9 Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Agency Outline

The Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment helps build a strong and economically vibrant State, by facilitating and supporting Tasmania's competitive strengths across primary industries and the environment.

The Department's objectives are to:

       facilitate the sustainable development of Tasmania's marine and freshwater resources;

       cultivate prosperity in Tasmania's primary industries and food sectors;

       secure a healthy and productive environment for all Tasmanians;

       manage the sensitive and appropriate use and enjoyment of Tasmania's Parks and reserves;

       protect, conserve and promote Tasmania's Aboriginal, natural and historic heritage;

       build on and protect the Tasmanian brand credentials;

       drive the integrity and viability of the racing industry; and

       deliver access to secure land tenure, land and resource information.

The Department reports to:

       the Minister for Primary Industries and Water, Hon Jeremy Rockliff MP;

       the Minister for Environment, Parks and Heritage, Hon Matthew Groom MP; and

       the Minister for Racing, Hon Adam Brooks MP.

This chapter provides the Department's financial information for 2016‑17 and the Forward Estimates period (2017‑18 to 2019‑20). Further information on the Department is provided at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au.


 

Key Deliverables

Table 9.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimate allocations for key deliverables within the Department.

Table 9.1: Key Deliverables Statement

 

2016‑17

 

Budget

2017‑18

Forward

Estimate

2018‑19

Forward

Estimate

2019‑20

Forward

Estimate

 

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal Joint Management of Reserves

200

200

200

200

Agricultural Industry Development1

115

115

45

....

Arthur Pieman Tracks

150

....

....

....

Cradle Mountain Master Plan

....

....

....

....

Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture Policy ‑ Implementation

1 540

1 275

....

....

Development of Woolmers Estate Visitor Centre

438

438

....

....

Environmental Policy Reform1

150

150

....

....

Increasing Biosecurity Capability

1 000

....

.

.

Increasing Biosecurity Services

500

500

500

500

Maria Island National Park Strategy

220

....

.

....

National Electronic Conveyancing Integration1

300

200

.

....

Oyster Industry Support

600

....

....

....

Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure

5 721

....

....

....

Rock Lobsters Policy ‑ Implementation

100

100

....

....

South Coast Track

250

250

....

....

Supporting a World Class Tasmanian Fisheries and Seafood Sector

 

 

 

 

Fisheries Integrated Licensing and Management System

575

575

....

....

IMAS Research Funding

167

166

....

....

Tasmanian Shellfish Quality Assurance Program

300

100

100

100

Wild Fisheries Management Program

100

100

100

100

Support the Regulatory and Other Services of the Poppy Industry

650

650

650

650

Three Capes Track ‑ Stage 3

1 700

1 485

735

....

Valuation and Information System of Tasmania Redevelopment1

600

600

200

....

West Coast Trails Projects

570

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1. This initiative is funded from within the Department's existing Budget allocation.

Aboriginal Joint Management of Reserves

The Government is funding $200 000 per year over the next four years to help ensure that the extraordinary Aboriginal cultural values of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area are appropriately recognised. Initiatives delivered in collaboration with the Aboriginal community include: the establishment of governance arrangements for joint management; development of interpretation material; cultural awareness training; and the provision of a regular access program for Aboriginal people.

Additional funding of $1 million has also been allocated to the Department of Premier and Cabinet over four years for additional trainee rangers and for support for Aboriginal women impacted by family violence as part of the Government's priority to reset its relationship with the Tasmanian Aboriginal community.

Agricultural Industry Development

This initiative will provide $140 000 over two years to Fruit Growers Tasmania to support it to undertake a range of industry and market development activities in response to market opportunity in the fruit sectors from recent Free Trade Agreements.

This initiative will provide an additional $135 000 over three years to the Rural Financial Counselling Service (RFCS) to allow it to provide additional services to farmers impacted by current seasonal conditions. This will take the total State Government funding for the RFCS from $40 000 per annum to $85 000 per annum over the next three years.

Arthur Pieman Tracks

The Government planned to invest $300 000 to undertake rehabilitation and erosion protection works in the Arthur‑Pieman Conservation Area. The project has been on hold awaiting the outcome of court proceedings. In the interim some urgent works have been undertaken to protect previous rehabilitation efforts.

Cradle Mountain Master Plan

The Cradle Coast Authority and the Tourism Industry Council Tasmania have developed a Master Plan that contemplates investment of around $160 million (both public and private sector investment). The Master Plan will be considered through the Structured Infrastructure Investment Review Process (SIIRP), particularly having regard to government‑owned infrastructure requirements such as a replacement visitors' centre, public toilets and car parks. Any future funding requirements would be able to be considered in the context of the unallocated provision in the Capital Investment Program.

Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture Policy ‑ Implementation

This major set of initiatives is collectively supporting Agrivision 2050, which is directed towards the long‑term growth of the Tasmanian agricultural sector. Some initiatives are being delivered by or in cooperation with other agencies. The initiatives (which commenced in 2014‑15) include $2 million to support the enhancement of irrigation benefits; $900 000 to strengthen biosecurity; $1.4 million for additional agricultural research, development and extension and improved farm productivity; $1 million for farm forestry development and improved returns from residues; $885 000 towards skills development and improved farm safety; and $250 000 towards a farmer loan scheme in conjunction with industry. Small grants will support key organisations in the rural community (e.g. Women in Agriculture and Rural Youth Tasmania).

Development of Woolmers Estate Visitor Centre

This initiative, which commenced in 2014‑15, is funding the development of a multi‑purpose Visitor Centre at Woolmers Estate to present the World Heritage and other historic heritage values of the Brickendon‑Woolmers World Heritage Site. The Government's contribution will be matched by private philanthropic contributions as part of a $3.5 million investment. The planning and approvals processes are complete and foundation works have commenced.


 

Environmental Policy Reform

This initiative will modernise the regulatory approach to the management of air quality in the State and develop a range of initiatives to support the improvement of air quality in Tasmania in line with the 2015 National Clean Air Agreement.

Increasing Biosecurity Capability

This initiative commenced in 2015‑16, and is a $2 million commitment over two years towards the upgrade and development of biosecurity infrastructure and operating systems. The initiative includes upgrading and development of laboratory equipment and information systems; improving the State's post‑border biosecurity hygiene infrastructure; and upgrading communications including signage at border entry points. The improved capabilities will enhance Tasmania's biosecurity system and build on the capability and capacity to protect Tasmania's primary industries, natural environment and social amenity.

Increasing Biosecurity Services

The Government has committed a further $2 million to continue to grow biosecurity services. This initiative will increase the number of detector dogs and handlers where biosecurity risks are identified as being the highest. The initiative will also support a Biosecurity Officer on King Island along with seasonal increases in Biosecurity Officers to address periods of peak demand.

This funding is in addition to the Government's previous commitment of $900 000 over four years to strengthen Tasmania's biosecurity protection, which commenced in the 2014‑15 Budget, and the commitment of $500 000 per annum for Dog Detector teams, which commenced in 2015‑16. These increases to frontline biosecurity services enhance Biosecurity Tasmania's capabilities to protect Tasmania's primary industries, natural environment and social amenity from biosecurity risks.

Maria Island National Park Strategy

This initiative will support the development of a preferred management model and strategy for Maria Island to ensure its full potential as a tourism asset for the East Coast region and Tasmania is realised. This recognises that Maria Island's Darlington Station is the only remaining publicly owned World Heritage Convict site in Tasmania that is not currently managed by the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority (PAHSMA) and investigates the feasibility of incorporating the island into the management responsibility of PAHSMA.

In addition, the Government has commenced an Expression Of Interest process for the provision of ferry services to the Island that will help boost visitation further and provide certainty of access for visitors and associated tourism businesses.

National Electronic Conveyancing Integration

This initiative will integrate Land Tasmania systems with the National Electronic Conveyancing System. The online property exchange system allows lawyers and conveyancers to electronically lodge land registry documents, and complete financial settlements as part of a National Electronic Conveyancing System.


 

Oyster Industry Support

The Government is providing 24 months fee and levy relief for all marine farming leaseholders licenced to farm Pacific Oysters as they recover from the impact of Pacific Oyster Mortality Syndrome. This relief includes provision of an additional $600 000 for the continuation of the Tasmanian Shellfish Quality Assurance Program (TSQAP) which would ordinarily be funded by the industry through the payment of the TSQAP Levy by leaseholders.

In addition, the support package also extends to waiving licence fees, lease rental fees and the Primary Produce Food Safety Accreditation Fee, which represents foregone revenue for the Government bringing the total package to $861 000 for 2016‑17.

Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure

The Government committed $8 million over two years from 2015‑16 aimed at high priority maintenance and infrastructure renewal in Parks and Reserves. The Department has undertaken consultation with local councils and other stakeholders to identify priority asset projects which can improve visitation and community benefit. During 2015‑16, improvements were made to popular walks within the Cradle Mountain National Park, including enabling disability access to one walk. The Mt Field Visitor Centre has been upgraded and repairs made to historic houses at Cape Bruny. Upgrades to the Marakoopa Caves Visitor Centre are currently underway. The 2016‑17 works program will include: an upgrade of campground and facilities at Fortescue Bay; upgrades to the amenities at Pirates Bay; replacement of the Mt Mawson day shelter; carpark expansion and new amenities at the Gardens near St Helens; amenities and infrastructure improvements at Cape Bruny; construction of new amenities at the northern end of Wineglass Bay; and construction of a new track linking the Freycinet Visitor Centre to the Wineglass Bay car park.

Rock Lobsters Policy ‑ Implementation

This three year funding builds on the success of an existing industry‑managed translocation program operating on the West Coast. This initiative aims to increase the biomass of rock lobster on the East Coast to augment the biomass rebuilding strategy. This election commitment was funded for $100 000 a year for three years commencing in 2015‑16.

South Coast Track

The Government committed $2 million towards upgrading the South Coast Track (from Melaleuca to Cockle Creek) to improve access to this spectacular natural asset. The funding is being used to upgrade existing infrastructure, complete minor rerouting where the established tracks have become difficult to access, and provide safe access to beach areas. Work to date has included significant planning and design works, and the commencement of construction on new track sections including the Deadmans Bay to Turua Beach section of the Track.

Supporting a World Class Tasmanian Fisheries and Seafood Sector

The Government has committed $1.2 million over two years for the ongoing development of the Fisheries Integrated Licensing and Management System to maximise efficiencies for wild fisheries management, commercial and recreational licensing and quota monitoring. Comprehensive and accessible fisheries data is integral to supporting the sustainable management of Tasmania's fisheries resources. This initiative will support the transition of commercial fishing in Tasmania into the digital age.

An additional $100 000 of funding per annum has been provided to supplement the TSQAP.

Funding of $100 000 per annum has also been provided to support the Wild Fisheries Management Program.

This is in addition to previous commitments of $600 000 over three years to supplement TSQAP and $500 000 over three years to the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies for salmon industry research.

Support the Regulatory and Other Services of the Poppy Industry

The Government has committed to the continued support of the Poppy Advisory and Control Board. The proposed industry levy to fund the costs of the Board will not be implemented and funding has been made available from the Budget to meet the Board's costs. The funding of the Board will underpin the competiveness of the poppy industry.

Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area

Building on the extensive public consultation undertaken over the previous 18 months, a new Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area Management Plan will be completed by the end of the calendar year. The plan will reflect Tasmania's world class approach to conservation and land management and ensure the natural and cultural values of the property are appropriately managed.

Three Capes Track ‑ Stage 3

Following the outstanding success of the Three Capes Track launch in 2015, the Government has reaffirmed the provision of $4 million towards construction of Stage Three of the track which, once completed, will provide improved access to Cape Raoul. The Three Capes Track has received overwhelmingly positive reviews and as predicted is being recognised as one of the world's great coastal walks.

Valuation and Information System of Tasmania (VISTAS) Redevelopment

This initiative of $1.4 million over three years will replace the aging VISTAS providing a stable and centralised property valuation and information environment for Tasmania that supports Government and other stakeholder's revenue generating and property management activities.

West Coast Trails Projects

The Government committed a total of $1.7 million to three projects that commenced in 2014‑15, being the Horsetail Falls Walking Trail, the Mountain Bike Project and the Granite Creek Bridge Replacement. Significant progress has been made, with the Granite Creek Bridge replacement undertaken and the other projects well progressed. The projects have utilised West Coast labour forces wherever possible. Construction works for Stage Two of the Mountain Bike Project, on the Heemskirk loop extension, are due to commence in 2016‑17.

Output Restructure

In 2015‑16, the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment completed an Output structure review and has implemented the following Output restructures as part of the 2016‑17 Budget.

       The former Output Group 5 Policy has been consolidated into the Department's corporate overhead cost pool which is spread across all of the Department's outputs. The 2015‑16 Budget estimate will be reported as Output Group 9 for the 2016-17 Budget in order to report the 2015-16 Budget allocation.

       The former Output Group 9 Racing Regulation and Policy becomes Output Group 5 but otherwise remains unchanged.

       The Poppy Advisory and Control Board was transferred from the Department of Justice to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment and has become Output 2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops within Output Group 2 Primary Industries.

The remaining funding under the Government's Fuel Reduction Program election commitment has been transferred from the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment to the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management, as the Fuel Reduction Unit resides within the Tasmania Fire Service.

Performance Measures ‑ Update

During 2015‑16, the Department undertook a review of performance measures reported in the Budget chapter, resulting in some changes to performance measures. In most cases changes were made to measures that had become outdated. These were replaced or reworded with more relevant measures. Wherever changes have occurred in an Output Group, they are summarised in the first note below the relevant performance information table, and are detailed in the notes specific to the measures concerned.

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment are provided under the following Output Groups:

       Output Group 1 ‑ Land Tasmania;

       Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries;

       Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage;

       Output Group 4 ‑ Water Resources;

       Output Group 5 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy;

       Output Group 6 ‑ Biosecurity Tasmania;

       Output Group 7 ‑ Environment Protection and Analytical Services;

       Output Group 8 ‑ Parks and Wildlife Management; and

       Output Group 9 ‑ Policy (for 2015‑16 reporting purposes only).


 

Table 9.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment.

Table 9.2: Output Group Expense Summary

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Lands Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services2

11 358)

12 311)

12 568)

12 809)

12 967)

1.2 Valuation Services2

5 143)

5 644)

5 737)

5 815)

5 876)

 

16 501)

17 955)

18 305)

18 624)

18 843)

Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 AgriGrowth Tasmania3

6 733)

6 554)

6 406)

5 489)

5 578)

2.2 Marine Resources

10 642)

11 007)

10 874)

10 800)

10 790)

2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops4

742)

679)

696)

707)

715)

 

18 117)

18 240)

17 976)

16 996)

17 083)

Output Group 4 ‑ Water Resources

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Water Resource Management5

8 365)

7 745)

7 668)

7 775)

7 848)

 

8 365)

7 745)

7 668)

7 775)

7 848)

Output Group 6 ‑ Biosecurity Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Biosecurity6

18 991)

20 273)

20 182)

20 274)

20 547)

6.2 Product Integrity7

2 171)

2 830)

2 673)

2 715)

2 739)

 

21 162)

23 103)

22 855)

22 989)

23 286)

Output Group 9 ‑ Policy Advice

 

 

 

 

 

9.1 Policy Advice8

2 046)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

2 046)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

6 156)

6 156)

6 156)

6 156)

6 156)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment, Parks and Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Resource Management and Conservation

15 175)

15 105)

14 759)

14 949)

15 146)

3.2 Historic Heritage Services9

3 384)

3 221)

3 281)

2 892)

2 933)

3.3 Aboriginal Heritage10

2 100)

2 585)

2 556)

2 439)

2 478)

3.4 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

2 684)

2 665)

2 749)

2 828)

2 894)

 

23 343)

23 576)

23 345)

23 108)

23 451)


 

Table 9.2: Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 7 ‑ Environment Protection and Analytical Services

 

 

 

 

 

7.1  Environmental Management and Pollution Control11

13 915)

14 931)

15 496)

15 770)

15 974)

7.2 Analytical Services12

4 685)

5 178)

5 275)

5 389)

5 493)

 

18 600)

20 109)

20 771)

21 159)

21 467)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 8 ‑ Parks and Wildlife Management

 

 

 

 

 

8.1 Parks and Wildlife Management13

60 784)

57 838)

58 135)

55 498)

55 921)

8.2 Crown Land Services14

11 288)

13 339)

12 111)

11 830)

11 735)

 

72 072)

71 177)

70 246)

67 328)

67 656)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

3 496)

3 629)

3 767)

3 895)

3 996)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program15

1 436)

1 126)

556)

556)

556)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Racing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Racing Regulation and Policy16

3 225)

4 348)

4 442)

4 523)

4 540)

 

3 225)

4 348)

4 442)

4 523)

4 540)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

29 699)

30 010)

30 382)

30 759)

31 140)

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

224 218)

227 174)

226 469)

223 868)

226 022)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2015‑16 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Output 2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops from the Department of Justice to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2015‑16 figures for this Department will differ from those published in the 2015‑16 Budget.

2.   The increases in Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services, and Valuation Services in 2016‑17 reflect increased levels of Land Tasmania activities funded from retained revenue. This increase is primarily in relation to systems and new product development.

3.   The decrease in AgriGrowth Tasmania in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture Policy ‑ Implementation initiative.

4.   The decrease in Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops in 2016‑17 is due to the completion of the development of a case management system for the Poppy Advisory and Control Board.

5.   The decrease in Water Resource Management in 2016‑17 reflects a reduction in Australian Government funding for the Compliance Project under the Water for the Future program.

6.   The increase in Biosecurity in 2016‑17 reflects additional funding received for Increasing Biosecurity Services. In addition, the increase is also due to a reassessment of corporate overhead costs to better reflect the provision of expenditure for this Output.

7.   The increase in Product Integrity in 2016‑17 reflects additional funding received for the Tasmanian Shellfish Quality Assurance Program (TSQAP) and the transfer of the remainder of TSQAP from Output 2.2 Marine Resources. The program was partly transferred in the 2015‑16 Budget.

8.   The decrease in Policy Advice in 2016‑17 reflects an Output restructure. The previous Output has been consolidated into the Department's corporate overhead cost pool which is spread across all of the Department's Outputs.

9.   The decrease in Historic Heritage Services in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Development of Woolmers Estate Visitor Centre initiative.

10. The increase in Aboriginal Heritage in 2016‑17 reflects additional funding received for the Joint Management of Reserves and additional Australian Government funding received for the Management of the World Heritage Values of the Tasmanian Wilderness.

11. The increase in Environmental Management and Pollution Control in 2016‑17 reflects additional funding received for the implementation of the Nyrstar Ground Water Management Strategy.

12. The increase in Analytical Services in 2016‑17 reflects increased levels of analytical services activity funded from retained revenue.

13. The decrease in Parks and Wildlife Management in 2016‑17 reflects the transfer of the Fuel Reduction Program to the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management. This is partially offset by additional Australian Government funding received for the Management of the World Heritage Values of the Tasmanian Wilderness and increased funding from retained revenue for the ongoing management of the Three Capes Track. The decrease in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the current agreement with the Australian Government for funding for the Management of the World Heritage Values of the Tasmanian Wilderness. A new deed is expected to be finalised by the end of 2017‑18.

14. The increase in Crown Land Services in 2016‑17 reflects additional expenditure for project management, legal advice, remediation works and other project costs to finalise the parliament square project.

15. The decrease in Capital Investment Program in 2017‑18 reflects the cessation of the West Coast Trails Projects initiative.

16. The increase in Racing Regulation and Policy in 2016‑17 reflects a revised budget based on previous year's actual expenditure.

 

Output Group 1: Land Tasmania

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

This Output provides a secure land titling system; an effective policy and legislative framework for land administration; and services that underpin land management and support the development of Tasmania's spatial data infrastructure. This Output also produces, maintains and integrates a wide range of land information data sets, which are easily accessible through the Land Information System Tasmania (LIST) web interface and TASMAP products.

1.2 Valuation Services

This Output provides an authoritative valuation service for Government on acquisition, purchase, sale and rental of property, including quality control of statutory property valuations. This Output also administers and delivers a uniform and consistent valuation system to support rating and taxing in Tasmania. Supplementary valuation services for municipal areas in Tasmania are also either undertaken by the Office of the Valuer‑General or subcontracted to valuation firms.


 

Table 9.3: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality of Tasmania's land survey and valuation services

 

 

 

 

 

Complying surveys lodged2

%

na

na

90

92

Objections resulting in an amended valuation3

%

0.28

0.53

<2.00

<2.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of land registration processes

 

 

 

 

 

Sealed plans lodged under the Early Issue Scheme registered within 10 working days of lodgement of the original plan

%

86

80

80

 

 

80

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of quality land information to support decision making

 

 

 

 

 

Number of land related data sets available via the LIST

Number of data sets

880

1 045

1 200

 

1 300

Number of land related data sets available under open data provisions4

Number of data sets

na

50

60

 

70

Level of government, industry and public use of LIST web service4,5

Number of requests

(million)

na

307

400

 

 

480

Level of government, industry and public use of LIST web site4,5

Number sessions

(million)

na

1.46

1.56

 

 

1.85

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   There is one change to the performance measures for 2016‑17, which is the renaming of the units of measure for the final two measures from 'total' number of requests and sessions to 'number' of request and sessions.

2.   This performance measure was introduced in 2015‑16 following revisions of the Surveyors Act 2002 and Surveyors Regulations 2014 that enabled the Surveyor‑General to implement a targeted audit program.

3.   This performance measure represents the percentage of total valuation notices issued in a financial year that have an amended valuation following the lodgement of an objection. It reflects the quality and consistency of valuations completed. The 2014‑15 actual has been amended from 0.24 per cent to 0.28 per cent, as published in last year's Budget, following final data collation of objections for the period.

4.   These performance measures were introduced in 2014‑15 as a result of new software enhancements to measure the public use of the LIST.

5.   These performance measures have been revised to more accurately capture the usage of the redeveloped LIST.


 

Output Group 2: Primary Industries

2.1 AgriGrowth Tasmania

This Output supports the Government's commitment to grow the value of the agricultural sector in Tasmania tenfold to $10 billion by 2050. It oversees the delivery of Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture. The majority of the agricultural research, development and extension services delivered via the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA) are reflected in this Output.

2.2 Marine Resources

This Output supports the orderly and sustainable development of the Tasmanian marine farming industry and develops and implements management policies and plans for Tasmania's wild fisheries to ensure that both commercial and recreational fishing are sustainable. This Output also includes advice and direction to the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies to assist aquaculture and fisheries research.

2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Industrial Hemp Crops

This Output aims to maintain a securely regulated poppy industry through responsibility for the licensing, inspection, supervision and management of the poppy industry. The Poppy Advisory and Control Board was transferred from the Department of Justice to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment during 2015‑16.

This Output ensures that the cultivation of poppy crops is performed in accordance with the Poisons Act 1971, ensuring policy coordination and preparation of advice to the Government, liaison with private enterprise, government agencies, growers and other stakeholder bodies.

The Output is also responsible for ensuring the licencing, inspection and testing of all industrial hemp crops is undertaken in accordance with the Industrial Hemp Act 2015 and Regulations.

Table 9.4: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value of primary industries sector1

 

 

 

 

 

Gross value of agricultural and fish production

 

 

 

 

 

Wild fisheries2

$ million

154.0

175.0

175

175

Aquaculture3

$ million

559.5

652.5

678

712

Agriculture4

$ million

1 353.3

na

1 400

1 435

Food production value added5

$ million

3 485.5

na

3 700

3 790

Exports of food, agriculture and fisheries

 

 

 

 

 

Overseas exports6

$ million

576.5

613.4

650

655

Interstate food trade7

$ million

2 086.2

na

2 150

2 230

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of fishers' licensing processes

 

 

 

 

 

Fishers' licensing transaction times8

% completed in 3 working days

97

97

95

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

External funds leveraged from Government investment in primary industries research9

 

 

 

 

 

External funds received by TIA10

$ million

11.0

8.9

9.0

8.1

External funds received by IMAS‑SMRCA11

$ million

9.1

7.0

8.3

7.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of information to support farmers to run their businesses12

 

 

 

 

 

Links to external websites provided via the FarmPoint website

Number

760

760

760

 

760

Level of public use of FarmPoint

Pages '000

76

76

75

75

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of Poppy Advisory Control Board per hectare sown13

$

22

26

23

na

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The first three performance measures provide information about the gross value of the primary industries sector to the Tasmanian economy.

2.   The outcome for 2014‑15 was above the target, due to strong prices and the depreciation of the Australian dollar. However, there remains a high level of uncertainty regarding future beach prices and market conditions for rock lobster and abalone. The target for 2015‑16 assumes conformity with long‑term production trends and no significant appreciation in the value of the Australian dollar. It should be noted that rock lobster catches were slightly below the total allowable catch for the 2015‑16 quota period due to fishery closures in response to a protracted toxic algal bloom event in the spring ‑ early summer of 2015. Targets for this measure are based on the total allowable commercial catches, set for the relevant licensing years, which do not coincide with financial years. Similarly, actuals relate to the licensing year ending in the relevant financial year.

3.   The increases in the 2014‑15 actual figure, 2015‑16 and 2016‑17 targets reflect an accelerated growth in salmonid production throughout 2015. The targets also included modest growth in the abalone and mussel sectors and a substantially reduced pacific oyster production due to pacific oyster mortality syndrome outbreak in February 2016.

4.   The 2016‑17 target assumes growth at the rate required to reach $10 billion in 2050. The 2014‑15 value for this indicator is not yet available as the sourcing and analysis of additional data results in this measure being subject to a lag.

5.   This measure is based on the quantity of agricultural and seafood produce data, sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the Department and in consultation with major food producers such as brewery and dairy manufacturers. The value of production is based on wholesale price estimates and export data. The 2013‑14 value is a preliminary estimate based on available data. The 2014‑15 value for this indicator is not yet available as the sourcing and analysis of additional data results in this measure being subject to a lag.

6.   This measure is derived from ABS overseas export data and incorporates meat, dairy, fish, and fruit and vegetables. The above‑trend growth in exports in 2013‑14 reflects depreciation of the Australian dollar and a substantial increase in the value of dairy exports, largely as a result of high commodity prices. The impact of the continued depreciation of the Australian dollar was not clear when the 2014‑15 target was set. The 2016‑17 target assumes conformity with long‑term production trends and no significant change in the value of the Australian dollar.

7.   The Department produces the Tasmanian Food and Beverage Industry Scorecard, which calculates the net value of interstate trade. It includes the four categories of overseas food exports reported by the ABS together with beverages and confectionery. ABS and industry data are used as the basis for the calculations. ABS data are adjusted to reflect further information gained from the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service. The 2013‑14 value is a preliminary estimate based on available data. The 2014‑15 value for this indicator is not yet available as the sourcing and analysis of additional data result in this measure being subject to a lag.

8.   This measure reflects the percentage of transactions completed within three days. The unit of measure was updated for 2016‑17 to specifically state the three day processing target.

9.   The funds received by TIA and the IMAS ‑ Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration Agreement (IMAS‑SMRCA) are calculated on a calendar year; for example, 2014‑15 refers to the total amount of funds received during the 2014 calendar year. These measures exclude the contribution by the University of Tasmania.

10. Leverage is only one measure of the success of the Joint Venture Agreement with TIA. The TIA Strategic Plan 2012‑16 identifies the priorities for the Institution, including supporting the Government's vision to increase the contribution of agriculture to the Tasmanian economy. TIA provides a substantial return on investment by leveraging the Government and University investment to attract matched external funding. The 2016‑17 target is less than the 2015‑16 target due to anticipated funding and the timing of funds received for some larger and longer term projects.

11. The leverage of State Government funds is one of over 40 performance measures for the IMAS‑SMRCA. The forward targets for leverage are revised annually and based on the prior year's actual external income. The 2014‑15 actual leverage is a substantial return on investment, being a multiplier of 2.69 of State Government funding.

12. The FarmPoint website provides easy access to information required by farmers to run their business.

13. This performance measure is new for the Department in 2016‑17. The Department is intending to undertake a review of the performance measure associated with this Output. As a result no target has been set for 2016‑17.


 

Output Group 3: Natural and Cultural Heritage

3.1 Resource Management and Conservation

This Output provides for the conservation and sustainable use of Tasmania's natural values and land resources. The Output manages the State's wildlife, including game species, and other terrestrial and marine natural values to ensure their sustainable use and conservation.

3.2 Historic Heritage Services

This Output aims to recognise, protect and ensure the sound statutory management of places of state historic cultural heritage of significance to the whole of Tasmania; facilitate their sustainable use, development and adaptive reuse; foster understanding of its importance to local communities and the visitor economy; and assist local government to manage places and precincts of local significance.

3.3 Aboriginal Heritage

This Output aims to protect, conserve and promote Tasmania's unique Aboriginal heritage. It seeks to increase community understanding and valuing of that heritage by providing training, education and interpretation materials. The Output supports organisations and individuals in fulfilling their responsibilities, both culturally and environmentally. Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania provides administrative support to the Minister's advisory body, the Aboriginal Heritage Council.

3.4 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

This Output represents the Government's contribution towards the operation of the Gardens and supports the management, conservation and enhancement of the Gardens in accordance with the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens Act 2002. Further information on the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens is provided in chapter 23 of Government Services Budget Paper No 2.

Table 9.5: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of Tasmanian land reserved

 

 

 

 

 

Land protected either by legislation or by contract in conservation reserves, under covenant or heritage regimes2

%

50.1

50.1

50.5

 

 

50.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area of Tasmanian private land reserved for a nature conservation purpose3

 

 

 

 

 

Private land covered by voluntary binding conservation agreements4

Hectares

'000

102.7

97.1

105.0

 

106.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 9.5: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3 (continued)

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of information to support natural resource management and development decisions

 

 

 

 

 

Level of use of the Natural Values Atlas (page hits)5

Pages '000

116

140

154

155

Percentage of threatened species covered by a listing statement6

 

%

44.3

46.0

47.7

 

48

 

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in status of threatened species7

 

 

 

 

 

Threatened species showing a decline in status

Number

.

.

5

4

Threatened species showing an improved status

Number

.

.

3

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Genetic diversity of the Tasmanian devil

 

 

 

 

 

Extent of genetic diversity of the Tasmanian devil insurance population8

%

99

99.25

>95

>95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management of the wild Tasmanian devil population

 

 

 

 

 

Number of devils within secure meta (wild) population9

Number

28‑40

90

90

140

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historic Heritage Services

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of places on the Tasmanian Heritage Register likely to meet at least one registration criterion10

%

70

70

>85

90

Percentage of places on the Tasmanian Heritage Register actively managed11

%

7.7

16

20

15

Proportion of development applications determined within the statutory timeframe12

%

na

na

na

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 9.5: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3 (continued)

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

Permit recommendations provided to the Director of National Parks and Wildlife within 20 working days13

%

100

100

100

100

Permit recommendations provided to the Director of National Parks and Wildlife that include evidence of community engagement

%

100

100

100

100

Response to applicant or their consultant within 10 working days in relation to Aboriginal Heritage Search or Desktop Assessment14

%

na

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens (RTBG)

 

 

 

 

 

RTBG total visitors

Number

'000

391

410

412

430

Tasmanian Seed Conservation Centre, number of collections held in seed store15

Number

1 578

1 693

1 575

1 625

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   In this Output Group one of the previous measures has been deleted and one has been added. The heading of one measure has been amended.

2.   The total land area of Tasmania used is 6.8 million hectares, based on the mean high‑water mark. This includes Macquarie Island and other Tasmanian offshore islands. Only the terrestrial portion of reserves is reported on. The use of the preliminary Tasmanian Reserve Estate layer may result in slight variances in the annual figures quoted as they are subject to revision based on the final reserve data. The 2013‑14 actual was previously calculated using preliminary data and it has since been revised based on final reserve data. The 2015‑16 target was set using preliminary data that has since proven to be too high. This target is therefore unlikely to be met. The 2016‑17 target has been set based on these considerations.

3.   This heading has been amended.

4.   Voluntary binding conservation agreements include both conservation covenants and management agreements, except for offset and compensation covenants. The measure represents the cumulative total for reservation. The figure for 2014‑15 showed a net decrease due to the expiry of a number of fixed‑term Management Agreements. The target for 2015‑16 reflects an increase due to the expected registration of large new covenants on the Central Plateau.

5.   The Natural Values Atlas (NVA) provides a web interface allowing access to authoritative and comprehensive natural values information. This measure refers to the number of requests for pages from the NVA website. Figures from 2014‑15 reflect an upward trend in use of the atlas likely due to added data and enhanced functionality.

6.   This measure indicates the availability of information to support decisions about threatened species management and recovery. This measure includes approved Listing Statements and draft Listing Statements that await comment from the Threatened Species Scientific Advisory Committee and the Threatened Species Community Review Committee and final approval by the Secretary of the Department.

7.   Changing the status of threatened species requires the completion of the statutory process detailed in the Threatened Species Protection Act 1995. The targets for 2015‑16 and 2016‑17 reflect the number of species for which the statutory process is expected to be completed in those periods.

8.   This performance measure is aimed at assessing the extent of genetic variation within the devil insurance population. Maintaining 95 per cent genetic diversity is considered desirable to minimise the likelihood of inbreeding within the population and to ensure that it remains fit for release at a later date, as and if required. The assessment is undertaken on an annual basis following the breeding season. It examines the genetic characteristics of the insurance population compared with the founder insurance animals.

9.   This performance measure provides information on the progress of establishing wild populations that are free from the Devil Facial Tumour Disease. The number of Tasmanian devils in the secure wild populations in the period 2013‑14 to 2014‑15 relates to the population established on Maria Island. A new population was established on the Tasman and Forestier Peninsulas in 2015‑16 and current targets include this. Figures previously reported for this measure were based on statistical boundaries around an estimate. The figures reported here are the best estimate from within the statistical range and provide a better measure of performance.

10. This performance measure provides an indication of the Heritage Register's integrity based on the extent to which its entries are likely to satisfy the registration criteria of the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995, in light of an audit conducted in 2013‑14 that concluded only 70 per cent of entries met at least one criterion.

11. This performance measure reflects tasks associated with administering the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995. It includes the percentage of places on the Register for which a development application or a certificate of exemption has been granted; places that received a grant managed during the year in review; any new provisional or permanent entries; and any entries that have been amended, replaced or removed. The figures from 2014‑15 onwards include places subject to registration or work tasks which accounts, in large part, for the increase over prior years.

12. This is a new performance measure, instigated from the start of the 2016‑17 financial year.

13. The Department provides permit advice directly to the Director of National Parks and Wildlife for consideration by the Minister in accordance with the Aboriginal Relics Act 1975.

14. This performance measure is aimed at assessing the Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania response time for providing relevant Aboriginal heritage site information to the applicant or their consultant prior to any field investigations, or providing determinations regarding the need for an Aboriginal cultural heritage assessment.

15. It is expected that the dry summer of 2015‑16 will impact on Tasmania's seed production season. Fires, particularly on the West Coast, have also hindered seed collection activities this year. As a consequence the number of collections held in store this year is unlikely to meet the 2015‑16 target and this shortfall is also reflected in the slightly higher new target set for 2016‑17.

Output Group 4: Water Resources

4.1 Water Resource Management

This Output develops and implements a range of legislation and policies for water management to ensure the equitable, efficient and sustainable allocation and use of surface and ground‑water resources and the safety of dams. It supports the development and coordination of policies relating to the regulation of the urban water and sewerage industry. It also provides services to assess, monitor, report and provide advice on the health, condition and state of Tasmania's water resources for the community, industry and government.

Table 9.6: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amount of water available for irrigation

 

 

 

 

 

Total volume of water licensed for irrigation2

Mega litres (ML) '000

709

720

755

 

768

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level of farm water development

 

 

 

 

 

Dam works permits approved per annum3

Number

40

35

40

na

Storage Capacity approved per annum4

ML

11 394

10 000

14 000

na

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of dam permit processing

 

 

 

 

 

Average time for processing applications for dam works permit approvals5

Days

79

84

84

 

na

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality of water information

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of streamflow sites that meet quality assurance standards6

%

na

na

95

 

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.   There is one change to performance measures for 2016‑17, which is the removal of the acronym 'pa' after 'per annum' in the third measure 'Storage Capacity approved'.

2.   This measure refers to the total volume of water licensed and should be read as a cumulative total. The target for 2015‑16 reflects the potential for future dam development.

3.   The performance targets for 2016‑17 is 'na' because this measure will no longer be used after the 2016‑17 Budget, due to amendments to the Water Management Act 1999 that came into effect on 1 January 2016 to simplify and further streamline the dam works approval process, making it necessary to develop a new measure, to report against the new legislative process that is now in place.

4.   As per note 3, this measure will not be used after the 2016‑17 Budget due to the legislative changes made to the Water Management Act; accordingly 'na' appears in the 2016‑17 target.

5.   The statutory timeframe for processing dam applications under the Water Management Act 1999 is 84 days. Interpretation of this measure needs to take account of the introduction of an integrated process for dealing with environmental issues at proposed dam sites. Dam proponents are no longer required to obtain additional authorisations for their dam works after gaining a dam permit. In addition, the trend towards larger and more complex dams has impacted on the level of complexity of applications to be assessed. The amendments to the Water Management Act that took effect on 1 January 2016 provide for a new process for low risk dams under Division 4. The legislation provides 14 days for a decision on whether or not an application is required under Division 3. This measure will not be used after the 2016‑17 Budget due to the legislative changes made to the Act making it necessary to develop a new measure; accordingly 'na' appears in the 2016‑17 target.

6.   This performance measure was introduced in 2015‑16 which accounts for the absence of data prior to this time. The measure provides accurate streamflow information. The nationally accepted benchmark for this indicator is 95 per cent of total sites.

Output Group 5: Racing Regulation and Policy

5.1 Racing Regulation and Policy

This Output delivers probity and integrity services to the Tasmanian racing industry. This is achieved by:

       registering race clubs;

       licensing and registering industry participants and racing animals;

       providing handicapping and grading services;

       providing stipendiary stewards;

       enforcing national and local rules of racing for each racing code;

       registering and regulating on‑course bookmakers and their agents;

       setting the integrity conditions applicable to all Tasmanian race field information publication approvals;

       providing administrative support to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board;

       undertaking high‑level research and analysis on a range of issues relating to the Tasmanian racing industry;

       developing, implementing and evaluating racing policy in Tasmania, with reference to local and national developments in the sector;

       representing the State and the local racing industry on national bodies and in national forums, in relation to racing integrity and related matters; and

       ensuring compliance with the requirements of the Racing Regulation Act 2004.


 

Table 9.7: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 5

Performance Measure1

Unit of

Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drug Detection2

 

 

 

 

 

Swabs taken by stewards3

Number

3 695

3 807

3 750

3 500

Positive swabs to swabs taken

%

0.38

0.32

0.27

0.30

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suspensions, disqualifications, fines and appeals2

 

 

 

 

 

Suspensions, disqualifications and fines imposed by stewards on licensed persons

Number

 

462

 

459

 

450

 

450

Suspensions, disqualifications and fines appealed to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board4

Number

 

18

 

22

 

14

 

22

Appeals to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board where conviction quashed5

%

33

18

16

18

Appeals to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board where penalty varied6

%

.

31

24

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

Licensing and Registration2

 

 

 

 

 

Persons licenced or registered7

Number

1 677

1 696

1 700

1 700

Licence and registration applications (not referred to Licensing Panel) approved within 14 days8

%

 

100

 

98

 

100

 

100

Licencing and registration decisions appealed to the Tasmania Racing Appeal Board9

Number

 

.

 

1

 

2

 

.

Appeals to the Tasmanian Racing Appeals Board where licensing or registration decision overturned10

Number

 

 

.

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Handicapping2

 

 

 

 

Races handicapped11

Number

759

717

770

770

Races handicapped requiring a redraw after publication of the fields, due to errors12

%

0.26

1.1

.

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grading2

 

 

 

 

 

Races graded11

Number

1 615

1 600

1 650

1 650

Races graded requiring a redraw after publication of the fields, due to errors12

%

....

0.56

.

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. Changes to the performance measures for 2016‑17 are three new measures added, four measures reworded for clarification, one measure deleted and three units of measure amended. The measures have also been grouped under five new headings.

2. This is a new group heading.

3. Additional costs, incurred as a result of more comprehensive individual testing under improved racing integrity measures, mean that testing is occurring in a more targeted way. The 2016‑17 target has been set based on these considerations.

4. The target for 2015‑16 is unlikely to be met. The measure is difficult to forecast and largely beyond the control of the Director of Racing.

5. The unit of measure changed in 2016‑17 from a number to a percentage to provide a more relevant measure.

6. This new performance measure for 2016‑17 measures the percentage of appeals where the penalty has been varied due to an appeal.

7. This performance measure has been reworded in 2016‑17 for clarification. The figures previously reported for this measure were found to be innaccurate due to a totalling error. The figures have now been corrected.

8. This performance measure has been reworded in 2016‑17 to include registration applications.

9. This new performance measure for 2016‑17 indicates the number of appeals against licensing decisions of the Director of Racing that have been heard by the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board.

10. This new performance measure for 2016‑17 indicates the number of appeals against the licensing decisions of the Director of Racing that have been overturned by the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board.

11. The number of races conducted is determined by Tasracing. The harness races are handicapped and the greyhound races are graded by the Office of Racing Integrity.

12. This performance measure has been reworded for 2016‑17. This amendment clarifies between redraws that are part of a normal operating process and those impacting participants. The unit of measure has also been changed from a number to a percentage.

Output Group 6: Biosecurity Tasmania

6.1 Biosecurity

This Output supports the Tasmanian Biosecurity Strategy, providing scientific risk‑based systems to exclude, eradicate or effectively manage pests and diseases that jeopardise the relative pest and disease free status of Tasmania. The Output delivers diagnostic services to support sustainable pest and disease control measures and to validate the State's relative pest and disease free status with scientific evidence. This Output also ensures animal welfare practices are consistent with legislative requirements and community expectations.

6.2 Product Integrity

This Output provides a framework to regulate and manage food safety in the primary production and processing sector and to identify and trace the movement of livestock. This Output also includes services aimed at ensuring that agricultural chemical use is consistent with legislative requirements and community expectations.


 

Table 9.8: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 6

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriateness of import requirements for plants and animals

 

 

 

 

 

Current and relevant import requirements in place for plants and plant products2

%

100

100

100

100

General authorities and conditions for animals and animal products reviewed3

%

na

na

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Responses to notifications of weeds, pests and diseases are undertaken in accord with State and national protocols

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of notifications requiring further regulatory action ‑ weeds4

%

na

na

<10

<10

Proportion of notifications followed up ‑ pests and diseases5

%

na

na

100

100

Compliance with response protocols6

%

na

na

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effectiveness of Diagnostic Services

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with the relevant International Standard as applied to veterinary and plant testing laboratories

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barrier inspections conducted to appropriate standards

 

 

 

 

 

Effective systems for targeting and undertaking quarantine inspections7

%

na

na

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effective Approved Quarantine Premises

 

 

 

 

 

Fully compliant Approved Quarantine Premises8

%

na

na

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with food safety standards by primary producers and processors

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety quality assurance plans/programs approved annually by DPIPWE for eligible producers/processors

Number

142

270

210

290

Audits of high risk food safety areas without significant findings9

%

100

99

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with animal welfare standards

 

 

 

 

 

Audits of high risk animal use undertaken without significant findings10

%

na

na

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 9.8: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 6 (continued)

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support for GMO Moratorium11

 

 

 

 

 

Former GM canola sites remediated (cumulative)

Number

4

4

4

4

Former GM canola sites with substantial progress towards remediation (cumulative)

Number

6

6

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with chemical usage legislation

 

 

 

 

 

Audits of agricultural and veterinary chemical usage without significant findings12

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   There are no modifications to performance measures for 2016‑17.

2.   This measure is reviewed at least every three years.

3.   This measure was introduced in 2015‑16 to include animals and animal products. Conditions are reviewed on a rolling basis over a three year period according to program specifications.

4.   This measure was introduced in 2015‑16. The target is calculated on the number of regulatory follow‑ups (e.g. requirement notices, infringement notices) that are needed after a landowner has been formally notified that they have a declared weed on their property and should commence action to control it. The lower the percentage of required follow‑ups, the higher the level of compliance.

5.   This measure was introduced in 2015‑16. It relates to the proportion of notifications coming to the Department that are followed up with appropriate action, so the target is 100 per cent.

6.   This measure was introduced in 2015‑16. Plant and animal biosecurity response protocols apply at state and national levels and are used in the event of a detection of a quarantine plant pest or disease for assessing the need for a response and conducting one if needed. After‑incident reviews of a response determine the level of compliance.

7.   This measure was introduced in 2015‑16 to report on the overall border inspection regime. It replaces the previous measure that reported on the amount of confiscated material over time, which was based on a survey each April. The results from this measure were variable and difficult to interpret. Variations could reflect changes in passenger numbers, changes to processes, changes to laws/import requirements, targeting of certain (heavier or lighter) risk material, improved passenger/importer education and awareness and improved officer awareness/skills. Some key inspection activities and systems with critical hazard points are currently being determined and will be audited on an annual basis to assess their overall effectiveness.

8.   This measure was introduced in 2015‑16. Approved Quarantine Premises are registered under the Plant Quarantine Act 1997 to receive imported plant material. Biosecurity Tasmania conducts regular audits of these premises to ensure compliance with conditions of registration, with a focus on managing the biosecurity risks these premises create through their import activities.

9.   High risk areas relate to aspects of primary food production that, if not controlled adequately by the operator, are likely to present a food safety risk to consumers. Following the introduction of the new Food Safety Schemes, regulatory control of some industry sectors was transferred from Local Government to Biosecurity Tasmania. During the transfer in 2014‑15, a small number of serious non‑compliances were identified within audits and corrective action subsequently undertaken to achieve compliance.

10. High risk animal use refers to intensive farming activities that, if not controlled adequately and in accordance with standards, can present an animal welfare risk.

11. After the introduction of the moratorium, permits were issued for each of the 57 sites to be managed for GM canola eradication. An audit program was implemented in 2001 to monitor compliance with the permits and assess the sites for release from management under permit. Remediated sites are those that have been released as monitoring evidence suggested that each could be considered clear of canola. Substantial progress towards remediation means that those sites are at the final stage of monitoring where they have to demonstrate no germination occurring after two soil disturbances at least six months apart.

12. The Department administers the Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Control of Use) Act 1995 which imposes controls on the handling and use of agricultural and veterinary chemicals in Tasmania. Audits of industry sectors including poppy, viticulture and horticulture have been undertaken with no significant findings of non‑compliance found to date.


 

Output Group 7: Environment Protection and Analytical Services

7.1 Environmental Management and Pollution Control

This Output undertakes activities to: develop high quality, contemporary policies and strategies for the protection of the environment; ensure development proposals meet appropriate guidelines and standards; regulate, via a risk based approach, environmental impacts of large industrial and municipal activities and monitor environmental performance.

7.2 Analytical Services

This Output focuses on providing a range of scientific and analytical services in order to support the delivery of best practice environmental management and the management of environmental incidents.

Table 9.9: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 7

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of

Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality2

 

 

 

 

 

Hobart ‑ Air Quality exceeding PM2.5 Standards2

Number of days

1

1

na

0

Hobart ‑ Air Quality exceeding PM10 Standards3

Number of days

....

....

<5

0

Launceston ‑ Air Quality exceeding PM2.5 Standards2

Number of days

11

12

na

0

Launceston ‑ Air Quality exceeding PM10 Standards3

Number of days

....

....

<5

0

Devonport ‑ Air Quality exceeding PM2.5 Standards4

Number of days

....

....

....

0

Devonport ‑ Air Quality exceeding PM10 Standards4

Number of days

....

....

<5

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment and Regulation of Activities

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Environment Protection Notices and Contaminated Sites Notices issued5

Number

62

66

60

60

Percentage of assessments undertaken within statutory timeframe

%

90

100

100

100

Percentage of planned audits of premises undertaken within scheduled timeframe6

%

na

38

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analytical Services Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

Number of analyses performed7

'000

299.4

341

320

250

Jobs reported on time

%

62.4

45.6

70

85

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.   For 2016‑17, one performance measure has been deleted and two new measures have been added. Furthermore, the three Air Quality performance measures are now presented against two standards, PM10 and PM2.5.

2.   In December 2015, the National Environment Protection (Ambient Air Quality) Measure (NEPM) was amended. The NEPM now includes standards for both PM10 and PM2.5 (particulate matter 10 and 2.5 micrometres or less in diameter). The new NEPM sets the standard as zero days exceedances. Previously this was <5 days. Targets in the table for 2016‑17 have been adjusted accordingly. This is consistent with the reporting requirements for the NEPM, the ambient air quality measure is calculated on a calendar year basis; for example 2013‑14 refers to performance against the standard during the 2013 calendar year.

3.   The 2013‑14 actual figures previously reported for these measures have been updated following the introduction of an automated air quality measurement validation system which has been applied retrospectively across all previous data.

4.   This is a new performance measure that extends the geographical coverage to Devonport.

5.   This measure identifies the number of key types of notices issued under the Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994. These notices are issued as required and the target figure therefore represents an expected number based on current practice rather than a desirable target.

6.   This is a new performance measure for 2016‑17, although figures are available from 2014‑15. The figure from 2014‑15 reflects the fact that the compliance audit program approach to regulation was still developing during that period. Systems to ensure improved functionality for the preparation and tracking of annual audit plans are currently in development for use in the 2016‑17 business planning process.

7.   This measure relates to activity that is driven by client demand, which is subject to large variation and cannot be predicted accurately.

 


 

Output Group 8: Parks and Wildlife Management

8.1 Parks and Wildlife Management

This Output aims to protect, promote and manage Tasmania's world‑renowned parks and reserve system. These areas provide significant environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits and experiences. This Output provides for their sustainable use through maintenance, appropriate infrastructure, high‑quality visitor experiences and a culture that promotes visitor safety. It also manages significant biodiversity restoration programs complemented by the development and implementation of enhanced biosecurity measures.

8.2 Crown Land Services

This Output manages Crown land, ensuring its suitable use and development. It also provides specialist Crown property‑related advice to government and the private sector.

Table 9.10: Performance Information ‑ Output Group 8

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of Measure

2013‑14

Actual

2014‑15

Actual

2015‑16

Target

2016‑17

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management Plans

 

 

 

 

 

Protected land covered by approved management plans2

%

60

60

65

 

64

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level of volunteer support3

 

 

 

 

 

Registered volunteer partner organisations

Number

100

100

100

100

WILDCARE Inc. registered members

Number

6 039

6 000

7 000

7 100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visitor numbers4,5

 

 

 

 

 

Mt Field

'000

141

147

155

162

Freycinet

'000

217

232

239

255

Cradle Mountain

'000

182

199

209

219

Lake St Clair

'000

69

85

89

93

Gordon River

'000

69

92

97

101

Mole Creek Caves

'000

49

51

54

57

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crown Land Services

 

 

 

 

 

Value of sales completed per year6

$ million

0.06

12.17

0.50

0.70

Number of lease and licence agreements issued7

Number

654

422

380

400

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   For 2016‑17, one of the previous performance measures has been deleted and one has been added. The area of Strategic Fire Management has been removed as funding for the Fuel Reduction Program has been transferred to the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management.

2.   As at 30 April 2016, there were approximately 816 reserves managed by the Parks and Wildlife Service. The actual for 2014‑15 was reviewed and revised down to 60 per cent due to the proclamation of extensions to reserves with existing management plans, but with the extensions not covered by the plans. The 2015‑16 target of 65 per cent was set using preliminary data that has since proven to be too high. This target is therefore unlikely to be met. The 2016‑17 target has been set based on these considerations.


 

3.   These measures provide information on volunteer activity. Volunteers and volunteer organisations contribute around 200 000 hours of time annually to the PWS, with an estimated value of approximately $6 million. This includes support provided through WILDCARE Inc., the PWS volunteer management partner. Volunteerism supports the development of a high level of community engagement with, and the sustainable use of, Tasmania's parks and reserve system.

4.   Visitor numbers are collated by ongoing monitoring at selected sites including:

-       Mt Field, estimated from vehicle counts and bus passengers;

-       Freycinet, estimated from vehicle counts and bus passengers;

-       Cradle Mountain, estimated from vehicle counts, shuttle bus and bus passengers;

-       Lake St Clair, estimated from vehicle counts and bus passengers;

-       Gordon River, visitors to Tasmania only (does not include Tasmanians). Source: Tasmanian Visitor Survey (Tourism Tasmania); and

-       Mole Creek Caves, estimated from cave ticket sales.

5.   Visitor number targets have been set to reflect the target set by the Government for the tourism industry in general.

6.   Sales revenue fluctuates depending on market conditions. Properties prepared for sale may be held back due to oversupply or lack of demand in particular areas or properties placed on the market may fail to sell. The figure for 2014‑15 reflects one large transaction and a general increase in the value of properties sold.

7.   This is a new performance measure for 2016‑17, although figures are available for preceeding years. It includes lease and licence agreements that are either new, conversion, renewal, variation, transfer and transfer and conversion. The larger figure in 2013‑14 is related to the commencement of the conversion of Marine Structure Licences into 25 year agreements which is now largely completed.


 

Capital Investment Program

Table 9.11 provides financial information for the Department's Capital Investment Program. For more information on the Capital Investment Program, see chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 9.11: Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated)

Total)

Cost)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

Fisheries Integrated Licensing and Management System

1 150)

575)

575)

....)

....)

Increasing Biosecurity Capability

2 000)

1 000)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment, Parks and Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur Pieman Tracks

300)

150)

....)

....)

....)

Crown Land Services ‑ Structural Asset Upgrades

Ongoing)

556)

556)

556)

556)

Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure1

8 000)

5 721)

....)

....)

....)

South Coast Track

2 000)

250)

250)

....)

....)

Three Capes ‑ Stage 31

4 000)

1 700)

1 485)

735)

....)

West Coast Trails Projects1

1 691 695)

570)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

)

10 522)

2 866)

1 291)

556)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1. The increase in estimated expenditure in 2016‑17 from the estimates presented in the 2015‑16 Budget reflect a reallocation of expenditure from 2015‑16 to 2016‑17.

Fisheries Integrated Licensing and Management System

The Government has committed $1.2 million over two years for the ongoing development of the Fisheries Integrated Licensing and Management System to maximise efficiencies for wild fisheries management, commercial and recreational licensing and quota monitoring. Comprehensive and accessible fisheries data is integral to supporting the sustainable management of Tasmania's fisheries resources. This initiative will support the transition of commercial fishing in Tasmania into the digital age.

Increasing Biosecurity Capability

The initiative commenced in 2015‑16, and is a $2 million commitment over two years towards the upgrade and development of biosecurity infrastructure and operating systems. The initiative includes upgrading and development of laboratory equipment and information systems; improving the State's post‑border biosecurity hygiene infrastructure; and upgrading communications including signage at border entry points. The improved capabilities will enhance Tasmania's biosecurity system and build on the capability and capacity to protect Tasmania's primary industries, natural environment and social amenity.


 

Arthur Pieman Tracks

The Government planned to invest $300 000 to undertake rehabilitation and erosion protection works in the Arthur‑Pieman Conservation Area. The project has been on hold awaiting the outcome of court proceedings. In the interim some urgent works have been undertaken to protect previous rehabilitation efforts.

Crown Land Services ‑ Structural Asset Upgrades

Ongoing funding is provided for the removal or remediation of physical structures and land that present public liability risks, for statutory maintenance and for essential and preventive maintenance to buildings.

Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure

The Government committed $8 million over two years from 2015‑16 aimed at high priority maintenance and infrastructure renewal in Parks and Reserves. The Department has undertaken consultation with local councils and other stakeholders to identify priority asset projects which can improve visitation and community benefit. During 2015‑16, improvements were made to popular walks within the Cradle Mountain National Park, including enabling disability access to one walk. The Mt Field Visitor Centre has been upgraded and repairs made to historic houses at Cape Bruny. Upgrades to the Marakoopa Caves Visitor Centre are currently underway. The 2016‑17 works program will include: an upgrade of campground and facilities at Fortescue Bay; upgrades to the amenities at Pirates Bay; replacement of the Mt Mawson day shelter; carpark expansion and new amenities at the Gardens near St Helens; amenities and infrastructure improvements at Cape Bruny; construction of new amenities at the northern end of Wineglass Bay; and construction of a new track linking the Freycinet Visitor Centre to the Wineglass Bay car park.

South Coast Track

The Government has committed $2 million towards upgrading the South Coast Track (from Melaleuca to Cockle Creek) to improve access to this spectacular natural asset. The funding is being used to upgrade existing infrastructure, complete minor rerouting where the established tracks have become difficult to access, and provide safe access to beach areas. Work to date has included significant planning and design works, and the commencement of construction on new track sections including the Deadmans Bay to Turua Beach section of the Track.

Three Capes Track ‑ Stage 3

The Government has committed $4 million towards construction of Stage Three of the track which, once completed, will provide improved access to the third cape, Cape Raoul.

West Coast Trails Projects

The Government committed a total of $1.7 million to three projects that commenced in 2014‑15, being the Horsetail Falls Walking Trail, the Mountain Bike Project and the Granite Creek Bridge Replacement. Significant progress has been made, with the Granite Creek Bridge replacement undertaken and the other projects well progressed. The projects have utilised West Coast labour forces wherever possible. Construction works for Stage Two of the Mountain Bike Project, on the Heemskirk loop extension, are due to commence in 2016‑17.


Detailed Budget Statements

Table 9.12: Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent2

128 660)

123 412)

124 828)

125 283)

127 058)

Appropriation revenue ‑ works & services3

18 906)

10 522)

2 866)

1 291)

556)

Other revenue from government4

200)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Grants5

11 466)

10 689)

9 692)

6 287)

6 287)

Sales of goods and services6

20 876)

24 192)

24 423)

24 661)

24 823)

Fees and fines7

8 807)

7 957)

8 573)

8 610)

8 615)

Interest8

591)

303)

295)

287)

292)

Other revenue9

636)

1 504)

1 515)

1 525)

1 536)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

190 142)

178 579)

172 192)

167 944)

169 167)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

99 086)

104 296)

105 501)

106 514)

107 957)

Depreciation and amortisation

14 396)

13 701)

13 701)

13 701)

13 701)

Supplies and consumables10

43 926)

48 613)

46 157)

43 743)

43 934)

Grants and subsidies11

24 292)

17 618)

17 612)

15 871)

15 884)

Other expenses

3 167)

3 151)

3 193)

3 229)

3 254)

Total expenses from transactions

184 867)

187 379)

186 164)

183 058)

184 730)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

5 275)

(8 800)

(13 972)

(15 114)

(15 563)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

Net gain/(loss) on non‑financial assets

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

Total other economic flows included in net result

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

7 589)

(6 486)

(11 658)

(12 800)

(13 249)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows ‑ other non‑owner changes in equity

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

6 581)

6 603)

6 603)

6 603)

6 603)

Other movements taken directly to equity12

1 592)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Total other economic flows ‑ other non‑owner changes in equity

8 173)

6 603)

6 603)

6 603)

6 603)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

15 762)

117)

(5 055)

(6 197)

(6 646)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2015‑16 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Output 2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops from the Department of Justice to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2015‑16 figures for this Department will differ from those published in the 2015‑16 Budget.

2.   The decrease in Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent in 2016‑17 is primarily due to the transfer of the Fuel Reduction Program to the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management.

3.   The movements in Appropriation revenue ‑ works & services over the Budget and Forward Estimates reflects the completion of the Three Capes Track, cash flow movements for the Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure, Increasing Biosecurity Capability and the Three Capes Track ‑ Stage 3 initiatives, and additional funding for the Fisheries Integrated Licencing Management System.

4.   The decrease in Other revenue from government in 2016‑17 reflects the utilisation of funding carried forward under Section 8A(2) of the Public Account Act 1986 for the development of a case management system for the Poppy Advisory and Control Board.

5.   The decrease in Grants in 2018‑19 reflects reduced Australian Government National Partnership Payments for the Management of the World Heritage Values of the Tasmanian Wilderness.

6.   The increase in Sales of goods and services in 2016‑17 primarily reflects additional revenue from the Three Capes Track.

7.   The decrease in Fees and fines in 2016‑17 reflects a reclassification of fisheries licence revenue to Other revenue and a reduction based on the temporary fee relief to support pacific oyster growers as they recover from the outbreak of pacific oyster mortality syndrome. The increase in 2017‑18 reflects cessation of the fee relief to support pacific oyster growers.

8.   The decrease in Interest in 2016‑17 reflects revised estimates of Special Deposit and Trust Fund account balances that attract interest.

9.   The increase in Other revenue in 2016‑17 reflects a reclassification of fisheries licence revenue from Fees and fines. Fisheries licence revenue is collected on behalf of other organisations such as the Tasmanian Seafood Industry Council and is not considered a fee or fine collected as revenue for the Government.

10. The increase in Supplies and consumables in 2016‑17 reflects Australian Government funding received for the Management of the World Heritage Values of the Tasmanian Wilderness and new activity in relation to the operations of the Three Capes Track. The decrease in 2017‑18 is mainly due to cash flow changes in expenditure for project management, legal advice, remediation works and other project costs to finalise the parliament square project. The decrease in 2018‑19 is mainly due to the cessation of the current deed with the Australian Government for funding for the Management of the World Heritage Values of the Tasmanian Wilderness. A new deed is expected to be finalised by the end of 2017‑18.

11. The decrease in Grants and subsidies in 2016‑17 reflects the transfer of the Fuel Reduction Program to the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management. The decrease in 2018‑19 primarily reflects the cessation of the Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture and the Development of Woolmers Estate Visitor Centre initiatives.

12. The decrease in Other movements taken directly to equity in 2016‑17 reflects the prior year transfer of net assets and liabilities to the Department of Premier and Cabinet as a result of the consolidation of Service Tasmania.

 


 

Table 9.13: Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent

39 351)

39 795)

40 305)

40 810)

41 292)

Sales of goods and services

16 205)

16 649)

16 952)

17 135)

17 317)

Fees and fines

17 995)

18 462)

18 801)

19 149)

19 519)

Other revenue

7 318)

7 322)

7 322)

7 322)

7 322)

Total revenue and other income from transactions

80 869)

82 228)

83 380)

84 416)

85 450)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies

39 351)

39 795)

40 305)

40 810)

41 292)

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

41 518)

42 433)

43 075)

43 606)

44 158)

Total expenses from transactions

80 869)

82 228)

83 380)

84 416)

85 450)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 9.14: Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Lands Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

9 836)

9 924)

10 150)

10 357)

10 512)

1.2 Valuation Services

4 262)

4 253)

4 346)

4 424)

4 485)

 

14 098)

14 177)

14 496)

14 781)

14 997)

Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 AgriGrowth Tasmania2

6 609)

6 314)

6 166)

5 249)

5 338)

2.2 Marine Resources3

4 936)

5 493)

5 309)

5 128)

5 194)

2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops4

739)

683)

696)

707)

715)

 

12 284)

12 490)

12 171)

11 084)

11 247)

Output Group 4 ‑ Water Resources

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Water Resource Management

7 036)

6 775)

6 860)

6 961)

7 034)

 

7 036)

6 775)

6 860)

6 961)

7 034)

Output Group 6 ‑ Biosecurity Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Biosecurity5

15 881)

16 935)

17 340)

17 432)

17 705)

6.2 Product Integrity6

2 126)

2 726)

1 969)

2 011)

2 035)

 

18 007)

19 661)

19 309)

19 443)

19 740)

Output Group 9 ‑ Policy Advice

 

 

 

 

 

9.1 Policy Advice7

2 074)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

2 074)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

6 156)

6 156)

6 156)

6 156)

6 156)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program8

1 000)

1 575)

575)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

59 655)

59 259)

58 992)

58 425)

59 174)

Works and Services8

1 000)

1 575)

575)

....)

....)

 

60 655)

60 834)

59 567)

58 425)

59 174)

 


 

Table 9.14: Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment, Parks and Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Resource Management and Conservation

11 001)

11 191)

11 473)

11 720)

11 892)

3.2 Historic Heritage Services9

3 193)

3 154)

3 214)

2 825)

2 866)

3.3 Aboriginal Heritage

2 073)

2 320)

2 378)

2 428)

2 467)

3.4 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

2 684)

2 665)

2 749)

2 828)

2 894)

 

18 951)

19 330)

19 814)

19 801)

20 119)

Output Group 7 ‑ Environment Protection and Analytical Services

 

 

 

 

 

7.1  Environmental Management and Pollution Control10

12 828)

13 652)

14 217)

14 491)

14 695)

7.2 Analytical Services

1 931)

2 062)

2 108)

2 152)

2 186)

 

14 759)

15 714)

16 325)

16 643)

16 881)

Output Group 8 ‑ Parks and Wildlife Management

 

 

 

 

 

8.1 Parks and Wildlife Management11

36 751)

29 123)

29 569)

30 160)

30 583)

8.2 Crown Land Services

1 971)

2 079)

2 127)

2 172)

2 202)

 

38 722)

31 202)

31 696)

32 332)

32 785)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

3 496)

3 629)

3 767)

3 895)

3 996)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program12

17 906)

8 947)

2 291)

1 291)

556)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services13

75 928)

69 875)

71 602)

72 671)

73 781)

Works and Services12

17 906)

8 947)

2 291)

1 291)

556)

 

93 834)

78 822)

73 893)

73 962)

74 337)

Minister for Racing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Racing Regulation and Policy14

2 729)

4 063)

4 157)

4 238)

4 255)

 

2 729)

4 063)

4 157)

4 238)

4 255)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

29 699)

30 010)

30 382)

30 759)

31 140)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

32 428)

34 073)

34 539)

34 997)

35 395)

 

32 428)

34 073)

34 539)

34 997)

35 395)

 


 

Table 9.14: Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

 

 

 

 

 

Total Recurrent Services

168 011)

163 207)

165 133)

166 093)

168 350)

Total Works and Services

18 906)

10 522)

2 866)

1 291)

556)

 

186 917)

173 729)

167 999)

167 384)

168 906)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Carried Forward15

200)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

187 117)

173 729)

167 999)

167 384)

168 906)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

147 766)

133 934)

127 694)

126 574)

127 614)

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

39 351)

39 795)

40 305)

40 810)

41 292)

 

187 117)

173 729)

167 999)

167 384)

168 906)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The 2015‑16 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Output 2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops from the Department of Justice to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2015‑16 estimates will differ from those published in the 2015‑16 Budget.

2.   The decrease in AgriGrowth Tasmania in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture Policy ‑ Implementation initiative.

3.   The increase in Marine Resources in 2016‑17 reflects additional funding for the Wild Fisheries Management Program. In addition, funding has also been received in 2016‑17 for a one off payment for research which has been funded through an additional one off licence fee by Huon Aquaculture.

4.   The Poppy Advisory and Control Board was transferred from the Department of Justice to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment and has become Output 2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops.

5.   The increase in Biosecurity in 2016‑17 reflects additional funding received for Increasing Biosecurity Services. In addition, the increase is also due to a reassessment of corporate overhead costs to better reflect the provision of expenditure for this Output.

6.   The increase in Product Integrity in 2016‑17 reflects the additional funding received for the Tasmanian Shellfish Quality Assurance Program as part of the Government's support package for pacific oyster growers in response to the recent pacific oyster mortality syndrome outbreak. The decrease in 2017‑18 reflects the cessation of the support package.

7.   The decrease in Policy Advice in 2016‑17 reflects an Output restructure. The previous Output has been consolidated into the Department's corporate overhead cost pool which is spread across all of the Department's Outputs.

8.   The increase in Capital Investment Program and Works and Services in 2016‑17 reflects the funding received for the Fisheries Integrated Licensing and Management System. The decrease 2017‑18 reflects the cessation of the Increasing Biosecurity Capability initiative. The decrease 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of Fisheries Integrated Licensing and Management System initiative.

9.   The decrease in Historic Heritage Services in 2018‑19 reflects the cessation of the Development of the Woolmers Estate Visitor Centre initiative.

10. The increase in Environmental Management and Pollution Control in 2016‑17 reflects additional funding received for the implementation of the Nyrstar Ground Water Management Strategy.

11. The decrease in Parks and Wildlife Management in 2016‑17 is primarily due to the transfer of the Fuel Reduction Burn program to the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management, partly offset by a reassessment of corporate overhead costs to better reflect the provision of expenditure for this Output.

12. The movements in Capital Investment Program and Works and Services over the Budget and Forward Estimates reflects the completion of the Three Capes Track and cash flow movements for the Parks High Priority Maintenance, West Coast Trails Project, South Coast Track and the Three Capes Track ‑ Stage 3 initiatives.

13. The decrease in Recurrent Services in 2016‑17 primarily relates to the transfer of the Fuel Reduction Burn program to the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management.

14. The increase in Racing Regulation and Policy in 2016‑17 reflects a revised budget based on previous years' actual expenditure.

15. The decrease in Appropriation Carried Forward in 2016‑17 reflects the utilisation of funding carried forward under section 8A(2) of the Public Account Act 1986 for the development of a case management system for the Poppy Advisory and Control Board.

Table 9.15: Administered Revenue

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Consolidated Fund

 

 

 

 

 

Abalone Licences1

4 652)

5 390)

5 416)

5 443)

5 484)

Environment Fees

4 591)

4 706)

4 824)

4 945)

5 069)

Land Information Charges

90)

92)

94)

96)

98)

Lands Titles Office Dealings2

15 016)

15 560)

15 704)

15 856)

16 006)

Marine Farms Fees and Recoveries3

1 099)

997)

1 154)

1 183)

1 213)

Other Revenue

5 000)

5 000)

5 000)

5 000)

5 000)

Quarantine Fees4

1 834)

1 210)

1 247)

1 292)

1 320)

Regulatory Fees

5 017)

5 232)

5 342)

5 448)

5 574)

Royalty Income

2 318)

2 322)

2 322)

2 322)

2 322)

Water Licence Fees

1 901)

1 924)

1 972)

2 021)

2 072)

 

41 518)

42 433)

43 075)

43 606)

44 158)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation

39 351)

39 795)

40 305)

40 810)

41 292)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

80 869)

82 228)

83 380)

84 416)

85 450)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The increase in Abalone Licences in 2016‑17 reflects revised estimates of abalone licence revenue due to an increase in the average abalone beach price.

2.   The increase in Land Titles Office Dealings in 2016‑17 reflects revised estimates of Land Titles Office revenue due to increased activity in the Tasmanian property market.

3.   The decrease in Marine Farms Fees and Recoveries in 2016‑17 reflects temporary fee relief to support pacific oyster growers as they recover from the pacific oyster mortality syndrome outbreak. This is partially offset by a one off additional licence fee from Huon Aquaculture.

4.   The decrease in Quarantine Fees in 2016‑17 reflects revised estimates due to new offshore clearance arrangements entered into with TT‑Line Company Pty Ltd.


 

Table 9.16: Administered Expenses

 

2015‑16]

)

Budget)

2016‑17]

)

Budget)

2017‑18]

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19]

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20]

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution to Commonwealth, State and Industry Organisations

470)

470)

470)

470)

470)

Grant to Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies

2 605)

2 605)

2 605)

2 605)

2 605)

Grant to Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture

1 958)

1 958)

1 958)

1 958)

1 958)

Inland Fisheries Service ‑ Government Contribution

1 123)

1 123)

1 123)

1 123)

1 123)

Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority

3 386)

3 519)

3 657)

3 785)

3 886)

Tasmanian Racing Assistance

29 699)

30 010)

30 382)

30 759)

31 140)

Wellington Park Contribution

110)

110)

110)

110)

110)

 

39 351)

39 795)

40 305)

40 810)

41 292)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Consolidated Fund

41 518)

42 433)

43 075)

43 606)

44 158)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

80 869)

82 228)

83 380)

84 416)

85 450)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution to Commonwealth, State and Industry Organisations

This funding is the State's contribution to cost sharing arrangements as agreed at meetings of the Agriculture Ministers' Forum and in relation to nationally agreed initiatives, particularly for biosecurity programs and projects. The funding contributes to activities under Output Group 2 Primary Industries, Output Group 3 Natural and Cultural Heritage and Output Group 6 Biosecurity Tasmania.

Grant to the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies

In 2010, the Department entered into the Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration Agreement with the University of Tasmania's Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), formerly the Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute, to assist aquaculture and fisheries research. The Government provides its contribution to the joint venture by way of an annual grant. Activities of IMAS contribute to Output Group 2 Primary Industries.

Grant to the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture

The Department and the University of Tasmania have an agreement in place for the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA) to undertake agricultural research, development, extension and education. The activities of TIA contribute to Output Group 2 Primary Industries and the majority of Government funding is reflected in that Output. The remaining funding is provided by way of an administered grant.


 

Inland Fisheries Service ‑ Government Contribution

This funding represents the community service functions of the Inland Fisheries Service in relation to the conservation, protection and management of Tasmania's native freshwater fauna and the carp management program.

Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority

This funding represents the Government's contribution to the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority to support the agreed conservation funding program for the Port Arthur, Coal Mines and Cascade Female Factory Historic Sites.

Tasmanian Racing Assistance

The Government separately funds the Tasmanian Racing Industry under a deed which provides secure funding and creates certainty for the Industry. The annual funding allocation allows Tasracing Pty Ltd to facilitate key administration roles and functions, including the responsibility for the corporate governance, strategic direction and funding of the Tasmanian Racing Industry, as well as ratification of national rules, the making of local rules and the setting of licence standards and criteria.

Wellington Park Contribution

The allocation represents the Government's contribution to the cost of administering Wellington Park through a grant to the Wellington Park Management Trust.


 

Table 9.17: Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2016)

 

Budget1)

2017)

 

Budget)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits2

86 123)

101 571)

101 206)

101 274)

101 628)

Investments

8 798)

8 589)

8 589)

8 589)

8 589)

Receivables3

4 743)

3 254)

3 340)

3 426)

3 512)

Other financial assets4

1 545)

2 136)

2 136)

2 136)

2 136)

 

101 209)

115 550)

115 271)

115 425)

115 865)

Non‑financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories

843)

818)

853)

888)

923)

Property, plant and equipment5

917 868)

1 055 465)

1 055 678)

1 055 891)

1 056 104)

Infrastructure

198 248)

215 601)

210 638)

204 675)

197 977)

Heritage and cultural assets

2 653)

2 585)

2 810)

3 035)

3 260)

Intangibles6

10 248)

12 964)

13 299)

13 059)

12 819)

Other assets

1 731)

1 801)

1 891)

1 981)

2 071)

 

1 131 591)

1 289 234)

1 285 169)

1 279 529)

1 273 154)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

1 232 800)

1 404 784)

1 400 440)

1 394 954)

1 389 019)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables7

2 809)

4 147)

4 285)

4 423)

4 561)

Provisions

9 243)

9 047)

9 047)

9 047)

9 047)

Employee benefits

28 179)

28 671)

29 243)

29 815)

30 387)

Other liabilities8

3 747)

5 349)

5 350)

5 351)

5 352)

Total liabilities

43 978)

47 214)

47 925)

48 636)

49 347)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

1 188 822)

1 357 570)

1 352 515)

1 346 318)

1 339 672)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Contributed capital9

1 592)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Reserves

266 411)

272 231)

278 834)

285 437)

292 040)

Accumulated funds10

135 423)

168 842)

157 184)

144 384)

131 135)

Other equity11

785 396)

916 497)

916 497)

916 497)

916 497)

Total equity

1 188 822)

1 357 570)

1 352 515)

1 346 318)

1 339 672)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. The 2015‑16 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Output 2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops from the Department of Justice to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2015‑16 figures for this Department will differ from those published in the 2015‑16 Budget

2. The increase in Cash and deposits in 2017 reflects an increase in the Crown Land Administration Fund due to asset sale proceeds.

3. The decrease in Receivables in 2017 reflects a more accurate estimate based on the 30 June 2015 outcome and improved debt management practices.

4. The increase in Other financial assets in 2017 reflects a more accurate estimate of accrued revenue based on the 30 June 2015 outcome.

5. The increase in Property, plant and equipment in 2017 reflects the addition of 359 802 hectares of land now managed by the Department via the Parks and Wildlife Service as a result of the Forestry (Rebuilding the Forest Industry) Act 2014.

6. The increase in Intangibles in 2017 reflects the revaluation of abalone quota units.

7. The increase in Payables in 2017 reflects a more accurate estimate of accrued expenses based on the 30 June 2015 outcome.

8. The increase in Other liabilities reflects a more accurate estimate of revenue received in advance based on changes in the business operations of the Department during 2015‑16, in particular the Three Capes Track is now in operation with bookings being received in advance and there is increased Australian Government revenue received in advance.

9. The decrease in Contributed capital in 2017 reflects the net impact of the transfer of Service Tasmania to the Department of Premier and Cabinet in the previous year. The amount has been moved to Accumulated Funds from 2017 onwards.

10. The increase in Accumulated funds in 2017 reflects a more accurate estimate based on the 30 June 2015 outcome.

11. The increase in Other equity in 2017 reflects the additional land now managed by the Department via the Parks and Wildlife Service as a result of the Forestry (Rebuilding the Forest Industry) Act 2014.

 


 

Table 9.18: Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June - Administered

 

2016)

 

Budget)

2017)

 

Budget)

2018)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019)

Forward)

Estimate)

2020)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

133)

67)

67)

67)

67)

Receivables1

1 505)

1 572)

1 631)

1 690)

1 749)

Other financial assets

1 944)

2 161)

2 161)

2 161)

2 161)

Total Assets

3 582)

3 800)

3 859)

3 918)

3 977)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

3 336)

3 455)

3 455)

3 455)

3 455)

Other liabilities2

246)

345)

404)

463)

522)

Total Liabilities

3 582)

3 800)

3 859)

3 918)

3 977)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Assets (liabilities)

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Equity

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1. The decrease in Cash and deposits in 2017 is offset by the increase in Receivables in 2017 and reflects a more accurate estimate based on the 30 June 2015 outcome.

2. The increase in Other liabilities in 2017 reflects a more accurate estimate based on the 30 June 2015 outcome.


 

Table 9.19: Statement of Cash Flows

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget1)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent2

128 660)

123 412)

124 828)

125 283)

127 058)

Appropriation receipts ‑ capital3

18 906)

10 522)

2 866)

1 291)

556)

Grants4

10 336)

10 689)

9 692)

6 287)

6 287)

Sales of goods and services5

20 876)

24 192)

24 423)

24 661)

24 823)

Fees and fines6

8 807)

7 957)

8 573)

8 610)

8 615)

GST receipts

9 070)

9 070)

9 070)

9 070)

9 070)

Interest received7

591)

303)

295)

287)

292)

Other cash receipts8

567)

1 435)

1 446)

1 456)

1 467)

Total cash inflows

197 813)

187 580)

181 193)

176 945)

178 168)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

(89 709)

(92 322)

(93 390)

(94 280)

(95 567)

Superannuation

(11 892)

(11 657)

(11 790)

(11 913)

(12 069)

GST payments

(9 070)

(9 070)

(9 070)

(9 070)

(9 070)

Grants and subsidies9

(24 292)

(17 618)

(17 612)

(15 871)

(15 884)

Supplies and consumables10

(44 121)

(48 613)

(46 157)

(43 743)

(43 934)

Other cash payments

(3 117)

(3 101)

(3 143)

(3 179)

(3 204)

Total cash outflows

(182 201)

(182 381)

(181 162)

(178 056)

(179 728)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

15 612)

5 199)

31)

(1 111)

(1 560)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets11

(21 371)

(9 871)

(2 710)

(1 135)

(400)

Proceeds from the disposal of non‑financial assets

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

2 314)

Equity injections and cashflows from restructuring12

(707)

....)

....)

....)

....)

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(19 764)

(7 557)

(396)

1 179)

1 914)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(4 152)

(2 358)

(365)

68)

354)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

90 275)

103 929)

101 571)

101 206)

101 274)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

86 123)

101 571)

101 206)

101 274)

101 628)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.   The 2015‑16 Budget comparative figures presented in this table have been adjusted to reflect the transfer of Output 2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops from the Department of Justice to the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. Accordingly, the 2015‑16 figures for this Department will differ from those published in the 2015‑16 Budget.

2.   The decrease in Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent in 2016‑17 is primarily due to the transfer of the Fuel Reduction Program to the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management.

3.   The movements in Appropriation receipts ‑ capital over the Budget and Forward Estimates include cash flow changes for the Three Capes Track, Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure, Increasing Biosecurity Capability and the Three Capes Track ‑ Stage 3 initiatives.

4.   The decrease in Grants in 2018‑19 reflects Australian Government funding for Management of the World Heritage Values of the Tasmanian Wilderness.

5.   The increase in Sales of goods and services in 2016‑17 primarily reflects increased revenue from the Three Capes Track.

6.   The decrease in Fees and fines in 2016‑17 reflects a reclassification of fisheries licence revenue to Other revenue and a reduction based on the temporary fee relief to support pacific oyster growers as they recover from the pacific oyster mortality syndrome outbreak. The increase in 2017‑18 reflects cessation of the fee relief to support pacific oyster growers.

7.   The decrease in Interest received in 2016‑17 reflects revised estimates of Special Deposits and Trust Fund account balances that attract interest.

8.   The increase in Other cash receipts in 2016‑17 reflects the reclassification of fisheries licence revenue from Fees and fines. Fisheries licence revenue is collected on behalf of other organisations such as the Tasmanian Seafood Industry Council.

9.   The decrease in Grants and subsidies in 2016‑17 reflects the transfer of the Fuel Reduction Program to the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management. The decrease in 2018‑19 primarily reflects the cessation of the Cultivating Prosperity in Agriculture and the Development of Woolmers Estate Visitor Centre initiatives.

10. The increase in Supplies and consumables in 2016‑17 reflects Australian Government funding for the Management of the World Heritage Values of the Tasmanian Wilderness and new activity in relation to the operations of the Three Capes Track. The decrease in 2017‑18 is mainly due to cash flow changes in expenditure for project management, legal advice, remediation works and other project costs to finalise the parliament square project. The decrease in 2018‑19 is mainly due to the cessation of the current deed with the Australian Government for funding for the Management of the World Heritage Values of the Tasmanian Wilderness. A new deed is expected to be finalised by the end of 2017‑18.

11. The decrease in Payments for acquisition of non-financial assets in 2016‑17 is primarily due to the completion of the Three Capes Track. The decreases from 2017‑18 onwards are primarily due to cash flow changes to the Parks High Priority Maintenance and Infrastructure, Increasing Biosecurity Capability, South Coast Track and Three Capes Track ‑ Stage 3 initiatives.

12. The decrease in Equity injections and cash flows from restructuring in 2016‑17 reflects the transfer of cash to the Department of Premier and Cabinet in 2015‑16 as a result of the consolidation of Service Tasmania.


 

Table 9.20: Statement of Cash Flows ‑ Administered

 

2015‑16)

 

Budget)

2016‑17)

 

Budget)

2017‑18)

Forward)

Estimate)

2018‑19)

Forward)

Estimate)

2019‑20)

Forward)

Estimate)

 

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

$'000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ recurrent

39 351)

39 795)

40 305)

40 810)

41 292)

Sales of goods and services

16 205)

16 649)

16 952)

17 135)

17 317)

Fees and fines

17 995)

18 462)

18 801)

19 149)

19 519)

Other cash receipts

7 318)

7 322)

7 322)

7 322)

7 322)

Total cash inflows

80 869)

82 228)

83 380)

84 416)

85 450)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies

(39 351)

(39 795)

(40 305)

(40 810)

(41 292)

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

(41 518)

(42 433)

(43 075)

(43 606)

(44 158)

Total cash outflows

(80 869)

(82 228)

(83 380)

(84 416)

(85 450)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

....)

....)

....)

....)

....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

133)

67)

67)

67)

67)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

133)

67)

67)

67)

67)