11    Department of State Growth

Agency Outline

The Department of State Growth’s role is to enable and support economic growth, and facilitate the creation of jobs and opportunities for Tasmanians. In doing so, the Department has five key objectives:

·       work with Tasmanian businesses and industry to support growth and job creation;

·       grow and support Tasmania’s visitor economy;

·       build Tasmania’s brand as the best place in the country to live, work, invest and raise a family;

·       support industry and business growth by strategically managing our infrastructure and transport systems; and

·       build organisational capacity by developing our people, safety, systems and culture.

The Department provides portfolio support for the following Ministers:

·       Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events; and Minister for Trade, Hon Will Hodgman MP;

·       Minister for State Growth, Hon Peter Gutwein MP;

·       Minister for the Arts, Hon Elise Archer MP;

·       Minister for Education and Training, Minister for Infrastructure, Minister for Advanced Manufacturing and Defence Industries, Hon Jeremy Rockliff MP;

·       Minister for Resources and Minister for Energy, Hon Guy Barnett MP; and

·       Minister for Science and Technology, Hon Michael Ferguson MP.

The Department also supports the Parliamentary Secretary for Regional Development, Mark Shelton MP.

The Department is organised into four key areas: Cultural and Tourism Development; Industry and Business Development; Transport Services; and Business Services. The Department supports the Office of the Coordinator‑General and Infrastructure Tasmania. State Growth works collaboratively and in partnership with other Government Departments to achieve growth in the Tasmanian economy. In delivering services to Tasmania and growing our State, we will be client centric, collaborative, values based, results driven, innovative, creative and adaptable.

This chapter provides the Department’s financial information for 2018‑19 and over the Forward Estimates period (2019‑20 to 2021‑22). Further information on the Department is provided at www.stategrowth.tas.gov.au.


 

Key Deliverables

Table 11.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimate allocations for key deliverables within the Department.

Table 11.1:       Key Deliverables Statement

 

2018‑19

 

Budget

2019‑20

Forward

Estimate

2020‑21

Forward

Estimate

2021‑22

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Election Commitments

 

 

 

 

Access to the South Line for the Tasmanian Transport Museum Society

25

....

....

....

Agricultural Centre of Excellence (TasTAFE)

....

5 000

....

....

Derwent Valley Rail line ‑ access

25

....

....

....

Develop new online marketing portal (MAST)

75

50

25

25

Digital Inclusion

100

100

100

100

Drysdale extension at Claremont and Devonport (TasTAFE)

3 500

....

….

….

Dutch Mill ‑ Edith Creek Support Package

775

775

....

....

Encourage Philanthropic Support for TMAG and QVMAG

100

100

100

100

Event Attraction Fund

1 000

1 000

1 000

1 000

Extend Digital Ready Program

....

….

….

250

Extend Enterprize Hubs

….

….

….

278

Extend the Successful Agri-growth Loans Scheme1

....

....

....

....

Extending the Great Eastern Drive ‑ Binalong Bay Road

....

2 000

2 500

....

Great Customer Experience

700

700

700

700

Greater Hobart Traffic Vision

3 325

6 250

7 600

13 600

Heritage Renewal Loan Scheme1

....

....

....

....

Hobart-Strahan Air Service

150

150

....

....

Improve catch opportunities ‑ artificial reefs (MAST)

....

....

500

500

Improving Mobile Coverage for the Great Eastern Drive

3 500

....

....

....

Improving Safety of Patrons

50

50

50

50

Intra-regional Bus Service

100

....

....

....

IT Workforce Development

75

....

....

....

Launceston and Tamar Valley Traffic Vision

2 180

4 700

7 700

20 500

Mining Exploration Grants Program

1 000

500

250

250

New Bridgewater Bridge

6 000

27 000

33 000

55 000

Permanent Children’s Exhibition at TMAG

....

500

500

....

Reimagining the Gorge

875

....

....

....

Roads Package to Support Tasmania’s Visitor Economy

7 150

14 750

16 017

13 817

Screen Innovation Fund

1 000

500

500

....

Shore based fishing (MAST)

495

50

440

650

Showcasing Tasmanian Artists Interstate

80

80

80

....

South East Traffic Solution

1 050

5 700

8 750

5 500

Special Interest Vehicles2

....

….

….

….

Table 11.1:       Key Deliverables Statement (continued)

 

2018‑19

 

Budget

2019‑20

Forward

Estimate

2020‑21

Forward

Estimate

2021‑22

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

State Road Upgrades ‑ Northern Region

4 150

7 000

17 332

14 467

State Road Upgrades ‑ North West and West Coast Region

4 350

4 250

6 250

9 250

State Road Upgrades ‑ Southern Region

11 750

14 220

12 517

13 217

Strahan Visitor Centre ‑ transformation

375

....

....

....

Stronger Marine Safety Arrangements (MAST)

440

690

495

345

Supporting more Apprenticeships and Traineeships

2 500

2 500

2 500

....

Supporting EV Charging Partnerships

250

....

....

....

Supporting Tasmanian Small Business3

....

....

....

....

Tasmanian Journeys

800

....

....

....

THA Workforce Development

750

750

750

750

Trades and Water Centre of Excellence (TasTAFE)

....

7 000

....

....

West Tamar Highway Traffic Solution

1 750

5 600

3 650

1 000

Wool ‑ harvesting and training program3

....

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

Other Initiatives

 

 

 

 

AFLW in Tasmania

518

543

570

597

Australian Rally Championships

150

150

135

....

Energy Security Management

275

275

275

275

Festivale

80

80

....

....

Greater Hobart Act4

….

….

….

….

Hobart City Deal4

….

….

….

….

ICC World Twenty20

500

2 250

250

....

Rosehaven - Season 3

200

....

....

....

Theatre Royal ‑ The Hedberg

678

692

705

719

 

Notes:

1.    This initiative will be administered by the Tasmania Development and Resources Board.

2.    The cost of this initiative is reflected by a reduction in Motor Tax revenue.

3.    This initiative will be met from within the existing budget of the Department of State Growth and the new initiatives arising from the B21 business growth strategy will be developed later this year.

4.    These initiatives are under development and are expected to be delivered later this year noting that some projects envisaged to be supported by these initiatives have already received funding.

Election Commitments

Access to the South Line for the Tasmanian Transport Museum Society

In keeping with its commitment to support heritage rail operations across Tasmania, the Government has committed funds to a number of well-established heritage rail operators, to assist them with the costs of accreditation and rail infrastructure improvements. A funding commitment of $25 000 has been made to the Tasmanian Transport Museum Society to assist with accreditation and planning costs.

Noting that other rail corridors are currently being assessed for their suitability for heritage rail further assistance, if required, will be considered once this work is completed.

Agricultural Centre of Excellence

The investment of $5 million will establish an Agricultural Centre of Excellence in Tasmania’s North West to provide the skills needed for Tasmania’s booming agricultural sector. Centred on Burnie’s Freer Farm, the Centre of Excellence will include TasTAFE course delivery, plus extended training delivery through partnerships with other training providers including the University of Tasmania.

Derwent Valley Rail line - access

In keeping with its commitment to support heritage rail operations across Tasmania, the Government has committed funds to a number of well-established heritage rail operators, to assist them with the costs of accreditation and rail infrastructure improvements. A funding commitment of $25 000 has been made to the Derwent Valley Railway to enable planning work to support rail reconstruction.

Develop new online marketing portal

Funding of $175 000 over four years will be used to develop a new online portal to promote and support recreational fishing and boating across Tasmania.

A new web portal and social media platform will provide recreational fishers with access to all boat registrations, boat operator licences, specialist fishing licences including nets, rock lobster, abalone and scallop licences. The information will include links to MAST, weather information, recreational fishing clubs and organisations and provide up to date advice on local catches, best fishing spots and shark sightings.

Digital Inclusion

This commitment is to invest $400 000 over four years to increase digital inclusion through the creation of a strategy to increase the capability and affordability for Tasmanians who are currently experiencing high levels of digital exclusion. Specifically this will include low income households, older Tasmanians and people not in paid employment. This strategy will enhance digital pathways for Tasmanian communities to increase participation online and expand their social and economic options and opportunities by working with government agencies, the private sector and not-for-profit organisations.

Drysdale extension at Claremont and Devonport

This commitment will see an investment of $3.5 million to establish a Drysdale tourism and hospitality delivery point at Claremont College, and the development of a training kitchen within the Devonport Living City Project.

Dutch Mill ‑ Edith Creek Support Package

Additional funding of $1.6 million over two years will be provided as part of an overall assistance package of up to $2.3 million to assist Dutch Mill to address identified capacity constraints and assist with workforce development and training for new workers. The restarted facility will see the processing of up to 40 million litres of milk per year, employing 26 full time equivalents initially, increasing up to 112 full time equivalents when the plant reaches full operational capacity.

Encourage Philanthropic Support for TMAG and QVMAG

The Government will provide up to $400 000 over four years in a scheme that matches funds raised by the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery Foundation and the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery Arts Foundation, for work that attracts philanthropic support to our premier cultural institutions.

Event Attraction Fund

The Fund will offer $4 million over four years to enable Events Tasmania to actively target and secure mass‑participation events. This fund will support both not for profit and commercial initiatives and focus on new events and assisting young events to expand. The commitment aims to ensure a broad ranging events calendar with regional and seasonal balance, bringing benefit to regional economies.

Extend Digital Ready Program

The Government has committed a further year of funding, in addition to the $900 000 previously allocated, to ensure that small businesses receive innovative, informative and relevant information to help seize the opportunities presented by the changing digital technology.

Extend Enterprize Hubs

The Government previously provided seed funding to launch and develop Enterprize Hubs in Launceston and Hobart which are already bringing people together, providing a location, training and hands-on mentoring to develop, evaluate and implement, pre-start-up and early stage business opportunities. This commitment is an extension of this program by a further year.         

Extend the Successful Agri-growth Loan Scheme

The Government will extend this loan scheme to young farmers with low interest (concessional) loan facilities, to support farmers and agri-food businesses to innovate and expand and turn their inspiration into reality.

Extending the Great Eastern Drive ‑ Binalong Bay Road

This Government will invest $4.5 million to improve visitor access at Binalong Bay Road, allowing more visitors to enjoy a stretch of coastline named by Lonely Planet as the hottest travel destination in the world.

Great Customer Experience

This investment of $2.8 million over four years will see the program expand to assist 2 000 businesses and include industrial relations and human resource training, a core of any successful small and large business.

Greater Hobart Traffic Vision

Funding in the 2018-19 Budget commits $30.8 million for congestion mitigation projects including:

·       transferring ownership of Macquarie and Davey Streets and implementation of traffic flow improvements;

·       implementation of a traffic incident response capability;

·       bus priority measures on key routes;

·       improvements to key inner transport access points;

·       commencement of public consultation, planning, design and initial works for a fifth lane on the Southern Outlet;

·       planning for a new underground bus transit centre; and

·       further work on the northern suburbs light rail project.

Heritage Renewal Loan Scheme

The Scheme recognises the importance and value of businesses within the visitor economy that work with and present Tasmania’s historic heritage assets as part of the State’s unique brand and appeal to visitors and locals alike. This initiative is designed to assist private businesses and local governments that use, or intend to use, their unique historic heritage assets as part of their current or proposed business undertakings or business opportunities in Tasmania.  Administered by the Tasmania Development and Resources Board, loans are for projects that will improve and upgrade existing heritage registered properties in order to facilitate tourism and business development, expansion and retention opportunities across Tasmania that help to stimulate the visitor economy and generate positive heritage outcomes.

Hobart-Strahan Air Service

As part of its commitment to Tasmania’s West Coast, the Government has committed $300 000 over two years to trial a Regular Passenger Transport air service between Hobart and Strahan.

Improve catch opportunities ‑ artificial reefs

The Government has allocated $1 million over two years to construct two artificial reef structures in Tasmanian coastal waters. These types of structures are used world-wide to improve catch opportunities. Structures will be located in Bass Strait off the North-West Coast and in Storm Bay in the south of the State. 

Improving Mobile Coverage for the Great Eastern Drive

This $3.5 million initiative will see the Government work with a telecommunications provider to increase mobile coverage to at least 95 per cent along the Great Eastern Drive between Binalong Bay and Buckland, providing better opportunities for communities, improved access for tourists and enhanced public safety in general.

Improving Safety of Patrons

This investment of $200 000 over four years will support the introduction of legislation to crack-down on coward punch attacks through investment in a campaign to send the strongest possible message that this act of violent cowardice will not be tolerated.


 

Intra-regional Bus Service

Funding of $100 000 has been provided for the establishment of an intra-regional bus service connecting Queenstown, Strahan, Rosebery and Zeehan. This funding will help support work opportunities for locals, as well as providing better access to centralised council facilities and bus departure points.

This is an addition to the Government’s commitment to extend the Strahan to Burnie (return) bus service from the current two days per week to seven days a week, commencing in early 2019.

IT Workforce Development

The Government has committed $75 000 to continue working with industry partners such as TasICT and the Australian Computer Society to develop a new Workforce Development Plan for the industry, with particular focus on encouraging women and diversity in IT.

Launceston and Tamar Valley Traffic Vision

With significant new commercial developments underway and planned in the Invermay area and the Learning City relocation of the University of Tasmania campus, this funding commences a program of investment in road infrastructure that will support this growth.

Projects in this investment program include shoulder widening on the Batman Highway, transfer of ownership of the Launceston Couplet, improvements at Goderich/Forster Street, capacity improvements at Charles Street Bridge and commencement of planning for a new Tamar River crossing near University Way.

Mining Exploration Grants Program

Mining and minerals processing is a key pillar of Tasmania’s economy, providing thousands of direct and indirect jobs and contributing over 50 per cent of the State’s exports. The identification of new ore deposits is critical to the future sustainability of the industry and the jobs it supports. To help identify new discoveries to underpin the future of mining in the State, the Government is contributing $2 million to a mining exploration grants program for co‑funded mining exploration drilling in Tasmania. It is anticipated that the program will support 10-20 drilling projects, with individual grants capped at $200 000.

New Bridgewater Bridge

The Government is committed to ensuring Tasmania’s future infrastructure needs are met and continues to invest strategically in important projects that benefit the Tasmanian community. In April 2016, the Government endorsed a report from Infrastructure Tasmania that recommended seeking funding from the Australian Government for a new four-lane Bridgewater Bridge.

Infrastructure Australia has accepted the Derwent River Crossing Capacity as an initiative of national significance, and the Australian Government has now provided funding in the 2018 Federal Budget of $461 million towards an 80 percent funding contribution towards a project cost estimate of $576.3 million.

The Government has committed $115 million towards the project and will invest $21 million over the 2018‑19 Budget and Forward Estimates period towards the State’s 20 percent share of the full project cost.


 

Permanent Children’s Exhibition at TMAG

The Government will provide $1 million to develop a highly interactive, permanent children’s exhibition at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. This investment will enable one of Tasmania’s most visited cultural attractions to update their visitor experience and enhance its reputation as a destination for children, families and their carers.

Reimagining the Gorge

The Government will provide $875 000 to work with the Launceston City Council to establish a new light show on the cliff faces and basin waters at Launceston’s Cataract Gorge that will be a night-time drawcard for Northern Tasmania.

Roads package to Support Tasmania’s Visitor Economy

Tasmania’s visitor economy is booming with the target of 1.5 million visitors annually by 2020 likely to be exceeded. This investment is part of the Government’s commitment to ensuring that Tasmania’s reputation as a premium destination is protected, for locals and visitors alike.

This investment will seal gravel roads, build more passing lanes and add new courtesy stopping bays, which are critical for the thousands more driving visitors, campervans and caravans visiting the State.

These works will improve the experience of the growing number of travellers to fast emerging icons such as the Three Capes Walk, Bruny Island, the Tarkine and the Great Eastern Drive.

Screen Innovation Fund

The Government will provide $2 million over three years to Screen Tasmania to support investment in the production of key strategic projects to generate jobs, investment and skills retention and development. Up to 25 per cent of the amount will be made available to support new innovative productions in the early stage of development, to enable them to prove their concepts to the marketplace.

Shore based fishing

The Government is committed to providing land-based recreational fishing opportunities to all Tasmanians. Funding of $700 000 over four years will improve access to jetties. The provision of $685 000 over three years to replace derelict jetties around the very popular Georges Bay area will provide safer access and facilities for children, seniors and Tasmanians with a disability. The Government has also allocated $250 000 over two years for a community led masterplan on future infrastructure upgrades for the Bridport foreshore that supports the growing number of recreational fishers and boaters.

Showcasing Tasmanian Artists Interstate

The Government will provide $80 000 per annum for three years to support the representation of Tasmanian galleries at leading national art fairs (Sydney Contemporary and the Melbourne Art Fair). Supporting the participation of our galleries and artists in these events continues to build our presence in key national arts markets.

South East Traffic Solution

There is a steadily growing demand on the Tasman Highway with increasing numbers of commuters between Sorell and the Southern Beaches and Hobart, and strong growth in tourist traffic to and from the Hobart Airport.

The 2018-19 Budget includes investment of $21 million over four years and includes the continued commitment of funds for construction of the Hobart Airport Interchange, along with upgrading of the Tasman Highway between the airport and causeway, capacity improvements at Midway Point and an overtaking facility on the Arthur Highway.

Special Interest Vehicles

The Government will remove the cost of motor tax from all registered Special Interest Vehicles. This provides a considerable saving on the total cost of registration fees for vehicle collectors and enthusiasts. This is an addition to the Government’s decision to increase allowable driving days for special interest and club event registered vehicles.

State Road Upgrades ‑ Northern Region

This Budget includes investment of $42.9 million over the Budget and Forward Estimates period for a suite of projects across northern Tasmania. This includes this Government’s contribution to the continued investment in the Midland Highway 10 Year Action Plan, a safe pedestrian solution for the Midland Highway at Campbell Town oval, overtaking lanes on the Tasman Highway at Myrtle Park, road widening on Evandale Road between Launceston Airport and Evandale, a package of improvements on State Roads in the Dorset Council area and commencement of planning for upgrading of the Bass Highway between Deloraine and Latrobe.

State Road Upgrades ‑ North West and West Coast Regions

The Government has committed $24.1 million over the forward estimates for a package of works on the Bass Highway west of Wynyard including rebuilding and strengthening the pavement through Brittons Swamp, new passing opportunities between Wynyard and Smithton, relocation of the Rocky Cape Hall to a safer location away from the edge of the highway and safety improvements at the access to Boat Harbour Primary School.

Other funding allocations include road improvements on the West Coast including reconstruction of sections of the Henty Main Road, a contribution towards a Central Coast Council project for a cycling connection across the Forth River and a contribution towards construction of an overpass at Leith to improve safety at the Bass Highway junctions with Leith Road and Short Street. In addition, the Australian Government has stated that the initial focus of the $400 million allocation to Tasmania from the Roads of Strategic Importance initiative will be on the Bass Highway corridor.


 

State Road Upgrades ‑ Southern Region

Population growth and greater economic activity have placed pressure on our road network. The 2018‑19 Budget includes investment of $51.7 million over four years for a suite of projects across southern Tasmania. This includes this Government’s contribution to the continued investment in the Midland Highway 10 Year Action Plan, further funding for continuation of the Richmond Road upgrades and Cambridge Bypass, Huon Highway/Sandfly Road intersection, Mud Walls Road, commencement of duplication of the East Derwent Highway at Geilston Bay, safety upgrades on the Huon and Channel Highways and cycling safety improvements.

Strahan Visitor Centre - transformation

This commitment provides $375 000 to transform the West Coast Visitor Information and Booking Centre into a vibrant, modern Visitor Experience Centre.

Stronger Marine Safety Arrangements

The Government has allocated additional funding to Tasmania’s Volunteer Marine Rescue Unit to ensure ongoing volunteer response coverage. Funding of $440 000 over four years will be provided to Surf Life Saving Tasmania as the peak body for Volunteer Marine Rescue units. A further $350 000 will be provided over three years for vessel replacement and $130 000 to expand the St Helens Volunteer Marine Rescue base.

To provide protection to boat owners in southerly weather, the Government has committed $500 000 over two years to extend the rock breakwater at Coles Bay. Additional funding of $100 000 has been allocated to finalise arrangements for a breakwater at Binalong Bay gulch to provide safer launch and retrieval conditions.

The Government has committed funding of $200 000 over two years to extend the Nubeena Jetty to address access needs for both recreational and commercial vessels and $250 000 over two years to provide upgraded facilities on the Scamander River.

Supporting more Apprenticeships and Traineeships

This commitment provides $7.5 million over three years for a targeted Small Business Grants for Apprentices and Trainees Program. This funding would provide a grant of up to $5 000 for each new apprentice or trainee taken on by a small business in an area of identified skills demand, such as building and construction, tourism and hospitality and manufacturing.

Supporting EV Charging Partnerships

Under the Climate Action 21: Tasmania’s Climate Change Action Plan 2017-20, the Government will commit to developing a coordinated approach for the uptake of electric vehicles in Tasmania. This commitment of $250 000 will support the progressive rollout of a statewide electric vehicle charging network. This will enable a partnership with electricity utilities, motoring bodies or private sector entities to install a number of fast charging stations to broaden the network and move towards coverage across the four major cities and a number of other charging stations in regional centres around the State.


 

Supporting Tasmanian Small Business

The Government will establish a Business Growth Strategy 2018-2023 (B21) through a strategic partnership with business and industry representatives through the Tasmanian Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the Tasmanian Small Business Council, with input from local chambers of commerce, industry peak bodies and other relevant organisations. B21 will establish a strategy to ensure Government policies are aligned with business and industry goals, and will bring government and the broader business sector together to develop strategies to reach the targets we have set for Tasmania.

Tasmanian Journeys

The Government will provide $800 000 to support the development and implementation of three new Tasmanian journeys that will build on the success of the Great Eastern Drive and the work underway on the Western Wilds. This funding supplements the $600 000 provided to Tourism Tasmania for this initiative.

THA Workforce Development

Hospitality is a booming sector, but to ensure it continues to grow, it must have a workforce to meet its demands, today and in the future. This funding of $3 million over four years will see a strong investment in the development of the Tasmanian Hospitality Association’s Strategic Plan and Workforce Development along with the establishment of a dedicated Hospitality Unit to spearhead industry and government collaboration.

Trades and Water Centre of Excellence

The Government will provide $7 million to establish a Trades and Water Centre of Excellence at Clarence in the State’s south. The Trades and Water Centre of Excellence will include a new purpose-built workshop allowing training delivered in a high quality industry endorsed setting. To maximise enrolments, the facility will also offer online courses and training to those in other parts of the State.

West Tamar Highway Traffic Solution

This investment comprises reconstruction and widening of the highway from Gravelly Beach Road to Rosevears Drive and Atkinsons Road to Waldhorn Drive, overtaking opportunities between Exeter and Batman Highway, widening between Batman Highway and Lightwood Hills Road, improvement for left turns into Motor Road and widening of shoulders for cyclists between Brisbane Street and Legana Park Drive.

Wool ‑ harvesting and training program

The Government will continue the successful Wool Harvesting Program supporting a skilled workforce which is critical to maintaining the standard and quality of the Tasmanian wool clip. Shearing and wool handling training supports employment, training and careers for young people in rural communities.

Other Major Initiatives

AFLW in Tasmania

The Government has entered into a five‑year partnership with the North Melbourne Football Club to deliver the North Melbourne Tasmanian Kangaroos AFL Women’s team, entering the competition in 2019. This partnership will deliver pathway and development opportunities for officials and Tasmanian female players.

Australian Rally Championships

A round of the Confederation of Australian Motor Sports Australian Rally Championships will be held in Tasmania from 2018 to 2022, bringing this national-level and world-class motor event to Tasmania for the first time in over a decade.

Energy Security Management

Funding provided by the Government is for the implementation of recommendations in the Energy Security Taskforce’s Final Report.

Festivale

The Government, via Events Tasmania, will provide financial assistance of $160 000 to the Launceston Festivale Committee to support Festivale for the years 2019 and 2020.

Greater Hobart Act

Through the Hobart City Deal, the Government will progress the development of a Greater Hobart Act to provide a strategic legislative framework for councils and the Government to collaborate and support the achievement of outcomes that enhance liveability, strategic infrastructure planning, connectivity, and operational efficiencies across municipal areas.

Hobart City Deal

The Government is working in partnership with the Australian Government and the Clarence, Glenorchy, Hobart and Kingborough councils to develop a Hobart City Deal. The Hobart City Deal will focus on harnessing the emerging opportunities and investment occurring in Hobart as it transitions into an increasingly diverse, vibrant and populated global city that is an epicentre for the region’s community and visitors, cultural arts and recreational activity, businesses and services.

The key focus areas of the Hobart City Deal were confirmed in a Heads of Agreement signed by the Prime Minister and the Premier in January 2018.

Whilst still under development the partnership has already assisted Tasmania secure a $461 million commitment (representing 80 per cent of anticipated project costs) from the Australian Government towards the replacement of the Bridgewater Bridge.

ICC World Twenty20

The Government was successful in its bid to be a host of the ICC World Cup Twenty20 cricket championship in 2020. Funding will be directed to police, security, transport and traffic management, marketing, venue hire, ancillary events along with media and business engagement.


 

Launceston City Deal

The Government is a signatory to the Launceston City Deal which will deliver jobs and economic growth in Northern Tasmania. The centrepiece of the deal is the new University of Tasmania at Inveresk, which is the largest single infrastructure investment in Launceston’s history. The City Deal also delivers the Launceston City Heart Project, which aims to revitalise the Launceston CBD by improving public spaces, transport and signage and helping to attract more people to live in the City. Also, as part of the City Deal, the Tamar Estuary Management Taskforce will oversee the implementation of a River Health Action Plan, to improve the health of the Tamar river by upgrading Launceston's combined sewerage and stormwater system. A Regional Economic Development Strategy is being delivered to identify the next wave of economic opportunities for the North to compliment the City Heart Project and the Inveresk University Campus development.

Rosehaven - Season 3

Rosehaven has been one of the ABC’s top rating shows since its debut in 2016 and was included in the New York Times’ top 10 international television series of 2017. The Government, through Screen Tasmania, has committed a total of $500 000 towards the third series with $300 000 already provided in 2017-18.

Theatre Royal - The Hedberg

The Government will provide additional funding to support the Theatre Royal Management Board in meeting costs associated with the construction and operation of the new $96 million creative industries and performing arts development, The Hedberg. The project will comprise improvements to the Theatre Royal, a new University of Tasmania Conservatorium of Music and will include performance venues, public places and an international research institute.

 


 

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of State Growth are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 ‑ Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth;

·       Output Group 2 ‑ Infrastructure;

·       Output Group 3 ‑ Energy Policy and Advice;

·       Output Group 4 ‑ Resources Policy and Regulatory Services;

·       Output Group 5 ‑ Culture and Creative Industries; and

·       Output Group 6 ‑ Subsidies and Concessions.

Table 11.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department of State Growth.


Table 11.2:       Output Group Expense Summary1

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 - Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

2.2 Infrastructure Strategy2

2 168 

1 595 

419 

274 

280 

2.3 Land Transport Safety3

21 151 

25 981 

26 419 

26 947 

27 315 

2.4 Passenger Transport

3 316 

3 676 

3 474 

3 546 

3 625 

2.5 Traffic Management and Engineering Services

4 166 

3 989 

3 579 

3 643 

3 715 

 

31 601 

36 041 

34 691 

35 210 

35 735 

Output Group 6 - Subsidies and Concessions

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

1 100 

1 133 

1 167 

1 202 

1 242 

6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services

40 110 

41 313 

42 552 

43 829 

45 295 

6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services

24 432 

25 165 

25 920 

26 698 

27 591 

6.4 Non-Metropolitan General Access Services

7 826 

7 826 

7 626 

7 626 

7 626 

6.5 Construction of Streets in Towns

52 

52 

52 

52 

52 

 

73 520 

75 489 

77 317 

79 407 

81 806 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

48 506 

46 040 

45 574 

47 085 

48 110 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program4

171 592 

161 792 

154 154 

155 277 

153 648 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.3 Skills Development6,7

108 877 

118 718 

123 109 

107 550 

108 126 

 

108 877 

118 718 

123 109 

107 550 

108 126 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Energy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 - Energy Policy and Advice

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Energy Policy and Advice8

2 448 

3 332 

2 221 

2 262 

2 307 

 

2 448 

3 332 

2 221 

2 262 

2 307 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 11.2:       Output Group Expense Summary (continued)1

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Growth5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and

Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Coordinator-General9

18 562 

24 007 

54 332 

5 972 

5 577 

1.2 Industry and Business Development10,11

61 644 

48 571 

34 389 

27 551 

25 414 

 

80 206 

72 578 

88 721 

33 523 

30 991 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 - Resources Policy and Regulatory

Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Forestry Policy and Reform12

1 500 

3 196 

2 453 

1 928 

1 105 

4.2 Mineral Resources13

9 547 

11 234 

8 251 

7 571 

7 534 

 

11 047 

14 430 

10 704 

9 499 

8 639 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

15 023 

15 086 

15 148 

15 210 

15 210 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.4 Events and Hospitality14

14 457 

19 133 

16 565 

14 844 

12 604 

 

14 457 

19 133 

16 565 

14 844 

12 604 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery15

10 530 

9 719 

10 201 

10 428 

10 180 

5.2 Arts Industry Development16

8 157 

7 749 

7 831 

7 852 

7 883 

5.3 Screen Industry Development17

2 084 

2 836 

2 147 

2 168 

1 692 

 

20 771 

20 304 

20 179 

20 448 

19 755 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

3 472 

4 176 

4 216 

4 256 

4 299 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

581 520 

587 119 

592 599 

524 571 

521 230 

 

Notes:

1.    Agency estimates do not include the indexation impact of any variations to agency expenditure that have been made since the finalisation of the Revised Estimates Report 2017-18 (including December Quarterly Report). For further information see chapter 1 of this Budget Paper.

2.    The variations in Infrastructure Strategy reflect the cash flow of the 2014 election commitment for Kings Meadows Flood Protection and the 2017‑18 Budget Initiative Forward Planning for Roads (including Launceston Traffic Planning).

3.    The increase in Land Transport Safety in 2018‑19 primarily reflects the continuation of the Road Safety Levy.

4.    This funding relates to expenses within the Capital Investment Program that are primarily maintenance costs and depreciation and therefore exclude asset purchases. For further information, refer to chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

5.    In 2018-19 Skills Development has been transferred from the Minister for State Growth to the Minister for Education and Training.

6.    The variations in Skills Development primarily reflect the cash flows of election commitments including grants to TasTAFE for the Agriculture Centre of Excellence, Drysdale extension at Claremont College and Devonport and the Trades and Water Centre of Excellence.

7.    In 2018-19 funding of $84.92 million will be provided as a grant to TasTAFE to support training activity and operations. This gives effect to the Government’s commitment to ensure a minimum 70 per cent of training funding is provided to TasTAFE.

8.    The decrease in Energy Policy and Advice in 2019-20 primarily reflects the cessation of funding for the Advancing the Case for a Nationally Funded Second Interconnector 2014 election commitment.

9.    The increases in Coordinator‑General in 2018‑19 and 2019‑20 reflects additional funding for Industry Assistance Grants and the cash flow of the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative. This Output also includes funding for Enterprize Hubs, which is the responsibility of the Minister for Science and Technology.

10.  The decrease in Industry and Business Development primarily in 2018-19 reflects the cash flow of prior year initiatives and other key deliverables including: The Community Infrastructure Fund, Employment Partnership: Jobs Action Package, Population Growth Strategy, Growing the Visitor Economy and The Hedberg.

11.  This Output also includes funding that relates to strategies and activities that are the responsibility of the Ministers for Advanced Manufacturing and Defence Industries, Minister for Science and Technology and Minister for Trade.

12.  The increase in Forest Policy and Reform in 2018-19 reflects the transfer of funds for the Tasmanian Forests Agreement from the Finance-General.

13.  The variations in Mineral Resources reflect additional funding for the Mining Exploration Grants Program and the cash flow of the commitment for the relocation of Mineral Resources Tasmania to Burnie.

14.  The increase in Events and Hospitality primarily reflects additional funding for election commitments including:  Event Attraction Fund, Great Customer Experience, Reimagining the Gorge and Tasmanian Hospitality Association Workforce Development.

15.  The variations in Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery primarily reflect the cash flow of Organisation Reform funding, and additional funding for the Permanent Children’s Exhibition at TMAG.

16.  The decrease in Arts Industry Development in 2018‑19 primarily reflects a redistribution of corporate overheads across departmental Outputs.

17.  The increase in Screen Industry Development in 2018-19 reflects additional funding for the Screen Innovation Fund.

Output Group 1:   Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

1.1 Coordinator‑General

The Office of the Coordinator‑General is Tasmania’s principal entity to attract and support investment in the State. The activities of the Office are a fundamental element to the Tasmanian Government’s agenda of promoting and developing Tasmania’s attractiveness for investment and creating jobs. Outcomes of the Office of the Coordinator-General are achieved by working collaboratively across the broader Department of State Growth, other State and Australian Government agencies, statutory authorities and local government. The Office operates broadly across four interconnected areas including Investment Attraction and Facilitation, Major Projects, the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative and Red Tape Reduction, which will incorporate the role of a Small Business Advocate who will work to create a more level playing field and assist small businesses in trying to resolve disputes with larger businesses, State Government bodies and local councils.

1.2 Industry and Business Development

The Industry and Business Development Output:

·       focuses on maximising growth and job creation through business and industry. The Output provides a regional interface to engage with Tasmanian businesses and supports the State’s core industries to leverage their competitive strengths;

·       provides a range of services that support the growth of Tasmanian business. This includes support for small business through business development services and online tools, and information on starting, running and growing a business; and

·       includes a range of international engagement functions to promote economic growth, including export support, economic diplomacy, international brand building, businesses and skilled migration promotion and Antarctic gateway development. The Trade and International Relations function works across government and industry partners to optimise Tasmania’s international market development across a range of goods and services sectors.

1.3 Skills Development

Skills Tasmania is responsible for:

·       managing Tasmania’s publicly funded training and workforce development system; directing Government training subsidies to training that is relevant to key industries; supports innovation and economic growth; and delivering positive employment outcomes;

·       developing policy and strategy relating to skills and workforce development. This work has two key components: facilitating the delivery of high quality vocational education and training by TasTAFE and other Registered Training Organisations; and working with industry to support workforce development activities that assist Tasmanian enterprises to attract and retain the skilled workers they need to grow and to strategically deploy skills in the workplace to drive business productivity; and

·       managing the regulation of apprenticeships and traineeships, providing support services to RTOs and for the overall management and performance monitoring of the Tasmanian training system.

Table 11.3:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018-19 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue to reduce red tape by progressing the resolution of the priority red tape issues identified in the Annual Red Tape reduction Report1,2,3

Yes/No

na

Yes

Yes

Yes

Investment facilitated by the Office of the Coordinator‑General2,4

$ million

280

306

320

340

International students commencing their studies in Tasmania2

Number

3 182

4 389

4 500

4 700

Supporting access to a skilled workforce through State nomination of skilled migrants2

Number

323

934

1 200

1 500

Grow the value of Tasmania’s premium exports to international markets2,5

$ million

2 460

2 341

2 400

2 500

Provision of information and advisory services to SMEs1,2,6

Number

na

na

4 900

5 090

Policy, project and program advice and implementation meets the expectations of stakeholders1,2,7

Stakeholder feedback survey

na

na

Satisfied

Satisfied

Table 11.3:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018-19 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

VET Graduates employed after training8

% of total

77.6

79.3

78.5

79.0

VET Graduates with improved employment status after training9

% of total

61.2

56.7

62.0

62.0

Apprentice/Trainee commencements10

Number

5 067

4 850

6 500

6 500

Apprentice/Trainee in training11

Number

8 167

7 595

8 400

8 400

Total VET commencements1,2,12

Number

na

na

na

25 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   “na” indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced.

2.   This is a new performance measure in 2018-19.

3.   The Annual Red Tape Reduction Report produced and published each year lists the red tape issues that have been identified for Government to take action on. This includes a list of identified red tape issues. The measures capture the active implementation of those commitments.

4.   This measure includes investment where the Office of the Coordinator-General has had a supporting role in directly engaging with an entity to support new, or to retain, investment in Tasmania; providing facilitation including advice, processes identification and navigation, and supporting engagement with linked parties; and/or by providing recommendations to Government resulting in financial support to facilitate investment.

5.   Premium exports is calculated as total exports less bulk commodities.

6.   This measure captures the number of advice services and assistance packages, provided by Business Tasmania, Enterprise Centres, Digital Ready and, targeted industry-specific grants programs.

7.   Satisfaction and outcomes are measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients. The feedback focuses on the quality, relevance and timeliness of advice.

8.   Graduates employed after training data is sourced from National Centre for Vocational Education Research Limited (NCVER) Student Outcomes Survey 2017, released November 2017. This data relates to graduates from 2016.

9.   Graduates with improved employment status after training data is sourced from NCVER Student Outcomes Survey 2017, released November 2017. Improved employment status after training is employment status changing from not employed before training to employed after training, or employed at a higher skill level after training, or received a job related benefit as reported by the graduate.

10. Apprentice/trainee commencements represents the number of Tasmanian trainees and apprentices who began their apprenticeship or traineeship in the 12 months to 30 June.  Consistent with national trends (although not to the same extent in Tasmania), this number has been trending downward since 2012-13, but is now stabilising.

11. Apprentice/Trainee in training represents the number of Tasmanian Apprentice and Trainees undertaking training as at 30 June. Consistent with national trends (although not to the same extent in Tasmania), this number has been trending downwards since 2012-13, but is now stabilising.

12. Total VET commencements represents the number of Government‑funded Tasmanian program enrolments in a VET course that commenced in the previous calendar year.

Output Group 2:   Infrastructure

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

The Tasmanian Government established Infrastructure Tasmania to provide a coordinated approach to the planning and delivery of all major infrastructure in Tasmania.

Infrastructure Tasmania’s core functions are:

·       assessment and prioritisation of all major publicly funded infrastructure;

·       leading the development of an infrastructure strategy for the State;

 

 

·       coordination of funding submissions under State and Australian Government budget processes, including;

-  the management of Tasmania’s interface with Infrastructure Australia; and

-  provision of advice on a range of infrastructure related issues and initiatives;

·       coordination of strategic infrastructure solutions across all levels of government; and

·       the completion of reviews and investigations at the request of the Government.

2.2 Infrastructure Strategy

This Output delivers effective strategic policy advice on infrastructure and transport issues affecting Tasmania. This includes the development of policy frameworks, high level policy implementation tasks and the coordination of major infrastructure planning initiatives, with a focus on:

·       working with Infrastructure Tasmania to ensure that planning and investment in Tasmania’s transport system is strategic, considered and supportive of industry and community development;

·       developing an understanding of the key issues affecting our transport system and identifying opportunities for positive change;

·       developing strategic transport infrastructure policy frameworks to guide the development of the transport system and enhance the safe and efficient movement of people and freight; and

·       advancing Tasmania’s interests in relation to national transport and infrastructure policy reforms and issues.

2.3 Land Transport Safety

This Output provides the legislation, regulatory policies and practices to support an efficient, safe and reliable land transport system that connects people, enhances visitor experiences and supports state growth, with a focus on:

·       providing strategic road safety policy advice, supporting the Road Safety Advisory Council, encouraging community involvement in road safety, delivering road safety education and awareness programs for Tasmanians and visitors, and administering the School Crossing Patrol Officer program;

·       delivery of all registration and licensing services to the Tasmanian community including, but not limited to, developing and maintaining legislation, business policies, practices and procedures, providing information, collection of fees and delivering services relating to the registration of vehicles and licensing of drivers; and

·       developing, encouraging and enforcing compliance with state-based regulations for roadworthiness, vehicle standards, dimensions and mass limits, loading and operation of vehicles; and undertaking management of approved inspection stations and transport operation schemes.

2.4 Passenger Transport

This Output manages the regulation and delivery of passenger transport services that support the efficient, equitable and appropriate movement of people, including the administration of targeted transport assistance schemes and subsidies for students, the unemployed, aged pensioners and persons living with disability, with a focus on:

·       the sustainable delivery of passenger transport services;

·       administering contracts for the delivery of regular passenger transport services in metropolitan, urban fringe and regional and rural areas; and

·       implementation of initiatives to support the uptake of passenger transport.

2.5 Traffic Management and Engineering Services

This Output delivers cost‑effective safety improvements to reduce the incidence of road crashes and provides specialist, technical traffic management and engineering solutions for the Government and the community. Key projects include delivering specific projects under the auspices of the Towards Zero ‑ Tasmanian Road Safety Strategy 2017‑2026.

Table 11.4:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018-19 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposals assessed by Infrastructure Tasmania within required timeframes1

%

100

100

100

100

Reviews requested by Government completed by Infrastructure Tasmania within required timeframes1

%

100

100

100

100

Provision of effective support to the Government by providing road safety and road transport policy advice and information to enable informed decision making2

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Motor Registry System availability

%

99

99

99

99

Vehicles found to be unregistered of those checked3

%

0.58

0.60

0.65

0.65

Heavy Vehicles found overweight4

%

2.64

3.2

≤5

na

Speed Limit reviews completed within 28 days of request5

%

na

na

80

80

Safety reviews completed within 28 days of request6

%

na

99

80

80

Wheelchair accessible taxis licensed7

Number

83

74

81

81

Average Bus Age on contracted services8

Number

14.1

14.2

16.5

16.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Proposals are publicly‑funded major economic infrastructure proposals. Timeframes will be developed on a case by case basis and documented in Infrastructure Tasmania’s yearly work program.

2.   Satisfaction and outcomes are largely measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office and, where appropriate colleagues and clients. The feedback focuses on the quality, relevance and timeliness of advice.

3.   This measure is based upon Automatic Number Plate Recognition cameras in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding between the Department and the Motor Accidents Insurance Board.

4.   From 2018-19, heavy vehicle compliance and enforcement will become the responsibility of the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator.

5.   Speed is a key factor in road safety and this measure ensures that requests for speed limit reviews are completed in a timely manner. “na” indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced.

6.   The Department receives many requests for safety reviews at junctions and other road locations and this measure reports on the timeliness of the safety assessment and response to request process.

7.   The number of WATS licences on issue diminished in 2016-17, following a review of the licence register which revealed a number of inactive licences.

 


 

8.   This is a measure of the effectiveness of government strategies to ensure that the average age of buses on government contracted services is appropriate. The average bus age on contracted services is expected to increase from 2016-17 levels, as current contracts near the end of their term and operators seek to defer vehicle replacement decisions where possible. It is anticipated the average age will decrease beyond 2018-19, once operators have contract certainty and resume fleet investment.

Output Group 3:   Energy Policy and Advice

3.1 Energy Policy and Advice

This Output provides policy advice and support to the Minister for Energy on matters affecting energy in Tasmania. The aim is to maintain an efficient and effective regulatory structure for the Tasmanian energy sector, for the benefit of Tasmanian energy consumers, with a focus on:

·       implementing the Government’s Tasmanian Energy Strategy and the Tasmanian First Energy policy to ensure energy is well placed to contribute to, and enable, future economic growth in Tasmania;

·       enhancing the framework to support the affordability and sustainability of energy markets and prices in Tasmania;

·       supporting the continuing implementation of reforms to the Tasmanian electricity supply industry;

·       supporting the Minister in his Shareholder Minister responsibilities for the State‑owned electricity businesses;

·       advancing Tasmania's interests in National Energy Market policy reforms and developments;

·       monitoring Tasmania’s energy security and continuing to improve the preparedness to deal with any high impact, low probability supply emergencies; and

·       managing programs and projects related to energy as requested by the Government.

Table 11.5:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018-19 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attend emergency security meetings and participate in emergency exercises at both the state and national level1,2

Number

na

na

2

2

Policy, project and program advice and analysis meets the expectations of stakeholders1,3

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   This is a new performance measure in 2018-19.

2.   The number of meetings that are held and attended each year varies depending on the level of risk and frequency of planned exercises. “na” indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced.

3.   Satisfaction and outcomes are measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients. The feedback focuses on the quality, relevance and timeliness of advice.


 

Output Group 4:   Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

4.1 Forestry Policy and Reform

This Output provides high level support on forest resource policy and management issues. It has a focus on forest policy projects of strategic importance as well as delivery of specific programs to assist the development and growth of the forest industry. The Output facilitates a number of inter‑agency committees relating to forest policy and programs.

4.2 Mineral Resources

This Output facilitates mineral exploration and mining development and fosters and encourages responsible land management in Tasmania, with a focus on:

·       improving the quality and quantity of geoscience information, essential to the encouragement of mineral exploration and responsible land management, including the continued development of the TIGER data management system and a comprehensive three dimensional geological model of the State;

·       promoting Tasmania nationally and internationally as being highly prospective for mineral exploration and mining through targeted and strategic marketing; and

·       providing information for sustainable land use planning and infrastructure development decisions through activities such as geohazard mapping, resource identification to protect against sterilisation and management and rehabilitation of abandoned mining lands.

This Output also ensures the responsible management of the State’s mineral resources and a fair and sustainable return to the community when a resource of metallic, construction, industrial and fuel minerals or geothermal energy is developed. This is achieved by focusing on:

·       assessment and regulation of legal titles for mineral tenements; and

·       managing the royalty regime and collecting fees and rentals.

Under the Mining for Tasmania’s Future Policy, Mineral Resources Tasmania functions and resources have been moved from Rosny to Burnie progressively over the previous term of the Government. In line with the Government’s commitment, the Mornington Core Library and staff who utilise it will not be relocated and the remaining functions and facilities at the Core Library are being improved as part of the initiative. This will ensure that Mineral Resources Tasmania can provide the most effective contribution to managing the State’s extensive minerals and energy resources.

Table 11.6:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018-19 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project management, policy advice and analysis is consistent with client and stakeholder expectations1,2

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Tasmania's percentage of industry's mineral exploration expenditure in Australia3

%

1.3

0.9

1.0

1.3

 


 

Table 11.6:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018-19 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area covered by modern geoscientific data collection techniques with subsequent 1:25 000 geological mapping coverage4,5

%

66.4

73.7

63.8

63.8

Programmed abandoned mining lands rehabilitation projects completed

%

73.6

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   Satisfaction and outcomes are measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients. The feedback focuses on the quality, relevance and timeliness of advice.

2.   This is a new performance measure in 2018-19.

3.   Statistics derived from the first three quarters of each financial year from ABS exploration data. The target for 2017-18 has been revised due to 2016-17 actuals.

4.   The area covered by modern remote sensing data (less than 15 years old) is subject to change. The performance targets are regularly refactored based on area of modern remote sensing data available at a given point in time.

5.   The method used to calculate this performance measure has been altered. The definition of modern remote sensing data is now defined as data created from 1996 onwards. The definition of modern mapping has also been changed to reflect this - modern mapping is now defined as data produced or updated from 1996 onwards. Figures prior to and including ‘2016-17 Actual’ were calculated using a previous method of calculation. Figures for ‘2017-18 Target’ and onwards have been calculated with the new definition and are not directly comparable with earlier figures.

Output Group 5:   Culture and Creative Industries

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

Through the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, this Output aims to increase community understanding of the cultural and natural world by collecting, conserving, interpreting and researching material evidence within the areas of humanities including visual arts, history and anthropology and the biological and physical sciences. It provides the community with opportunities to experience the past and the present, invites participation in the State’s collection and offers a stimulating museum and art environment.

5.2 Arts Industry Development

This Output focuses on working with Tasmanian artists and arts organisations to grow this important industry. It aims to broaden the engagement of Tasmanians in the arts, highlight the State’s diverse arts and cultural sector and build the sustainability of arts businesses. This is achieved through a range of industry development programs and projects, coupled with the provision of funding to individual artists, arts organisations and major Tasmanian cultural institutions to assist their planning and realisation of projects, as well as to develop and present new work. These projects generate economic activity, create employment opportunities and add to our terrific array of cultural tourist attractions. The Output also includes investment funding and professional assistance to Tasmanian museums (other than TMAG), art galleries and moveable cultural heritage organisations, as a key part of the Government’s ongoing support for the preservation of the State’s moveable cultural heritage.


 

5.3 Screen Industry Development

This Output aims to build on the success that has occurred in the sector through increased local, interstate and international screen production in this State. It also provides support for professional and project development, and the development of interactive games. In doing so, it seeks to promote Tasmanian talent and stories to a world‑wide audience. This Output also aims to position Tasmania as a centre for the creation and development of quality content in the digital media environment as an important part of the growing creative industries sector.

5.4 Events and Hospitality

This Output aims to build and sustain a strong events sector, promote investment and support for the sector, and maximise the value and return on investment of events supported by the Government through major event partnerships, grant and development programs, and a research program. The aim is to develop a seasonally balanced events portfolio that brings people to Tasmania; helps achieve the Government’s goal of 1.5 million tourists by 2020; builds the visitor economy; gets people moving around the State; encourages positive conversation about Tasmania; creates job opportunities; benefits communities through economic stimulus; and makes Tasmania the boutique events capital of Australia. This Output also includes oversight of Princes Wharf No. 1 Shed, a key event venue on the Hobart waterfront.

This Output also supports hospitality industry development through working closely with the Tasmanian Hospitality Association to address key issues facing the industry. This includes collaboration with Output 1.3 to support skills and capability development, career pathways, recruitment and retention, and providing consistent high quality service. This Output also supports raising the industry profile and improving profitability and sustainability.

Table 11.7:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 5

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018-19 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

 

 

 

 

 

TMAG Total Visitors1

Number

1 220/day

415 172 pa

366 750 pa

375 000 pa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts Industry Development

 

 

 

 

 

Attendance at selected cultural venues2

Number

243 527

282 456

290 000

290 000

Contribution to Gross State Product of selected arts industries

$ million

65.0

61.0

70.0

71.0

Attendance at selected performing arts events

Number

243 527

282 456

282 456

282 456

Number of artists, arts and museum-workers supported3

Number

na

na

na

na

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screen Industry Development

 

 

 

 

 

Developed projects that advance into production4

Ratio

6.5:1

6:1

10:1

8:1

Leveraged spend in the State

Ratio

8.25:1

5:65

4:1

4:1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.   TMAG was open six days a week in 2015-16. The average daily number of visitors was up by 11 percent from the previous year. Total visitation to TMAG’s site on Hobart’s waterfront was also up at 383 026 visitors, an increase of 6 percent from the previous year. Due to a change in methodology, aimed at capturing total visitations per annum, the target for 2017-18 will move to an annual figure, rather than a daily target. Using this methodology the target for 2016‑17 would be 366 750 visits per annum.

2.   Attendance at selected cultural venues includes only those organisations receiving assistance under the Museums, Art Galleries and Heritage Organisations funding program of Arts Tasmania. This program was replaced by the Cultural Heritage Program in 2016-17. The 2017-18 target was revised due to the increase in attendance in 2016-17.

3.   This is a new measure and replaces ABS data Participation in Selected Cultural Activities, Australia (Cat. No. 4921.0) which is captured triennially. Baseline data collected during 2016-17 will inform the development of performance targets. Collection methodology of data for this indicator is in development as part of KPI review of acquittal data, with the first figures to be available in 2019‑20.

4.   The industry standard ratio for developed projects advancing into production is 10:1. The ratio varies because of the time taken by some projects to go into production, and because of that time, this ratio has been taken over three years.

Output Group 6:   Subsidies and Concessions

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

This Output relates to payments for the provision of services for the Bruny Island Ferry, Furneaux Shipping and King Island Shipping.

6.2 Metropolitan General Access Regular Passenger Transport Services

This Output relates to the contract funding provided to suppliers of public bus services, including school‑day‑only services in the metropolitan areas of Hobart, Launceston, Devonport and Burnie.

6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services

This Output relates to contract payments to suppliers of rural and special needs school bus services during the school year.

6.4 Non‑Metropolitan General Access Regular Passenger Transport Services

This Output relates to contract funding provided to suppliers of public bus services outside the metropolitan areas of Hobart, Launceston, Devonport and Burnie but includes services to, from and between the metropolitan areas.

6.5 Construction of Streets in Towns

This Output contributes to the construction of streets as provided under the Local Government (Highways) Act 1982 and the Local Government Act 1993.


Capital Investment Program

Table 11.8 provides financial information for the Department’s Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 11.8:           Capital Investment Program1,2

 

Estimated 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Infrastructure Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

Extending the Great Eastern Drive - Binalong Bay Road3

4 500

.... 

2 000 

2 500 

.... 

Greater Hobart Traffic Vision3,4

73 775

3 325 

6 250 

7 600 

13 600 

Launceston and Tamar Valley Traffic Vision3,4

75 080

2 180 

4 700 

7 700 

20 500 

New Bridgewater Bridge3,4,5

576 000

6 000 

27 000 

33 000 

55 000 

Roads of Strategic Importance4,5

400 000

10 000 

20 000 

20 000 

50 000 

Roads Package to Support Tasmania's Visitor Economy3,4

66 067

7 150 

14 750 

16 017 

13 817 

South East Traffic Solution3,4

27 000

1 050 

5 700 

8 750 

5 500 

State Road Upgrades - North West and West Coast Region3,4

50 050

4 350 

4 250 

6 250 

9 250 

State Road Upgrades - Northern Region3,4,6

54 182

4 150 

7 000 

17 332 

14 467 

State Road Upgrades - Southern Region3,4,6

99 837

11 750 

14 220 

12 517 

13 217 

Tourism Journeys3

800

800 

.... 

.... 

.... 

West Tamar Highway Traffic Solution3

12 000

1 750 

5 600 

3 650 

1 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing Infrastructure Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

Asset Management

Ongoing

5 663 

5 783 

5 933 

6 102 

Bass Highway - Birralee to Exton

9 600

1 467 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Bass Highway - Wynyard

2 875

2 300 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Bridge Renewal Program

Ongoing

490 

870 

.... 

.... 

Bridge Strengthening on Esk and Tamar

Highways

10 000

4 100 

4 900 

.... 

.... 

Bridport Western Access Road5

2 900

380 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Brooker Highway - Elwick, Goodwood,

Howard Roads5

32 000

.... 

.... 

1 500 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 11.8:           Capital Investment Program (continued)1,2

 

Estimated 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colebrook Main Road

6 500

2 998 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Domain Highway Planning5

5 000

4 337 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Environmental Management

Ongoing

585 

599 

615 

633 

Esk Main Road

13 000

4 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Freight Access Bridge Upgrades

19 050

5 350 

4 400 

4 500 

.... 

Great Eastern Drive

6 300

3 000 

3 000 

.... 

.... 

Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity

Ongoing

820 

860 

.... 

.... 

Highland Lakes Road5

9 000

2 500 

100 

.... 

.... 

Hobart Airport Interchange5,7

30 000

25 000 

2 000 

.... 

.... 

Infrastructure Development5,7

Ongoing

3 912 

1 005 

1 023 

1 055 

Infrastructure Maintenance5,7

Ongoing

69 850 

71 051 

72 840 

69 121 

Launceston Northbank

1 350

675 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Midland Highway5,6

450 000

100 164 

41 034 

5 067 

1 471 

Mowbray Connector

7 000

6 500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Murchison Highway5

8 000

2 311 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Program Management

Ongoing

1 213 

1 247 

1 282 

1 322 

Real-Time Traffic Congestion Management in Hobart

1 800

640 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Road Safety and Traffic Management5,8

Ongoing

12 970 

13 091 

13 454 

13 647 

Strategic Planning and Policy

Ongoing

2 970 

3 026 

3 099 

3 181 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

A Workforce for Now and the Future

200

50 

50 

50 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

316 750 

264 486 

244 679 

292 883 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The profile of funding for the CIP varies significantly from year to year due to the cash flow requirements of specific capital projects.

2.   All roads project estimates are provided at the ‘P50’ level. This is based on the project cost with sufficient contingency to provide a 50 percent likelihood that this cost will not be exceeded. On this basis projects are managed at a whole of program level to achieve a balance in cost estimating.

3.   Funding for these projects is part of the State Government’s 2018 election commitments.

4.   This project includes funding beyond the 2018-19 Budget and Forward Estimates period.

5.   This project includes funding from the Australian Government. For further information, refer to chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

6.   The State Government’s contribution to the Midland Highway has now been incorporated into the State Road Upgrades ‑ Southern Region and State Road Upgrades ‑ Northern Region.

7.   The Australian Government committed funding for a number of local government roads as part of its 2016 election commitments. This funding is provided to the relevant council via the State Government.

8.   This project includes funding from the Road Safety Levy.

Roads and Rail

Funding of $316.8 million has been allocated in 2018‑19 for roads infrastructure projects, with total roads funding over the Budget and Forward Estimates period estimated at $1.1 billion, including $406.4 million in Australian Government funding.

In addition, the Government has committed funding of $8.1 million for rail infrastructure in the 2018‑19 Budget for Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd with total rail funding over the Budget and Forward Estimates period of $135.4 million, including $58.2 million in Australian Government rail funding. Under the Tasmanian Rail Revitalisation Program, both the State and Australian Government funding is provided as equity to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd via Finance-General.

As part of the 2017-18 Budget, the Tasmanian Government committed additional funding of $59.8 million over a further four years, commencing in 2019‑20, in order to facilitate the second Tranche of the Program, dependent on a matching contribution from the Australian Government. The Australian Government, through its 2018-19 Budget, has also now committed to fund an additional $59.8 million for the second Tranche of the Tasmanian Rail Revitalisation Program. The combined Tasmanian and Australian Government funding under the second Tranche of the Program over an additional four year period will build on Tranche one, upgrading priority sections of the State’s freight rail network, with all key rail freight corridors benefitting from this investment.

From 2018-19, road investment will be managed under separate programs of work to allow greatest flexibility in delivery of projects, adjusting to stakeholder feedback and approvals timeframes. Specific programs in 2018-19 include:

·       Greater Hobart Traffic Vision;

·       Launceston and Tamar Valley Traffic Vision;

·       Roads Package to Support Tasmania’s Visitor Economy;

·       A South East Traffic Solution roads package;

·       A West Tamar Highway Traffic Solutions;

·       State Roads Upgrades ‑ Northern Region;

·       State Roads Upgrades ‑ North West and West Coast Regions; and

·       State Roads Upgrades ‑ Southern Region.

For more information in relation to the Roads Program see chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.


Detailed Budget Statements

Table 11.9:              Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - recurrent1

318 047 

329 914 

346 546 

282 276 

279 846 

Appropriation revenue - works & services2

128 038 

154 175 

161 098 

175 205 

193 259 

Grants3

160 612 

163 338 

102 824 

63 040 

93 190 

Sales of goods and services

4 255 

4 255 

4 255 

4 255 

4 255 

Fees and fines

13 644 

14 012 

14 476 

14 862 

14 862 

Interest

2 380 

2 380 

2 380 

2 380 

2 380 

Other revenue

1 972 

1 972 

2 172 

1 972 

1 972 

Total revenue and other income from transactions

628 948 

670 046 

633 751 

543 990 

589 764 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

63 390 

65 779 

64 121 

65 318 

65 875 

Depreciation and amortisation

88 860 

89 055 

89 280 

89 505 

89 280 

Supplies and consumables

101 802 

102 366 

98 925 

97 524 

94 424 

Grants and subsidies4

251 045 

256 869 

273 138 

203 472 

201 826 

Borrowing costs

1 670 

1 670 

1 670 

1 670 

1 670 

Other expenses5

7 752 

6 078 

527 

531 

536 

Total expenses from transactions

514 519 

521 817 

527 661 

458 020 

453 611 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

114 429 

148 229 

106 090 

85 970 

136 153 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

Net gain/(loss) on non-financial assets

Total other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

114 433 

148 233 

106 094 

85 974 

136 157 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows - other non-owner changes in

equity

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

Total other economic flows - other non-owner

changes in equity

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

264 380

298 180

256 041

235 921

286 104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The variations in Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent primarily reflect the cash flow of election commitments as well as the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative projects.

2.   The variations in Appropriation revenue ‑ works & services primarily reflect additional election commitments funding provided for the Capital Investment Program.  Refer to Table 11.8 for further information on capital projects.

3.   The profile of Grants revenue funding over the Forward Estimates reflects cash flows for Australian Government receipts, in particular relating to the CIP.

4.   The variations in Grants and subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily reflect the cash flow of election commitments as well as the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative projects.

5.   The decrease in Other Expenses in 2019-20 primarily reflects cash flows for Australian Government infrastructure funding that is not capitalised.

 

Table 11.10:               Statement of Comprehensive Income - Administered

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions1

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - recurrent

66 771 

64 840 

64 938 

66 551 

67 619 

Grants

310 

542 

80 

80 

80 

Taxation

42 100 

43 784 

45 535 

47 356 

49 251 

Sales of goods and services

5 220 

5 315 

5 413 

5 513 

5 625 

Fees and fines

9 821 

9 978 

10 135 

10 278 

10 537 

Other revenue

42 333 

34 108 

34 608 

28 108 

23 108 

Total revenue and other income from transactions

166 555 

158 567 

160 709 

157 886 

156 220 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions2

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

230 

462 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Supplies and consumables

136 

136 

136 

136 

136 

Grants and subsidies

66 635 

64 704 

64 802 

66 415 

67 483 

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund

99 554 

93 265 

95 771 

91 335 

88 601 

Total expenses from transactions

166 555 

158 567 

160 709 

157 886 

156 220 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The variations in Revenue and other income from transactions are detailed in Table 11.12 Administered Revenue.

2.   The variations in Expenses from transactions are detailed in Table 11.13 Administered Expenses

 

 


 

Table 11.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 - Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

2.2 Infrastructure Strategy1

2 108 

1 133 

359 

214 

220 

2.3 Land Transport Safety2

11 839 

14 145 

14 351 

14 686 

15 054 

2.4 Passenger Transport

2 896 

3 256 

3 054 

3 126 

3 205 

2.5 Traffic Management and Engineering Services

3 907 

3 730 

3 320 

3 384 

3 456 

 

21 550 

23 064 

21 884 

22 210 

22 735 

Output Group 6 - Subsidies and Concessions

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

1 100 

1 133 

1 167 

1 202 

1 242 

6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services

40 110 

41 313 

42 552 

43 829 

45 295 

6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services

24 432 

25 165 

25 920 

26 698 

27 591 

6.4 Non-Metropolitan General Access Services

7 826 

7 826 

7 626 

7 626 

7 626 

 

73 468 

75 437 

77 265 

79 355 

81 754 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

48 276 

45 578 

45 574 

47 085 

48 110 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program3

127 988 

154 125 

161 048 

175 155 

193 259 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

143 294 

144 079 

144 723 

148 650 

152 599 

Works and Services

127 988 

154 125 

161 048 

175 155 

193 259 

 

271 282 

298 204 

305 771 

323 805 

345 858 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.3 Skills Development4,5

103 132 

113 135 

117 389 

107 707 

108 283 

 

103 132 

113 135 

117 389 

107 707 

108 283 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

50 

50 

50 

50 

…. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

103 132 

113 135 

117 389 

107 707 

108 283 

Works and Services

50 

50 

50 

50 

…. 

 

103 182 

113 185 

117 439 

107 757 

108 283 


 

Table 11.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Energy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 - Energy Policy and Advice

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Energy Policy and Advice6

1 970 

2 854 

1 743 

1 784 

1 829 

 

1 970 

2 854 

1 743 

1 784 

1 829 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

1 970 

2 854 

1 743 

1 784 

1 829 

 

1 970 

2 854 

1 743 

1 784 

1 829 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and

Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Coordinator-General7

18 573 

23 518 

54 343 

5 983 

5 588 

1.2 Industry and Business Development8,9

54 727 

41 343 

29 022 

22 444 

20 307 

 

73 300 

64 861 

83 365 

28 427 

25 895 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

73 300 

64 861 

83 365 

28 427 

25 895 

 

73 300 

64 861 

83 365 

28 427 

25 895 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 - Resources Policy and Regulatory

Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Forestry Policy and Reform

1 495 

1 535 

1 548 

1 573 

1 100 

4.2 Mineral Resources10

9 038 

10 725 

7 742 

7 062 

7 025 

 

10 533 

12 260 

9 290 

8 635 

8 125 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

15 023 

15 086 

15 148 

15 210 

15 210 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

25 556 

27 346 

24 438 

23 845 

23 335 

 

25 556 

27 346 

24 438 

23 845 

23 335 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 11.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.4 Events and Hospitality11

14 272 

18 948 

16 380 

14 659 

12 419 

 

14 272 

18 948 

16 380 

14 659 

12 419 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

14 272 

18 948 

16 380 

14 659 

12 419 

 

14 272 

18 948 

16 380 

14 659 

12 419 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery12

10 296 

9 485 

9 967 

10 194 

9 946 

5.2 Arts Industry Development13

7 390 

6 982 

7 064 

7 085 

7 116 

5.3 Screen Industry Development14

2 084 

2 836 

2 147 

2 168 

1 692 

 

19 770 

19 303 

19 178 

19 447 

18 754 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

3 472 

4 176 

4 216 

4 256 

4 299 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

23 242 

23 479 

23 394 

23 703 

23 053 

 

23 242 

23 479 

23 394 

23 703 

23 053 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

Total Recurrent Services

384 766 

394 702 

411 432 

348 775 

347 413 

Total Works and Services

128 038 

154 175 

161 098 

175 205 

193 259 

 

512 804 

548 877 

572 530 

523 980 

540 672 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserved by Law

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution towards Construction of Streets in Towns

by Municipal Councils (Local Government Act

1993)

52 

52 

52 

52 

52 

 

52 

52 

52 

52 

52 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

512 856 

548 929 

572 582 

524 032 

540 724 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

446 085 

484 089 

507 644 

457 481 

473 105 

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

66 771 

64 840 

64 938 

66 551 

67 619 

 

512 856 

548 929 

572 582 

524 032 

540 724 

 

Notes:

1.   The variations in Infrastructure Strategy reflect the cash flow of the 2014 election commitment for Kings Meadows Flood Protection and the 2017‑18 Budget Initiative Forward Planning for Roads (including Launceston Traffic Planning).

2.   The increase in Land Transport Safety in 2018‑19 primarily reflects a redistribution of corporate overheads across departmental Outputs.

3.   The increase in the Capital Investment Program primarily reflects additional funding for election commitments including: Greater Hobart Traffic Vision; Launceston and Tamar Valley Traffic Vision; Roads Package to Support Tasmania’s Visitor Economy; South East Traffic Solution; State Road Upgrades ‑ Northern Region; State Road Upgrades ‑ North West and West Coast Region; State Road Upgrades ‑ Southern Region; and West Tamar Highway Traffic Solution.

4.   The variations in Skills Development primarily reflect the cash flows of election commitments including grants to TasTAFE for the Agriculture Centre of Excellence, Drysdale extension at Claremont College and Devonport and Trades and Water Centre of Excellence.

5.   In 2018-19 funding of $84.92 million will be provided as a grant to TasTAFE to support training activity and operations. This gives effect to the Government’s commitment to ensure a minimum 70 per cent of training funding is provided to TasTAFE.

6.   The decrease in Energy Policy and Advice in 2019-20 primarily reflects the cessation of funding for the Advancing the Case for a Nationally Funded Second Interconnector 2014 election commitment.

7.   The increases in Coordinator‑General in 2018‑19 and 2019‑20 reflects additional funding for Industry Assistance Grants and the cash flow of Northern Cities Major Development Initiative. This Output also includes funding for Enterprize Hubs, which is the responsibility of the Minister for Science and Technology.

8.   The decrease in Industry and Business Development in 2018-19 primarily reflects the cash flow of prior year initiatives and other key deliverables including: The Community Infrastructure Fund; Employment Partnership: Jobs Action Package; Population Growth Strategy; Growing the Visitor Economy; and The Hedberg.

9.   This Output also includes funding that relates to strategies and activities that are the responsibility of the Ministers for Advanced Manufacturing and Defence Industries, Science and Technology and Trade.

10. The variations in Mineral Resources reflect additional funding for the Mining Exploration Grants Program and the cash flow of the commitment for the relocation of Mineral Resources Tasmania to Burnie.

11. The increase in Events and Hospitality primarily reflects additional funding for election commitments including:  Event Attraction Fund; Great Customer Experience; Reimagining the Gorge; and Tasmanian Hospitality Association Workforce Development.

12. The decrease in Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery in 2018-19 primarily reflects the cash flow of Organisation Reform funding, the increase in 2019-20 reflects additional funding for the Permanent Children’s Exhibition at TMAG.

13. The decrease in Arts Industry Development in 2018‑19 primarily reflects a redistribution of corporate overheads across departmental Outputs

14. The increase in Screen Industry Development in 2018-19 reflects additional funding for the Screen Innovation Fund.

 

 


18.         

 

Table 11.12:        Administered Revenue

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Consolidated

Fund

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth Capital Grants

80 

80 

80 

80 

80 

Drivers Licences

6 970 

7 090 

7 210 

7 319 

7 520 

Fines

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

MAIB Commission

2 525 

2 588 

2 653 

2 719 

2 794 

Motor Vehicle Taxes and Fees

42 100 

43 784 

45 535 

47 356 

49 251 

Other Revenue1

1 213 

Other Sales of Services

2 208 

2 229 

2 250 

2 272 

2 296 

Personalised and Custom Plates

454 

465 

477 

489 

502 

Photo Licence Fees

1 720 

1 750 

1 780 

1 807 

1 857 

Regulatory Fees

1 072 

1 078 

1 084 

1 090 

1 097 

Royalty Income2

41 120 

34 100 

34 600 

28 100 

23 100 

Sales of Goods

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

Vehicle Inspection Services Fees

47 

48 

49 

50 

51 

 

99 554 

93 265 

95 771 

91 335 

88 601 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation

66 771 

64 840 

64 938 

66 551 

67 619 

 

66 771 

64 840 

64 938 

66 551 

67 619 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth Recurrent Grants3

230 

462 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

230 

462 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

166 555 

158 567 

160 709 

157 886 

156 220 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.   The decrease in Other Revenue in 2018-19 reflects the cessation of payments from the Tasmanian Risk Management Fund in relation to the June 2016 flood event that resulted in road and bridge damage.

2.   The decrease in Royalty income from 2018-19 reflects an adjusted forecast based on information from mining companies about expected Royalty payments, analysis of commodity prices and 2017-18 receipts.

3.   The decrease in 2019-20 for Commonwealth Recurrent Grants reflects the cessation of Australian Government funding for Exporter Assistance.

 

 


 

Table 11.13:        Administered Expenses

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution to Marine and Safety Authority1

1 603 

2 613 

1 793 

2 463 

2 523 

Conveyance Allowance

1 630 

1 630 

1 630 

1 630 

1 630 

Exporter Assistance2

230 

462 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Sustainable Timber Tasmania CSO

12 000 

12 000 

12 000 

12 000 

12 000 

Government Contribution to the Tasmanian Symphony

Orchestra

1 519 

1 519 

1 519 

1 519 

1 519 

National Transport Commission: Local

Government Contribution

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

Payments for Forest Practices Authority

1 473 

1 503 

1 533 

1 563 

1 563 

Pensioner Air Travel Subsidy

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

Private Forests Tasmania

1 550 

1 583 

1 615 

1 647 

1 647 

Student-Only Passenger Services

26 415 

27 207 

28 023 

28 864 

29 829 

Tasmanian Icon Program - Tasmanian Symphony

Orchestra

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd3

8 100 

8 100 

8 100 

8 100 

8 100 

Ten Days on the Island

1 275 

1 301 

1 327 

1 354 

1 383 

Theatre Royal4

178 

856 

870 

883 

897 

Transport Access Scheme

4 518 

4 518 

4 518 

4 518 

4 518 

West Coast Wilderness Railway5

4 500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

67 001 

65 302 

64 938 

66 551 

67 619 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Consolidated Fund

99 554 

93 265 

95 771 

91 335 

88 601 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

166 555 

158 567 

160 709 

157 886 

156 220 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in 2018-19 reflects Taking Recreational Boating and Fishing to the Next Level.

2.    The decrease in 2019-20 for Exporter Assistance relates to the cessation of Australian Government funding.

3.    From 2018-19, funding for the State Government component of the Tasmanian Rail Revitalisation Program will now be provided as an equity contribution through Finance‑General.

4.    The increase in 2018-19 for Theatre Royal reflects additional funds to support the Theatre Royal Management Board in meeting costs associated with the construction and operation of the new $96 million creative industries and performing arts development, The Hedberg. 

5.    The reduction in 2018‑19 reflects the completion of the Government’s current funding agreement for the West Coast Wilderness Railway. The Railway’s current financial projections and passenger demand forecasts indicate that they have cash reserves to maintain Railway operations over the short to medium term.


 

Contribution to Marine and Safety Tasmania

This contribution supports Marine and Safety Tasmania in carrying out its functions of managing the Government’s non‑commercial marine facilities and Tasmania’s marine regulatory environment. The 2018‑19 Budget reflects additional funding of $4.8 million over the Forward Estimates for Taking Recreational Boating and Fishing to the Next Level.

Conveyance Allowance

The Department administers allowances paid to parents and guardians of students who do not have access to Government subsidised public passenger transport services for travel to and from school. It is intended to assist with the cost of providing private transport to the nearest bus stop or school. Allowances are also paid to Bass Strait Islands residents to assist with the cost of flights and ground travel to mainland Tasmania to access education.

Sustainable Timber Tasmania CSO (Non‑commercial and Roads)

This provision will ensure that permanent timber production zone land continues to be managed and is accessible and available for multiple uses. It includes funding for maintenance of the forestry road network to allow for continued community, tourism and firefighting access, management of public recreation sites, provision of forest education activities, special species timber management and ongoing facilitation of forestry research.

Government Contribution to the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

The Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, one of the world’s finest small orchestras, continues to receive State Government support. The TSO plays to audiences throughout the State and its award‑winning recordings are heard throughout the world. A versatile orchestra, the TSO is renowned for its expertise in music of the classical and early romantic periods, and is recognised internationally as a champion of Australian music.

National Transport Commission: Local Government Contribution

Under the reform measures that abolished local road tolls in favour of national heavy vehicle charges, $1.5 million is provided annually from motor tax receipts to local government to compensate for loss of revenues from heavy vehicles.

Payment for Forest Practices Authority

This payment represents the Government’s contribution to the Forest Practices Authority. The role of the FPA is to advance the objective of the State’s forest practices system and to foster a cooperative approach towards policy implementation and management.

Pensioner Air Travel Subsidy

Aged pensioner residents of the Bass Strait Islands are entitled to an air fare subsidy when travelling between the Bass Strait Islands and Northern Tasmania. The subsidy is a 50 per cent concession on one return airfare from their Island residence to Northern Tasmania each financial year.

Private Forests Tasmania

This payment represents the Government’s contribution to Private Forests Tasmania. The role of PFT is to facilitate and expand the development of the private forest resource in Tasmania in a manner that is consistent with sound forest land management practice.

Student‑Only Passenger Services

This Output relates to contract payments to suppliers of fare charging student-only bus services during the school year.

Tasmanian Icon Program ‑ Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

The Tasmanian Icon Program is designed to utilise world‑class Tasmanian talent to promote the State both nationally and internationally. Currently, funded icons are the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, Menzies Institute for Medical Research and the Tasmanian Tigers State Cricket Team (the latter two being funded through other agencies).

Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd

This payment represents the Government’s grant contribution to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd. The payment allows TasRail to manage, maintain and operate the Tasmanian rail network on a sustainable basis, and also provides for critical annual maintenance of rolling stock assets.

Ten Days on the Island

Ten Days on the Island is Tasmania’s premier arts festival. The Government will continue to support Ten Days on the Island to deliver a festival of excellence with a particular focus on regional Tasmania.

Theatre Royal

The Theatre Royal is Australia’s oldest continually operating theatre. The Government’s commitment in funding the Theatre Royal recognises the Theatre Royal as a significant piece of Tasmania's history and a centre for the performing arts.

Transport Access Scheme

The Scheme provides for payments to operators of taxis including wheelchair accessible taxis to support fare concessions and subsidies made available to eligible persons with permanent disabilities or medical conditions that significantly restrict their personal mobility.

West Coast Wilderness Railway

The West Coast Wilderness Railway is an iconic West Coast attraction that helps attract visitors to the region and Queenstown. This funding supported capital works and the maintenance of the Railway’s operations.


 

Table 11.14:        Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2018 

2019 

2020 

2021 

2022 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

73 176 

58 651 

54 644 

54 809 

57 822 

Investments2

36 282 

89 915 

86 115 

79 815 

77 315 

Receivables

5 577 

6 625 

6 621 

6 617 

6 613 

Equity investments

50 

50 

75 

100 

125 

Other financial assets

114 

125 

125 

125 

125 

 

115 199 

155 366 

147 580 

141 466 

142 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories

331 

349 

359 

369 

379 

Property, plant and equipment3

169 897 

179 777 

181 478 

183 179 

184 819 

Infrastructure3

4 498 194 

4 800 918 

5 045 756 

5 269 664 

5 543 455 

Heritage and cultural assets

428 159 

428 744 

438 884 

449 024 

459 164 

Investment property

586 

586 

879 

1 172 

1 465 

Intangibles3

3 002 

1 222 

811 

400 

.... 

Other assets3

1 873 

12 739 

12 823 

12 907 

12 991 

 

5 102 042 

5 424 335 

5 680 990 

5 916 715 

6 202 273 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

5 217 241 

5 579 701 

5 828 570 

6 058 181 

6 344 273 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

10 916 

9 097 

9 215 

9 333 

9 451 

Interest bearing liabilities4

47 586 

84 116 

76 486 

69 718 

69 248 

Provisions

3 678 

2 514 

2 474 

2 434 

2 394 

Employee benefits3

18 227 

20 055 

20 475 

20 895 

2