6     Department of Justice

Agency Outline

The Department of Justice provides services that contribute to achieving a fair, just and safe Tasmania by providing an accessible system of justice, protecting and respecting rights, improving laws, influencing positive behaviour and enforcing responsibilities.

The Department is responsible to: the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice, and Minister for Corrections, Hon Elise Archer MP; the Minister for Building and Construction, Hon Guy Barnett MP; the Minister for Planning, Hon Roger Jaensch MP; and the Treasurer, Hon Peter Gutwein MP.

The Department provides administrative support for: the Supreme and Magistrates Courts; Tasmanian Industrial Commission; Legal Aid Commission of Tasmania; Tasmanian Electoral Commission; Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Tribunal; WorkCover Tasmania Board; Guardianship and Administration Board; Mental Health Tribunal; Parole Board of Tasmania; Resource Management and Planning Appeal Tribunal; and the Tasmanian Planning Commission. It also supports the statutory offices of the Solicitor‑General; Director of Public Prosecutions; Public Guardian; and the Anti-Discrimination Commissioner. Each of these areas has separate accountability arrangements.

The Department comprises: Corrective Services; Crown Law; the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages; WorkSafe Tasmania; Consumer, Building and Occupational Services; Monetary Penalties Enforcement Service; Victims Support Services; Strategic Legislation and Policy; Planning Policy Unit; Corporate Support and Strategy; and the Office of the Secretary.

By working closely with the community, other parts of government and relevant statutory bodies, the Department aims to:

·       support Ministers by providing honest, comprehensive, accurate and timely advice;

·       administer and develop courts, tribunals, statutory and regulatory bodies that promote, protect and enforce laws;

·       inform the community about laws, rights and responsibilities;

·       undertake law and policy development;

·       support the community to achieve effective outcomes in the justice system;

·       provide a sustainable, safe, secure, humane and effective corrections system; and

·       ensure all aspects of the Department’s activities are conducted effectively, efficiently and safely.

This chapter provides the Department’s financial information for 2018-19 and over the Forward Estimates period (2019-20 to 2021-22). Further information on the Department is available at www.justice.tas.gov.au.


Key Deliverables

The Government has committed to a series of policies and legislative reform to keep the community safe and free from the impact of crime, and to provide important redress to the victims of Institutional Child Sexual Abuse in Tasmania. The Department is working to implement this agenda.

Table 6.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimate allocations for key deliverables.

Table 6.1:         Key Deliverables Statement

 

2018-19

 

Budget

2019-20

Forward

Estimate

2020-21

Forward

Estimate

2021-22

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

2018 Election Commitments

 

 

 

 

An Upgraded Burnie Court Complex

....

1 000

3 000

4 000

Chatter Matters Pilot Program

150

....

....

....

Law and Order Legislative Reforms1

....

....

....

....

New Northern Prison

....

5 000

10 000

30 000

New Southern Remand Centre

10 000

35 000

25 000

....

Risdon Prison Shared Facilities Upgrade

....

....

....

9 340

 

 

 

 

 

Other Commitments

 

 

 

 

Alternative Sentencing Options

4 300

4 300

4 300

4 300

Court Security and Prisoner Transport

789

789

789

789

Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse

25 000

5 000

5 000

5 000

Additional Tasmania Prison Service Funding

4 000

4 000

4 000

4 000

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The Law and Order Legislative Reform package will be funded from existing Departmental resources.

An Upgraded Burnie Court Complex

Funding of $15 million over four years from 2019-20 has been provided to upgrade the Burnie Magistrates and Supreme Court Complex. The upgrade works will:

·       enable the long term continuation of magistrate and supreme court services in Burnie;

·       improve safety and amenity for court users;

·       improve disability access;

·       enable the essential functional requirements of a modern court facility; and

·       ensure the building is fit for purpose.

These upgrades will ensure that the Burnie Court Complex can continue to provide efficient and effective access to justice and service the region well into the future.


 

Chatter Matters Pilot Program

Funding of $150 000 in 2018-19 has been provided to deliver a pilot Chatter Matters program to prisoners in Tasmania. Chatter Matters Tasmania was developed by Rosalie Martin (2017 Tasmanian Australian of the Year) and uses evidence-based practices to improve literacy, support positive interpersonal interaction and communication skills, and teach participants skills for developing secure attachment with their children.

The Chatter Matters program will assist prisoners to strengthen vital bonds with family and to improve their rehabilitation with the aim of reducing their likelihood of re‑offending after release.

Chatter Matters will also provide training to Tasmania Prison Service staff to assist their communication and interaction with prisoners.

Law and Order Legislative Reforms

The Government has committed to a number of legislative reforms across Justice Ministerial portfolios, including:

Minister for Building and Construction

·       committing to a series of measures to address the issue of shoplifting; and

·       amending the Workplaces (Protection from Protesters) Act to support the rights of workers.

Attorney-General and Minister for Justice

·       creating new legislation to ensure violent offenders engaging in ‘one punch’ incidents, that cause the death of another, will always be criminally responsible for the consequences of their actions. These changes will be undertaken along with a review of existing provisions in the Sentencing Act 1997 that give courts the power to ban offenders from certain areas;

·       creating a new offence of ‘persistent family violence’;

·       amending Tasmania’s dangerous criminal declaration legislation to streamline, with appropriate safeguards, the dangerous criminal declaration process and introduce a second tier declaration for dangerous criminals, who will be subject to intensive monitoring post-release;

·       re-introducing legislation to require courts to impose mandatory sentences of imprisonment for serious sexual offences against children, and for serious assaults on frontline workers;

·       reforming bail laws in Tasmania; and

·       amending the Criminal Code 1924 to allow the prosecution of cyberbullies.

Minister for Corrections

·       legislating to ensure a member with policing experience is represented on the Parole Board; and

·       abolishing remission for prisoners.

The work to prepare these legislative reforms will be delivered by existing resources within the Department’s Strategic Legislation and Policy unit.

New Prison Infrastructure

The Government has committed to funding several significant prison infrastructure projects to increase prison capacity and upgrade existing facilities to meet modern correctional standards.

New Northern Prison

Funding of $270 million over 10 years has been announced to commence construction of a new Northern Prison. The prison will be built in two stages, with $150 million allocated for Stage 1 Northern Remand Centre and $120 million for stage 2 of the prison. Consultation with northern communities will commence in 2018-19 and construction of stage 1 is expected to commence in the 2019-20 financial year and will be completed within five years, with Stage 2 works to follow thereafter.

The Northern Prison will ultimately provide accommodation for a variety of security classifications, remand facilities, and a women’s prison. The Northern Prison will not only relieve pressure on the Risdon facility, but will also be designed to create increased opportunities for prisoners to find meaningful work on release, and importantly provide improved family connections for Northern prisoners.

New Southern Remand Centre

Funding of $70 million over three years will be provided to build a new remand facility on the Risdon Prison site.

The new remand facility will be incorporated into the existing network of secure walkways within the Risdon Prison Complex, with the main connection located near the existing Visits Building.

Risdon Prison Shared Facilities Upgrade

Funding of $9.3 million has been provided to upgrade shared facilities at the Risdon Prison to meet increased service demands. Upgrades will include the construction of:

·       an upgraded and expanded gatehouse;

·       an upgraded and expanded medical/health centre;

·       a new kitchen;

·       an upgraded and expanded visits facility; and

·       an upgraded prisoner processing area.

Alternative Sentencing Options

Funding of $4.3 million per annum has been provided as part of the Government’s commitment to progressively phase out the use of suspended sentences. This funding will enable the Department to develop and implement new sentencing options for offenders, in addition to new reintegration, education and therapeutic support services to offenders and prisoners to reduce their chances of re‑offending in the future.

Court Security and Prisoner Transport

Funding of $789 000 per annum has been provided as part of the Government’s policy to remove police from court duties in Launceston and put them back on the beat. The funding provided is to meet the cost of additional correctional officers who will assume responsibility from Tasmania Police for court security and prisoner transport in the Launceston Supreme Court and associated prisoner transport and security costs.

Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse

The Tasmanian Government has agreed to participate in the Australian Government’s National Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse. The decision to opt in to the National Redress Scheme builds on Tasmania’s record of supporting victims, including through the $54 million Abuse in State Care compensation scheme that operated in Tasmania between 2003 and 2013, that assisted more than 1 800 survivors who were the subject of sexual, physical or emotional abuse whilst in State care as children.

The Scheme allows for redress to be provided to individuals who suffered abuse (sexual abuse and related non-sexual abuse) which occurred when the person was a child while in the care of an institution.

Survivors will be able to lodge an application with the Scheme, including where they suffered abuse in more than one institution. The three components of redress available to eligible survivors will be:

·       a monetary payment of between $5 000 and $150 000 as a tangible means of recognising the wrong survivors have suffered;

·       a monetary payment or provision of services to a value up to $5 000 for the purpose of counselling and psychological care; and

·       a direct personal response from the responsible institution(s).

The Scheme is to be operated by the Australian Government’s Department of Social Services. The Department will provide verifying information as required, deliver elements of the redress and contribute costs associated with redress, legal support, counselling and management, and administrative costs associated with the program.

The National Scheme will operate for a period of 10 years, from 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2028 with assessment of Tasmanian applications expected to commence in early 2019. The Department has been provided with funding of $70 million for compensation and administration costs over the 10 year life of the Scheme.

Additional Tasmania Prison Service Funding

Additional funding of $4 million per annum has been provided to the Tasmania Prison Service to assist with increasing cost pressures as a result of an increase in prisoner numbers.

This funding will address increased correctional staffing costs relating to additional shifts to maintain the safety and security of the facilities, staff and prisoners, in addition to managing increased prisoner court, hospital and other escorts. Increased demand for prisoner reintegration, activities, education and therapeutic support services will also be funded.

Furthermore, this funding will address additional costs such as energy, water, food, clothing, bedding and other prisoner related consumable and non-salary costs affected by the increase in prisoner numbers.


Output Information

Outputs of the Department of Justice are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 - Administration of Justice;

·       Output Group 2 - Legal Services;

·       Output Group 3 - Corrections and Enforcement; and

·       Output Group 4 - Regulatory and Other Services.

Table 6.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department.


 

Table 6.2:         Output Group Expense Summary1

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treasurer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Administration of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

1.9 Tasmanian Industrial Commission

1 364 

1 397 

1 415 

1 445 

1 478 

 

1 364 

1 397 

1 415 

1 445 

1 478 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attorney-General and Minister for Justice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Administration of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Supreme Court Services2

14 442 

14 030 

13 513 

13 629 

13 885 

1.2 Magisterial Court Services

15 603 

15 659 

15 849 

16 164 

16 514 

1.3 Births, Deaths and Marriages

1 642 

1 665 

1 679 

1 702 

1 727 

1.4 Support and Compensation for Victims of Crime3

8 291 

8 348 

7 255 

7 369 

7 496 

1.5 Legal Aid4

16 311 

16 468 

14 869 

15 128 

15 431 

1.6 Protective Jurisdictions

3 534 

3 667 

3 712 

3 796 

3 888 

1.7 Equal Opportunity Tasmania

1 619 

1 665 

1 682 

1 717 

1 755 

1.8 Elections and Referendums5

6 412 

5 925 

3 579 

4 057 

6 197 

 

67 854 

67 427 

62 138 

63 562 

66 893 

Output Group 2 - Legal Services

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Crown Law

6 529 

6 761 

6 844 

6 995 

7 155 

2.2 Legislation Development and Review6

1 312 

26 529 

6 549 

6 586 

6 626 

 

7 841 

33 290 

13 393 

13 581 

13 781 

Output Group 3 - Corrections and Enforcement

 

 

 

 

 

3.3 Enforcement of Monetary Penalties

7 551 

7 683 

7 761 

7 861 

7 973 

 

7 551 

7 683 

7 761 

7 861 

7 973 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Corrections

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 - Corrections and Enforcement

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Prison Services7

71 073 

82 936 

83 801 

85 650 

87 457 

3.2 Community Corrective Services8

12 066 

11 875 

12 000 

12 244 

12 515 

 

83 139 

94 811 

95 801 

97 894 

99 972 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 6.2:         Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Building and Construction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Administration of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

1.10 Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Tribunal

1 721 

1 742 

1 745 

1 750 

1 755 

 

1 721 

1 742 

1 745 

1 750 

1 755 

Output Group 4 - Regulatory and Other Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 WorkSafe Tasmania9

11 184 

10 716 

10 857 

11 092 

10 622 

4.4 Consumer, Building and Occupational Services10

13 524 

14 264 

14 396 

14 561 

14 667 

 

24 708 

24 980 

25 253 

25 653 

25 289 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

16 076 

16 139 

16 298 

16 417 

16 417 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Planning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Administration of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

1.11 Resource Management and Planning Appeal Tribunal

1 754 

1 817 

1 845 

1 896 

1 952 

 

1 754 

1 817 

1 845 

1 896 

1 952 

Output Group 4 - Regulatory and Other Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.2 Tasmanian Planning Commission

4 774 

4 860 

4 925 

5 032 

5 152 

4.3 Planning Policy and Reform11

1 068 

771 

778 

793 

810 

 

5 842 

5 631 

5 703 

5 825 

5 962 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

217 850 

254 917 

231 352 

235 884 

241 472 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Agency estimates do not include the indexation impact of any variations to agency expenditure that have been made since the finalisation of the Revised Estimates Report 2017-18 (including December Quarterly Report). For further information see chapter 1 of this Budget Paper.

2.    The decrease in Supreme Court Services in 2018-19 reflects a reallocation of overheads across outputs within the Department. The further decrease in 2019-20 reflects the completion of additional funding for two years provided for the appointment of acting judges to the courts and associated operational requirements of the courts.

3.    The decrease in Support and Compensation for the Victims of Crime in 2019-20 reflects the completion of additional funding for two years for the Eligible Persons Register in addition to the completion of current funding for initiatives under the Safe Homes, Safe Families: Tasmania’s Family Violence Action Plan 2015-2020.

4.    The decrease in Legal Aid in 2019-20 reflects the completion of additional funding for the Legal Aid Commission of Tasmania and Community Legal Centres to offset the funding reductions under the Australian Government National Partnership Agreement.

5.    The variation in the Forward Estimates of Elections and Referendums reflects the timing of elections undertaken, including the next scheduled Local Government elections in 2018 and the next State Election in 2022.

6.    The increase in Legislation Development and Review primarily reflects additional funding provided for the Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse.

7.    The increase in Prison Services in 2018-19 primarily reflects additional funding for: the Chatter Matters Pilot Program; Court Security and Prisoner Transport; Alternative Sentencing Options; and Additional Tasmania Prison Service Funding.

8.    The decrease in Community Corrective Services in 2018-19 reflects the completion of the funding for the Back on Track Program provided as part of the 2014-15 Budget.

9.    The decrease in WorkSafe Tasmania in 2018-19 reflects a reallocation of overheads across outputs within the Department.

10.  The increase in Consumer, Building and Occupational Services in 2018-19 reflects a reallocation of overheads across outputs within the Department.

11.  The decrease in Planning Policy and Reform in 2018-19 reflects the cessation of additional one‑off funding in 2017‑18 provided for community education associated with the introduction of the statewide planning scheme and the new arrangements for visitor accommodation in Tasmania.

Output Group 1:   Administration of Justice

1.1 Supreme Court Services

This Output is responsible for supporting the Judiciary in the just and timely resolution of criminal and civil matters in the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court has unlimited jurisdiction in criminal and civil matters and acts as a court of review for the Magistrates Court and a range of other decision making bodies.

1.2 Magisterial Court Services

This Output is responsible for the operation of the Magistrates Court of Tasmania at registries in Hobart, Launceston, Devonport and Burnie, and several country courts on a regular circuit basis.

1.3 Births, Deaths and Marriages

This Output provides services involving the registration of a range of life events which legislation requires or enables to be registered. By the provision of these services it aims to preserve the rights of individuals including the right to a unique identity.

1.4 Support and Compensation for Victims of Crime

This Output manages services provided by the Department to support victims in their recovery from the impacts of crime. The Output includes administration of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme.

1.5 Legal Aid

This Output provides legal advice, education and representation on a means tested basis. It operates under State legislation with joint State and Australian Government funding and provides services in accordance with an Australian Government-State Government Agreement.

1.6 Protective Jurisdictions

This Output includes:

·       the Guardianship and Administration Board which determines applications and performs functions under the Guardianship and Administration Act 1995, the Disability Services Act 2011, the Wills Act 2008 and the Powers of Attorney Act 2000. These functions primarily relate to appointing guardians and administrators for persons with disabilities; registering and reviewing appointments of enduring guardians; reviewing enduring powers of attorney for persons with a disability under the Powers of Attorney Act; and creating statutory wills;


 

·       the Public Guardian who, when appointed by the Guardianship and Administration Board, acts as the guardian or administrator for persons with decision making disabilities, promotes and protects their interests, provides education on the operation of the Guardianship and Administration Act, and undertakes investigations when requested by the Guardianship and Administration Board; and

·       the Mental Health Tribunal, which makes treatment orders that authorise the treatment of patients who are unable to provide informed consent under the Mental Health Act 2013 and conducts regular reviews of those orders to determine whether the order should be affirmed, varied or discharged. In addition, the Tribunal also reviews restriction and supervision orders of patients (under the Criminal Justice (Mental Impairment) Act 1999), authorises treatment for such patients who are unable to provide informed consent and approves leaves of absence for patients subject to restriction orders (under both Acts).

1.7 Equal Opportunity Tasmania

Operating under the Anti-Discrimination Act 1998, this Output supports the Anti-Discrimination Commissioner’s functions, including:

·       the investigation and conciliation of complaints regarding alleged discrimination and prohibited behaviour;

·       advising government on the Act and discrimination and related conduct; and

·       education and promotion across Tasmania of equal opportunity, human rights, discrimination and how to comply with the Act.

The Commissioner must refer unresolved complaints to the Anti-Discrimination Tribunal and can also grant exemptions, or reject applications for exemption, from the Act.

1.8 Elections and Referendums

This Output is responsible for the administration of State elections and referendums. Through these services, it contributes to the preservation of the State’s parliamentary democracy. It is also responsible for the management and maintenance of electoral rolls for State and local governments, administration of electoral and enrolment policy and systems and the implementation of electoral boundary redistributions.

The Electoral Commissioner also has statutory responsibility for Aboriginal Land Council and local government elections. The latter are conducted on a cost recovery basis.

1.9 Tasmanian Industrial Commission

The Commission is an independent tribunal established under the Industrial Relations Act 1984. The Commission exercises jurisdiction over the Tasmanian State Service for which it is to:

·       conciliate and arbitrate to resolve industrial disputes, including claims of unfair dismissal;

·       fix wage rates and set terms and conditions of employment by making industrial awards; and

·       approve enterprise and industrial agreements.


 

1.10 Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Tribunal

This Output facilitates the resolution of disputes about the payment of workers’ compensation entitlements on matters referred by employers, employees and insurers. The Tribunal is funded from the Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Fund. This Output also provides administrative support for the Motor Accidents Compensation Tribunal, the Asbestos Compensation Tribunal, Anti‑Discrimination Tribunal and the Health Practitioners Tribunal.

1.11 Resource Management and Planning Appeals Tribunal

The Resource Management and Planning Appeal Tribunal is an independent statutory body established by the Resource Management and Planning Appeal Tribunal Act 1993. This Output provides for the hearing of appeals regarding heritage, planning, marine and environmental decisions and determines applications for orders under relevant legislation. The Tribunal is also vested with the jurisdiction of the Building Appeal Tribunal. The Registry of the RMPAT also manages appeals for the Forest Practices Tribunal.


 

Table 6.3:         Performance Information - Output Group 1

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018‑19

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supreme Court - Criminal Jurisdiction

 

 

 

 

 

Pending cases older than 12 months

%

29.0

29.0

29.0

29.0

Real net recurrent expenditure per finalisation1

$

16 902

16 601

17 000

17 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supreme Court - Civil Jurisdiction

 

 

 

 

 

Pending cases older than 12 months2

%

34.0

36.2

34.0

34.0

Real net recurrent expenditure per finalisation1,2

$

4 686

4 567

4 600

4 600

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magistrates Court - Criminal Jurisdiction

 

 

 

 

 

Pending cases older than six months

%

30.4

34.6

30.0

30.0

Real net recurrent expenditure per finalisation1

$

489

494

500

500

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magistrates Court - Youth Justice Division

 

 

 

 

 

Pending cases older than six months

%

24.3

16.3

20.0

20.0

Real net recurrent expenditure per finalisation1

$

645

682

600

600

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magistrates Court - Civil Division

 

 

 

 

 

Pending cases older than six months

%

40.0

41.0

35.0

35.0

Real net recurrent expenditure per finalisation1

$

261

261

250

250

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magistrates Court - Coronial Division

 

 

 

 

 

Pending cases older than 12 months

%

31.9

38.9

30.0

30.0

Real net recurrent expenditure per finalisation1

$

3 290

2 995

3 000

3 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Births, Deaths and Marriages

 

 

 

 

 

Unit Cost per Transaction

$

14.50

14.88

14.50

14.50

Registration within seven days of receipt

%

80

84

80

85

Certificates within seven days of receipt

%

80

86

75

85

Registration error rate

%

na

1.3

<4

<2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legal Aid

 

 

 

 

 

Duty Lawyer Services

Number

3 742

3 966

3 000

4 000

Legal Advice to Clients

Number

5 952

5 600

5 900

6 000

Applications for Legal Aid Approved

Number

4 873

4 556

4 800

4 800

Telephone Advice Line Calls3

Number

17 810

15 154

17 000

18 000


Table 6.3:         Performance Information - Output Group 1 (continued)

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018‑19

Target

 

 

 

 

 

Protective Jurisdictions - Guardianship and Administration Board

 

 

 

 

 

Matters commenced within statutory time frame

%

75.0

97.6

100.0

100.0

Number of hearings per sitting

Number

4.1

4.4

5.0

5.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Protective Jurisdictions - Mental Health Tribunal

 

 

 

 

 

Matters determined within statutory time frame4

%

85

90

100

100

Number of hearings per sitting

Number

4.0

4.0

5.0

5.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equal Opportunity Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

Complaints received

Number

150

147

150

150

Complaints accepted for investigation

Number

102

85

105

105

 

%

69

59

70

70

Accepted complaints resolved or part resolved by the parties reaching agreement facilitated by the Tasmanian Anti‑Discrimination Commissioner

Number

87

84

85

90

 

%

85

99

81

60

Number of complaints finalised

Number

156

162

150

150

Complaints received and finalised within 6 months

%

53

63

65

65

Complaints received and finalised within 9 months

%

72

81

80

85

Complaints received and finalised within 12 months

%

83

86

90

90

Training/education sessions delivered

Number

216

226

250

200

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legislative Council Elections

 

 

 

 

 

Legislative Council Participation Rate

%

81.3

84.4

85.0

85.0

Legislative Council Rate of Informal Votes

%

4.5

3.6

3.5

3.5

Legislative Council ‑ Election Cost Per Enrolled Elector5

$

12.0

11.5

12.0

12.0

Roll Maintenance Cost per Elector

$

1.1

1.2

1.1

1.2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Industrial Commission

 

 

 

 

 

Clearance Rate6

%

83.4

95

100

100

Proportion of matters finalised within three months6

%

72.6

78

75

75

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Management and Planning Appeal Tribunal

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of substantive decisions of Resource Management Planning Appeal Tribunal resolved by mediation (consent)

%

79.7

73.2

78.0

78.0

Percentage of appeals resolved within 90 days without extension

%

55.5

57.5

100

100

Percentage of appeals which did require extensions due to parties

%

91.2

84.6

95.0

95.0

Table 6.3:         Performance Information - Output Group 1 (continued)

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2014

Actual

2018

Target

2022
Target

2026
Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

House of Assembly Elections7

 

 

 

 

 

House of Assembly Election Participation Rate

%

93.5

94.0

94.0

94.0

House of Assembly Rate of Informal Votes

%

4.8

4.4

4.4

4.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2015-16 actual has been updated to reflect the Report on Government Services 2018. Historical financial data is adjusted to 2016-17 dollars using the General Government Final Consumption Expenditure chain price deflator.

2.    The 2017-18 and 2018-19 targets have been revised to better align targets with the most recent actual performance information.

3.    The target for 2017-18 was set on the basis that the Legal Aid Call Centre would be fully staffed following a period of staff turnover. However, since this time the launch of the new website and the increase in Community Legal Education programs have reduced the number of calls to the Advice Line. Based on this trend the target has been moderated.

4.    This performance measure was first set in 2017-18. As part of the measurement capturing process, the Tribunal has been able to utilise past data to determine performance in previous years.

5.    The 2015-16 actual has been updated from 16.7 to 12.0 to reflect the changed funding structure of the Tasmanian Electoral Commission. The reduction is due to removal of recurrent costs from the election costing model to ensure that only election related costs are included.

6.    The Clearance Rate is the proportion of matters finalised during a reporting period expressed as a percentage of those lodged during the same period.

7.    The House of Assembly Election Participation Rate and the House of Assembly Rate of Informal Votes are measured on a calendar year basis.

Performance Information Comments

Table 6.3 reports actual and target data for efficiency and effectiveness indicators for the Administration of Justice Output Group. Indicators for court services are taken from chapter 7 Courts, of the Productivity Commission’s Report on Government Services 2018. The indicators are:

·       a backlog indicator of pending cases older than a given time period, as an indicator of the timeliness of case processing. It is derived by comparing the age (in elapsed time) of a court’s pending caseload against time standards. The indicator recognises that case processing must take some time and that this time does not necessarily equal delay. Timeliness is often affected by delays caused by factors outside the direct control of the Court such as the preparedness and availability of the parties, prosecutors, legal representatives and witnesses; and

·       cost per finalisation or real net recurrent expenditure per finalisation, as an indicator of efficiency. This indicator is not a measure of the actual cost per case. It is derived by dividing the total net recurrent expenditure within each Court for the financial year by the total number of finalisations for the same period (net recurrent expenditure refers to expenditure minus income, where income is derived from court fees and other revenue but excludes revenue from fines).

Supreme Court - Criminal Jurisdiction

The Court continues to aim to achieve the national target of no more than 10 per cent of pending cases being older than 12 months. It should be noted that the majority of Australian jurisdictions do not achieve this target. It should also be noted that a relatively small number of cases can have a significant impact on Court indicators in Tasmania.


 

However, given the current level of the criminal case backlog greater than 12 months, it is expected that this will remain constant in 2018-19. The Court is implementing a range of case management strategies to reduce the backlog, including allocating additional judicial time, adopting more active case management focussing on older cases, improving documentation for some types of applications to streamline processes, and a more rigorous management of the appeals process.

Supreme Court - Civil Jurisdiction

The age of pending cases is managed according to the Court’s active case management processes which focus on ensuring cases are ready for trial at the appropriate time. Once cases are ready for trial, there is a minimal delay in listing them before a judge. It should be noted that many external factors can affect the timeliness of finalisation of cases, including the time taken for injuries to stabilise, for negotiation and mediation between the parties and the availability of parties and their counsel and witnesses. Throughput in the civil jurisdiction has remained constant during recent years.

Magistrates Court - Criminal Jurisdiction and Youth Justice Division

Staff of the Magistrates Court provide support to the Magistrates and work with court users to help ensure the timely and just resolution of the range of matters which are brought before the court.

Criminal lodgements and finalisations in the adult criminal jurisdiction of the Magistrates Court have remained steady over the last three years. Expenditure has also remained steady during this period and consequently the cost per finalisation is largely unchanged.

The number of lodgements in the Youth Justice division has halved in the past six years. Expenditure has also been substantially reduced, but the cost per finalisation has increased somewhat due to the reduced caseload. The percentage of older cases in the pending caseload has decreased and the overall size of the pending caseload has also reduced.

Magistrates Court - Civil Jurisdiction

Civil lodgements and finalisations have decreased in recent years. The percentage of older cases in the pending caseload has decreased, while the overall size of the pending caseload has remained constant.

Magistrates Court - Coronial Division

There has been a significant increase in real net recurrent expenditure per finalisation in the Coronial Division from 2014-15 onwards, as more dedicated Magisterial resources were allocated to Coronial duties. However, due to an increase in coronial cases during 2016-17, the cost per finalisation has reduced.

Coronial finalisations have remained fairly steady, around 500 per year, with an increase in 2016-17. However, the net recurrent expenditure per finalisation in the Coronial Division is particularly sensitive to the number of significant coronial inquests held each year. There were five inquests in 2013-14, 10 in 2014‑15, 17 in 2015-16 and 22 in 2016-17.

Births, Deaths and Marriages

The performance assessment for this Output focuses on efficiency and timeliness of this Output’s service delivery.

Unit cost per transaction represents the aggregation of a wide range of transaction types. These transaction types include: the registration and provision of certificates for births, deaths and marriages; changes of name; changes of sex; adoptions; and the registration of significant and caring relationships.

The cost of each type of transaction may vary significantly from the aggregate measure. The unit cost per transaction measure is sensitive to variations in demand, as the Output has a high proportion of fixed costs.

The registration and certificate processing time targets are based on recent averages across all Australian Registries of Births, Deaths and Marriages.

Registration error rate has been added as a measure of effectiveness, as the public must have confidence that Registry records are accurate and reliable.

Legal Aid

The Commission, through its Grants Section, assesses requests by lawyers from the private profession and its in-house lawyers for legal aid grants to represent clients in various matters. These grants of aid are subject to a means and merit test. The request process is online via the Commission’s Internet site. The Commission publishes guidelines relating to the types of matters where aid is granted. This indicator reflects the volume of work undertaken by the Commission.

The Commission provides duty lawyer services on a daily basis at the Courts in Burnie, Devonport, Launceston and Hobart to assist people appearing for the first time. This service ensures the efficient processing of unrepresented defendants through the court process. The Duty Lawyer will explain the options for a first appearance and represent the person in any bail application or assist with a plea if required. This indicator reflects the volume of work undertaken by the Commission.

The Commission runs free legal advice sessions in all four of its offices around the State. Lawyers provide face to face advice to clients in the Launceston and Hobart offices during advertised times and advice via video services to clients visiting the Burnie and Devonport offices. The lawyers providing this advice work in the Commission’s telephone advice service in either the Launceston or Hobart office. This indicator reflects the volume of work undertaken by the Commission.

The Commission operates a free telephone advice service five days a week during business hours. Any member of the Tasmanian community can access this service. The staff providing this service are lawyers and are located in either Hobart or Launceston. Call centre technology provides the mechanism to queue and process these calls. The service deals with 22 000 calls on average per year. This indicator reflects the volume of work undertaken by the Commission.


 

Protective Jurisdictions

The Protective Jurisdictions are responsible for reviewing orders and hearing applications and reviewing orders relating to rights of, and protections for, persons with decision making disabilities or incapacities. Because of the nature of the decisions, there are statutory requirements to perform the functions within a defined timeframe.

The percentage of matters determined within the statutory timeframe is an indicator of the effectiveness of jurisdictions in managing caseloads within the defined timeframe. This Key Performance Indicator is impacted by the number of applications being lodged, orders made each year and the requirement for further review hearings. Other influences include the introduction of the National Disability Insurance Scheme and an ageing population with increasing cases of dementia, all of which increase the demand for services.

One of the significant costs of these jurisdictions is the payment of Board or Tribunal members to preside over hearings. The number of hearings per sitting (or session) is an indicator of the efficiency of the hearing processes adopted by the Guardianship and Administration Board and the Mental Health Tribunal. However, too many hearings per sitting (i.e. less time for consideration) may undermine the quality of decision making by Board members.

Equal Opportunity Tasmania

Complaints received and accepted for investigation indicate the level of complaint work undertaken by the Commissioner’s office and to some extent reflects levels of awareness of the Anti-Discrimination Act as a means to deal with discrimination.

Complaints resolved provides a measure of the extent to which the Commissioner is successful in assisting the parties to complaints to reach a mutually acceptable resolution. Resolution of complaints through alternative dispute resolution is a key objective of the legislation and is of benefit not only to the parties, but to the legal system and community more broadly as it avoids disputes escalating and having to be litigated.

The number of complaints finalised indicates the net increase or decrease in the number of open complaints. Increased finalisation numbers indicate improved timeliness and management of complaints.

The time taken to finalise complaints is important as delays in complaints being finalised can result in parties dropping out of the process and additional impacts on parties. Improvement in the number of complaints finalised within 12 months is an indication of improved focus on timely complaint management and resolution.

Training and education sessions delivered provides a measure of the extent to which the Commissioner is disseminating information about discrimination and prohibited conduct and the effects of discrimination and prohibited conduct and promoting acceptable attitudes, acts and practices relating to discrimination and prohibited conduct (functions under section 6(b) and (d) of the Anti-Discrimination Act). Training and education are key functions of the Commissioner and are of benefit through promoting compliance and assisting people and organisations to avoid engaging in conduct that may be in breach of the Act, thereby avoiding the risk of being the subject of a complaint under the Act.


 

Elections and Referendums

The performance indicators for this Output focus on the effectiveness and efficiency of the electoral process and maintenance of the electoral roll.

The Electoral Commission reports on participation rate (i.e. proportion of enrolled electors who voted) and whether voters cast their votes correctly (i.e. informal votes as a proportion of the total votes cast).

Tasmanian Industrial Commission

The clearance rate is a measure of the efficiency of the Tasmanian Industrial Commission and indicates whether the Commission is keeping up with its workload.

The proportion of matters finalised within three months is an indicator of timeliness of the resolution of disputes. Performance against this indicator is a measure of the effectiveness of the Commission’s case management, together with the preparation of the parties to the dispute. In the majority of cases, where matters take longer than three months to settle, the delay is at the instigation of the parties.

Resource Management and Planning Appeal Tribunal

The settlement of disputes through mediation (consent) provides a fair and cost effective way of resolving disputes. The Tribunal is committed to the continued use of mediation to resolve disputes. The targets have been set to maintain a high level of resolution of disputes by Alternative Dispute Resolution.

The Tribunal is obliged under its legislation to resolve matters within 90 days or such further period as may be granted (Section 16(1)(f) of the Resource Management and Planning Appeal Tribunal Act). The parties to proceedings may require additional time to the 90-day timeframe for a range of reasons. The figures disclose whether the Tribunal or parties to proceedings required additional time beyond the 90 days.


Output Group 2:   Legal Services

2.1 Crown Law

This Output aims to protect the interests of the Crown by providing legal services and advice.

2.2 Legislation Development and Review

This Output provides advice to assist the Attorney-General and other Ministers with the formation of strategic policy and development of legislation which the Department administers. The Office also provides support to the Attorney-General in the discharge of parliamentary, constitutional and legal duties, including participation in the Council of Attorneys-General and advice in relation to cooperative legislative schemes.

Table 6.4:         Performance Information - Output Group 2

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018‑19

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crown Law

 

 

 

 

 

Notionally chargeable time

%

82

73

60

60

Number of new matters1

File

1 778

1 882

1 700

1 900

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The Number of new matters is dictated by demand from government agencies for legal services. This demand is subject to fluctuations over time.

Performance Information Comments

The performance indicators for this Output Group focus on the demand for the services provided and the effective use of legal practitioners’ time. The target of 60 per cent of practitioners’ time being chargeable is aspirational and based on the normal expectation in private practice. This target is based on notional chargeable hours. The number of new matters commenced provides a broad indication of demand for transactional legal services.


Output Group 3:   Corrections and Enforcement

3.1 Prison Services

This Output aims to provide a safer Tasmania by ensuring the secure containment of inmates and offering them opportunities for rehabilitation and personal development. It maintains facilities that provide care and custody, at various levels of security, for inmates and persons detained in custody. It also provides safe, secure transport between prison and courts and to receive medical care, as required.

3.2 Community Corrective Services

This Output supports a variety of non-custodial sentencing options. It is responsible for the data collation, reporting and administrative support to Safe at Home forums; pre-parole reporting to the Parole Board; pre‑sentence reporting to the Courts; community service orders, probation and parole supervision; administration of the Court Mandated Diversion Program; and the delivery of educational, therapeutic and criminogenic programs. It provides these services in accordance with the Sentencing Act 1997, the Corrections Act 1997 and various other Acts that include sentencing provisions.

3.3 Enforcement of Monetary Penalties

This Output is responsible for the collection and enforcement of monetary penalties imposed by courts and other authorities. It ensures that the integrity of orders for payment of fines is maintained and maximises the collection of revenue by utilising Service Tasmania shops, telephone systems and the Internet to provide avenues of payment for clients.


Table 6.5:         Performance Information - Output Group 3

 

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018‑19

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prison Services

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of prisoners returning to corrective services within two years of release1

%

49.8

55.0

48

48

Prison Escape Rate - Secure Perimeter

Number per 100 prisoners

2

....)

....

....)

Prison Escape Rate - Open Perimeter

Number per 100 prisoners

....)

....)

<2

<2

Cost per Prisoner per day2,3

$

317

297

324

313

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Corrective Services

 

 

 

 

 

Completion rate for community supervision orders4

%

85.0

86.4

85

86

Cost per Community Supervised Offender per day3

$

13.39

14.05

14

14

Percentage of Community Corrections offenders returning to corrective services within two years of discharge1

%

24.1

24.2

22

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enforcement of Monetary Penalties

 

 

 

 

 

Fine Collection Rate

%

98.2

95

95

95

Debt finalisation rate

%

118.0

111.0

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    These performance measures relate to prisoners and community corrections offenders who completed their justice order two years before the reference period.

2.    The actual cost per prisoner per day does not include prisoner health costs borne by the Department of Health and Human Services on behalf of Corrective Services. Due to the high fixed costs of operating a prison system, the cost per prisoner per day is strongly affected by prisoner numbers. In 2016-17, there was a significant increase in prisoner numbers and a resulting decrease in cost per prisoner per day.

3.    Historical financial data is adjusted to 2016-17 dollars using the General Government Final Consumption Expenditure chain price deflator (2016-17 = 100). This indicator includes both supervision orders (Probation, Parole and Court Mandated Diversion) and Community Service Orders.

4.    This indicator includes both supervision orders (Probation, Parole and Court Mandated Diversion) and Community Service Orders.

Performance Information Comments

Prison Services and Community Corrective Services

Table 6.5 reports actual and target data for efficiency and effectiveness indicators as reported in the Productivity Commission’s Report on Government Services 2018 chapter 8 Corrective Services and the Justice sector overview.


 

Corrective Services agencies administer services and programs which aim to reduce prisoners’ and offenders’ risk of re-offending. Two indicators are provided, which show the return to corrections figures for prisoners and offenders released from prison or discharged from community corrections. These are drawn from the Report on Government Services 2018 and refer to offenders released from prison or completing sentences with Community Corrections in 2014-15. Repeat offender data is difficult to interpret. A low proportion of repeat offenders may indicate an effective justice system discouraging repeat offending. However, a high proportion of repeat offenders may indicate more effective policing. The indicators are:

·       the effectiveness of the Outputs in ensuring the containment of prisoners and the compliance of offenders with community based orders; and

·       the efficiency of the corrections system.

Enforcement of Monetary Penalties

The fine collection rate is an indicator of the effectiveness of the enforcement of monetary penalties and measures the collection of monetary penalties against the amount referred in the same period.

The commencement of the Monetary Penalties Enforcement Act 2005 in April 2008 provided a wider range of tools for enforcing monetary penalties and consequently improving the fine collection rate. These tools have enabled the Monetary Penalties Enforcement Service to achieve a high fine collection rate by effectively targeting and collecting fines that have been outstanding for long periods.

The debt finalisation rate measures the number of penalties finalised against the number referred in the same period. A finalisation rate greater than 100 per cent means that more penalties are being finalised than have been referred for collection.


Output Group 4:   Regulatory and Other Services

4.1 WorkSafe Tasmania

This Output focuses on improving workplace safety, health and return to work. WorkSafe Tasmania administers laws that regulate workplace relations, work health and safety and workers’ compensation.

WorkSafe Tasmania has a strong relationship with the WorkCover Tasmania Board, assisting the Board to fulfil its statutory functions in injury management, work health and safety, and workers’ compensation. Providing strategic policy advice to the Minister for Building and Construction is another area of focus.

4.2 Tasmanian Planning Commission

This Output has a range of statutory planning assessment and review responsibilities prescribed in the Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993 and other Resource Management and Planning System legislation including:

·       assessment of interim planning scheme amendments or combined permit and amendment applications;

·       assessment of amendments to the State Planning Provisions under the Tasmanian Planning Scheme;

·       assessment of Local Provision Schedules under the Tasmanian Planning Scheme;

·       establishing and maintaining a digital version of State Planning Provisions and Local Provision Schedules under the Tasmanian Planning Scheme;

·       assessment of projects of regional or state significance;

·       review of reports on representations to park and water management plans;

·       reporting on the Tasmanian State of the Environment report; and

·       conduct of inquiries and reviews under other legislation.

This Output provides advice to the Minister for Planning and to local government on land use and development planning in Tasmania.

4.3 Planning Policy and Reform

This Output provides advice to assist the Minister for Planning on the formation of strategic policy and the development of legislation which the Department administers relating to planning. It provides support to the Minister in the discharge of parliamentary, statutory and Ministerial planning duties including the development and maintenance of the Tasmanian Planning Scheme and the rezoning and approval of subdivisions on Crown Land under the proposed Residential Housing Supply Bill 2018. It also provides advice to local government and other bodies on planning policy matters relating to the work of the Department and the Resource Management and Planning System.

4.4 Consumer, Building and Occupational Services

This Output has oversight of the regulatory scheme for building in Tasmania, including the issuing of instructions, the mandating of forms, the provision of advice, and monitoring of compliance with the Building Act 2016 and the National Construction Code, by way of audits.

It also has oversight of the licensing and accreditation of defined occupations, which are currently, electricians, plumbers, gasfitters and building practitioners. This includes undertaking licensing audits and, in the case of electricians, the inspection of the work undertaken.

The Director, Building Control, is the Security of Payments Official and is responsible for the appointment of nominating authorities in the scheme under the legislation.

The Output is also responsible for the provision of services for the Office of Consumer Affairs and Fair Trading which is the principal advisor to the Government on matters affecting the interests of consumers. Supporting the Australian Consumer Law, it regulates consumer markets, administers consumer laws and provides support to the Rental Deposit Authority and the Residential Tenancy Commissioner.

Table 6.6:         Performance Information - Output Group 4

Performance Measure

Unit of Measure

2015‑16

Actual

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Target

2018‑19

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

WorkSafe Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

Safety of Workers - rates of serious injury1

Claims per 1 000 employees

11.8

13.2

11.8

11.3

Returned to Work2

Rate

92

92

94

95

Workers' Compensation Premium as a percentage of Wages3

Rate

1.81

1.77

1.75-2.75

1.75-2.75

 

 

 

 

 

 


Consumer, Building and Occupational Services

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer complaints resolved within 60 days

%

95

86

95

95

Rental bond claims paid within 30 days

%

90

81

90

90

Number of matters resolved prior to final compliance action

%

94

94

95

95

Number of assessments made within 21 days

%

93

83

95

95

New WWVP applicants receipt of decisions within six weeks

%

97

91

95

95

 

Notes:

1.    The Safety of Workers measure reflects the incidence rates of claims with lost time (time off work) of five days or more per 1 000 workers. The Safe Work Australia - Australian Work Health and Safety Strategy 2012-2022 has a target to reduce the incidence of workplace injury by at least 30 per cent by 2022. Using 2011‑12 as the base period and WorkSafe Tasmania data, the target incidence rate for Tasmania is 10 claims per 1 000 workers by June 2022. In accordance with the Safe Work Australia - Australian Work Health and Safety Strategy 2012‑2022, the 2018-19 target has been revised to align with the measurement principles in the strategy.

2.    Returned to Work Rate is the proportion of injured workers with 10 or more days off work who returned to work for any period of time at some stage since their first day off work.

3.    Workers’ Compensation Premium as a percentage of Wages represents the total workers’ compensation insurance premiums paid as a percentage of the total wages paid.

Performance Information Comments

WorkSafe Tasmania

WorkSafe Tasmania is committed to the prevention of death, injury, illness and disease arising from work activities in all Tasmanian workplaces. The rate of serious injury is a key measure of performance used nationally by WHS Regulators and Safe Work Australia as the peak WHS policy Agency.

WorkSafe Tasmania aims for injured workers to return to safe and sustainable work as soon as possible. This results in increased productivity, reducing workers’ compensation insurance premiums, as well as reducing the financial, health and emotional impacts on the worker.

WorkSafe Tasmania aims to provide a fair and sustainable workers’ compensation system; the overall aim of a competitive workers’ compensation premium is to charge each employer a fair premium while still collecting an overall premium pool which is sufficient to cover claims costs and expenses and provide insurers with a reasonable return on the capital required. A target range has been established that is optimal to providing sufficient funds to cover claim costs, returning an adequate return to insurers, and if exceeded would suggest the number or size of claims is at an unacceptably high level.

Consumer, Building and Occupational Services

In regard to the performance measures for consumer services within this Output, the focus is on the disposition rate of complaints and rental bond claims.

The building and occupational services performance measures for this Output focus on ensuring the timely and accurate turnaround for applicants requiring licensing for their occupation. As well as occupations within the building and construction industry, the performance indicators also relate to persons who are required to be registered under the Working with Vulnerable People Act 2013. The Executive Director is the Registrar of this Act.

The number of matters resolved prior to final compliance action relates to the resolution of disputes and complaints in a timely manner in accordance with the Building Act, Housing Indemnity Act 1992 and Occupational Licensing Act 2005.

The number of assessments made relates to ensuring that all practitioners are appropriately accredited or licensed. This is relevant to all occupations covered by Building and Occupational Services. The provision of fast and accurate processing of applications contributes to overall compliance by industry members.

The performance measure for new Working with Vulnerable People applicants receipt of decisions within six weeks, relates to ensuring an accurate and robust system for applicants under this Act. The requirements under this Act can make the turnaround time for applicants longer than others. Setting a target time for applicants to receive a decision is both useful in staff compliance with the Act and in achieving a measurable estimate which applicants can respond to if they have not received a decision.

 


Capital Investment Program

Table 6.7 provides financial information for the Department's Capital Investment Program. Further information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 6.7:         Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

New Infrastructure Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attorney-General and Minister for Justice

 

 

 

 

 

An Upgraded Burnie Court Complex1

15 000 

.... 

1 000 

3 000 

4 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Corrections

 

 

 

 

 

New Northern Prison1

270 000 

.... 

5 000 

10 000 

30 000 

New Southern Remand Centre1

70 000 

10 000 

35 000 

25 000 

.... 

Risdon Prison Shared Facilities Upgrade1

9 340 

.... 

.... 

.... 

9 340 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing Infrastructure Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attorney-General and Minister for Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Justice Connect2,3

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Corrections

 

 

 

 

 

O'Hara Pre-Release Facility - Additional Units2

1 500 

800 

700 

.... 

.... 

Ron Barwick Minimum Security Prison - Cell

Recommissioning2

3 000 

2 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Planning

 

 

 

 

 

iPlan Stage Two: Integrated Planning and

Building Portal2

1 900 

900 

525 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

13 700 

42 225 

38 000 

43 340 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    A description of this project is provided in the Key Deliverables section at the commencement of the chapter.

2.    These commitments were announced as part of the 2016-17 Budget.

3.    Funding for Justice Connect is provided in the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program within Finance‑General.


 

Justice Connect

Justice Connect is an initiative driven primarily by the need to address the shortcomings of existing technology in key justice business systems. The Department has identified a number of significant problems with the management of information in the criminal justice sector that are impeding its ability to effectively deliver services to the Tasmanian Community.

The Department recognises an opportunity to review how it plans to replace these key business systems and develop a contemporary ICT architecture for the criminal justice sector systems that will better serve the Community. At its core, the Department is looking to redevelop these business systems and replace them with a Service-Orientated Architecture that enhances efficiencies and improves policy outcomes through better information sharing, access to timely and trusted information and integration across Government with relevant critical ICT systems (e.g. Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management). This SOA will become Justice Connect.

An allocation of $2.5 million in 2018-19 has been made within the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program within Finance-General to continue with the preparation of detailed requirements for the redevelopment of the Department’s key Justice ICT systems. Further funding from the Program will be provided in future years as the project progresses.

O’Hara Pre-release Facility - Additional Units

Funding of $1.5 million has been provided over two years from 2018-19 for the construction of four additional independent living accommodation units to increase the pre-release capacity for minimum-security prisoners on the Risdon site. These units will be designed to house four prisoners within each unit, resulting in an increase in the prison capacity by a further 16 beds. This will have the effect of freeing up some of the existing beds in the Ron Barwick Minimum Security Prison.

Ron Barwick Minimum Security Prison - Cell Recommissioning

Funding of $3.0 million has been provided over two years from 2017-18 for the refurbishment of Division 7 within the Ron Barwick Minimum Security Prison. This refurbishment will provide an additional 40 minimum‑security cells within this facility. As a result of the provision of these additional cells and the ageing infrastructure of the facility, part of the $3 million funding has been provided to address the electrical and plumbing issues throughout this facility.

iplan Stage Two: Integrated Planning and Building Portal

Stage Two of the iplan project will make Tasmanias online one stop shop development approvals system one of the best in the nation, by the end of the implementation phase in 2020. It places Tasmania in a strong position to benefit from the advanced rollout of the national broadband network and the associated rapid changes in technology and information delivery and complements the development of the statewide Tasmanian planning scheme.

The system will benefit every home builder and commercial developer in the state, as they will have real time access to the planning and building rules that apply to their land, to help them make decisions about their project. They will also be able to track the progress of their applications to Council.

Stage Two is a $3.3 million investment from Government, which is utilising existing resources and will be completed with a capital injection of $1.9 million over the three years from 2017-18.

Industry and local government requested that the Department develop iplan further. The full funding of Stage Two delivers on the Government’s promise of a faster, fairer, simpler and cheaper planning and building process in Tasmania.


Detailed Budget Statements

Table 6.8:         Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - recurrent1

159 208 

193 808 

173 421 

177 681 

183 999 

Appropriation revenue - works & services2

2 125 

13 700 

42 225 

38 000 

43 340 

Grants3

8 813 

8 749 

7 561 

7 561 

7 561 

Sales of goods and services

3 903 

3 984 

4 067 

4 151 

4 151 

Fees and fines

9 257 

9 287 

9 317 

9 347 

9 347 

Interest

816 

853 

891 

930 

930 

Other revenue4

7 607 

9 927 

7 627 

7 627 

7 627 

Total revenue and other income from transactions

191 729 

240 308 

245 109 

245 297 

256 955 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits5

119 091 

127 471 

126 535 

129 340 

134 110 

Depreciation and amortisation

7 812 

7 812 

7 812 

7 812 

7 812 

Supplies and consumables6

41 445 

44 184 

43 051 

44 263 

45 219 

Grants and subsidies

16 729 

17 641 

15 892 

16 151 

15 904 

Other expenses7

14 197 

39 170 

19 264 

19 401 

19 510 

Total expenses from transactions

199 274 

236 278 

212 554 

216 967 

222 555 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

(7 545)

4 030 

32 555 

28 330 

34 400 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

(7 545)

4 030 

32 555 

28 330 

34 400 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

(7 545)

4 030 

32 555 

28 330 

34 400 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Appropriation revenue ‑ recurrent in 2018-19 primarily reflects additional funding provided for: Alternative Sentencing Options; the Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse; and Additional Tasmania Prison Service Funding. The decrease in funding in 2019-20 reflects the completion of additional funding for legal assistance services and Supreme Court acting judges, and the timing of funding for the Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse.

2.    The movements in Appropriation revenue ‑ works & services reflect the timing of the Department’s capital projects. See Table 6.7 Capital Investment Program for further information.

3.    The decrease in Grants in 2019-20 reflects the completion of the additional funding for the Legal Aid Commission of Tasmania and Community Legal Centres to offset the funding reductions under the Australian Government National Partnership Agreement in addition to completion of current funding for initiatives under the Safe Homes, Safe Families: Tasmania’s Family Violence Action Plan 2015-2020.

4.    The increase in Other revenue in 2018-19 and subsequent decrease in 2019-20 reflects the timing of cost recoveries by the Tasmanian Electoral Commission for Local Government Elections.

5.    The increase in Employee benefits in 2018-19 reflects additional funding for Alternative Sentencing Options and Additional Tasmania Prison Service Funding. The decrease in 2019-20 reflects the completion of additional funding for the Supreme Court acting judges, and the increase in 2021-22 reflects additional costs associated with the 2022 House of Assembly election.

6.    The increase in Supplies and consumables in 2018-19 reflects expenditure in accordance with the timing of Local Government Elections in addition to the completion of funding and associated expenditure for the Safe Homes, Safe Families: Tasmania’s Family Violence Action Plan 2015-2020.

7.    The increase in Other expenses from 2018-19 reflects additional funding for the Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse and movements in that funding.

 

Table 6.9:         Statement of Comprehensive Income - Administered

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Sales of goods and services

17 

17 

17 

17 

17 

Fees and fines1

25 271 

25 206 

25 243 

25 281 

25 279 

Interest

124 

127 

131 

134 

134 

Other revenue

16 110 

16 429 

16 836 

17 260 

17 260 

Total revenue and other income from transactions

41 522 

41 779 

42 227 

42 692 

42 690 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

3 369 

3 437 

3 500 

3 572 

3 572 

Depreciation and amortisation

109 

109 

109 

109 

109 

Supplies and consumables

2 942 

3 040 

3 079 

3 115 

3 115 

Grants and subsidies

253 

259 

266 

272 

272 

Transfers to the Consolidated Fund1

22 768 

22 703 

22 740 

22 778 

22 776 

Other expenses2

11 903 

11 794 

11 844 

11 849 

11 849 

Total expenses from transactions

41 344 

41 342 

41 538 

41 695 

41 693 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

178 

437 

689 

997 

997 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

178 

437 

689 

997 

997 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

178 

437 

689 

997 

997 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decreases in Fees and fines and Transfers to the Consolidated Fund in 2018-19 reflect a small reduction in anticipated civil fees for the Supreme Court.

2.    The decrease in Other expenses in 2018-19 reflects a minor decrease in Asbestos Compensation Fund expenditure as advised by the actuary.

 


Table 6.10:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treasurer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Administration of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

1.9 Tasmanian Industrial Commission

1 220 

1 253 

1 271 

1 301 

1 334 

 

1 220 

1 253 

1 271 

1 301 

1 334 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

1 220 

1 253 

1 271 

1 301 

1 334 

 

1 220 

1 253 

1 271 

1 301 

1 334 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attorney-General and Minister for Justice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Administration of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Supreme Court Services1

7 520 

7 031 

6 877 

6 907 

7 074 

1.2 Magisterial Court Services2

8 860 

8 815 

8 962 

9 162 

9 385 

1.3 Births, Deaths and Marriages

1 031 

1 054 

1 068 

1 091 

1 116 

1.4 Support and Compensation for Victims of Crime3

5 484 

5 540 

5 417 

5 531 

5 658 

1.5 Legal Aid4

8 465 

8 687 

7 306 

7 565 

7 868 

1.6 Protective Jurisdictions

3 163 

3 296 

3 341 

3 425 

3 517 

1.7 Equal Opportunity Tasmania

1 412 

1 458 

1 475 

1 510 

1 548 

1.8 Elections and Referendums2

705 

669 

680 

697 

715 

 

36 640 

36 550 

35 126 

35 888 

36 881 

Output Group 2 - Legal Services

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Crown Law

5 848 

6 066 

6 141 

6 276 

6 423 

2.2 Legislation Development and Review5

1 259 

26 476 

6 496 

6 533 

6 573 

 

7 107 

32 542 

12 637 

12 809 

12 996 

Output Group 3 - Corrections and Enforcement

 

 

 

 

 

3.3 Enforcement of Monetary Penalties

3 936 

4 068 

4 146 

4 246 

4 358 

 

3 936 

4 068 

4 146 

4 246 

4 358 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program6

.... 

.... 

1 000 

3 000 

4 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

47 683 

73 160 

51 909 

52 943 

54 235 

Works and Services

.... 

.... 

1 000 

3 000 

4 000 

 

47 683 

73 160 

52 909 

55 943 

58 235 

 

 

Table 6.10:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

Minister for Corrections

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 - Corrections and Enforcement

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Prison Services7

62 454 

74 246 

75 039 

76 815 

78 622 

3.2 Community Corrective Services8

12 040 

11 849 

11 974 

12 218 

12 489 

 

74 494 

86 095 

87 013 

89 033 

91 111 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program9

1 650 

12 800 

40 700 

35 000 

39 340 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

74 494 

86 095 

87 013 

89 033 

91 111 

Works and Services

1 650 

12 800 

40 700 

35 000 

39 340 

 

76 144 

98 895 

127 713 

124 033 

130 451 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Building and Construction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Administration of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

1.10 Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Tribunal

185 

186 

189 

194 

199 

 

185 

186 

189 

194 

199 

Output Group 4 - Regulatory and Other Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 WorkSafe Tasmania2

9 335 

8 837 

8 978 

9 213 

9 473 

4.4 Consumer, Building and Occupational Services2

2 938 

3 641 

3 705 

3 801 

3 907 

 

12 273 

12 478 

12 683 

13 014 

13 380 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

12 458 

12 664 

12 872 

13 208 

13 579 

 

12 458 

12 664 

12 872 

13 208 

13 579 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Planning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Administration of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

1.11 Resource Management and Planning Appeal Tribunal

1 651 

1 714 

1 742 

1 793 

1 849 

 

1 651 

1 714 

1 742 

1 793 

1 849 

Output Group 4 - Regulatory and Other Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.2 Tasmanian Planning Commission

4 168 

4 254 

4 319 

4 426 

4 546 

4.3 Planning Policy and Reform10

1 068 

771 

778 

793 

810 

 

5 236 

5 025 

5 097 

5 219 

5 356 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program11

475 

900 

525 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Services

6 887 

6 739 

6 839 

7 012 

7 205 

Works and Services

475 

900 

525 

.... 

.... 

 

7 362 

7 639 

7 364 

7 012 

7 205 

Table 6.10:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Total Recurrent Services

142 742 

179 911 

159 904 

163 497 

167 464 

Total Works and Services

2 125 

13 700 

42 225 

38 000 

43 340 

 

144 867 

193 611 

202 129 

201 497 

210 804 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserved by Law

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses of Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania Elections

(Aboriginal Lands Act 1995, Section 17)

Expenses of Parliamentary Elections and Referendums

(Electoral Act 2004 and Referendum

Procedures Act 2004)12

5 428 

2 730 

2 680 

3 141 

5 263 

Expenses under the Legislative Council Electoral

Boundaries Act 199513

65 

12 

Salaries of Judges (Supreme Court Act 1887)14

3 567 

3 630 

3 257 

3 327 

3 405 

Salaries of Magistrates (Magistrates Court Act

1987)

4 943 

5 043 

5 085 

5 199 

5 326 

Salary and Travel Allowances, Solicitor-General

(Solicitor-General Act 1983)

518 

528 

532 

544 

557 

Salary and Travelling Allowance, Associate Judge of the

Supreme Court (Supreme Court Act 1959)

440 

449 

453 

463 

474 

Victims of Crime Assistance Act 1976

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

 

16 466 

13 897 

13 517 

14 184 

16 535 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

161 333 

207 508 

215 646 

215 681 

227 339 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

161 333 

207 508 

215 646 

215 681 

227 339 

 

161 333 

207 508 

215 646 

215 681 

227 339 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Supreme Court Services in 2018-19 reflects a reallocation of overheads across outputs within the Department. The further decrease in 2019-20 reflects the completion of additional funding for two years provided for the appointment of acting judges to the courts and associated operational requirements of the courts.

2.    The decreases in Magisterial Court Services, Elections and Referendums, and WorkSafe Tasmania, and the increase in Consumer, Building and Occupational Services in 2018-19, reflects a reallocation of overheads across outputs within the Department.

3.    The decrease in Support and Compensation for Victims of Crime in 2019-20 reflects the completion of current funding for the Eligible Persons Register in addition to the completion of current funding for the Safe Homes, Safe Families: Tasmania’s Family Violence Action Plan 2015-2020.

4.    The decrease in Legal Aid in 2019-20 reflects the completion of additional funding for the Legal Aid Commission of Tasmanian and Community Legal Centres to offset the funding reductions under the Australian Government National Partnership Agreement.

5.    The increase in Legislation Development and Review in 2018-19 primarily reflects additional funding provided for the Redress Scheme for Institutional Child Sexual Abuse.

6.    The increase in Capital Investment Program in 2018-19 reflects the additional funding provided for an Upgraded Burnie Court Complex.

7.    The increase in Prison Services in 2018-19 primarily reflects additional funding for: the Chatter Matters Pilot Program; Court Security and Prisoner Transport; Alternative Sentencing Options; and Additional Tasmania Prison Service Funding.

8.    The decrease in Community Corrective Services in 2018-19 reflects the completion of the funding for the Back on Track Program provided as part of the 2014-15 Budget.

9.    The increase in Capital Investment Program in 2018-19 reflects the additional funding provided for the Corrections portfolio related capital projects. See Table 6.7 Capital Investment Program for further information.

10.  The decrease in Planning Policy and Reform in 2018-19 reflects additional funding provided in 2017-18 for community education associated with the introduction of the statewide planning scheme and the new arrangements for visitor accommodation in Tasmania which has now been completed.

11.  The variation in Capital Investment Program reflects the timing of funding associated with iPlan Stage 2 development to integrate the planning and business processes.

12.  The increase in Expenses of Parliamentary Elections and Referendums (Electoral Act 2004 and Referendum Procedures Act 2004) in 2021-22 reflects funding for the next State Election.

13.  The decrease in Expenses under the Legislative Council Electoral Boundaries Act 1995 in 2018-19 reflects the timing of expenditure associated with the major review of the Legislative Council electoral boundaries by the Tasmanian Electoral Commission. The review is to be completed in 2018.

14.  The decrease in Salaries of Judges (Supreme Court Act 1887) in 2019-20 primarily reflects the completion of the additional funding for the salaries of the acting judges for two years.


Table 6.11:       Administered Revenue

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Consolidated

Fund

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer Affairs Office Regulatory Fees

223 

225 

227 

229 

229 

Fines

18 125 

18 125 

18 125 

18 125 

18 125 

Magisterial Courts Regulatory Fees

576 

582 

588 

594 

594 

Other Revenue

40 

40 

40 

40 

40 

Other Sales of Services

Registrar-General Regulatory Fees

1 923 

1 942 

1 961 

1 981 

1 981 

Regulatory Fees

698 

703 

708 

713 

713 

Supreme Court Regulatory Fees1

1 176 

1 079 

1 084 

1 089 

1 087 

 

22 768 

22 703 

22 740 

22 778 

22 776 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Fines

2 550 

2 550 

2 550 

2 550 

2 550 

Interest income

124 

127 

131 

134 

134 

Other Revenue

16 070 

16 389 

16 796 

17 220 

17 220 

Other Sales of Services

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

 

18 754 

19 076 

19 487 

19 914 

19 914 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

41 522 

41 779 

42 227 

42 692 

42 690 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The decrease in Supreme Court Regulatory Fees in 2018-19 reflects a small reduction in anticipated civil fees for the Supreme Court.

 

 


 

Table 6.12:       Administered Expenses

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Asbestos Compensation Fund

6 788 

6 794 

6 818 

6 796 

6 796 

Workcover Tasmania Board

9 288 

9 345 

9 480 

9 621 

9 621 

 

16 076 

16 139 

16 298 

16 417 

16 417 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Consolidated Fund1

22 768 

22 703 

22 740 

22 778 

22 776 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Administered Expenses

2 500 

2 500 

2 500 

2 500 

2 500 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

41 344 

41 342 

41 538 

41 695 

41 693 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The decrease in Transfer to the Consolidated Fund in 2018-19 reflects a small reduction in anticipated civil fees for the Supreme Court.

Asbestos Compensation Fund

The Asbestos Compensation Fund was established in accordance with the Asbestos-Related Diseases (Occupational Exposure) Compensation Act 2011. The Fund is established for the payment of compensation and certain other expenses, related to the contraction of asbestos related diseases by workers who are exposed to asbestos in the course of their employment. The Fund is overseen by the Asbestos Compensation Commissioner, who is responsible for making determinations regarding a worker’s application for compensation and managing all monies in relation to the Fund.

WorkCover Tasmania Board

The WorkCover Tasmania Board oversees, promotes, reviews and ensures the efficient operation of workers’ rehabilitation and compensation procedures in accordance with the Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988. Integral to this role, it advises the Minister on matters relating to workers’ rehabilitation and compensation in the State. Other major functions include reviewing the performance of licensed insurers and self-insurers and the operation of the Nominal Insurer, and managing the Workers’ Rehabilitation and Compensation Fund.


Table 6.13:       Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2018 

2019 

2020 

2021 

2022 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

22 232 

22 832 

21 499 

20 166 

19 563 

Receivables1

1 278 

714 

739 

764 

789 

 

23 510 

23 546 

22 238 

20 930 

20 352 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories1

394 

448 

448 

448 

448 

Property, plant and equipment2

140 497 

149 861 

184 759 

215 957 

252 495 

Intangibles3

2 363 

3 272 

2 837 

1 877 

917 

Other assets1

7 912 

8 017 

7 967 

7 917 

7 867 

 

151 166 

161 598 

196 011 

226 199 

261 727 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

174 676 

185 144 

218 249 

247 129 

282 079 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables1

2 460 

2 718 

2 818 

2 918 

3 018 

Employee benefits1

26 915 

28 336 

28 749 

29 162 

29 575 

Other liabilities1

74 

73 

110 

147 

184 

Total liabilities

29 449 

31 127 

31 677 

32 227 

32 777 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

145 227 

154 017 

186 572 

214 902 

249 302 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Reserves

52 564 

52 564 

52 564 

52 564 

52 564 

Accumulated funds2

92 663 

101 453 

134 008 

162 338 

196 738 

Total equity

145 227 

154 017 

186 572 

214 902 

249 302 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variations in Cash and deposits, Receivables, Inventories, Other assets, Payables, Employee benefits and Other liabilities in 2019 reflect revised estimates based on 30 June 2017 actuals.

2.    The increases in Property, plant and equipment and Accumulated funds reflects the timing of the Department’s capital projects, offset by annual depreciation charges. See Table 6.7 Capital Investment Program for further information.

3.    The decrease in Intangibles across the Forward Estimates reflects annual amortisation charges on software.

 


Table 6.14:       Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June - Administered

 

2018 

2019 

2020 

2021 

2022 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

17 516 

22 112 

22 920 

24 036 

25 152 

Receivables2

130 428 

119 949 

114 963 

109 977 

104 991 

 

147 944 

142 061 

137 883 

134 013 

130 143 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Intangibles3

594 

483 

374 

265 

156 

 

594 

483 

374 

265 

156 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

148 538 

142 544 

138 257 

134 278 

130 299 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables4

3 435 

3 181 

3 184 

3 187 

3 190 

Provisions2

91 464 

85 699 

80 713 

75 727 

70 741 

Employee benefits4

880 

899 

905 

911 

917 

Other liabilities

Total liabilities

95 781 

89 781 

84 805 

79 829 

74 853 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

52 757 

52 763 

53 452 

54 449 

55 446 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated funds

52 757 

52 763 

53 452 

54 449 

55 446 

Total equity

52 757 

52 763 

53 452 

54 449 

55 446 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Cash and deposits in 2019 reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2017 actuals. This adjustment is mainly associated with the Asbestos Compensation Fund.

2.    The decreases in Receivables and Provisions in 2019 reflect reassessments of future fees receivable and future compensation payable from the Asbestos Compensation Fund by the Fund’s actuary in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards.

3.    The decrease in Intangibles in 2019 reflects annual amortisation charges on the WorkCover Tasmania Board’s software applications.

4.    The increases in Payables and Employee benefits in 2019 reflect revised estimates based on 30 June 2017 actuals.

 


Table 6.15:              Statement of Cash Flows

 

2017-18 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - recurrent1

159 208 

193 808 

173 421 

177 681 

183 999 

Appropriation receipts - capital2

2 125 

13 700 

42 225 

38 000 

43 340 

Grants3

8 813 

8 749 

7 561 

7 561 

7 561 

Sales of goods and services

3 878 

3 959 

4 042 

4 126 

4 126 

Fees and fines

9 257 

9 287 

9 317 

9 347 

9 347 

GST receipts

5 700 

5 700 

5 700 

5 700 

5 700 

Interest received

816 

853 

891 

930 

930 

Other cash receipts4

7 607 

9 927 

7 627 

7 627 

7 627 

Total cash inflows

197 404 

245 983 

250 784 

250 972 

262 630 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits5

(105 533)

(113 100)

(112 253)

(114 785)

(119 047)

Superannuation5

(13 108)

(13 921)

(13 832)

(14 105)

(14 613)

GST payments

(5 700)

(5 700)

(5 700)

(5 700)

(5 700)

Grants and subsidies6

(16 729)

(17 641)

(15 892)

(16 151)

(15 904)

Supplies and consumables7

(41 345)

(44 084)

(42 951)

(44 163)

(45 119)

Other cash payments8

(14 197)

(39 170)

(19 264)

(19 401)

(19 510)

Total cash outflows

(196 612)

(233 616)

(209 892)

(214 305)

(219 893)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

792 

12 367 

40 892 

36 667 

42 737 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non-financial assets2

(2 125)

(13 700)

(42 225)

(38 000)

(43 340)

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(2 125)

(13 700)

(42 225)

(38 000)

(43 340)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

held

(1 333)

(1 333)

(1 333)

(1 333)

(603)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting

period

23 565 

24 165 

22 832 

21 499 

20 166 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

22 232 

22 832 

21 499 

20 166 

19 563