table 10.3:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1

Performance Measure1

Unit of

Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Tape Reduction ‑ Annual audit reports published2

Number

na

na

1

1

Difference between the Tasmanian and national unemployment rate3

% point difference

1.8

0.9

<1

<1

Investment, exports, and import replacements facilitated

$ million

376.0

270.0

320.0

320.0

VET Graduates employed after training4

% of total

77.9

77.5

78.0

78.5

VET Graduates with improved employment status after training5

% of total

61.6

60.7

61.0

61.5

Employers using VET system6

% of total

56.7

na

55.0

na

Apprentice/Trainee commencements7

Number

6 094

6 110

6 400

6 500

Apprentice/Trainee in training8

Number

9 365

8 923

9 700

9 700

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   'na' indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced.

2.   The Government is undertaking red tape reduction in accordance with its commitments. A program of activity and progress will be published in the form of an annual audit report. The Tasmanian Red Tape Audit Report 2015 identified 73 red tape issues, of which the Government has so far addressed 41.

3.   The Government committed to reducing the Tasmanian unemployment rate to the national average in its first term. This was achieved in September 2015 when both rates were 6.2 per cent.

4.   Graduates employed after training data is sourced from National Centre for Vocational Education Research Limited (NCVER) Student Outcomes Survey 2014, released December 2014. This data relates to graduates from 2013.

5.   Graduates with improved employment status after training data sourced from NCVER Student Outcomes Survey 2014, released December 2014. Improved employment status after training is employment status changing from not employed before training to employed after training, or employed at a higher skill level after training, or received a job‑related benefit as reported by the graduate.

6.   Employers using VET system data is sourced from NCVER Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System 2013, released October 2013. This survey is conducted every second year which is why the 2014‑15 actual is not available. External factors influence this indicator.

7.   Apprentice/Trainee commencements represents the number of Tasmanian Trainees and Apprentices who began their Apprenticeship or Traineeship in the 12 months.

8.   Apprentice/Trainee in training represents the number of Tasmanian Apprentice and Trainees undertaking training.

Output Group 2:   Infrastructure

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

The Tasmanian Government introduced Infrastructure Tasmania to provide a coordinated approach to the planning and delivery of all major infrastructure in Tasmania, including rail, major roads and ports.

Infrastructure Tasmania's core functions are:

·       assessment and prioritisation of all major publicly funded infrastructure;

·       coordination of funding submissions under State and Australian Government budget processes;

·       management of Tasmania's interface with Infrastructure Australia; and

·       the completion of tasks, investigations, and the provision of advice at the request of the Government that relate to the matters listed above.

Infrastructure Tasmania's initial focus is on transport infrastructure, but it will have a broader coordination, assessment and prioritisation role for major publicly‑funded infrastructure.

2.2 Infrastructure Strategy

This Output delivers effective strategic policy guidance and advice on infrastructure and transport issues affecting Tasmania. This includes the development of guiding policy frameworks, high level policy implementation tasks and the coordination of major infrastructure planning initiatives, with a focus on:

·       working with Infrastructure Tasmania to deliver advice that ensures that planning and investment in Tasmania's transport system is strategic, considered and supportive of industry and community development;

·       developing close working relationships with stakeholders to understand their transport needs, the key issues affecting our transport system and identifying opportunities for positive change;

·       coordinating participation in the development of strategic infrastructure solutions across all levels of government;

·       developing national transport and infrastructure policy reforms;

·       developing transport infrastructure strategic policy frameworks; and

·       enhancing the safe and efficient movement of people and freight.

2.3 Land Transport Safety

This Output provides the legislation, regulatory policies and practices to support an efficient, safe and reliable land transport system that connects people, enhances visitor experiences and supports state growth, with a focus on:

·       providing strategic road safety policy advice, supporting the Road Safety Advisory Council, encouraging community involvement in road safety, delivering road safety education and awareness programs for Tasmanians and visitors, and administering the School Crossing Patrol Officer program;

·       delivery of all registration and licensing services to the Tasmanian community, including but not limited to developing and maintaining legislation, business policies, practices and procedures, providing information, collection of fees and delivering services relating to the registration of vehicles and licensing of drivers; and

·       delivering compliance, enforcement and education services in Tasmania on behalf of the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator; developing, encouraging and enforcing compliance with national and state‑based regulations for roadworthiness, vehicle standards, dimensions and mass limits, loading and operation of vehicles; and undertaking management of approved inspection stations and transport operation schemes.

2.4 Passenger Transport

This Output manages the regulation and delivery of passenger transport services that support the efficient, equitable and appropriate movement of people, including the administration of targeted transport assistance schemes and subsidies for students, the unemployed, aged pensioners and persons living with disability, with a focus on:

·       the sustainable delivery of passenger transport services;

·       administering contracts for the delivery of regular passenger transport services in metropolitan, urban fringe and regional and rural areas; and

·       implementation of programs including those arising from the Tasmanian Urban Passenger Transport Framework.

2.5 Traffic Management and Engineering Services

This Output delivers cost‑effective safety improvements to reduce the incidence of road crashes and provides specialist, technical traffic management and engineering solutions for the Government, and the community. Key projects include delivering specific projects under the auspices of the Tasmanian Road Safety Strategy 2007‑2016.


 

Table 10.4:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2

Performance Measure1

Unit of

Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposals assessed by Infrastructure Tasmania within required timeframes2

%

na

na

100

100

Reviews requested by Government completed by Infrastructure Tasmania within required timeframes2

%

na

na

100

100

Provision of effective support to the Government by providing road safety and road transport policy advice and information to enable informed decision making3

Satisfaction

na

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Motor Registry System availability

%

99

99

99

99

Vehicles found to be unregistered of those checked4

%

0.63

0.65

0.70

0.70

Heavy Vehicles found overweight

%

4.72

2.67

≤5

≤5

Line marking program achieved by the end of the financial year

%

100

62

100

100

Blackspot interventions in accordance with the program

%

100

100

100

100

Wheelchair accessible taxis (WATS) licensed

Number

65

77

75

75

Average Bus Age on contracted services5

Number

na

na

16

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   'na' indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced.

2.   Proposals are publicly‑funded major economic infrastructure proposals. Timeframes will be developed once Infrastructure Tasmania has completed its first full year of operation.

3.   Satisfaction and outcomes are largely measured by feedback from the Minister's Office, Secretary, relevant Deputy Secretary and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients.

4.   This measure is based upon Automatic Number Plate Recognition cameras in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding between the Department and the Motor Accidents Insurance Board (MAIB).

5.   This is a measure of the effectiveness of government strategies to ensure that the average age of buses on government contracted services is appropriate.

Output Group 3:   Energy Policy and Advice

3.1 Energy Policy and Advice

This Output provides policy advice and support to the Minister for Energy on matters affecting energy in Tasmania. The aim is to maintain an efficient and effective regulatory structure for the Tasmanian energy sector, for the benefit of Tasmanian energy consumers, with a focus on:

·       implementing the Government's Tasmanian Energy Strategy to ensure energy is well placed to contribute to, and enable, future economic growth;

·       enhancing the framework to support the affordability and sustainability of energy markets and prices in Tasmania;

·       supporting the continuing implementation of reforms to the Tasmanian electricity supply industry;

·       supporting the Minister in his Shareholder Minister responsibilities for the State‑owned electricity businesses;

·       advancing Tasmania's interests in National Energy Market policy reforms and developments;

·       monitoring Tasmania's energy security and continuing to improve the preparedness to deal with any high impact, low probability supply emergencies; and

·       managing programs and projects related to energy as requested by the Government.

A key output for 2016‑17 will be providing support to the Tasmanian Energy Security Taskforce. The Taskforce will review energy security in Tasmania given the energy issues experienced in the past year.

Table 10.5:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3

Performance Measure1

Unit of

Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Policy Advice

 

 

 

 

 

Provision of effective support to the Government by providing information and advice to enable informed decision making

Satisfaction

≥4

4

4

≥4

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Energy Market Development

 

 

 

 

 

Promote and protect Tasmanian interests in national energy market developments and reforms

Outcomes

>4

4

4

≥4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Energy Security

 

 

 

 

 

Maintain adequate frameworks to deal with major energy security risks

Adequacy

>4

4

4

≥4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Projects and Programs

 

 

 

 

 

Achieve objectives within budget and time frame, achieve sponsor and client satisfaction and comply with all prudential guidelines.

Outcomes

>4

4

4

≥4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.   Satisfaction and outcomes are largely measured by feedback from the Minister's Office and Secretary, using a five‑point scale where four is rated 'good'.


 

Output Group 4:   Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

4.1 Forestry Policy and Reform

This Output provides high level support on forest resource policy and management issues. It has a focus on forest policy projects of strategic importance such as the legislative review to support the Government's forestry policy, review and extension of the Regional Forest Agreement, as well as delivery of specific programs to assist the development and growth of the forest industry. The Output facilitates a number of inter‑agency committees relating to forest policy and programs.

4.2 Mineral Resources

This Output facilitates mineral exploration and mining development and fosters and encourages responsible land management in Tasmania, with a focus on:

·       improving the quality and quantity of geoscience information, essential to the encouragement of mineral exploration and responsible land management, including the continued development of the TIGER data management system and a comprehensive three dimensional geological model of the State;

·       promoting Tasmania nationally and internationally as being highly prospective for mineral exploration and mining through targeted and strategic marketing; and

·       providing information for sustainable land use planning and infrastructure development decisions through activities such as geohazard mapping, resource identification to protect against sterilisation and management and rehabilitation of abandoned mining lands.

This Output also ensures the responsible management of the State's mineral resources and a fair and sustainable return to the community when a resource of metallic, construction, industrial and fuel minerals or geothermal energy is developed. This is achieved by focusing on:

·       assessment and regulation of legal titles for mineral tenements; and

·       managing the royalty regime and collecting fees and rentals.

Under the Mining for Tasmania's Future Policy, Mineral Resources Tasmania will be relocated to Burnie to ensure it can provide the most effective contribution to managing the State's expansive minerals and energy resources.

Table 10.6:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Survey regarding standards in administrative process and policy development that meet the needs of the end‑user:1

 

 

 

 

 

Minister

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Agency ‑ Secretary / Deputy Secretary

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied


 

Table 10.6:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmania's percentage of industry's mineral exploration expenditure in Australia2

%

1.4

1.6

1.3

1.3

Area covered by modern geoscientific data collection techniques with subsequent 1:25 000 geological mapping coverage3

%

71.0

74.4

66.4

67.0

Programmed abandoned mining lands rehabilitation projects completed

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   A user satisfaction survey seeks stakeholder feedback regarding the level of satisfaction perceived on such issues as quality, equity, efficiency and openness of the consultation process.

2.   Statistics derived from the first three quarters of each financial year from ABS greenfields exploration data.

3.   The area covered by modern remote sensing data (less than 15 years old) is subject to change. The performance targets are regularly refactored based on area of modern remote sensing data available at a given point in time.

Output Group 5:   Culture and Creative Industries

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

Through the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG), this Output aims to increase community understanding of the cultural and natural world by collecting, conserving, interpreting and researching material evidence within the areas of humanities including visual arts, history and anthropology and the biological and physical sciences. It provides the community with opportunities to experience the past and the present, invites participation in the State's collection and offers a stimulating museum and art environment.

5.2 Arts Industry Development

This Output focuses on working with Tasmanian artists and arts organisations to grow this important industry. It aims to broaden the engagement of Tasmanians in the arts, highlight the State's diverse arts and cultural sector and build the sustainability of arts businesses. This is achieved through a range of industry development programs and projects, coupled with the provision of investment funding to individual artists, arts organisations and major Tasmanian cultural institutions to assist their planning and realisation of projects, as well as to develop and present new work. These projects generate economic activity, create employment opportunities and add to our terrific array of cultural tourist attractions. The Output also includes investment funding and professional assistance to Tasmanian museums (other than TMAG), art galleries and moveable cultural heritage organisations as a key part of the Government's ongoing support for the preservation of the State's cultural heritage.


 

5.3 Screen Industry Development

This Output aims to build on the success that has occurred in the sector through increased local, interstate and international screen production in this State. It also provides support for professional and project development, and promotion of screen culture activities. In doing so, it seeks to promote Tasmanian talent and stories to a world‑wide audience. This Output also aims to position Tasmania as a centre for the creation and development of quality content in the digital media environment as an important part of the growing creative industries sector.

5.4 Events and Hospitality

This Output aims to build and sustain a strong events sector, promote investment and support for the sector, and maximise the value and return on investment of events supported by the Government through major event partnerships, grant and development programs and a research program. Our aim is to develop a seasonally balanced events portfolio that brings people to Tasmania; helps achieve the Government's goal of 1.5 million tourists by 2020; builds the visitor economy; gets people moving around the State; encourages positive conversation about Tasmania; creates job opportunities; benefits communities through economic stimulus; and makes Tasmania the boutique events capital of Australia. This Output also includes oversight of Princes Wharf No. 1 Shed, a key event venue on the Hobart waterfront.

This Output also supports hospitality industry development through working closely with the Tasmanian Hospitality Association to address key issues facing the industry. This includes collaboration with Output 1.3 to support skills and capability development, career pathways, recruitment and retention and providing consistent high quality service. This Output also supports raising the industry profile and improving profitability and sustainability.

Table 10.7:        Performance Information ‑ Output Group 5

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

 

 

 

 

 

TMAG Total Visitors1

Number

1 440/day

1 097/day

1 125/day

1 125/day

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts Industry Development

 

 

 

 

 

Attendance at selected cultural venues2

Number

243 308

251 246

250 000

255 000

Contribution to Gross State Product of selected arts industries3

$ million

64.4

61.8

65.0

68.0

Participation in Selected Cultural Activities4

Per cent

28.1

na

28.3

28.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screen Industry Development

 

 

 

 

 

Developed projects that advance into production5

Ratio

4.4:1

4:1

6:1

6:1

Investment Attracted6

Ratio

12.4:1

14:4

5:1

5:1

Leveraged spend in the state

Ratio

4.4:1

7:1

4:1

4:1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   It is typical after the one‑off effect of a redevelopment opening year to see a reduction. Target numbers for 2015‑16 are 40 per cent (325 visitors per day) above pre‑redevelopment figures, which averaged 800 visits per day.

2.   Attendance at selected cultural venues includes only those organisations receiving assistance under the Programs Category of the Cultural Heritage Program of Arts Tasmania.

3.   Contribution to gross state product of selected arts industries in 2013‑14 has been revised downwards by the ABS in its publication 5220.0 Australian National Accounts: State Accounts. It was previously reported at $67.3 million.

4.   Data for this measure has been gained from the ABS release Participation in Selected Cultural Activities, Australia (Cat. No. 4921.0). It compares with a national participation rate of 26.8 per cent.

5.   The industry standard ratio for developed projects advancing into production is 10:1. The ratio varies because of the time taken by some projects to go into production, and because of that time, this ratio has been taken over three years.

6.   Investment Attracted ratios vary in line with the size of production budgets. Animation and TV drama series leverage more investment and jobs than documentaries.

Output Group 6:   Subsidies and Concessions

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

This Output relates to payments for the provision of services for the Bruny Island Ferry, Furneaux Shipping and King Island Shipping.

6.2 Metropolitan General Access Regular Passenger Transport Services

This Output relates to the contract funding provided to suppliers of public bus services, including school‑day‑only services in the metropolitan areas of Hobart, Launceston, Devonport and Burnie.

6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services

This Output relates to contract payments to operators of rural and special needs school buses during the school year.

6.4 Non‑Metropolitan General Access Regular Passenger Transport Services

This Output relates to contract funding provided to suppliers of public bus services outside the metropolitan areas of Hobart, Launceston, Devonport and Burnie but includes services to, from and between the metropolitan areas.

6.5 Construction of Streets in Towns

This Output contributes to the construction of streets as provided under the Local Government (Highways) Act 1982 and the Local Government Act 1993.


Capital Investment Program

Table 10.8 provides financial information for the Department's Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program (CIP) is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 10.8:        Capital Investment Program1,2

 

Estimated)

Total)

Cost)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

Asset Management

Ongoing)

 5 388)

 5 529)

 5 663)

 5 783)

Bass Highway ‑ Birralee to Exton3

10 000)

 1 000)

....)

....)

....)

Bridge Renewal Program3

Ongoing)

 1 670)

 1 850)

 1 240)

....)

Bridge Strengthening/replacement

10 000)

  500)

 4 100)

 4 900)

....)

Brooker Highway, Elwick, Goodwood, Howards Roads3

32 000)

 17 800)

 1 000)

....)

....)

Bruny Main Road: The Neck

3 700)

  500)

 1 900)

  800)

....)

Colebrook Main Road: Cambridge to Richmond

6 500)

  700)

 4 000)

 1 300)

....)

Domain Highway Planning3

5 000)

 2 000)

 3 000)

....)

....)

Environmental Management

Ongoing)

  556)

  571)

  585)

  599)

Esk Main Road ‑ Avoca to Fingal Shoulder Sealing

13 000)

 3 000)

 5 000)

 4 000)

....)

Great Eastern Drive4

6 300)

....)

  300)

 3 000)

 3 000)

Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity3

Ongoing)

 1 350)

 1 030)

  820)

....)

Highland Lakes Road

4 000)

 2 000)

 1 900)

....)

....)

Huon Highway / Summerleas Rd3

21 900)

 17 406)

 1 000)

....)

....)

Huon Highway: Glendevie Passing Opportunity

8 000)

 3 000)

 1 800)

....)

....)

Infrastructure Development

Ongoing)

  832)

  942)

  968)

  995)

Infrastructure Maintenance3,5

Ongoing)

 66 699)

 68 350)

 70 040)

 64 437)

Launceston Northbank

1 350)

  675)

....)

....)

....)

Midland Highway3,6

250 000)

 96 835)

 48 594)

 53 000)

....)

Murchison Highway

8 000)

 2 900)

 2 800)

  300)

....)

North East Freight Roads3

42 500)

 2 177)

....)

....)

....)

Program Management

Ongoing)

 1 098)

 1 180)

 1 213)

 1 247)

Road Safety and Traffic Management3,6

Ongoing)

 16 192)

 7 366)

 7 527)

 6 091)

Rokeby Main Road: Stage 2

15 000)

  200)

....)

....)

....)

Strategic Planning and Policy

Ongoing)

 2 836)

 2 905)

 2 970)

 3 026)

Tasman Ramps3

15 000)

  370)

....)

....)

....)


 

Table 10.8:        Capital Investment Program (continued)1,2

 

Estimated)

Total)

Cost)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Cities Major Development Initiative7

90 000)

 15 000)

 20 000)

 20 000)

 35 000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

)

 262 684)

 185 117)

 178 326)

 120 178)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The profile of funding for the CIP varies significantly from year to year due to the cash flow requirements of specific capital projects.

2.   All roads project estimates are provided at the 'P50' level. This is based on the project cost with sufficient contingency to provide a 50 per cent likelihood that this cost will not be exceeded. On this basis projects will be managed at a whole of program level to achieve a balance in cost estimating.

3.   This project includes funding from the Australian Government. The current five‑year agreement expires in 2018‑19. For further information, refer to chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

4.   Funding has been provided as a 2016‑17 Budget Initiative.

5.   Includes a provision for investment in improved and safer cycling infrastructure.

6.   This project includes funding from the Road Safety Levy. For further information, refer to chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

7.   Funding of $30 million has been provided as a 2016‑17 Budget Initiative.

Roads Program

The Roads Program directly contributes to the achievement of the Departmental outcome of a safe, sustainable and efficient transport system that enhances economic and social development.

Funding of $247.7 million has been allocated in 2016‑17 for roads infrastructure projects with total roads funding over the Budget and Forward Estimates period of $656.3 million.

Significant roads projects in 2016‑17 include:

·       continuation of significant works on the Brooker Highway, Elwick, Goodwood and Howard Roads intersections;

·       continuation of significant works on the Midland Highway;

·       continuation of construction works on Esk Main Road;

·       commencement of construction on the Highland Lakes Road;

·       commencement of construction of the Huon Highway/Summerleas Road intersections;

·       commencement of construction on the Murchison Highway; and

·       ongoing maintenance of existing road and bridge assets.

New funding has been provided in the 2016‑17 Budget to fund capital improvements on the Great Eastern Drive to enhance the visitor experience on Tasmania's iconic tourist drive.

All road projects incorporate the Positive Cycling policy to improve cycling access and safety as part of planning and design activities.

For more information in relation to the Roads Program see chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Northern Cities Major Development Initiative

The Northern Cities Major Development Initiative will see the State Government working in close collaboration with Northern Tasmanian Councils to help revive communities through infrastructure investment projects. Immediate projects include Devonport Living City, the University of Tasmania (Launceston Campus) relocation project, and the commencement of discussions regarding the enhanced presence and impact of the University of Tasmania in the Burnie area. An additional allocation of $35 million has been provided in 2019‑20 made up of $30 million in new funding and $5 million reallocated from 2016‑17. This takes the full allocation for this initiative to $90 million over four years.


Detailed Budget Statements

Table 10.9:        Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent1

 301 652)

 283 786)

 274 617)

 269 336)

 257 727)

Appropriation revenue ‑ works & services2

 90 631)

 113 483)

 130 653)

 127 266)

 120 078)

Grants3

 123 374)

 146 348)

 52 354)

 58 346)

 6 546)

Sales of goods and services

 2 007)

 4 255)

 4 255)

 4 255)

 4 255)

Fees and fines4

 12 815)

 12 815)

 5 815)

  475)

  475)

Interest

 2 430)

 2 380)

 2 380)

 2 380)

 2 380)

Other revenue

 2 690)

 1 972)

 1 972)

 1 972)

 1 972)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

 535 599)

 565 039)

 472 046)

 464 030)

 393 433)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

 58 468)

 59 691)

 61 108)

 61 535)

 61 505)

Depreciation and amortisation5

 108 641)

 86 928)

 88 860)

 89 055)

 89 280)

Supplies and consumables6

 62 089)

 91 899)

 87 688)

 86 652)

 82 733)

Grants and subsidies7

 234 077)

 213 886)

 205 611)

 202 605)

 189 894)

Borrowing costs

 1 630)

 1 670)

 1 670)

 1 670)

 1 670)

Other expenses

 4 643)

 1 517)

 3 519)

  523)

  527)

Total expenses from transactions

 469 548)

 455 591)

 448 456)

 442 040)

 425 609)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

 66 051)

 109 448)

 23 590)

 21 990)

(32 176)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

Net gain/(loss) on non‑financial assets

  4)

  4)

  4)

  4)

  4)

Total other economic flows included in net result

  4)

  4)

  4)

  4)

  4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

 66 055)

 109 452)

 23 594)

 21 994)

(32 172)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows ‑ other non‑owner changes in equity

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

 149 937)

 149 947)

 149 947)

 149 947)

 149 947)

Total other economic flows ‑ other non‑owner changes in equity

 149 937)

 149 947)

 149 947)

 149 947)

 149 947)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

 215 992)

 259 399)

 173 541)

 171 941)

 117 775)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The movements in Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent over the Budget and Forward Estimates are primarily attributable to the cash flow of election commitments and initiatives.

2.   The movement in Appropriation revenue ‑ works & services in 2016‑17 and over the Forward Estimates represents funding provided for the Capital Investment Program (CIP). The profile of funding for the CIP changes significantly from year to year due to the cash flow requirements of specific capital projects. Refer to Table 10.8 for further information on capital projects.

3.   The profile of Grants funding over the Forward Estimates reflects cash flows for Australian Government receipts, in particular relating to infrastructure and skills development.

4.   The reduction in Fees and fines from 2017‑18 reflects the existing completion date of the Road Safety Levy in December 2017 in accordance with Vehicle and Traffic (Driver Licensing and Vehicle Registration) Regulations 2010.

5.   The decrease in Depreciation and amortisation in 2016‑17 reflects a revision of the depreciation methodology applied to road infrastructure assets.

6.   The increase in Supplies and consumables in 2016‑17 reflects a review of capitalisation of road maintenance budgets to better reflect current accounting treatment of actual expenditure.

7.   The decrease in Grants and subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the cash flow of election commitments, particularly within the Industry and Business Development Output, and Australian Government funding administered by Skills Tasmania.

 


Table 10.10:      Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions1

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent2

 87 474)

 87 780)

 53 661)

 50 031)

 50 863)

Grants

  109)

  310)

  80)

  80)

  80)

Taxation

 38 184)

 40 376)

 41 587)

 42 835)

 44 118)

Sales of goods and services

 5 036)

 5 127)

 5 220)

 5 315)

 5 413)

Fees and fines

 9 801)

 9 998)

 10 200)

 10 370)

 10 608)

Other revenue

 28 032)

 20 348)

 24 508)

 24 508)

 24 508)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

 168 636)

 163 939)

 135 256)

 133 139)

 135 590)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions3

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

....)

  230)

....)

....)

....)

Supplies and consumables

  136)

  136)

  136)

  136)

  136)

Grants and subsidies

 87 367)

 87 644)

 53 525)

 49 895)

 50 727)

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

 81 133)

 75 929)

 81 595)

 83 108)

 84 727)

Total expenses from transactions

 168 636)

 163 939)

 135 256)

 133 139)

 135 590)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Movements in Revenue and other income from transactions are detailed in Table 10.11 Revenue from Appropriation by Output and Table 10.12 Administered Revenue.

2.   Movements in Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent and Grants and subsidies expense over the Forward Estimates primarily relate to grant funding provided to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd (TasRail).

3.   Movements in Expenses from transactions are detailed in Table 10.13 Administered Expenses.

 


Table 10.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 ‑ Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

2.1  Infrastructure Tasmania

  800)

  800)

  800)

  800)

  800)

2.2  Infrastructure Strategy2

 1 726)

 1 849)

 1 608)

  587)

  88)

2.3  Land Transport Safety3

 15 585)

 11 798)

 11 839)

 12 051)

 12 232)

2.4  Passenger Transport4

 2 819)

 3 153)

 2 566)

 2 585)

 2 516)

2.5  Traffic Management and Engineering Services5

 3 249)

 3 669)

 3 757)

 3 289)

 3 320)

 

 24 179)

 21 269)

 20 570)

 19 312)

 18 956)

Output Group 6 ‑ Subsidies and Concessions

 

 

 

 

 

6.1  Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

 1 036)

 1 067)

 1 100)

 1 133)

 1 167)

6.2  Metropolitan General Access Services6

 41 057)

 38 942)

 40 110)

 41 313)

 42 552)

6.3  Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services

 23 029)

 23 720)

 24 432)

 25 165)

 25 920)

6.4  Non‑Metropolitan General Access Services

 7 626)

 7 626)

 7 626)

 7 626)

 7 626)

 

 72 748)

 71 355)

 73 268)

 75 237)

 77 265)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies7

 81 041)

 81 262)

 47 676)

 43 968)

 44 784)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program8

 90 171)

 98 483)

 110 653)

 107 266)

 85 078)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 177 968)

 173 886)

 141 514)

 138 517)

 141 005)

Works and Services

 90 171)

 98 483)

 110 653)

 107 266)

 85 078)

 

 268 139)

 272 369)

 252 167)

 245 783)

 226 083)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Energy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Energy Policy and Advice

 

 

 

 

 

3.1  Energy Policy and Advice9

 1 733)

 3 271)

 1 404)

 1 442)

 1 460)

 

 1 733)

 3 271)

 1 404)

 1 442)

 1 460)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 1 733)

 3 271)

 1 404)

 1 442)

 1 460)

 

 1 733)

 3 271)

 1 404)

 1 442)

 1 460)


 

Table 10.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.1  Coordinator‑General10

 3 500)

 2 750)

 2 500)

 2 500)

 2 500)

1.2  Industry and Business Development11,12

 62 699)

 48 952)

 37 194)

 31 867)

 19 106)

1.3  Skills Development

 98 625)

 98 116)

 100 781)

 101 955)

 102 120)

 

 164 824)

 149 818)

 140 475)

 136 322)

 123 726)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

....)

 15 000)

 20 000)

 20 000)

 35 000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 164 824)

 149 818)

 140 475)

 136 322)

 123 726)

Works and Services

....)

 15 000)

 20 000)

 20 000)

 35 000)

 

 164 824)

 164 818)

 160 475)

 156 322)

 158 726)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.4  Events and Hospitality13,14

 11 947)

 10 870)

 11 722)

 10 852)

 9 964)

 

 11 947)

 10 870)

 11 722)

 10 852)

 9 964)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 11 947)

 10 870)

 11 722)

 10 852)

 9 964)

 

 11 947)

 10 870)

 11 722)

 10 852)

 9 964)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.1  Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

 9 827)

 9 816)

 9 969)

 10 009)

 9 997)

5.2  Arts Industry Development

 7 024)

 6 881)

 7 030)

 7 101)

 7 191)

5.3  Screen Industry Development

 1 854)

 1 755)

 1 784)

 1 815)

 1 828)

 

 18 705)

 18 452)

 18 783)

 18 925)

 19 016)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 3 527)

 3 554)

 2 962)

 2 977)

 2 993)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

  460)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 22 232)

 22 006)

 21 745)

 21 902)

 22 009)

Works and Services

  460)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 22 692)

 22 006)

 21 745)

 21 902)

 22 009)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Forestry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1  Forestry Policy and Reform15

 1 673)

 1 503)

  995)

 1 015)

 1 026)

 

 1 673)

 1 503)

  995)

 1 015)

 1 026)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 2 906)

 2 964)

 3 023)

 3 086)

 3 086)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 4 579)

 4 467)

 4 018)

 4 101)

 4 112)

 

 4 579)

 4 467)

 4 018)

 4 101)

 4 112)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Mining

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.2  Mineral Resources16

 5 791)

 7 196)

 7 348)

 6 179)

 6 262)

 

 5 791)

 7 196)

 7 348)

 6 179)

 6 262)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

 5 791)

 7 196)

 7 348)

 6 179)

 6 262)

 

 5 791)

 7 196)

 7 348)

 6 179)

 6 262)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

Total Recurrent Services

 389 074)

 371 514)

 328 226)

 319 315)

 308 538)

Total Works and Services

 90 631)

 113 483)

 130 653)

 127 266)

 120 078)

 

 479 705)

 484 997)

 458 879)

 446 581)

 428 616)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserved by Law

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution towards Construction of Streets in Towns by Municipal Councils (Local Government Act 1993)

  52)

  52)

  52)

  52)

  52)

 

  52)

  52)

  52)

  52)

  52)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

 479 757)

 485 049)

 458 931)

 446 633)

 428 668)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

 392 283)

 397 269)

 405 270)

 396 602)

 377 805)

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

 87 474)

 87 780)

 53 661)

 50 031)

 50 863)

 

 479 757)

 485 049)

 458 931)

 446 633)

 428 668)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2015‑16 Budget included an allowance for a 27th pay.

2.   The movements in expenses in Infrastructure Strategy reflect the cash flow of election commitments including: Development of Derwent Valley Marina, Kings Meadows Flood Protection, and Legana Boat Ramp.

3.   The decrease in Land Transport Safety in 2016‑17 primarily reflects the completion of the Support to Local Council initiative, and a saving relating to the third year of the National Heavy Vehicle initiative.

4.   The movements in Passenger Transport reflect the cash flow of the Public Transport Bus Services Procurement initiative.

5.   Movements in Traffic Management and Engineering Services reflect additional funding provided in 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 for the Congestion in Greater Hobart initiative.

6.   A decrease in Metropolitan General Access Services from 2016-17 reflects the removal of a $3.25 million grant to Metro Tasmanian Pty Ltd for capital works. Funding for related activities will now be addressed as an equity payment through Finance‑General.

7.   The movement in Grants and Subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects cash flow changes associated with the Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd (TasRail) administered item. Refer to Table 10.13 for further information.

8.   This funding relates to the Consolidated Fund appropriation for the Capital Investment Program, which includes maintenance and asset purchases.

9.   The increase in expenses in Energy Policy and Advice in 2016‑17 primarily reflects the cash flow of funds remaining for the Advancing the Case for a Nationally Funded Second Interconnector election commitment.

10. The decrease in Coordinator‑General in 2016‑17 reflects the end of additional funding relating for international engagement, investment attraction and facilitation, and the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative.

11. Movements in Industry and Business Development reflects the cash flow of election commitment and initiative funding for multiple key business growth deliverables including: Business and Jobs Attraction and Population Growth Initiatives, Caterpillar Transition Taskforce, Growing the Visitor Economy, Regional Revival Fund ‑ New Projects Investment, Academy of Creative Industries and Performing Arts (ACIPA) and UXC Enterprise Development Centre.

12. Funding relating to ICT strategies that are the responsibility of the Minister for Information Technology and Innovation have been included within this Output.

13. Movements in Events and Hospitality reflect the cash flow of election commitment and initiative funding including: V8 Supercars, World Cup Cricket and Hawthorn Football Club.

14. Funding relating to Tourism supply‑side activities that are the responsibility of the Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events has been included within the Industry and Business Development Output.

15. Movements in Forestry Policy and Reform reflect the cash flow of initiative funding for the Regional Forests Agreement Review and Forestry Reform Implementation. Funding for growth strategy initiatives will be sourced from remaining Tasmanian Forests Agreement funding and existing election commitment funding.

16. Movements in funding reflect the cash flow of the geoscience initiative and additional funding allocated in the 2015‑16 Revised Estimate Report to support the relocation of mineral resources to Burnie.

Table 10.12:      Administered Revenue

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Consolidated Fund

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth Capital Grants

  80)

  80)

  80)

  80)

  80)

Drivers Licences

 7 014)

 7 154)

 7 297)

 7 403)

 7 588)

Fines

  12)

  12)

  12)

  12)

  12)

MAIB Commission

 2 403)

 2 463)

 2 525)

 2 588)

 2 653)

Motor Vehicle Taxes and Fees

 38 184)

 40 376)

 41 587)

 42 835)

 44 118)

Other Revenue

  8)

  8)

  8)

  8)

  8)

Other Sales of Services

 2 168)

 2 188)

 2 208)

 2 229)

 2 250)

Personalised and Custom Plates

  432)

  443)

  454)

  465)

  477)

Photo Licence Fees

 1 670)

 1 720)

 1 772)

 1 829)

 1 875)

Regulatory Fees

 1 060)

 1 066)

 1 072)

 1 078)

 1 084)

Royalty Income1

 28 024)

 20 340)

 24 500)

 24 500)

 24 500)

Sales of Goods

  33)

  33)

  33)

  33)

  33)

Vehicle Inspection Services Fees

  45)

  46)

  47)

  48)

  49)

 

 81 133)

 75 929)

 81 595)

 83 108)

 84 727)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation2

 87 474)

 87 780)

 53 661)

 50 031)

 50 863)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth Recurrent Grants3

  29)

  230)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

 168 636)

 163 939)

 135 256)

 133 139)

 135 590)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The decrease in Royalty income from 2016‑17 reflects an adjusted forecast based on information from mining companies about expected Royalty payments, analysis of commodity prices and 2015‑16 receipts.

2.   The movements in Annual Appropriation over the Forward Estimates primarily reflect cash flow changes associated with the Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd administered item.

3.   Commonwealth Recurrent Grant revenue in 2016‑17 reflects Exporter Assistance funding.

 


 

Table 10.13:      Administered Expenses

 

2015‑16]

)

Budget)

2016‑17]

)

Budget)

2017‑18] 

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19]

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20]

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution to Marine and Safety Authority1

 2 092)

 1 592)

 1 003)

 1 003)

 1 003)

Conveyance Allowance

 1 630)

 1 630)

 1 630)

 1 630)

 1 630)

Exporter Assistance

....)

  230)

....)

....)

....)

Government Contribution to the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

 1 519)

 1 519)

 1 519)

 1 519)

 1 519)

National Transport Commission (NTC): Local Government Contribution

 1 500)

 1 500)

 1 500)

 1 500)

 1 500)

Payments for Forest Practices Authority

 1 416)

 1 444)

 1 473)

 1 503)

 1 503)

Pensioner Air Travel Subsidy

  10)

  10)

  10)

  10)

  10)

Private Forests Tasmania

 1 490)

 1 520)

 1 550)

 1 583)

 1 583)

Student‑Only Passenger Services

 24 899)

 25 646)

 26 415)

 27 207)

 28 023)

Tasmanian Icon Program ‑ Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

  500)

  500)

  500)

  500)

  500)

Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd2

 41 892)

 41 866)

 8 100)

 8 100)

 8 100)

Ten Days on the Island3

 1 330)

 1 357)

  765)

  780)

  796)

Theatre Royal

  178)

  178)

  178)

  178)

  178)

Transport Access Scheme

 4 547)

 4 518)

 4 518)

 4 518)

 4 518)

West Coast Wilderness Railway4

 4 500)

 4 500)

 4 500)

....)

....)

 

 87 503)

 88 010)

 53 661)

 50 031)

 50 863)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Consolidated Fund

 81 133)

 75 929)

 81 595)

 83 108)

 84 727)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

 168 636)

 163 939)

 135 256)

 133 139)

 135 590)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Additional funding was provided in the 2015‑16 Budget to Marine and Safety Tasmania (MAST) to contribute towards works associated with the Prosser River and St Helens Barway.

2.   The reduction from 2017‑18 against Tasmanian Railway Pty reflects the end of additional State grant funding provided for the Freight Rail Revitalisation Program.

3.   The reduction from 2017‑18 reflects the Government's commitment to reduce funding for Ten Days on the Island.

4.   The reduction from 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Government's funding for the West Coast Wilderness Railway.

Contribution to Marine and Safety Tasmania

This contribution supports Marine and Safety Tasmania (MAST) in carrying out its functions of managing the Government's non‑commercial marine facilities and Tasmania's marine regulatory environment. Additional funding was provided to MAST in the 2015‑16 Budget to contribute towards stabilisation of the mouth of the Prosser River and for works on the St Helen's Barway in the form of training wall extensions and groynes.

Conveyance Allowance

The Department administers allowances paid to parents and guardians of students who do not have access to government subsidised public passenger transport services for travel to and from school. It is intended to assist with the cost of providing private transport to the nearest bus stop or school. Allowances are also paid to Bass Strait Islands residents.

Exporter Assistance

On 22 March 2012, the Australian Government announced that it would provide a one‑off $20 million funding package to assist Tasmanian exporters access their international markets. The funding was used to provide immediate and direct financial assistance to exporters; invest in critical infrastructure improvements; and assist with longer‑term strategic planning and freight logistics coordination. Only a small residual amount of funding remains as most grant monies were disbursed in 2012‑13.

Government Contribution to the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

The Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra (TSO), one of the world's finest small orchestras, continues to receive State Government support. The TSO plays to audiences throughout the State and its award‑winning recordings are heard throughout the world. A versatile orchestra, the TSO is renowned for its expertise in music of the classical and early romantic periods and is recognised internationally as a champion of Australian music.

National Transport Commission (NTC): Local Government Contribution

Under the reform measures that abolished local road tolls in favour of national heavy vehicle charges, $1.5 million is provided annually from motor tax receipts to local government to compensate for loss of revenues from heavy vehicles.

Payment for Forest Practices Authority

This payment represents the Government's contribution to the Forest Practices Authority (FPA). The role of the FPA is to advance the objective of the State's forest practices system and to foster a cooperative approach towards policy implementation and management.

Pensioner Air Travel Subsidy

Aged pensioner residents of the Bass Strait Islands are entitled to an air fare subsidy when travelling between the Bass Strait Islands and Northern Tasmania. The subsidy is a 50 per cent concession on one return airfare from their Island residence to Northern Tasmania each financial year.

Private Forests Tasmania

This payment represents the Government's contribution to Private Forests Tasmania (PFT). The role of the PFT is to facilitate and expand the development of the private forest resource in Tasmania in a manner that is consistent with sound forest land management practice.

Student‑Only Passenger Services

In accordance with Government policy, provision is made for payments to operators of contracted fare charging student‑only bus services for the difference between the fare paid by students, set by Government policy, and that which would be charged if the services were operating on a commercial basis.

Tasmanian Icon Program ‑ Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

The Tasmanian Icon Program is designed to utilise world‑class Tasmanian talent to promote the State both nationally and internationally. Currently, funded icons are the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, the Tasmanian Tigers State Cricket Team, funded through the Sport and Recreation portfolio of the Department of Premier and Cabinet and the Menzies Institute for Medical Research, funded through the Industry and Business Development Output of the Department of State Growth.

Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd

This payment represents the Government's grant contribution to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd (TasRail). The payment allows TasRail to manage, maintain and operate the Tasmanian rail network on a sustainable basis and it also provides for critical annual maintenance of rolling stock assets. Additional funding has been provided in 2015‑16 and 2016‑17 to ensure Tasmania's 50 per cent co‑contribution requirements have been fully funded for the Freight Rail Revitalisation Program. The Freight Rail Revitalisation Program, undertaken by TasRail will raise the quality of the major lines on the Tasmanian rail network through selective re‑sleepering, upgrading old rail and bridges as well as culvert strengthening, drainage and formation work.

Ten Days on the Island

Ten Days on the Island is a biennial event that commenced in 2001. In accordance with the Government's election commitment, funding for this event will be reduced after the current deed expires in 2016‑17.

Theatre Royal

The Theatre Royal is Australia's oldest continually operating theatre. The Government's commitment in funding the Theatre Royal recognises the Theatre Royal, not just as a significant piece of Tasmania's history, but a living centre for the performing arts.

Transport Access Scheme

The scheme provides for payments to operators of taxis and wheelchair accessible taxis to support fare concessions and subsidies made available to eligible persons with permanent disabilities or medical conditions that significantly restrict their personal mobility.

West Coast Wilderness Railway

The West Coast Wilderness Railway is an iconic west coast attraction that helps attract visitors to the region and Queenstown. This funding supports capital works and the maintenance of the Railway's operations.


Table 10.14:      Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

 

Budget)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1,2

 51 955)

 60 464)

 55 653)

 54 876)

 54 099)

Investments1

 51 817)

 42 948)

 45 448)

 47 948)

 50 448)

Receivables

 3 947)

 3 715)

 3 711)

 3 707)

 3 703)

Equity investments

  770)

  150)

  175)

  200)

  225)

Other financial assets3

 7 628)

  470)

  470)

  470)

  470)

 

 116 117)

 107 747)

 105 457)

 107 201)

 108 945)

Non-financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories

  357)

  434)

  444)

  454)

  464)

Property, plant and equipment3

 162 732)

 171 123)

 172 774)

 174 425)

 176 076)

Infrastructure

4 417 407)

4 488 979)

4 654 501)

4 814 389)

4 920 111)

Heritage and cultural assets

 409 956)

 421 175)

 431 315)

 441 455)

 451 595)

Investment property3

 9 943)

  586)

  879)

 1 172)

 1 465)

Intangibles3

 7 055)

 4 834)

 4 423)

 4 012)

 3 601)

Other assets

 2 172)

 1 899)

 1 983)

 2 067)

 2 151)

 

5 009 622)

5 089 030)

5 266 319)

5 437 974)

5 555 463)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

5 125 739)

5 196 777)

5 371 776)

5 545 175)

5 664 408)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables3

 7 044)

 8 395)

 8 513)

 8 631)

 8 749)

Interest bearing liabilities

 42 982)

 42 513)

 43 513)

 44 513)

 45 513)

Provisions3

 3 280)

 4 462)

 4 422)

 4 382)

 4 342)

Employee benefits

 20 233)

 20 893)

 21 313)

 21 733)

 22 153)

Other liabilities3

 8 631)

 6 787)

 6 747)

 6 707)

 6 667)

Total liabilities

 82 170)

 83 050)

 84 508)

 85 966)

 87 424)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

5 043 569)

5 113 727)

5 287 268)

5 459 209)

5 576 984)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Contributed capital4

3 173 900)

 417 447)

 417 447)

 417 447)

 417 447)

Reserves

1 848 221)

1 916 285)

2 066 232)

2 216 179)

2 366 126)

Accumulated funds4

 21 448)

2 779 995)

2 803 589)

2 825 583)

2 793 411)

Total equity

5 043 569)

5 113 727)

5 287 268)

5 459 209)

5 576 984)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Changes over the Forward Estimates are primarily due to administered loan schemes funded by the Australian Government.

2.   Decreases from 2018 include the existing completion date of the Road Safety levy in December 2017 in accordance with the Vehicle and Traffic (Driver Licensing and Vehicle Registration) Regulations 2010.

3.   The movements in these items in 2017 reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2015 actuals.

4.   The movements in these items in 2016 reflects a re‑categorisation of Contributed capital to Accumulated funds to achieve consistent accounting treatment with the Department's annual report.

Table 10.15:      Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June ‑ Administered

 

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

 

Budget)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits

 3 358)

 3 186)

 3 186)

 3 186)

 3 186)

Receivables

  97)

  27)

  27)

  27)

  27)

Other financial assets

  20)

  64)

  64)

  64)

  64)

 

 3 475)

 3 277)

 3 277)

 3 277)

 3 277)

Non‑Financial Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Property, plant and equipment

  3)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Other assets

....)

  16)

  16)

  16)

  16)

 

  3)

  16)

  16)

  16)

  16)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Assets

 3 478)

 3 293)

 3 293)

 3 293)

 3 293)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

  284)

  210)

  210)

  210)

  210)

Employee benefits

  302)

  309)

  309)

  309)

  309)

Other liabilities1

 1 537)

  944)

  944)

  944)

  944)

Total Liabilities

 2 123)

 1 463)

 1 463)

 1 463)

 1 463)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Assets (liabilities)

 1 355)

 1 830)

 1 830)

 1 830)

 1 830)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated funds

 1 355)

 1 830)

 1 830)

 1 830)

 1 830)

Total Equity

 1 355)

 1 830)

 1 830)

 1 830)

 1 830)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.   The reduction in Other liabilities in 2017 reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2015 actuals.

 


Table 10.16:      Statement of Cash Flows1

 

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

 

Budget)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - recurrent2

 301 652)

 283 786)

 274 617)

 269 336)

 257 727)

Appropriation receipts - capital2

 90 631)

 113 483)

 130 653)

 127 266)

 120 078)

Grants3

 123 374)

 146 348)

 52 354)

 58 346)

 6 546)

Sales of goods and services

 2 012)

 4 260)

 4 260)

 4 260)

 4 260)

Fees and fines4

 12 815)

 12 815)

 5 815)

  475)

  475)

GST receipts

 16 898)

 16 898)

 16 898)

 16 898)

 16 898)

Interest received

 2 430)

 2 380)

 2 380)

 2 380)

 2 380)

Other cash receipts

 2 690)

 1 972)

 1 972)

 1 972)

 1 972)

 Total cash inflows

 552 502)

 581 942)

 488 949)

 480 933)

 410 336)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

(53 392)

(53 318)

(54 572)

(54 957)

(54 875)

Superannuation

(5 755)

(5 993)

(6 156)

(6 198)

(6 250)

Borrowing costs

(1 710)

(1 760)

(1 760)

(1 760)

(1 760)

GST payments

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

Grants and subsidies5

(234 002)

(213 811)

(205 536)

(202 530)

(189 819)

Supplies and consumables6

(62 295)

(92 105)

(87 894)

(86 858)

(82 939)

Other cash payments

(4 643)

(1 517)

(3 519)

(523)

(527)

Total cash outflows

(378 696)

(385 403)

(376 336)

(369 725)

(353 069)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

 173 806)

 196 539)

 112 613)

 111 208)

 57 267)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non-financial assets7

(166 501)

(197 063)

(115 928)

(110 489)

(56 548)

Proceeds from the disposal of non-financial assets

  4)

  4)

  4)

  4)

  4)

Equity injections and cash flows from restructuring

(100)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Net advances paid

(2 500)

(500)

(2 500)

(2 500)

(2 500)

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(169 097)

(197 559)

(118 424)

(112 985)

(59 044)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.16:      Statement of Cash Flows (continued)1

 

2015-16)

 

Budget)

2016-17)

 

Budget)

2017-18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018-19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019-20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings8

  282)

(9 000)

 1 000)

 1 000)

 1 000)

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

  282)

(9 000)

 1 000)

 1 000)

 1 000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

 4 991)

(10 020)

(4 811)

(777)

(777)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

 46 964)

 70 484)

 60 464)

 55 653)

 54 876)

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

 51 955)

 60 464)

 55 653)

 54 876)

 54 099)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Cash flow estimates include the impact of election commitments, Budget initiatives and previous savings strategies, which have resulted in variations in the profile over the Forward Estimates.

2.   The movement in Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent and Appropriation receipts ‑ capital are detailed in Table 10.11 ‑ Revenue from Appropriation by Output.

3.   The profile of Grants funding over the Forward Estimates reflects cash flows for Australian Government receipts, in particular relating to infrastructure and skills development.

4.   The reduction in Fees and fines in 2017‑18 reflects the existing completion date of the Road Safety Levy in December 2017 in accordance with Vehicle and Traffic (Driver Licensing and Vehicle Registration) Regulations 2010.

5.   The decrease in Grants and subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the cash flow of election commitments, particularly within the Industry and Business Development Output, and Australian Government funding administered by Skills Tasmania.

6.   The increase in Supplies and consumables over the Forward Estimates is primarily attributable to a reclassification between capital and expense within road maintenance funding to better reflect the accounting treatment of expenditure.

7.   Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets primarily includes expenditure incurred for projects included in the Department's Capital Investment Program. Details on the Department's CIP program is shown in Table 10.8 Capital Investment Program.

8.   Net borrowings reflects the cash flows associated with administered loan schemes funded by the Australian Government.

 


Table 10.17:      Statement of Cash Flows ‑ Administered

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent1

 87 474)

 87 780)

 53 661)

 50 031)

 50 863)

Grants

  109)

  310)

  80)

  80)

  80)

Taxation

 38 184)

 40 376)

 41 587)

 42 835)

 44 118)

Sales of goods and services

 5 036)

 5 127)

 5 220)

 5 315)

 5 413)

Fees and fines

 9 801)

 9 998)

 10 200)

 10 370)

 10 608)

Other cash receipts

 28 032)

 20 348)

 24 508)

 24 508)

 24 508)

Total cash inflows

 168 636)

 163 939)

 135 256)

 133 139)

 135 590)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

....)

(230)

....)

....)

....)

Grants and subsidies2

(87 367)

(87 644)

(53 525)

(49 895)

(50 727)

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

(81 133)

(75 929)

(81 595)

(83 108)

(84 727)

Supplies and consumables

(136)

(136)

(136)

(136)

(136)

Total cash outflows

(168 636)

(163 939)

(135 256)

(133 139)

(135 590)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

 3 358)

 3 186)

 3 186)

 3 186)

 3 186)

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

 3 358)

 3 186)

 3 186)

 3 186)

 3 186)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The changes in Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent are detailed in Table 10.11 Revenue from Appropriation by Output.

2.   The movements in Grants and subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily relate to grant funding provided to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd and the reduction of funding for the West Coast Wilderness Railway from 2018‑19.