2     Department of Education

Agency Outline

The Department of Education is responsible for the delivery of public early years and school education, adult and community education and library and archive services throughout Tasmania. The Department is responsible to the Minister for Education and Training, Hon Jeremy Rockliff MP.

The Department's services provide Tasmanians with the opportunity to learn and reach their potential, to lead fulfilling and productive lives and to contribute positively to the community. More broadly the services recognise that education is a key driver for both economic and social reform.

Service delivery is provided through:

·       Early Years and Schools;

·       LINC Tasmania; and

·       Government Education and Training International (GETI).

Early Years and Schools educational services are provided through 12 Child and Family Centres and 196 schools (including the Early Childhood Intervention Service and senior secondary schools). In 2016, services are provided to 60 317 full‑time equivalent students from pre‑kindergarten to senior secondary. Educational leadership is provided through regional Learning Services which focus on school improvement and the Government's key education priorities. Early Years and Schools is also responsible for the regulation of early childhood education and care services.

The aim of Early Years and Schools is to deliver on the Government's policy to lead the nation in education and create a job ready generation. Key priorities to meet this goal include:

·       extending schools in rural and regional communities to Year 12 to improve retention rates;

·       providing opportunities for quality literacy and numeracy learning for all students from Kindergarten to Year 12 and achieving benchmarks above the national standard through targeted assistance by 25 literacy and numeracy specialists;

·       strengthening the approach to career development in schools, and building on the general capabilities of the Australian Curriculum through the implementation of My Education;

·       providing quality education programs and services for students and families living with disabilities including progressing reforms that flow from the Improved Support for Students with Disability Ministerial Taskforce report;

·       ensuring quality education programs and services for young children and their families, so they develop as confident and curious learners prior to commencing full‑time school;

·       extending support to families through Learning in Families Together (LIFT) especially in communities with the greatest need;

·       enabling students to successfully develop 21st century competencies as an integral part of Kindergarten to Year 12 curriculum implementation through the Early Years Learning Framework and Australian Curriculum;

·       building a culture of respect and shared values, which supports schools to focus on quality teaching and learning, leading to creative and innovative approaches that meet the needs of all students;

·       maintaining a strategic focus on improving the quality of teaching using professional learning to build capacity for both school leaders and teachers; and

·       implementing the State's Fairer Funding Model, as part of the Students First education reforms, to ensure that resources are targeted where most needed across schools.

LINC Tasmania is a statewide network that gives Tasmanians access to library services, research and information, adult literacy support, community learning, online access, and archive and heritage services.

GETI brokers education services for international students looking to study in Tasmania. It also provides a diverse range of support services for international students while studying in Tasmania.

The Department also provides a centralised corporate support function to TasTAFE (a separate statutory authority).

This chapter provides the Department's financial information for 2016‑17 and over the Forward Estimates period (2017‑18 to 2019‑20). Further information on the Department is provided at www.education.tas.gov.au.


 

Key Deliverables

Table 2.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimate allocations for key deliverables within the Department.

Table 2.1:          Key Deliverables Statement1

 

2016‑17

 

Budget

2017‑18

Forward

Estimate

2018‑19

Forward

Estimate

2019‑20

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

26TEN

85

85

85

85

Aboriginal Curriculum

260

260

….

….

Combatting Bullying

1 500

500

500

500

Disability Taskforce

3 000

3 000

3 000

3 000

Education Act Review

 

 

 

 

Project Transition

2 250

2 250

….

….

Implementation

….

….

….

6 295

Job Readiness ‑ Beacon Foundation

250

250

250

250

Learning for Life and School Community Hubs

400

400

400

400

Learning in Families Together

4 250

4 250

4 250

4 250

Literacy and Numeracy Support

1 700

3 000

3 000

3 000

National Assessment Program ‑ Literacy and Numeracy Online (NAPLAN)

250

750

600

….

Officer for Specialist Youth Justice Courts (SYJC) Program

70

70

70

70

Review of Literacy Teaching, Training and Practice in Government Schools

330

330

330

….

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Programs (STEM)

250

125

….

….

Schools Infrastructure Package2

5 350

20 400

10 350

13 900

Sexual Assault Awareness Program for Students

100

100

100

100

Students First3,4

87 400

84 900

81 400

85 700

Student Health Initiative

500

500

500

500

Student Wellbeing Initiative (Strong Families, Safe Kids)

1 300

1 300

1 300

1 300

Tasmanian Archives and Heritage Office

….

….

2 000

1 000

Year 9 to 12 Review

250

….

….

….

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Initiatives are funded from within the Department's existing Budget allocation, with the exception of the Schools Infrastructure Package and Students First.

2.   A complete list of Capital Investment Projects is available in Table 2.5. Additional funding totalling $50 million has been made available in this Budget for education‑related capital works. The total package includes $3 million for TasTAFE comprising of $1.5 million in 2017‑18 and $1.5 million in 2018‑19. Funding for those projects is provided to TasTAFE via the Department of State Growth (refer to chapter 10 of this Budget Paper for further details). Over the 2016‑17 Budget and Forward Estimates period a total of over $113 million is allocated for education infrastructure.


 

3.   The total includes cumulative additional Australian Government and State Government funding for the Government school sector under the Students First education reforms that commenced from 1 January 2014. Part of the Australian Government increase offsets funding that was previously provided through National Partnership Program funding. The Australian Government component is a provisional allocation to the extent that it is subject to finalisation of enrolments and loadings in each school year, as well as any refinements to the resourcing model by the Australian Government.

The Forward Estimates do not reflect the policy change in the 2016-17 Australian Government Budget to increase indexation to 3.56 per cent for the 2018 to 2020 calendar years as that information was not available at the time of finalising the 2016‑17 Budget.

4.   The 2016‑17 Budget estimate of $87.4 million is an increase of $9.6 million on the estimate for 2015‑16 of $77.8 million.

26TEN

Funding of $85 000 per annum will be provided for an additional resource in the 26TEN team within LINC Tasmania. The additional resource will provide stronger support to the 26TEN Coalition which is focused on improving adult literacy levels through community‑based action.

Aboriginal Curriculum

Funding of $520 000 over two years will provide more resources and training to support teachers to deliver an enhanced Aboriginal Curriculum. Under this initiative the Department will work with the Tasmanian Aboriginal community to further develop the Aboriginal Curriculum with a specific focus on incorporating Tasmanian Aboriginals into the history and culture component of the Australian Curriculum. Funding of $260 000 will be expended in 2016‑17.

Combatting Bullying

Funding of $3 million over four years has been allocated to develop and implement a program to combat bullying in schools. This initiative will particularly target cyber bullying as well as address other bullying issues. Parts of the program will be made available to all schools in all education sectors. Implementation costs of $1 million will be spent in 2016‑17 to develop the resources for schools to deliver the program. Funding of $500 000 per year has been allocated to implement the program.

Disability Taskforce

As part of the Government's Election Commitments, a Ministerial Taskforce was established in 2014 to review the framework for supporting students with disabilities. Funding of $12 million over four years has been provided to progress reforms that flow from the report of the Taskforce. Reforms will assist all Tasmanian Government schools to: be disability ready and responsive; continuously improve through high‑quality teaching and learning; work with communities in partnership; and align resources to inclusive education practice, with $3 million to be expended in 2016‑17.

In respect to supporting students with Autism, reforms will be informed by a review of the current pilot model at Lindisfarne North Primary School. The Autism program is for the Government sector and is funded from Students First.


 

Education Act Review

The Education Act review will deliver a contemporary and cohesive legislative framework for education that will support the Government's Leading the Nation in Education policy. It will target opportunities to positively influence key drivers of improved education outcomes for young Tasmanians.

Funding of $4.5 million over two years will be provided for the implementation of the new Education Act. This funding supports a project implementation team to oversee the transition phase of this significant project as well as specific implementation changes such as the development of a complex data system to track students across government and non‑government sectors.

Provision of $6.3 million per annum has been made from 2019‑20 to meet the additional cost associated with the student cohort impacted by the proposed change to the starting and leaving age, which first commences in the 2020 school year.

Job Readiness ‑ Beacon Foundation

The Government has made a clear commitment to increasing school retention and developing students' 'job readiness', thereby allowing them to transition more effectively into employment opportunities. Funding of $250 000 per year for four years will be provided to the Beacon Foundation to facilitate the development of links between schools and industry. This will foster strong links between schools and industry complementing the My Education program.

Learning for Life and School Community Hubs

Funding totalling $1.6 million over four years will be provided for a co‑investment to be negotiated between the Smith Family and the Government to sustain and expand the Learning for Life and School Community Hubs (SCH). The Learning for Life scholarship program provides programs from the early years to tertiary level to help ensure engagement in education. The initiative includes literacy and numeracy programs, mentoring, learning clubs and career activities. The SCH concept is based on the understanding that improving education outcomes in highly disadvantaged communities cannot be achieved by any single organisation and takes account of cultural factors, including attitudes, relationships and the wider community influence on students' education. The SCHs are already operating in Launceston and Wynyard. A total of $400 000 per year will be expended commencing in 2016‑17.

Learning in Families Together

Funding totalling $17 million over four years will be provided to continue a new literacy and numeracy initiative, Learning in Families Together (LIFT). This initiative focuses on children from Kindergarten to Year two, and will encourage parents, or other guardians, to be actively involved in their child's learning and ensure young Tasmanians have the very best start in the basics of literacy and numeracy. The program is delivered across multiple platforms to offer various means of support to parents and students, giving them the chance to learn together. The program has been implemented in 80 school communities where students are struggling most with the educational basics and are in need of additional literacy and numeracy support. Funding of $4.3 million will be expended in 2016‑17.


 

Literacy and Numeracy Support

The Government is continuing with its fundamental commitment to raising educational standards, particularly in relation to literacy and numeracy support. Funding of $10.7 million over four years will be expended as part of a suite of initiatives targeted at improving the literacy and numeracy outcomes of students in Government schools. This initiative will provide $1.7 million in 2016‑17, increasing to $3 million per year from 2017‑18 building upon existing programs such as Launching into Learning (LiL), LIFT and My Education.

National Assessment Program ‑ Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) Online

At the 31 October 2014 Council of Australian Governments Education Council meeting, Ministers endorsed recommendations providing a national, phased transition to NAPLAN Online with schools and jurisdictions opting in from 2017 and compliance by no later than 2019. Total funding of $1.6 million over three years has been allocated to develop systems to support Tasmanian Government schools to achieve readiness for participation in the NAPLAN Online assessments. This initiative will commence with expenditure of $250 000 in 2016‑17.

Officer for Specialist Youth Justice Courts (SYJC) Program

Funding of $70 000 per year for four years will be provided for an additional officer to expand the Department's involvement in the SYJC Program to the Northern region of the SYJC. The role of this officer will be to focus on rehabilitation and early intervention, providing opportunities for young offenders to engage in positive behaviours, such as education and employment, and reduce the likelihood of future offending. This is in addition to the existing resource provided by the Department in the Southern region of the SYJC.

Review of Literacy Teaching, Training and Practice in Government Schools

A funding allocation of $330 000 per year for three years will be made to undertake targeted research focusing on literacy and teaching practices in Government Schools. The Department will partner with the Peter Underwood Centre for Educational Attainment which will initially commence an independent review of literacy pedagogies in Government schools and the training of teachers. This research will identify those practices that are most effective in improving literacy outcomes for students and will take account of other studies previously undertaken in other jurisdictions.

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Programs

A two year allocation totalling $375 000 will be made to develop resources that support schools to provide extension and enrichment for gifted and highly able students in STEM programs in line with the Australian Curriculum. This initiative will facilitate the development of online resources that build capacity of Tasmanian Government schools and teachers to provide all students with engaging, challenging learning that will prepare them for 21st century careers. Funding of $250 000 will be expended in 2016‑17.

Schools Infrastructure Package

New funding of $50 million will be provided over four years for the Schools Infrastructure Package, taking the total investment to $113 million over the Budget and Forward Estimates period. This is in addition to the significant capital investment made by the Government in the 2015‑16 Budget, which had a particular focus on high schools. These projects are primarily focused on addressing capacity and safety issues for schools. Included within the package is a $3 million commitment for TasTAFE training infrastructure to be spent over two years commencing with $1.5 million in 2018‑19. Details of funding for that project are contained within chapter 26 of this Budget Paper.

Sexual Assault Awareness Program for Students

Funding of $400 000 over four years will be provided to the Tasmanian Sexual Assault Support Service to work with selected high schools and colleges to provide a whole‑school approach to address the underlying causes of family violence and sexual assault. The focus of the program will be to promote respectful behaviours amongst young people and to enhance the capacity of school communities to respond to sexual assault. For those participating schools, the initiative will extend the Department of Education's respectful relationships education for all schools that is being developed as part of Action two of the Safe Homes, Safe Families, Tasmania's Family Violence Action Plan 2015‑2020.

Students First

The Government continues to deliver on its Students First funding and education reforms, providing the full $134 million of additional funding over the scheduled six years to 2019 ($98 million for the Government Sector and $36 million for the Non‑Government Sector). From 2020, additional State and Australian Government funding for the Government sector will continue to provide funding for schools on the basis of need. Funding will also continue for program areas that continue and extend joint State and Australian Government reforms around workforce redevelopment, improved and more consistent level of information technology access and platforms across schools, quality teaching, quality learning and empowered school leadership. A number of the initiatives are funded through Students First funds.

Negotiations in respect of Australian Government funding beyond 2017 are continuing.

Student Health Initiative

Funding of $500 000 per annum for four years will be allocated to support Tasmanian Government schools to promote student health and wellbeing in low socio‑economic communities. This allocation will be provided to community organisations, to partner with schools, to promote opportunities for students to contribute to building a positive school environment that supports healthy, safe and active choices. The focus of the partnerships with schools will cover the following areas:

·       healthy school canteen and accreditation;

·       kitchen garden or agricultural initiatives;

·       breakfast clubs, as well as initiatives relating to physical activity;

·       drug education; and

·       relationships.

Student Wellbeing Initiative (Strong Families, Safe Kids)

Funding of $5.2 million over four years has been allocated to ensure the wellbeing of children and resilience of families in Tasmania is a collective and shared responsibility as part of the $20 million Strong Families, Safe Kids initiative. The Tasmanian Government has committed to the recommendations in the Strong Families, Safe Kids report released by the Minister for Human Services in March 2016. This initiative will provide additional services and support for children in Government schools and Child and Family Centres to improve child wellbeing and safety. These services will be part of a coordinated response to improving child wellbeing across government agencies and will complement existing student support services, with $1.3 million to be expended in 2016‑17. Total funding provided by the Tasmanian Government for the Strong Families, Safe Kids initiative is $20 million over four years, with $15 million being allocated to the Department of Health and Human Services, and $5.2 million to be expended by the Department of Education.

Year 9 to 12 Review

The Government has a commitment to raising educational standards and retention in Tasmania to at or above the national standard. Under this initiative, funding of $250 000 will be provided in 2016‑17 for the purpose of commissioning an independent review of education provision in Year 9 to 12 in Tasmanian schools, including Vocational Education and Training provision. The review will identify opportunities to improve attendance, retention and attainment outcomes.


 

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of Education are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 ‑ Education; and

·       Output Group 2 ‑ LINC Tasmania.

Table 2.2:          Output Group Expense Summary

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Education

 

 

 

 

 

1.1  In School Education1

943 742)

973 477)

984 660)

986 515)

1 006 341)

1.2  School Support Services

13 592)

14 034)

14 207)

14 307)

14 471)

1.3  Early Learning2

6 514)

6 269)

6 370)

6 446)

6 510)

1.4  Statutory Offices3

2 825)

2 486)

2 539)

2 579)

2 609)

 

966 673)

996 266)

1 007 776)

1 009 847)

1 029 931)

Output Group 2 ‑ LINC Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

2.1  Information Services and Community Learning

33 972)

34 722)

35 317)

35 778)

36 183)

2.2  Tasmanian Archives and Heritage Office

2 693)

2 951)

3 026)

3 066)

3 101)

 

36 665)

37 673)

38 343)

38 844)

39 284)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies4

288 073)

306 139)

322 316)

332 480)

340 519)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

312)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

1 291 723)

1 340 078)

1 368 435)

1 381 171)

1 409 734)

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The increase in In School Education reflects the continued implementation of election commitments to extend high schools to Year 11 and 12 and to provide School Health Nurses and Literacy and Numeracy Specialists and additional State and Australian Government funding for the Government school sector under the Students First education reforms. The variations from 2018‑19 are impacted by the cessation of funding from the Australian Government under the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education ‑ 2016 and 2017. Negotiations are continuing between the Australian Government and jurisdictions for the continuation of this funding.

2.   The decrease in Early Learning is primarily due to funding under the Australian Government National Partnership Agreement on the National Quality Agenda for Early Childhood Education and Care not being included in the Forward Estimates. Negotiations for the continuation of funding are currently being finalised.

3.   The decrease in Statutory Offices reflects internal accounting adjustments to better align indirect cost apportionment as well as a reduction in expenses associated with the Office of Tasmanian Assessment Standards and Certification.

4.   The increase in Grants and Subsidies reflects increased grants to non‑government schools for the Students First education reforms.

 

Output Group 1:   Education

1.1 In School Education

The services provided under this Output focus on the delivery of education to students in schools enrolled in classes from Kindergarten to Senior Secondary. The purpose of this Output is to provide a range of educational services that will help students develop intellectually, socially, morally, emotionally and physically in a stimulating, inclusive and supportive environment. The services provided under this Output are crucial to ensure that Tasmania's young people achieve the educational skills necessary to continue their education and training and become job‑ready and contributing citizens. The Output has a strong focus on improving the transition of students from Year 10 and retaining them, so that they gain a meaningful Year 12 or equivalent qualification.

1.2 School Support Services

The services provided under this Output focus on services provided to schools through Learning Services and Education Performance Services.

Learning Services works collaboratively with networks of schools to initiate and promote system level initiatives and directions. Learning Services has a key role in facilitating the sharing of resources, knowledge, innovation and learning between schools and across the State and responds to schools on the basis of their improvement needs.

Education Performance Services monitors and measures student outcomes in the pre‑compulsory and compulsory years of schooling including achievement against the national benchmarks established under the National Assessment Plan ‑ Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). It also provides statewide support and advice for assessment and reporting, as well as information regarding teacher assessment using the standards of the Tasmanian Curriculum and the Australian Curriculum.

1.3 Early Learning

This Output has two points of focus. The first, through the Education and Care Unit, is for approving and regulating education and care services (long day care, outside school hours care and family day care) under national legislation. It is also responsible for the licensing and monitoring of all other child care services under the Child Care Act 2001. This Output also provides assistance and advice to education and care services. Funds are provided to eligible service providers as a contribution towards operating expenses and capital upgrades through the Education and Care Grants Program. The second point of focus is on services delivered through Child and Family Centres.

1.4 Statutory Offices

This Output provides for the operation of independent educational Statutory Authorities administratively supported by the Department. It reflects operations of the new Office of Tasmanian Assessment Standards and Certification, which is responsible for Year 11 and 12 accreditation and certification.


 

Table 2.3:          Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1

 

Performance Measure

Unit of
Measure

2013‑14 Actual

2014‑15) Actual)

2015‑16 Target

2016‑17 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading1,2

 

 

 

 

 

Reading rates against national minimum standard (NMS) Year 3

% of students at or above the NMS

92.1)

92.9)

94.0)

94.0)

Reading rates against NMS Year 5

%

91.3)

92.1)

94.0)

94.0)

Reading rates against NMS Year 7

%

94.7)

94.7)

94.8)

94.8)

Reading rates against NMS Year 9

%

90.5)

91.4)

92.1)

92.1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numeracy1,2

 

 

 

 

 

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 3

% of students at or above the NMS

94.5)

94.0)

96.0)

96.0)

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 5

%

92.6)

94.9)

94.5)

95.0)

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 7

%

94.8)

96.0)

95.0)

95.5)

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 9

%

93.5)

95.8)

93.5)

95.0)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal Students1,2,3

 

 

 

 

 

Year 3 reading for aboriginal students

educational outcome gap %

4.3)

5.7)

4.0)

4.0)

Year 5 reading for aboriginal students

%

10.0)

10.5)

6.0)

6.0)

Year 7 reading for aboriginal students

%

6.0)

5.9)

6.0)

6.0)

Year 9 reading for aboriginal students

%

8.9)

10.6)

7.5)

7.5)

Year 3 numeracy for aboriginal students

educational outcome gap %

2.1)

4.7)

4.0)

4.0)

Year 5 numeracy for aboriginal students

%

8.6)

4.8)

6.5)

6.0)

Year 7 numeracy for aboriginal students

%

6.4)

5.2)

6.0)

5.5)

Year 9 numeracy for aboriginal students

%

8.1)

6.4)

8.0)

7.0)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kindergarten and Prep4

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of children meeting the Kindergarten Development Check

%

 

74.5)

 

74.1)

 

77.0)

 

77.0)

Percentage of Prep students achieving: Expected literacy outcomes

%

85.4)

85.9)

86.0)

86.0)

Expected numeracy outcomes

%

85.5)

87.0)

86.5)

86.5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Education and Care

 

 

 

 

 

Service quality assessment visits5,6

Number

50.0)

100.0)

85.0)

60.0)

Visits to approved or licensed education and child care services7

Number

 

101.0)

 

152.0)

 

200.0)

 

210.0)

 


 

Table 2.3:          Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1 (continued)

 

Performance Measure

Unit of
Measure

2013‑14 Actual

2014‑15 Actual

2015‑16 Target

2016‑17 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attainment Measures for 15 ‑ 19 year olds, achieving:1,8

 

 

 

 

 

120 credit points in education and training

Number

4 879

4 993

5 000

5 100

Some vocational education and training

Number

5 892

5 120

6 500

6 500

A Tasmanian Certificate of Education

Number

3 319

3 385

3 500

3 600

A Tertiary Entrance Rank

Number

2 306

2 202

2 450

2 450

NSSC Census9

Number

7 589

7 497

7 850

7 850

Apparent retention rate Years 10‑1210

%

70.1

73.8

72.5

75.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources: National Assessment Program: Literacy and Numeracy: Achievement in Reading, Writing, Language Conventions and Numeracy 2013, 2014; Department of Education Annual Report 2014‑15; and Department of Education records.

Tasmanian Qualifications Authority Annual Reports; National Schools Statistics Collection (NSSC), Schools, Australia ABS Cat No 4221.0.

National Quality Agenda Information Technology System (NQAITS).

Education and Care Unit.

Notes:

1.   Actual performance measures are based on calendar years. The measures for the 2013‑14 Actuals are based on the 2014 calendar year, while the measures for the 2014‑15 Actuals are based on the 2015 calendar year.

2.   Sustained school improvement is long‑term in nature and will be subject to variations from year to year. School performance targets are set with this in mind. For example, targets for Years 7 and 9 numeracy are lower than 2014‑15 Actuals due to volatility in data as a result of measurement factors.

3.   This measure represents the difference between the achievement for all Tasmanian non‑Aboriginal students and the achievement of Aboriginal students and has been established to meet the Council of Australian Government's goal of halving the educational outcome gap between Aboriginal and non‑Aboriginal students in ten years. These measures represent the percentage educational gap, as a result a lower figure represents a better result. Due to the relatively lower student numbers for this performance measure, results can have greater variability from year to year compared to performance measures that include the total student cohort.

4.   Actual performance measures are based on calendar years. The measures for the 2013‑14 Actuals are based on the 2013 calendar year, while the measures for the 2014‑15 Actuals are based on the 2014 calendar year.

5.   Services are assessed against the seven Quality Areas, 18 standards and 58 elements of the National Quality Standard and ratings are published. A risk based approach to new assessments and reassessments of services informs the 2016‑17 target.

6.   Actual performance measures are responsive to the emergent demands of the education and care sector and community, in accordance with the principles of best practice regulation.

7.   The number of visits to approved or licensed education and child care services is in addition to the number of service quality assessments conducted.

8.   Completion and participation numbers are affected by state‑level cohort sizes. Further, rates of completion and participation are affected by economic circumstances and targets assume these circumstances, especially youth employment opportunities, will remain stable over this period.

9.   Actuals are the total full‑time equivalent of government senior secondary students regardless of age, at the Mid Year Census.

10. Apparent retention rate is a measure of the number of government school students in a designated year of education expressed as a percentage of their respective cohort group in a base year. Figures relate to government full‑time school students. For small populations, like Tasmania, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) notes that relatively small changes in student numbers can create large movements in apparent retention rates. The ABS also notes care should be exercised in the interpretation of apparent retention rates as the method of calculation does not take into account a range of factors such as:

·   students progressing at a faster or slower than expected rate of one grade a year;

·   interstate/international migration;

·   movement between the government and non‑government sector;

·   enrolment policies; and

·   students enrolled in alternative education and training pathways, such as vocational education and training.

Sustained improvement in retention is long‑term in nature and will be subject to variations from year to year.

Output Group 2:   LINC Tasmania

2.1 Information Services and Community Learning

This Output provides for the lifelong learning of all Tasmanians through the delivery of information, education and training, literacy support and other community services through the LINC network.

2.2 Tasmanian Archives and Heritage Office

This Output focuses on the provision of Tasmanian Information Services and the management of Tasmania's Archival and Heritage Collection.

Table 2.4:          Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2013‑14 Actual

2014‑15 Actual

2015‑16 Target

2016‑17 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

In‑person visits

Number

3 283 397

3 141 871

3 400 000

3 300 000

Visits to LINC Online

Number

2 348 609

2 674 746

2 800 000

2 800 000

Library items borrowed

Number

4 366 611

4 195 308

4 500 000

4 500 000

Community education enrolments

 

 

 

 

 

Work and Life Skills program enrolments

Number

8 438

9 913

9 500

10 000

Adult Education program enrolments2

Number

1 491

1 536

3 000

1 600

People accessing literacy support services3

Number

1 879

2 252

1 660

2 000

Number of new members and supporters of
26TEN4

Number

 

 

….(

 

….(

 

100

Volunteer hours

Number

114 852

107 742

116 500

115 000

Heritage documents and artefacts publicly available in digital format5

Number

246 637

274 712

300 000

320 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The performance measure New Tasmanian items publicly available which had been reported in previous Budget Papers is no longer being reported. This is due to LINC Tasmania not being able to influence outputs associated with this measure.

2.   The 2015‑16 target no longer represents recent performance. With a reduction in program overheads together with a stabilising enrolment pattern, the revised 2016‑17 target is expected to achieve cost recovery for the program. Program enrolments have stabilised over the past three years and this is expected to continue.

3.   This performance measure is based on the number of people receiving individually tailored support to increase their literacy skills. The 2015‑16 target was set prior to extensive promotion of 26TEN services. The 2016‑17 target reflects a sustainable level of client support that can be provided by the existing LINC network and volunteer pool. Figures for 2014‑15 include an exceptional level of response to local literacy campaigns which required temporary additional resourcing.

4.   This measure has not previously been reported in the Budget Papers. This is a key goal outlined in the 26TEN Tasmania Action Plan 2015‑17, launched in October 2015, which aims to increase awareness of Adult Literacy.

5.   While each volume can include several hundred digitised pages, for statistical purposes each volume is counted as a single item. Items to be digitalised are selected in accordance with the LINC Tasmania Digitisation Policy and are considered a high priority for digitisation.


 

Capital Investment Program

Table 2.5 provides financial information for the Department's Capital Investment Program (CIP). Further information on the CIP is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 2.5:          Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated)

Total)

Cost)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing Infrastructure Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

Glenorchy Primary School

4 000)

3 500)

....)

....)

....)

Kings Meadows High School

5 000)

4 000)

....)

....)

....)

Latrobe High School

10 000)

8 000)

....)

....)

....)

LINC Tasmania Burnie

2 800)

1 000)

....)

....)

....)

Montrose Bay High School

5 800)

5 045)

....)

....)

....)

Northern Support School1

4 600)

2 000)

....)

....)

....)

Parklands High School

9 145)

8 445)

....)

....)

....)

Prospect High School

8 500)

5 500)

....)

....)

....)

Riverside High School

12 000)

....)

2 400)

7 200)

2 400)

School of Special Education North West

4 500)

3 120)

....)

....)

....)

Smithton High School

7 000)

5 663)

....)

....)

....)

South Hobart Primary School

3 600)

3 100)

....)

....)

....)

Year 7‑12 Implementation Plan ‑ capital

6 000)

1 500)

1 500)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Infrastructure commitments2

 

 

 

 

 

Austins Ferry Primary School

5 500)

1 000)

4 500)

....)

....)

East Devonport Primary School

1 750)

....)

....)

875)

875)

East Launceston Primary School

4 500)

1 000)

3 500)

....)

....)

Hobart College

2 500)

....)

....)

800)

1 700)

Lenah Valley Primary School

3 000)

800)

2 200)

....)

....)

Montagu Bay Primary School

1 750)

....)

....)

750)

1 000)

Queechy High School

3 000)

....)

....)

1 500)

1 500)

Riverside Primary School

2 500)

....)

....)

800)

1 700)

Snug Primary School

2 500)

....)

....)

1 250)

1 250)

Somerset Primary School

1 750)

750)

1 000)

....)

....)

Sorell School

3 750)

....)

....)

1 875)

1 875)

St Marys District School

5 000)

....)

....)

1 000)

4 000)

Tasman District School

4 000)

800)

3 200)

....)

....)

Tasmanian Archives and Heritage Office

3 000)

....)

....)

2 000)

1 000)

Windermere Primary School

5 500)

1 000)

4 500)

....)

....)

Table 2.5:          Capital Investment Program (continued)

 

Estimated)

Total)

Cost)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

)

56 223)

22 800)

18 050)

17 300)

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Additional funding for this project will be made available following the sale of surplus property.

2.   The Schools Infrastructure Package includes $3 million for TasTAFE comprising of $1.5 million in 2017‑18 and $1.5 million in 2018‑19. Funding for those projects is provided to TasTAFE via the Department of State Growth (refer to chapter 10 of this Budget Paper for further details).

Austins Ferry Primary School

Funding of $1 million has been allocated in 2016‑17, for a $5.5 million project, over two years, to provide additional general learning and support areas at Austins Ferry Primary School. This project will address capacity issues being experienced by the school due to enrolment growth.

East Devonport Primary School

Funding of $1.8 million has been allocated to provide contemporary learning areas at East Devonport Primary School. Work on this project will commence in 2018‑19.

East Launceston Primary School

Funding of $1 million has been allocated in 2016‑17 for the provision of new kindergarten facilities, general learning areas and a multi‑purpose facility to cater for increased enrolments at East Launceston Primary School. The total project cost is $4.5 million, over two years.

Hobart College

Funding of $2.5 million has been allocated for a two year project commencing in 2018‑19 to refurbish the Hobart College Theatrette. The works will update the facility providing a contemporary and safe environment for the school and wider community.

Lenah Valley Primary School

Funding of $800 000 has been allocated in 2016‑17, the first year of a two year $3 million project, to construct new general learning areas and refurbish existing general learning areas at Lenah Valley Primary School to address capacity issues.

Montagu Bay Primary School

Funding of $750 000 has been allocated in 2018‑19 which is the first year of a two year $1.8 million project for the construction of general learning and support areas and additional car parking at Montagu Bay Primary School to cater for enrolment demand.

Queechy High School

Funding of $3 million has been allocated to provide contemporary learning areas at Queechy High School. Work on this project will commence in 2018‑19.

Riverside Primary School

Funding of $2.5 million has been allocated for a two year project, commencing in 2018‑19, to construct new general learning areas, amenities and an improved support space at Riverside Primary School. This project will address capacity issues being experienced by the school due to enrolment growth.

Snug Primary School

Funding of $2.5 million has been allocated to construct a new gymnasium and presentation hall at Snug Primary School. Work on this project will commence in 2018‑19.

Somerset Primary School

Funding of $750 000 has been allocated in 2016‑17 for the construction of new general learning areas to cater for increased enrolments. The total project cost is $1.8 million over two years.

Sorell School

Funding of $3.8 million has been allocated for the first stage to provide contemporary learning areas at Sorell School commencing in 2018‑19.

St Marys District School

Funding of $5 million has been allocated to undertake a major redevelopment at St Marys District School. This project will provide contemporary general learning areas, including music and performing arts facilities. Work on this project will commence in 2018‑19.

Tasman District School

Funding of $800 000 has been allocated in 2016‑17 to provide contemporary learning and support areas and redevelopment of amenities including the administration block at Tasman District School. Total funding for this two year project is $4 million.

Tasmanian Archives and Heritage Office

Funding of $3 million has been allocated for the relocation of the Tasmanian Archive and Heritage Office storage facility to Geilston Bay. This project will free up the existing Berriedale site to be used to meet additional storage requirements for the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. Work on this project will commence in 2018‑19.

Windermere Primary School

Funding of $1 million has been allocated in 2016‑17 for a $5.5 million project, over two years, to construct additional general learning and support areas at Windermere Primary School. This project will address capacity issues being experienced by the school due to enrolment growth.


 

Detailed Budget Statements

Table 2.6:          Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent1

894 787)

901 983)

921 303)

932 768)

947 141)

Appropriation revenue ‑ works & services2

24 580)

56 223)

22 800)

18 050)

17 300)

Other revenue from government3

9 600)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Grants4

18 861)

17 791)

11 655)

1 053)

148)

Sales of goods and services

38 326)

36 401)

37 303)

37 358)

37 744)

Fees and fines5

....)

240)

240)

240)

240)

Interest6

1 561)

1 080)

1 060)

1 040)

1 020)

Other revenue7

23 413)

29 967)

30 228)

30 493)

30 767)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

1 011 128)

1 043 685)

1 024 589)

1 021 002)

1 034 360)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits8

714 419)

752 760)

767 873)

773 203)

793 156)

Depreciation and amortisation9

52 180)

51 113)

51 360)

51 284)

51 558)

Supplies and consumables10

218 767)

209 928)

208 114)

205 352)

205 303)

Grants and subsidies

7 803)

7 958)

6 348)

6 180)

6 273)

Other expenses11

10 481)

12 180)

12 424)

12 672)

12 925)

Total expenses from transactions

1 003 650)

1 033 939)

1 046 119)

1 048 691)

1 069 215)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

7 478)

9 746)

(21 530)

(27 689)

(34 855)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

Net gain/(loss) on non‑financial assets

243)

243)

243)

243)

243)

Total other economic flows included in net result

243)

243)

243)

243)

243)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

 7 721)

 9 989)

(21 287)

(27 446)

(34 612)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows ‑ other non‑owner changes in equity

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve12

34 557)

(4 872)

18 294)

35 258)

40 562)

Total other economic flows ‑ other non‑owner changes in equity

34 557)

(4 872)

18 294)

35 258)

40 562)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

42 278)

5 117)

(2 993)

7 812)

5 950)

 

 


 

Notes:

1.   The increase in Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent primarily reflects the continued implementation of election commitments to extend high schools to Year 11 and 12 and to provide School Health Nurses and Literacy and Numeracy Specialists and additional State and Australian Government funding for the Government school sector under the Students First education reforms. This is partially offset by the cessation of funding for the 27th pay in 2015‑16.

2.   The movement in Appropriation revenue ‑ works & services reflects the timing of capital projects being undertaken by the Department.

3.   The decrease in Other revenue from government in 2016‑17 reflects the utilisation of funding carried forward under Section 8A(2) of the Public Account Act 1986.

4.   The decrease in Grants across the Forward Estimates reflects the finalisation of Australian Government National Partnership funding to the State. In particular Australian Government expenditure relating to the National Partnership Agreement on the National Quality Agenda for Early Childhood Education and Care is not included in the Forward Estimates. The movements from 2018‑19 reflect the cessation of funding from the Australian Government under the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education ‑ 2016 and 2017. Negotiations are continuing between the Australian Government and jurisdictions for the continuation of these two National Partnership Agreements.

5.   The increase in Fees and fines represents library fees and fines which were previously reported under Sales of goods and services.

6.   The decrease in Interest in 2016‑17 reflects estimated interest receipts based on lower interest rates.

7.   The increase in Other revenue primarily reflects increased estimated revenue receipts within the Department's Special Deposits and Trust Fund, including a revised estimate for school revenue receipts, based on actual trends.

8.   The increase in Employee benefits reflects increased expenditure related to increased State and Australian Government funding for Students First as well as increased funding associated with the election commitment to extend high schools to Year 11 and 12. The increase in 2019‑20 reflects the proposed implementation of changes in school starting and leaving age due to the Education Act Review.

9.   The decrease in Depreciation and amortisation in 2016‑17 reflects the estimated depreciation expense based on the current valuation of Property, plant and equipment.

10. The decrease in Supplies and consumables reflects a realignment of school expenditure according to actual trends, with some expenditure being reclassified as employee entitlements.

11. The increase in Other expenses reflects a revision of the Tasmanian Risk Management Fund Workers' Compensation premiums resulting from the latest advice from the actuary.

12. Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve reflect the revaluation of Land and Buildings.


 

Table 2.7:          Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent1

288 073)

306 139)

322 316)

332 480)

340 519)

Sales of goods and services

364)

373)

382)

391)

400)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

288 437)

306 512)

322 698)

332 871)

340 919)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies1

288 073)

306 139)

322 316)

332 480)

340 519)

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

364)

373)

382)

391)

400)

Total expenses from transactions

288 437)

306 512)

322 698)

332 871)

340 919)

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.   The increases in Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent and Grants and subsidies reflect increased funding to non‑government schools under the Students First education reforms.


Table 2.8:          Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Education

 

 

 

 

 

1.1  In School Education1

841 587)

847 974)

866 224)

876 911)

890 557)

1.2  School Support Services2

11 263)

12 699)

12 872)

12 972)

13 136)

1.3  Early Learning

5 815)

5 639)

5 739)

5 813)

5 877)

1.4  Statutory Offices2

2 756)

2 398)

2 451)

2 491)

2 521)

 

861 421)

868 710)

887 286)

898 187)

912 091)

Output Group 2 ‑ LINC Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

2.1  Information Services and Community Learning

30 751)

30 660)

31 331)

31 844)

32 280)

2.2  Tasmanian Archives and Heritage Office

2 615)

2 613)

2 686)

2 737)

2 770)

 

33 366)

33 273)

34 017)

34 581)

35 050)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies3

288 073)

306 139)

322 316)

332 480)

340 519)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

24 580)

56 223)

22 800)

18 050)

17 300)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Education

 

 

 

 

 

Total Recurrent Services

1 182 860)

1 208 122)

1 243 619)

1 265 248)

1 287 660)

Total Works and Services

24 580)

56 223)

22 800)

18 050)

17 300)

 

1 207 440)

1 264 345)

1 266 419)

1 283 298)

1 304 960)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Carried Forward4

9 600)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

1 217 040)

1 264 345)

1 266 419)

1 283 298)

1 304 960)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

 928 967)

 958 206)

 944 103)

 950 818)

 964 441)

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

 288 073)

 306 139)

 322 316)

 332 480)

 340 519)

 

1 217 040)

1 264 345)

1 266 419)

1 283 298)

1 304 960)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The increase in the In School Education Output primarily reflects the continued implementation of election commitments to extend high schools to Year 11 and 12 and to provide School Health Nurses and Literacy and Numeracy Specialists and additional State and Australian Government funding for the Government school sector under the Students First education reforms. This is partially offset by the cessation of funding for the 27th pay in 2015‑16.

2.   The movements in School Support Services and Statutory Offices primarily reflect internal accounting adjustments to better align indirect cost apportionment.

3.   The increase in Grants and Subsidies reflects increased grants to non‑government schools under the Students First education reforms.

4.   The decrease in Appropriation Carried Forward in 2016‑17 reflects the utilisation of funding carried forward under Section 8A(2) of the Public Account Act 1986.


 

Table 2.9:          Administered Revenue

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Consolidated Fund

 

 

 

 

 

Other Sales of Services

364)

373)

382)

391)

400)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation1

288 073)

306 139)

322 316)

332 480)

340 519)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

288 437)

306 512)

322 698)

332 871)

340 919)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.   The increase in Annual Appropriation reflects increased funding to non‑government schools under the Students First education reforms.

Table 2.10:        Administered Expenses

 

2015‑16]

)

Budget)

2016‑17]

)

Budget)

2017‑18] 

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19]

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20]

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth grants to non‑government schools1

226 163)

240 748)

251 544)

257 734)

264 078)

Non‑government schools: capital assistance

1 137)

1 137)

1 137)

1 137)

1 137)

Non‑government schools: grants2

60 773)

64 254)

69 635)

73 609)

75 304)

 

288 073)

306 139)

322 316)

332 480)

340 519)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Consolidated Fund

364)

373)

382)

391)

400)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

288 437)

306 512)

322 698)

332 871)

340 919)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The increase in Commonwealth grants to non‑government schools reflects increased Australian Government funding to non‑government schools under the Students First education reforms. These figures are grossed up to include Goods and Services Tax.

2.   The increase in Non‑government schools: grants reflects increased State funding to non‑government schools under the Students First education reforms.


 

Commonwealth Grants to Non‑Government Schools

This Grant Program represents Australian Government funding relating to non‑government schools. These funds are administered on behalf of the Australian Department of Education and, upon receipt, are forwarded to non‑government schools.

Non‑Government Schools: Capital Assistance

These grants provide funding to non‑government schools and non‑government school authorities for assistance with eligible capital projects in accordance with sections 64‑70 of the Education Act 1994.

Non‑Government Schools: Grants

The Program covers the cost of grants which are distributed to registered non‑government schools in accordance with Part 5, Division 3 of the Education Act and Part 6 of the Education Regulations 1995. Since the implementation of the Students First education reforms, funding allocations that had previously been provided to non‑government schools under the Student Assistance Scheme are now included within this payment.


 

Table 2.11:        Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

 

Budget)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

 51 008)

 68 372)

 66 000)

 62 445)

 58 879)

Receivables2

 22 019)

 17 013)

 17 995)

 18 727)

 19 459)

 

 73 027)

 85 385)

 83 995)

 81 172)

 78 338)

Non‑financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Assets held for sale3

 6 069)

 3 720)

 2 756)

 2 063)

 1 899)

Property, plant and equipment4

1 478 877)

1 346 695)

1 348 697)

1 362 191)

1 379 392)

Heritage and cultural assets

 69 448)

 69 928)

 71 700)

 73 524)

 75 348)

Intangibles5

 1 282)

 4 408)

 3 406)

 2 629)

 2 046)

Other assets

 10 839)

 10 922)

 10 426)

 10 180)

 9 784)

 

1 566 515)

1 435 673)

1 436 985)

1 450 587)

1 468 469)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

1 639 542)

1 521 058)

1 520 980)

1 531 759)

1 546 807)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables6

 6 518)

 4 710)

 4 831)

 4 952)

 5 073)

Employee benefits7

 126 826)

 139 565)

 142 359)

 145 205)

 154 182)

Other liabilities8

 2 119)

 4 021)

 4 021)

 4 021)

 4 021)

Total liabilities

 135 463)

 148 296)

 151 211)

 154 178)

 163 276)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

1 504 079)

1 372 762)

1 369 769)

1 377 581)

1 383 531)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Reserves

 423 487)

 305 126)

 323 420)

 358 678)

 399 240)

Accumulated funds

1 080 592)

1 067 636)

1 046 349)

1 018 903)

 984 291)

Total equity

1 504 079)

1 372 762)

1 369 769)

1 377 581)

1 383 531)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The increase in Cash and deposits in 2017 reflects opening cash balances for 2015‑16 being higher than originally estimated.

2.   The decrease in Receivables from 2017 reflects a revised estimate based on 30 June 2015 actuals.

3.   The decrease in Assets held for sale reflects an updated estimate based on an analysis of the timing of property sales.

4.   The decrease in Property, plant and equipment from 2017 reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2015 revaluation of land and building assets. This revaluation resulted in a significant decrease in the value of land assets.

5.   The increase in Intangibles from 2017 reflects revised estimates based on the completion of high priority information technology projects. Intangibles are systematically amortised over a period of four years.

6.   The decrease in Payables from 2017 reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2015 actuals.

7.   The increase in Employee benefits from 2017 primarily reflects an increase in accrued salaries following the 27th pay in 2015‑16 which resulted in a decrease in the accrual in that year.

8.   The increase in Other liabilities from 2017 reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2015 actuals.


 

Table 2.12:        Statement of Cash Flows

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent1

 894 787)

 901 983)

 921 303)

 932 768)

 947 141)

Appropriation receipts ‑ capital2

 24 580)

 56 223)

 22 800)

 18 050)

 17 300)

Grants3

 18 861)

 17 791)

 11 655)

 1 053)

  148)

Sales of goods and services

 36 949)

 35 302)

 35 787)

 36 092)

 36 478)

Fees and fines4

....)

  240)

  240)

  240)

  240)

GST receipts

 28 503)

 28 503)

 28 503)

 28 503)

 28 503)

Interest received5

 1 561)

 1 080)

 1 060)

 1 040)

 1 020)

Other cash receipts6

 23 413)

 28 967)

 29 228)

 29 493)

 29 767)

Total cash inflows

1 028 654)

1 070 089)

1 050 576)

1 047 239)

1 060 597)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits7

(649 020)

(662 124)

(677 395)

(682 366)

(694 611)

Superannuation

(80 277)

(81 538)

(84 135)

(84 442)

(86 019)

GST payments

(29 207)

(29 207)

(29 207)

(29 207)

(29 207)

Grants and subsidies

(7 803)

(7 958)

(6 348)

(6 180)

(6 273)

Supplies and consumables

(227 909)

(219 070)

(217 256)

(214 494)

(214 445)

Other cash payments8

(10 481)

(12 180)

(12 424)

(12 672)

(12 925)

Total cash outflows

(1 004 697)

(1 012 077)

(1 026 765)

(1 029 361)

(1 043 480)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

 23 957)

 58 012)

 23 811)

 17 878)

 17 117)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets9

(37 763)

(61 506)

(26 183)

(21 433)

(20 683)

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(37 763)

(61 506)

(26 183)

(21 433)

(20 683)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(13 806)

(3 494)

(2 372)

(3 555)

(3 566)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

 64 814)

 71 866)

 68 372)

 66 000)

 62 445)

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

 51 008)

 68 372)

 66 000)

 62 445)

 58 879)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.   The increase in Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent primarily reflects the continued implementation of election commitments to extend high schools to Years 11 and 12 and to provide School Health Nurses and Literacy and Numeracy Specialists and additional State and Australian Government funding for the Government school sector under the Students First education reforms. This is partially offset by the cessation of funding for the 27th pay in 2015‑16.

2.   The increase in Appropriation receipts ‑ capital reflects the timing of capital projects being undertaken by the Department.

3.   The decrease in Grants across the Forward Estimates reflects the finalisation of Australian Government National Partnership funding to the State. In particular Australian Government expenditure relating to the National Partnership Agreement on the National Quality Agenda for Early Childhood Education and Care is not included in the Forward Estimates. The movements from 2018‑19 reflect the cessation of funding from the Australian Government under the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education ‑ 2016 and 2017. Negotiations are continuing between the Australian Government and jurisdictions for the continuation of these two National Partnership Agreements.

4.   The increase in Fees and fines represents library fees and fines which were previously reported under Sales of goods and services.

5.   The decrease in Interest received in 2016‑17 reflects the estimated interest receipts based on lower interest rates.

6.   The increase in Other cash receipts primarily reflects increased estimated revenue receipts within the Department's Special Deposits and Trust Fund, including a revised estimate for school revenue receipts, based on actual trends.

7.   The increase in Employee benefits reflects increased expenditure related to increased State and Australian Government funding for Students First as well as increased funding associated with the election commitment to extend high schools to Years 11 and 12. The increase in 2019‑20 reflects the proposed implementation of changes in school starting and leaving age due to the Education Act Review.

8.   The increase in Other cash payments reflects a revision of the Tasmanian Risk Management Fund Workers' Compensation premiums resulting from the latest advice from the actuary.

9.   The increase in Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets reflects increases in the Capital Investment Program.


 

Table 2.13:        Statement of Cash Flows ‑ Administered

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent1

 288 073)

 306 139)

 322 316)

 332 480)

 340 519)

Sales of goods and services

  364)

  373)

  382)

  391)

  400)

Total cash inflows

 288 437)

 306 512)

 322 698)

 332 871)

 340 919)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies1

(288 073)

(306 139)

(322 316)

(332 480)

(340 519)

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

(364)

(373)

(382)

(391)

(400)

Total cash outflows

(288 437)

(306 512)

(322 698)

(332 871)

(340 919)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.   The increases in Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent and Grants and subsidies reflect increased funding to non‑government schools under the Students First education reforms.