11    Department of State Growth

Agency Outline

The Department of State Growth’s role is to enable and support economic growth, and facilitate the creation of jobs and opportunities for Tasmanians. In doing so, the Department has five key objectives:

·       work with Tasmanian businesses and industry to support growth and job creation;

·       grow and support Tasmania’s visitor economy;

·       build Tasmania’s brand as the best place in the country to live, work, invest and raise a family;

·       support industry and business growth by strategically managing our infrastructure and transport systems; and

·       build organisational capacity by developing our people, safety, systems and culture.

The Department provides portfolio support for the following Ministers:

·       Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events, and Minister for Trade, Hon Will Hodgman MP;

·       Minister for State Growth, Hon Peter Gutwein MP;

·       Minister for the Arts, Hon Elise Archer MP;

·       Minister for Education and Training, Minister for Infrastructure, and Minister for Advanced Manufacturing and Defence Industries, Hon Jeremy Rockliff MP;

·       Minister for Resources, Hon Sarah Courtney MP;

·       Minister for Energy, Hon Guy Barnett MP; and

·       Minister for Science and Technology, Hon Michael Ferguson MP.

The Department also supports the Parliamentary Secretary for Regional Affairs, Joan Rylah MP.

The Department is organised into four key areas: Cultural and Tourism Development; Industry and Business Development; Transport Services; and Business Services. The Department supports the Office of the Coordinator‑General and Infrastructure Tasmania. State Growth works collaboratively and in partnership with other Government Departments to achieve growth in the Tasmanian economy. In delivering services to Tasmania and growing our State, we are client centric, collaborative, values based, results driven, innovative and creative, adaptable, efficient, and welcome and support diversity in our organisation.

This chapter provides the Department’s financial information for 2019‑20 and over the Forward Estimates period (2020‑21 to 2022‑23). Further information on the Department is provided at www.stategrowth.tas.gov.au.

Key Deliverables

Table 11.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimate allocations for key deliverables to be undertaken by the Department.

Table 11.1:       Key Deliverables Statement

 

2019-20

 

Budget

2020-21

Forward

Estimate

2021-22

Forward

Estimate

2022-23

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

AFL Licence Business Case

150

....

....

....

Boosting Business and Skilled Migration1

....

....

....

....

Business Events Attraction Fund

300

300

300

300

Business Growth Strategy

250

250

250

250

Coastal Pathway Project

1 680

3 120

....

....

Defence Strategy

500

750

750

750

Enhanced P1 Driving Assessment Service Delivery

300

150

79

79

Festivale

150

150

....

....

Flinders Island Business Inc. Support1

....

....

....

....

Hobart City Deal and Greater Hobart Act

400

400

400

400

Hobart City Deal - Kingborough Congestion

5 000

5 000

10 000

....

Mona Foma

1 750

1 750

....

....

No Interest Loans Scheme for Energy Efficient Products

250

250

250

250

Norske Skog Paper Mills

1 075

....

....

....

Northern Tasmania Arts Program

100

100

....

....

Office of the Coordinator-General

250

....

....

....

Regional Tourism Attraction Loan Scheme2

....

....

....

....

Roads of Strategic Importance3

2 200

5 413

9 125

9 125

Science and Technology Sector Strategy

70

100

100

100

Skilled Workforce to Meet Industry Demand4

950

1 950

....

....

Tasmanian Government Free Wi-Fi Service

150

150

150

150

Tasmanian Theatre Fund

200

....

....

....

Tasmanian Trade Strategy

1 100

1 100

1 100

1 100

TasRail Below Rail Infrastructure Funding

2 000

3 500

5 000

5 800

Taste of Tasmania Support

500

....

....

....

Tourism and Hospitality Supply

1 100

1 100

1 100

1 100

Urban Congestion Fund3

8 000

8 000

8 000

....

V8 Supercars

1 860

1 580

1 270

1 320

West Coast Wilderness Railway

4 000

4 000

4 000

4 000

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This initiative will be met from within the Department’s existing Budget allocation.

2.    This initiative will be administered by the Tasmania Development and Resources Board.

3.    The item reflects the State’s matching contribution for Australian Government commitments under the new National Partnership Agreement for Land Transport Infrastructure Projects.

4.    This item reflects a grant payment to TasTAFE.

AFL Licence Business Case

Funding of $150 000 is provided in 2019‑20 to support the development of a business case for a Tasmanian AFL licence.

Boosting Business and Skilled Migration

This program plays a critical role in growing Tasmania’s economy and population by attracting, nominating and settling skilled and business migrants to benefit Tasmanian businesses and industry sectors. This will ensure ongoing growth in Tasmania’s share of international students and skilled workers targeted to meeting current and future skills needs in Tasmania. Consistent with other states, an application fee will be introduced to support the expansion of this program and increase the quality of applications received to grow international students and skilled workers in Tasmania.

Business Events Attraction Fund

This commitment of $1.2 million over four years will provide financial support to attract significant national and international business events to Tasmania. Business events make a significant contribution to the State’s visitor economy, with the industry currently worth approximately $120 million annually.

Business Growth Strategy

The Government has committed $1 million over four years to support the development of new programs and initiatives to execute the Business Growth Strategy 2019 ‑ 2023.

Coastal Pathway Project

In the 2019‑20 Budget the Government has allocated $4.8 million towards the next stages of the North West Coastal Pathway project, linking the existing sections of the pathway between Sulphur Creek and Latrobe. This matches the funding provided by the Australian Government and the local government municipal areas of Central Coast, Devonport and Latrobe.

Defence Strategy

The Government will invest $2.8 million over four years to assist industry to develop a globally recognised brand and assist new business entrants from advanced manufacturing, food, health, Antarctic and ICT industries to diversify into defence and grow their customer base. This funding will also assist in developing and presenting a strong, united and consistent high value brand in domestic and international (allied) defence markets.

Enhanced P1 Driving Assessment Service Delivery

Building on the Government’s 2018 election commitment of enabling suitably qualified driving instructors to deliver P1 driver assessments to reduce wait times, the 2019‑20 Budget allocates $608 000 over four years to this initiative. This funding will assist industry to both develop the necessary training and authorisation framework as well as deliver the required technology changes and ultimately reduce wait time for novice drivers in accessing a licence assessment, especially in regional areas.


 

Festivale

The Government will continue its support for this event in 2020 and 2021, building on the success of this three day celebration showcasing the very best of Tasmanian food, wine, beer, cider, spirits, arts and entertainment.

Flinders Island Business Inc. Support

The Government recognises the unique challenges of living, working and running businesses in places such as the Furneaux Islands. Commencing from the 2019‑20 financial year, a dedicated officer within the Department of State Growth will be established to support the aims and objectives of Flinders Island Business Inc. Specifically, this will involve regular visits to Flinders Island by the Department to work with FIBI and local businesses to establish links to Tasmanian business networks and to provide an interface with government to maximise opportunities and initiatives that support business and economic development on the islands.

Hobart City Deal and Greater Hobart Act

In 2019, the Government entered into a landmark city deal with the Australian Government and the local government areas of Clarence, Glenorchy, Hobart and Kingborough. This shared vision will support Hobart’s growth as a vibrant, liveable capital city, which is part of a connected region linking communities, destinations and precincts. The Government will commit $1.6 million over 2019‑20 and the Forward Estimates to establish both the Greater Hobart Act and implement governance arrangements to build strong relationships that promote strategic planning outcomes and service delivery that considers the impact on, and benefits for, the Greater Hobart region.

Hobart City Deal - Kingborough Congestion

The State Government has committed $20 million over three years for better transport solutions and to ease traffic congestion in the Kingborough area. This is a component of the landmark Hobart City Deal.

Mona Foma

Building on the success of this five day festival of music and art, $3.5 million over two years is committed to support this major cultural festival in 2020 and 2021.

No Interest Loans Scheme for Energy Efficient Products

The Government will provide $250 000 per annum over four years to NILS to provide assistance to low income earners that have not previously been able to take advantage of the Tasmanian Energy Efficiency Loan Scheme.

Norske Skog Paper Mills

Funding of $1.1 million will be provided as part of an overall assistance package of up to $2.6 million to assist with product diversification, whilst ensuring long-term quality of product and building on the mill’s skill base to ensure long-term sustainability and local jobs.


 

Northern Tasmania Arts Program

The Government will invest $200 000 to support arts organisations based in Northern Tasmania to deliver high quality arts activities that strengthen the region’s arts sector, engage and inspire audiences and the wider community, and benefit Northern Tasmania’s professional artists and art workers.

Office of the Coordinator‑General

As Tasmania’s principal entity to attract and support investment in the State, the Office of the Coordinator‑General is a fundamental part of the Government’s agenda of developing and promoting Tasmania’s attractiveness for investors, and attracting investment and job creation. The Government will provide an additional $250 000 in 2019‑20 to underpin delivery of the Office’s expansive activities.

Regional Tourism Attraction Loan Scheme

The new $20 million Regional Tourism Attraction Loan Scheme will provide loans of up to $1 million to support the development of attractions in regional Tasmania to increase visitation, spend and overnight stays. Projects could include agribusinesses such as vineyards, distilleries and breweries developing accommodation and cellar doors, or adventure tourism business wishing to diversify and create new products that will attract visitors to the area.

Roads of Strategic Importance

The Australian Government has provided $530 million to a program of investment in Roads of Strategic Importance in Tasmania. Projects to receive funding through this investment program include:

·       Tasman Highway - Hobart to Sorell;

·       Bass Highway - Wynyard to Marrawah; and

·       Murchison Highway.

The Tasmanian Government has provided $133 million of matching funding to this program. This is funded within the State Road Upgrades ‑ North West and West Coast Regions and South East Traffic Solution, with the remaining $76.3 million from the Roads of Strategic Importance program.

Science and Technology Sector Strategy

Funding of $370 000 over four years will be used to raise the profile and brand of the science and technology sector, enhance engagement, career paths and capability in the industry, increase knowledge, awareness and foresight of industry and address critical science and technology infrastructure investment priorities.

Skilled Workforce to Meet Industry Demand

This investment of $2.9 million over two years will be delivered by TasTAFE. For details of the program, see chapter 27 of this Budget Paper.

Tasmanian Government Free Wi-Fi Service

Funding of $600 000 over four years has been committed to continue the Government’s investment in free public Wi-Fi service in key hotspots around the State, including key tourism locations.

Tasmanian Theatre Fund

This commitment continues the Government’s support to the professional theatre sector of $200 000 per annum in 2019‑20.

Tasmanian Trade Strategy

The Government will invest a further $4.4 million over four years to support the Tasmanian Trade Strategy 2019 ‑ 2025 that sets out a coordinated whole-of-government approach to work with business and partners to grow trade, both domestically and internationally. This funding is also complemented with targeted defence industry promotion under the Defence Strategy.

TasRail Below Rail Infrastructure Funding

The Government has committed additional funding of $16.3 million over 2019‑20 and the Forward Estimates for below rail infrastructure to TasRail. This additional funding will allow TasRail to manage, maintain and operate the Tasmanian rail network on a sustainable basis, and provides for essential annual maintenance of rolling stock.

Taste of Tasmania Support

The Government will provide an additional $500 000 in 2019‑20 to the Hobart City Council to support this iconic event for the next two years with the provision of any further funding to be reviewed as part of the 2021‑22 Budget process.

Tourism and Hospitality Supply

Funding of $4.4 million over four years provides a continuing commitment to support the delivery of the supply-side elements of the Government’s policy to grow the State’s visitor economy and support the delivery of the goals of Tourism 21 ‑ The Tasmanian Visitor Economy Strategy 2015 ‑ 2020. Funding will be used to implement programs and projects that accelerate the achievement of quality tourism, hospitality or business event outcomes in product and experience development, improved business capability and visitor engagement capacity.

Urban Congestion Fund

The Government has committed a total of $25 million, which commenced with $1 million funding in 2018‑19, as matching funding for approved projects under the Australian Government’s Urban Congestion Fund. Projects to be commenced will include the Hobart Congestion Package, Northern Suburbs Transit Corridor and Tasman Highway Intelligent Transport Solutions.

V8 Supercars

The Government will continue its financial support for a five year partnership with both V8 Supercars Australia Pty Ltd and Motorsports Tasmania Ltd to secure one round of the Supercars series championship in Tasmania from 2019 to 2023 at Symmons Plains.


 

West Coast Wilderness Railway

The WCWR provides an iconic experience that underpins tourist visitation to the entire West Coast region and supports growth in the regional economy and local prosperity. This investment of $16 million, over four years, will include replacement of rail, bridge maintenance, upgrades to rolling stock and the introduction of a further steam locomotive to meet operational needs and increase operational capacity.


 

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of State Growth are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth;

·       Output Group 2 - Infrastructure;

·       Output Group 3 - Energy Policy and Advice;

·       Output Group 4 - Resources Policy and Regulatory Services;

·       Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries; and

·       Output Group 6 - Subsidies and Concessions.

Table 11.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department.


 

Table 11.2:       Output Group Expense Summary

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.3 Skills Development1,2

118 718 

134 502 

123 483 

121 555 

123 643 

 

118 718 

134 502 

123 483 

121 555 

123 643 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 - Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

800 

800 

800 

866 

884 

2.2 Infrastructure Strategy3

1 595 

842 

787 

720 

738 

2.3 Land Transport Safety

25 981 

26 301 

26 734 

26 953 

27 246 

2.4 Passenger Transport4

3 676 

6 015 

6 155 

6 275 

6 398 

2.5 Traffic Management and Engineering Services

3 989 

3 628 

3 684 

3 737 

3 791 

 

36 041 

37 586 

38 160 

38 551 

39 057 

Output Group 6 - Subsidies and Concessions

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

1 133 

1 167 

1 202 

1 238 

1 275 

6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services4

41 313 

63 202 

65 150 

67 158 

69 227 

6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services4

25 165 

38 420 

39 368 

40 341 

41 344 

6.4 Non-Metropolitan General Access Services4

7 826 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

6.5 Construction of Streets in Towns

52 

52 

52 

52 

52 

 

75 489 

102 841 

105 772 

108 789 

111 898 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies4

46 040 

23 631 

25 883 

27 526 

26 891 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program5

161 792 

164 005 

158 859 

159 212 

159 707 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Energy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 - Energy Policy and Advice

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Energy Policy and Advice6

3 332 

6 274 

5 512 

2 552 

2 587 

 

3 332 

6 274 

5 512 

2 552 

2 587 


 

Table 11.2:       Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Coordinator-General7

24 007 

21 166 

28 212 

20 770 

20 164 

1.2 Industry and Business Development8,9

48 571 

44 535 

32 888 

28 547 

27 599 

 

72 578 

65 701 

61 100 

49 317 

47 763 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 - Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Forestry Policy and Reform10

3 196 

2 459 

1 935 

1 106 

1 128 

4.2 Mineral Resources11

11 234 

11 502 

8 066 

7 700 

7 432 

 

14 430 

13 961 

10 001 

8 806 

8 560 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

15 086 

13 148 

11 210 

11 274 

11 340 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.4 Events and Hospitality12

19 133 

24 152 

20 575 

15 536 

8 990 

 

19 133 

24 152 

20 575 

15 536 

8 990 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery13

9 719 

10 226 

10 466 

10 131 

10 337 

5.2 Arts Industry Development14

7 749 

16 505 

8 563 

7 874 

7 787 

5.3 Screen Industry Development15

2 836 

2 148 

2 168 

1 688 

1 708 

 

20 304 

28 879 

21 197 

19 693 

19 832 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

4 176 

4 215 

4 255 

4 494 

4 573 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

587 119

618 895

586 007

567 305

564 841

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Skills Development primarily reflects cash flows of existing commitments including grants to TasTAFE for the Agricultural Centre of Excellence and the Trades and Water Centre of Excellence, as well as the new funding for the Skilled Workforce to Meet Industry Demand initiative.

2.    In 2019‑20, funding of $92.3 million will be provided as a grant to TasTAFE to support training activity and operations. This gives effect to the Government’s commitment to ensure a minimum 70 per cent of training funding is provided to TasTAFE.

3.    The decrease in Infrastructure Strategy, in 2019‑20, reflects the cash flows of 2018 election commitments and the profile of Australian Government funding.

4.    Funding has been reallocated between Output Group 6 Subsidies and Concessions, Output 2.4 Passenger Transport and the Administered Expense item Student‑Only Passenger Services to more accurately reflect the manner in which the cost of general access and school bus services is incurred.

5.    This funding relates to expenses within the Capital Investment Program that are primarily maintenance costs and depreciation and therefore exclude asset purchases. For further information, refer to chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

6.    The increase in Energy Policy and Advice in 2019‑20 primarily reflects additional Australian Government funding for Project Marinus.

7.    The variation in Coordinator‑General reflects the cash flows of Industry Assistance Grants and Northern Cities Major Development Initiatives. This Output also includes funding for Enterprize Hubs, which is the responsibility of the Minister for Science and Technology.

8.    The variation in Industry and Business Development primarily reflects the cash flow of new initiatives as detailed in the key deliverables Table 11.1, as well as other deliverables including: the Community Infrastructure Fund; Employment Partnership: Jobs Action Package; and Improving Mobile Coverage for the Great Eastern Drive.

9.    This Output includes funding that relates to strategies and activities that are the responsibility of the Ministers for Advanced Manufacturing and Defence Industries, Minister for Science and Technology and Minister for Trade.

10.  The decrease in Forestry Policy and Reform primarily reflects the profile of Tasmanian Forests Agreement funds.

11.  The variation in Mineral Resources reflects additional funding for the Mining Exploration Grants Program, which finishes in 2021‑22, and the cash flow of the relocation of Mineral Resources Tasmania to Burnie, which is finishing in 2019-20.

12.  The increase in Events and Hospitality in 2019‑20 and 2020‑21 primarily reflects additional funding for Mona Foma, ICC Twenty20 World Cup and Taste of Tasmania Support.

13.  The variation in Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery primarily reflects the cash flow of Organisation Reform funding, and additional funding for the Permanent Children’s Exhibition at TMAG.

14.  The increase in Arts Industry Development in 2019‑20 primarily reflects the reallocation of grant funding for the Hedberg from 2018‑19 to 2019‑20.

15.  The variation in Screen Industry Development reflects the cash flow of additional funding for the Screen Innovation Fund.

Output Group 1:    Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

1.1 Coordinator-General

The Office of the Coordinator‑General is Tasmania’s principal entity to attract and support investment in the State. The activities of the Office are a fundamental element to the Government’s agenda of promoting and attracting investment for Tasmania and creating jobs. Outcomes of the Office of the Coordinator‑General are achieved for clients and for Tasmania by working collaboratively across the broader Department of State Growth, other state and Australian Government agencies, statutory authorities and local government. The Office operates broadly across four interconnected areas including Investment Attraction and Promotion, Major Project Facilitation, the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative and Red Tape Reduction, which incorporates the role of a Small Business Advocate who assists small businesses trying to resolve disputes with larger organisations.

1.2 Industry and Business Development

The Industry and Business Development Output:

·       focuses on maximising growth and job creation through business and industry. The Output provides a regional interface to engage with Tasmanian businesses and supports the State’s core industries to leverage their competitive strengths;

·       provides a range of services that support the growth of Tasmanian business. This includes support for small business through business development services and online tools, and information on starting, running and growing a business; and

·       includes a range of international engagement functions to promote economic growth including: export support; economic diplomacy; international brand building; businesses and skilled migration promotion; and Antarctic gateway development. The Trade and International Relations function works across government and industry partners to optimise Tasmania’s international market development across a range of goods and services sectors.

1.3 Skills Development

Skills Tasmania is responsible for:

·       managing Tasmania’s publicly funded training and workforce development system, directing Government training subsidies to training that is relevant to key industries; supporting innovation and economic growth; and delivering positive employment outcomes;

·       developing policy and strategy relating to skills and workforce development. This work has two key components: facilitating the delivery of high quality vocational education and training by TasTAFE and other Registered Training Organisations; and working with industry to support workforce development activities that assist Tasmanian enterprises to attract and retain the skilled workers they need to grow and to strategically deploy skills in the workplace to drive business productivity; and

·       managing the regulation of apprenticeships and traineeships, providing support services to RTOs and for the overall management and performance monitoring of the Tasmanian training system.

Table 11.3:       Performance Information - Output Group 1

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2016-17 Actual

2017-18 Actual

2018-19 Target

2019-20 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publish the Annual Red Tape Reduction Report and continue to reduce red tape by progressing the red tape issues identified in the Report1

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Investment facilitated by the Office of the Coordinator‑General2

$ million

306

378

340

340

International students commencing their studies in Tasmania3

Number

4 389

5 272

5 500

6 875

Supporting access to a skilled workforce through State nomination of skilled migrants3,4

Number

934

1 626

1 750

2 300

Grow the value of Tasmania's premium exports to international markets3,5

$ million

2 341

3 170

3 400

3 500

Provision of information and advisory services to SMEs3,6

Number

na

5 483

5 500

5 650

Policy, project and program advice and implementation meets the expectations of stakeholders7

Stakeholder feedback survey

na

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

VET Graduates employed after training8

% of total

79.3

80.3

79.0

81.0

VET Graduates with improved employment status after training9

% of total

56.7

59.7

62.0

62.0

Apprentice/Trainee commencements10

Number

4 850

5 035

6 500

6 500

Table 11.3:       Performance Information - Output Group 1 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2016-17 Actual

2017-18 Actual

2018-19 Target

2019-20 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apprentice/Trainee in training11

Number

7 595

8 290

8 400

8 400

Total VET commencements12

Number

na

19 652

25 000

25 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The Annual Red Tape Reduction Report lists the red tape issues that have been identified for the Government to take action on and captures the progress towards resolution and issues that have been resolved. The name of this performance measure has been updated since the 2018‑19 Budget.

2.    This measure includes investment where the Office of the Coordinator‑General has had a direct role supporting new, or retaining existing, investment in Tasmania; facilitating projects including providing advice, processes identification and navigation, and supporting engagement with linked parties; and/or by providing recommendations to the Government resulting in financial or other support to facilitate investment.

3.    The target for 2018‑19 was increased during the Annual Reporting process to provide a more aspirational target.

4.    The 2017‑18 Actual includes nominations under the 190 Skilled Nominated visa, 489 Skilled Regional visa and 187 Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme visa.

5.    Premium exports is calculated as the value of total goods exports less iron ores and concentrates.

6.    This measure captures the number of advice services and assistance packages, provided by Business Tasmania, Enterprise Centres, Digital Ready and targeted industry-specific grants programs. “na" indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced.

7.    Satisfaction and outcomes are measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients. The feedback focuses on the quality, relevance and timeliness of advice. “na" indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced.

8.    Graduates employed after training data is sourced from National Centre for Vocational Education Research Limited (NCVER) Student Outcomes Survey.

9.    Graduates with improved employment status after training data is sourced from NCVER Student Outcomes Survey. Improved employment status after training is measured based on employment status changing from not employed before training to employed after training, or employed at a higher skill level after training, or received a job related benefit, as reported by the graduate.

10.  Apprentice/trainee commencements represents the number of Tasmanian trainees and apprentices who began their apprenticeship or traineeship in the 12 months to 30 June. Consistent with national trends (although not to the same extent in Tasmania), this number has been trending downward since 2012‑13, but is now stabilising.

11.  Apprentice/Trainee in training represents the number of Tasmanian apprentice and trainees undertaking training as at 30 June. Consistent with national trends (although not to the same extent in Tasmania), this number has been trending downwards since 2012‑13, but is now stabilising.

12.  Total VET commencements represents the number of Government-funded Tasmanian program enrolments in a VET course that commenced in the previous calendar year. “na" indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced.

Output Group 2:    Infrastructure

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

The Government established Infrastructure Tasmania to provide a coordinated approach to the planning and delivery of all major infrastructure in Tasmania.

Infrastructure Tasmania’s core functions are:

·       assessment and prioritisation of all major publicly funded infrastructure;

·       leading the development of an infrastructure strategy for the State;

·       coordination of funding submissions under State and Australian Government budget processes, including;

-   the management of Tasmania’s interface with Infrastructure Australia;

-   provision of advice on a range of infrastructure related issues and initiatives;

·       coordination of strategic infrastructure solutions across all levels of government; and

·       the completion of reviews and investigations at the request of the Government.

2.2 Infrastructure Strategy

This Output delivers effective strategic policy advice on infrastructure and transport issues affecting Tasmania. This includes the development of policy frameworks, high level policy implementation tasks and the coordination of major infrastructure planning initiatives, with a focus on:

·       working with Infrastructure Tasmania to ensure that planning and investment in Tasmania’s transport system is strategic, considered and supportive of industry and community development;

·       developing an understanding of the key issues affecting our transport system and identifying opportunities for positive change;

·       developing strategic transport infrastructure policy frameworks to guide the development of the transport system and enhance the safe and efficient movement of people and freight; and

·       advancing Tasmania’s interests in relation to national transport and infrastructure policy reforms and issues.

2.3 Land Transport Safety

This Output provides the legislation, regulatory policies and practices to support an efficient, safe and reliable land transport system that connects people, enhances visitor experiences and supports state growth, with a focus on:

·       providing strategic road safety policy advice, supporting the Road Safety Advisory Council, encouraging community involvement in road safety, delivering road safety education and awareness programs for Tasmanians and visitors, and administering the School Crossing Patrol Officer program;

·       delivery of all registration and licensing services to the Tasmanian community including, but not limited to, developing and maintaining legislation, business policies, practices and procedures, providing information, collection of fees and delivering services relating to the registration of vehicles and licensing of drivers; and

·       developing, encouraging and enforcing compliance with state-based regulations for roadworthiness, vehicle standards, dimensions and mass limits, loading and operation of vehicles; and undertaking management of approved inspection stations and transport operation schemes.

2.4 Passenger Transport

This Output manages the regulation and delivery of passenger transport services that support the efficient, equitable and appropriate movement of people, including the administration of targeted transport assistance schemes and subsidies for students, the unemployed, aged pensioners and persons living with a disability, with a focus on:

·       the sustainable delivery of passenger transport services;

·       administering contracts for the delivery of regular passenger transport services in metropolitan, urban fringe and regional and rural areas; and

·       implementation of initiatives to support the uptake of passenger transport.

2.5 Traffic Management and Engineering Services

This Output delivers cost-effective safety improvements to reduce the incidence of road crashes and provides specialist, technical traffic management and engineering solutions for the Government and the community. Key projects include delivering specific projects under the auspices of the Towards Zero ‑ Tasmanian Road Safety Strategy 2017 ‑ 2026.

Table 11.4:       Performance Information - Output Group 2

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2016-17 Actual

2017-18 Actual

2018-19 Target

2019-20 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposals assessed by Infrastructure Tasmania within required timeframes1

%

100

100

100

100

Reviews requested by Government completed by Infrastructure Tasmania within required timeframes1

%

100

100

100

100

Provision of effective support to the Government by providing road safety and road transport policy advice and information to enable informed decision making2,3

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Motor Registry System availability

%

99

99

99

99

Vehicles found to be unregistered of those checked2,4

%

0.60

0.63

0.65

0.65

Heavy Vehicles found overweight2,5

%

3.2

3.1

na

na

Speed Limit reviews completed within 28 days of request2,6

%

62

72

80

80

Safety reviews completed within 28 days of request2,7

%

99

98

80

90

Wheelchair accessible taxis licensed2,8

Number

74

76

76

76

Average bus age on contracted services2,9

Number of years

14.2

14.8

15.0

14.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Proposals are publicly-funded major economic infrastructure proposals. Timeframes will be developed on a case by case basis and documented in Infrastructure Tasmania’s yearly work program.

2.    The Transport Services Group is implementing a new Performance Management Framework ‑ an integrated set of performance indicators to benchmark performance and support continuous improvement. It is expected that performance information in future years will be revised to reflect the new measures.

3.    Satisfaction and outcomes are largely measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office, Secretary, relevant Deputy Secretary and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients.

4.    This measure is based upon Automatic Number Plate Recognition cameras in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding between the Department and the Motor Accidents Insurance Board.

5.    From 2 July 2018 heavy vehicle compliance and enforcement became the responsibility of the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator.

6.    Speed is a key factor in road safety and this measure ensures that requests for speed limit reviews are completed in a timely manner. The 2016‑17 actual figure has been updated since the 2018‑19 Budget as this information was not available at that time.

7.    The Department receives many requests for safety reviews at junctions and other road locations and this measure reports on the timeliness of the safety assessment and response to request process.

8.    The 2018‑19 target has been reduced as a number of wheelchair accessible taxi licences on issue decreased in 2016‑17, following a review of the licence register which revealed a number of inactive licences.


 

9.    This is a measure of the effectiveness of Government strategies to ensure that the average age of buses on Government contracted services is appropriate. It is anticipated the average age will decrease once operators have contract certainty as part of the current bus re-contracting process. The forecast bus age for 2018‑19 has been revised down due to a better than expected result for 2017‑18.

Output Group 3:    Energy Policy and Advice

3.1 Energy Policy and Advice

This Output provides policy advice and support to the Minister for Energy on matters affecting energy in Tasmania. The aim is to maintain an efficient and effective regulatory structure for the Tasmanian energy sector, for the benefit of Tasmanian energy consumers, with a focus on:

·       implementing the Government’s Tasmanian Energy Strategy and developing the Tasmania First Energy Plan to ensure energy is well placed to contribute to, and enable, future economic growth in Tasmania;

·       supporting key strategic energy projects including Battery of the Nation and Project Marinus;

·       enhancing the framework to support the affordability and sustainability of energy markets and prices in Tasmania;

·       supporting the continuing implementation of reforms to the Tasmanian electricity supply industry;

·       supporting the Minister in his Shareholder Minister responsibilities for the State-owned electricity businesses;

·       advancing Tasmania’s interests in National Energy Market policy reforms and developments;

·       monitoring Tasmania’s energy security and continuing to improve the preparedness to deal with any high impact, low probability supply emergencies; and

·       managing programs and projects related to energy, as requested by the Government.

Table 11.5:       Performance Information - Output Group 3

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2016-17 Actual

2017-18 Actual

2018-19 Target

2019-20 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attend emergency security meetings and participate in emergency exercises at both the state and national level1

Number

na

2

2

2

Policy, project and program advice and analysis meets the expectations of stakeholders2

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The number of meetings that are held and attended each year varies depending on the level of risk and frequency of planned exercises. “na” indicates that data is not available or measurement has not yet commenced.

2.    Satisfaction and outcomes are measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients. The feedback focuses on the quality, relevance and timeliness of advice.


 

Output Group 4:    Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

4.1 Forestry Policy and Reform

This Output provides high level support on forest resource policy and management issues. It has a focus on forest policy projects of strategic importance as well as delivery of specific programs to assist the development and growth of the forest industry. The Output facilitates a number of inter-agency committees relating to forest policy and programs.

4.2 Mineral Resources

This Output facilitates mineral exploration and mining development and fosters and encourages responsible land management in Tasmania, with a focus on:

·       improving the quality and quantity of geoscience information, essential to the encouragement of mineral exploration and responsible land management, including the continued development of the TIGER data management system and a comprehensive three dimensional geological model of the State;

·       promoting Tasmania nationally and internationally as being highly prospective for mineral exploration and mining through targeted and strategic marketing; and

·       providing information for sustainable land use planning and infrastructure development decisions through activities such as geohazard mapping, resource identification to protect against sterilisation and management and rehabilitation of abandoned mining lands.

This Output also ensures the responsible management of the State’s mineral resources and a fair and sustainable return to the community when a resource of metallic, construction, industrial and fuel minerals or geothermal energy is developed. This is achieved by focusing on:

·       assessment and regulation of legal titles for mineral tenements; and

·       managing the royalty regime and collecting fees and rentals.

Table 11.6:       Performance Information - Output Group 4

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2016-17 Actual

2017-18 Actual

2018-19 Target

2019-20 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project management, policy advice and analysis is consistent with stakeholder expectations1

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Tasmania's percentage of industry's mineral exploration expenditure in Australia2

%

0.9

1.0

1.3

1.3

Area covered by modern geoscientific data collection techniques with subsequent 1:25 000 geological mapping coverage3

%

73.7

63.8

64.7

67.1

Programmed abandoned mining lands rehabilitation projects completed

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Satisfaction and outcomes are measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients. The feedback focuses on the quality, relevance and timeliness of advice.

2.    Statistics are derived from the first three quarters of each financial year from ABS series 8412.0 Mineral and Petroleum Exploration, Australia.

3.    The method used to calculate this performance measure has been altered. The definition of modern remote sensing data is now defined as data created from 1996 onwards. The definition of modern mapping has also been changed to reflect this - modern mapping is now defined as data produced or updated from 1996 onwards. Figures prior to and including the 2016‑17 actual were calculated using a previous method of calculation. Figures for the 2017‑18 actual and onwards have been calculated with the new definition and are not directly comparable with earlier figures. The 2018‑19 target published in last year’s Budget chapter has been revised upwards accordingly.

Output Group 5:    Culture and Creative Industries

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

Through the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, this Output aims to increase community understanding of the cultural and natural world by collecting, conserving, interpreting and researching material evidence within the areas of humanities including visual arts, history and anthropology and the biological and physical sciences. It provides the community with opportunities to experience the past and the present, invites participation in the State’s collection and offers a stimulating museum and art environment.

5.2 Arts Industry Development

This Output focuses on working with Tasmanian artists and arts organisations to grow this important industry. It aims to broaden the engagement of Tasmanians in the arts, highlight the State’s diverse arts and cultural sector and build the sustainability of arts businesses. This is achieved through a range of industry development programs and projects, coupled with the provision of funding to individual artists, arts organisations and major Tasmanian cultural institutions to assist their planning and realisation of projects, as well as to develop and present new work. These projects generate economic activity, create employment opportunities and add to Tasmania’s cultural tourist attractions. The Output also includes investment funding and professional assistance to Tasmanian museums (other than TMAG), art galleries and moveable cultural heritage organisations, as a key part of the Government’s ongoing support for the preservation of the State’s moveable cultural heritage.

5.3 Screen Industry Development

This Output aims to build on the success that has occurred in the sector through increased local, interstate and international screen production in this State. It also provides support for professional and project development, and the development of interactive games. In doing so, it seeks to promote Tasmanian talent and stories to a worldwide audience and provide employment and increased economic activity in the State. This Output also aims to position Tasmania as a centre for the creation and development of quality content in the digital media environment as an important part of the growing creative industries sector.


 

5.4 Events and Hospitality

This Output aims to build and sustain a strong events sector, promote investment and support for the sector, and maximise the value and return on investment of events supported by the Government through major event partnerships, grant and development programs, and a research program. The aim is to develop a seasonally balanced events portfolio that brings people to Tasmania; helps achieve the Government’s goal of 1.5 million tourists by 2020; builds the visitor economy; gets people moving around the State; encourages positive conversation about Tasmania; creates job opportunities; benefits communities through economic stimulus; and makes Tasmania the boutique events capital of Australia. This Output includes oversight of Princes Wharf No.1 Shed, a key event venue on the Hobart waterfront.

This Output also supports hospitality industry development through working closely with the Tasmanian Hospitality Association to address key issues facing the industry. This includes collaboration with Output 1.3 to support skills and capability development, career pathways, recruitment and retention, and provide consistent high quality service. This Output also supports raising the industry profile and improving profitability and sustainability.

Table 11.7:       Performance Information - Output Group 5

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2016-17 Actual

2017-18 Actual

2018-19 Target

2019-20 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

 

 

 

 

 

TMAG Total Visitors per annum1

Number

415 172

446 707

375 000

375 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts Industry Development

 

 

 

 

 

Attendance at selected cultural venues2

Number

282 456

319 274

324 000

324 000

Contribution to Gross State Product of selected arts industries3

$ million

62.5

66.6

67.0

67.0

Attendance at selected performing arts events

Number

282 456

na

282 456

285 000

Number of artists, arts and museum-workers supported4

Number

na

na

na

na

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screen Industry Development

 

 

 

 

 

Developed projects that advance into production5

Ratio

6:1

7.5:1

10:1

10:1

Leveraged spend in the State6

Ratio

5.7:1

4.7:1

4:1

4:1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Total TMAG Visitors per annum represents the combined number of visits made across the TMAG sites.

2.    Attendance at selected cultural venues includes only those organisations receiving assistance under Arts Tasmania’s Cultural Heritage Program. Organisations receiving assistance change from year to year. The target for 2018‑19 was increased during the Annual Reporting process to provide a more aspirational target.

3.    Contribution to Gross State Product of selected arts industries is taken from the annual ABS publication 5220.0 Australian National Accounts: State Accounts released in November each year. Actual figures are subject to change due to ongoing revision of data supplied by the ABS. This includes historical figures for previous financial years. The target has been adjusted to ensure that it is appropriate in the context of revised ABS figures.

4.    This measure replaces ABS data 4921.0 Participation in Selected Cultural Activities, Australia, which is captured triennially. Baseline data collected during 2016‑17 will inform the development of performance targets. Collection methodology of data for this indicator is in development as part of a KPI review of acquittal data, with the first figures to be available in 2019‑20.

5.    The industry standard ratio for developed projects advancing into production is 10:1. The ratio varies due to the time taken by some projects to go into production.

6.    The calculation of the actual Tasmanian spend leveraged by productions is updated as projects acquit against investments. This may result in previously reported actuals being restated to reflect the final actual position.

Output Group 6:    Subsidies and Concessions

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

This Output relates to payments for the provision of services for the Bruny Island Ferry, Furneaux Shipping and King Island Shipping.

6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services

This Output relates to the contract funding provided to suppliers of public bus services, including school‑day‑only services in the metropolitan areas of Hobart, Launceston, Devonport and Burnie. From 2019‑20 this Output includes funding reallocated from Output 6.4 Non-Metropolitan General Access Services and additional funding from the Administered Expense item Student-Only Passenger Services to more accurately reflect the cost of general access bus services. From 2020‑21 it is intended that the title of this Output be renamed to General Access Services.

6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services

This Output relates to contract payments to suppliers of rural and special needs school bus services during the school year. From 2019‑20 this Output includes some funding reallocated from the Administered Expense item Student-Only Passenger Services to more accurately reflect the cost of school bus services. From 2020‑21 it is intended that the title of this Output be renamed to School Bus Services.

6.4 Non-Metropolitan General Access Services

This Output relates to contract funding provided to suppliers of public bus services outside the metropolitan areas of Hobart, Launceston, Devonport and Burnie but includes services to, from, and between the metropolitan areas. From 2019‑20, funding from this Output has been reallocated to Output 6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services to better reflect for the cost of general access bus services. From 2020‑21 it is intended that this Output be incorporated into Output 6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services.

6.5 Construction of Streets in Towns

This Output contributes to the construction of streets as provided under the Local Government (Highways) Act 1982 and the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Capital Investment Program

Table 11.8 provides financial information for the Department’s Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 11.8:       Capital Investment Program1,2

 

Estimated 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asset Management

Ongoing 

5 782 

5 933 

6 076 

6 223 

Bridge Renewal Program

Ongoing 

4 224 

1 600 

2 200 

1 700 

Bridge Strengthening on Esk and Tasman Highways

10 000 

5 100 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Brooker Highway - Elwick, Goodwood, Howard Roads3

32 000 

.... 

1 500 

.... 

.... 

Domain Highway Planning3

5 000 

1 701 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Environmental Management

Ongoing 

599 

615 

631 

649 

Extending the Great Eastern Drive - Binalong Bay Road

4 500 

200 

700 

3 600 

.... 

Freight Access Bridge Upgrades

19 050 

4 400 

4 500 

.... 

.... 

Great Eastern Drive

6 300 

3 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Greater Hobart Traffic Solution4,5,6

93 775 

8 750 

12 980 

25 100 

25 150 

Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity

Ongoing 

4 700 

2 020 

2 210 

.... 

Highland Lakes Road3

9 000 

100 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Hobart Airport Interchange3

30 000 

9 500 

16 222 

.... 

.... 

Infrastructure Development

Ongoing 

1 125 

1 023 

1 051 

1 081 

Infrastructure Maintenance3,7

Ongoing 

72 111 

73 900 

75 727 

69 925 

Launceston and Tamar Valley Traffic Vision

75 080 

4 790 

9 400 

20 500 

40 000 

Midland Highway3,4,8

450 000 

52 716 

17 540 

1 471 

40 000 

Mowbray Interconnector

7 000 

6 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

New Bridgewater Bridge3,4

576 000 

8 000 

33 000 

65 000 

188 000 

Program Management

Ongoing 

1 248 

1 282 

1 319 

1 355 

Road Safety and Traffic Management3

Ongoing 

19 291 

18 214 

17 888 

17 568 

Roads of Strategic Importance3,4

606 251 

15 200 

57 413 

79 125 

79 125 

Roads Package to Support Tasmania's Visitor Economy

66 067 

20 740 

20 907 

13 084 

3 333 

South East Traffic Solution9

27 000 

4 900 

12 950 

2 000 

6 000 

State Road Upgrades - North West and West Coast Regions4,9

50 050 

3 600 

11 100 

10 020 

11 000 

State Road Upgrades - Northern Region4,8

54 182 

7 230 

17 852 

9 167 

10 733 

State Road Upgrades - Southern Region4,8

99 837 

25 150 

17 567 

15 267 

27 633 

Strategic Planning and Policy

Ongoing 

3 026 

3 098 

3 171 

3 242 

Tasmanian Journeys

800 

300 

300 

200 

.... 

Urban Congestion Fund3

84 700 

24 200 

31 500 

20 900 

6 100 

West Tamar Highway Traffic Solution

12 000 

5 800 

5 400 

.... 

.... 

Table 11.8:       Capital Investment Program (continued)1,2

 

Estimated 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Workforce for Now and the Future

200 

50 

50 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

323 533 

378 566 

375 707 

538 817 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The profile of funding for the CIP varies significantly from year to year due to the cash flow requirements of specific capital projects.

2.    All roads project estimates are provided at the ‘P50’ level. This is based on the project cost with sufficient contingency to provide a 50 per cent likelihood that this cost will not be exceeded. On this basis, projects are managed at a whole-of-program level to achieve a balance in cost estimating.

3.    This project includes co-contribution funding from the Australian Government. For further information, refer to chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

4.    This project includes funding beyond the 2019‑20 Budget and Forward Estimates period.

5.    This project includes the Government’s commitment of $20 million for Kingborough Congestion as part of the Hobart City Deal.

6.    This project includes the balance of the State funding contribution to the Tasman Highway Intelligent Transport Solutions initiative as part of the Urban Congestion Fund.

7.    The variation in Infrastructure Maintenance reflects the impact of current Australian Government funding profiles.

8.    The State Government’s contribution to the Midland Highway has now been incorporated into State Road Upgrades ‑ Southern Region and State Road Upgrades ‑ Northern Region.

9.    This project includes the balance of the State funding contribution to Roads of Strategic Importance.

Roads

Funding of $323.5 million has been allocated in 2019‑20 for roads infrastructure projects, with total roads funding over the Budget and Forward Estimates period estimated at $1.6 billion, including $690.8 million in Australian Government funding.

The Government is committed to the construction of the new Bridgewater Bridge which has a target completion date of 2024. This will ensure future infrastructure needs continue to be met by the Government’s strategic investment in important projects for the Tasmanian community.

From 2019‑20, road investment has been managed on a work program basis to allow greatest flexibility in delivery of projects, adjusting for stakeholder feedback and approvals timeframes. These programs include:

·       Greater Hobart Traffic Solution;

·       Launceston and Tamar Valley Traffic Vision;

·       Roads Package to Support Tasmania’s Visitor Economy;

·       Roads of Strategic Importance;

·       South East Traffic Solution;

·       State Road Upgrades - North West and West Coast Regions;

·       State Road Upgrades - Northern Region;

·       State Road Upgrades - Southern Region;

·       Urban Congestion Fund; and

·       West Tamar Highway Traffic Solution.

For more information in relation to the Roads Program see chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Rail

The Government has committed funding of $10.1 million for rail infrastructure in the 2019‑20 Budget for Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd, bringing total funding over the Budget and Forward Estimates period to $304.9 million, which includes $127.8 million of Australian Government funding. Funding under the Tasmanian Rail Revitalisation Program is provided as equity to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd via Finance‑General.

The Tasmanian Government has committed additional funding of $68 million in the 2019‑20 Budget to match the recently announced Australian Government contribution to Tranche 3 of the Tasmanian Rail Revitalisation Program. This will provide for upgrades of priority sections of the State’s freight rail network, with all key rail freight corridors benefitting from this investment.


 

Detailed Budget Statements

Table 11.9:       Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - operating1

329 914 

373 257 

349 297 

333 146 

329 979 

Appropriation revenue - capital2

154 175 

197 238 

215 457 

217 699 

259 964 

Grants3

163 338 

137 556 

170 800 

161 714 

283 798 

Sales of goods and services

4 255 

4 255 

4 255 

4 255 

4 255 

Fees and fines

14 012 

14 476 

14 862 

14 862 

14 862 

Interest

2 380 

2 380 

2 380 

2 380 

2 380 

Other revenue

1 972 

2 172 

1 972 

1 972 

1 972 

Total revenue and other income from transactions

670 046 

731 334 

759 023 

736 028 

897 210 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

65 779 

69 479 

70 178 

69 897 

71 141 

Depreciation and amortisation4

89 055 

92 226 

92 187 

91 840 

91 594 

Supplies and consumables5

102 366 

103 649 

98 342 

94 735 

96 319 

Grants and subsidies6

256 869 

307 067 

281 024 

263 894 

259 397 

Borrowing costs4

1 670 

2 902 

2 826 

2 754 

2 688 

Other expenses7

6 078 

2 578 

102 

891 

898 

Total expenses from transactions

521 817 

577 901 

544 659 

524 011 

522 037 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

148 229 

153 433 

214 364 

212 017 

375 173 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

Net gain/(loss) on non-financial assets

Total other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

148 233 

153 437 

214 368 

212 021 

375 177 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows - other non-owner changes in equity

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

Total other economic flows - other non-owner changes in equity

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

149 947 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

298 180 

303 384 

364 315 

361 968 

525 124 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating primarily reflect additional funding for 2019‑20 key deliverables and the cash flows of existing funding commitments including 2018 election commitments.

2.    The variation in Appropriation revenue ‑ capital primarily reflects the cash flows of additional 2018 election commitment funding provided for the Capital Investment Program. Refer to Table 11.8 for further information on capital projects.

3.    The variation in Grants in 2019‑20 and over the Forward Estimates reflects cash flows for Australian Government funding, in particular relating to the Roads Program.

4.    The increase in this item from 2019‑20 primarily relates to the application of the new Australian Accounting Standard AASB 16 Leases from 1 July 2019.

5.    The decrease in Supplies and consumables from 2020‑21 primarily reflects the profile of existing funding commitments including 2018 election commitments.

6.    The variation in Grants and subsidies in 2019‑20 and over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the cash flow of funding commitments, including Northern Cities Major Development Initiative projects, Community Infrastructure Fund, Coastal Pathway Project and grants to TasTAFE for the Agricultural Centre of Excellence and the Trades and Water Centre of Excellence. It also includes funding reallocated from the Administered Expense item Student-Only Passenger Services.

7.    The decrease in Other expenses from 2019‑20 primarily reflects cash flows for Australian Government infrastructure funding that is not capitalised.

Table 11.10:      Statement of Comprehensive Income - Administered

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions1

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - operating

64 840 

40 994 

41 348 

43 294 

42 804 

Grants

542 

80 

80 

80 

80 

Taxation

43 784 

45 536 

47 362 

49 264 

51 221 

Sales of goods and services

5 315 

5 412 

5 514 

5 619 

5 723 

Fees and fines

9 978 

10 134 

10 278 

10 490 

10 733 

Other revenue

34 108 

33 008 

28 008 

27 008 

27 008 

Total revenue and other income from transactions

158 567 

135 164 

132 590 

135 755 

137 569 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions2

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

462 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Supplies and consumables

136 

136 

136 

136 

136 

Grants and subsidies

64 704 

40 858 

41 212 

43 158 

42 668 

Transfers to the Public Account

93 265 

94 170 

91 242 

92 461 

94 765 

Total expenses from transactions

158 567 

135 164 

132 590 

135 755 

137 569 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

....

....

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variations in Revenue and other income from transactions are detailed in Table 11.12 Administered Revenue.

2.    The variations in Expenses from transactions are detailed in Table 11.13 Administered Expenses.


 

Table 11.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.3 Skills Development1,2

113 135 

119 214 

110 395 

109 961 

111 321 

 

113 135 

119 214 

110 395 

109 961 

111 321 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

50 

50 

50 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services Expenditure

113 135 

119 214 

110 395 

109 961 

111 321 

Capital Services Expenditure

50 

50 

50 

.... 

.... 

 

113 185 

119 264 

110 445 

109 961 

111 321 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 - Infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

800 

800 

800 

866 

884 

2.2 Infrastructure Strategy3

1 133 

782 

727 

660 

678 

2.3 Land Transport Safety

14 145 

14 248 

14 421 

14 644 

14 942 

2.4 Passenger Transport4

3 256 

5 595 

5 735 

5 855 

5 978 

2.5 Traffic Management and Engineering Services

3 730 

3 320 

3 384 

3 441 

3 499 

 

23 064 

24 745 

25 067 

25 466 

25 981 

Output Group 6 - Subsidies and Concessions

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

1 133 

1 167 

1 202 

1 238 

1 275 

6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services4

41 313 

63 202 

65 150 

67 158 

69 227 

6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services4

25 165 

38 420 

39 368 

40 341 

41 344 

6.4 Non-Metropolitan General Access Services4

7 826 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

75 437 

102 789 

105 720 

108 737 

111 846 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies4

45 578 

23 631 

25 883 

27 526 

26 891 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

154 125 

197 188 

215 407 

217 699 

259 964 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services Expenditure

144 079 

151 165 

156 670 

161 729 

164 718 

Capital Services Expenditure

154 125 

197 188 

215 407 

217 699 

259 964 

 

298 204 

348 353 

372 077 

379 428 

424 682 


 

Table 11.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Energy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 - Energy Policy and Advice

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Energy Policy and Advice5

2 854 

2 796 

2 034 

2 074 

2 109 

 

2 854 

2 796 

2 034 

2 074 

2 109 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services Expenditure

2 854 

2 796 

2 034 

2 074 

2 109 

 

2 854 

2 796 

2 034 

2 074 

2 109 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Industry, Skills Development and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Coordinator-General6

23 518 

21 177 

28 223 

20 781 

20 175 

1.2 Industry and Business Development7,8

41 343 

38 137 

28 127 

23 780 

22 849 

 

64 861 

59 314 

56 350 

44 561 

43 024 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services Expenditure

64 861 

59 314 

56 350 

44 561 

43 024 

 

64 861 

59 314 

56 350 

44 561 

43 024 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 - Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Forestry Policy and Reform9

1 535 

1 554 

1 580 

1 101 

1 123 

4.2 Mineral Resources10

10 725 

10 948 

7 513 

7 151 

6 887 

 

12 260 

12 502 

9 093 

8 252 

8 010 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

15 086 

13 148 

11 210 

11 274 

11 340 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services Expenditure

27 346 

25 650 

20 303 

19 526 

19 350 

 

27 346 

25 650 

20 303 

19 526 

19 350 


 

Table 11.11:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Tourism, Hospitality and Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.4 Events and Hospitality11

18 948 

23 967 

20 390 

15 351 

8 805 

 

18 948 

23 967 

20 390 

15 351 

8 805 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services Expenditure

18 948 

23 967 

20 390 

15 351 

8 805 

 

18 948 

23 967 

20 390 

15 351 

8 805 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 - Culture and Creative Industries

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery12

9 485 

9 992 

10 232 

9 897 

10 103 

5.2 Arts Industry Development

6 982 

15 738 

7 796 

7 107 

7 020 

5.3 Screen Industry Development13

2 836 

2 148 

2 168 

1 688 

1 708 

 

19 303 

27 878 

20 196 

18 692 

18 831 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

4 176 

4 215 

4 255 

4 494 

4 573 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services Expenditure

23 479 

32 093 

24 451 

23 186 

23 404 

 

23 479 

32 093 

24 451 

23 186 

23 404 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

Total Operating Services Expenditure

394 702 

414 199 

390 593 

376 388 

372 731 

Total Capital Services Expenditure

154 175 

197 238 

215 457 

217 699 

259 964 

 

548 877 

611 437 

606 050 

594 087 

632 695 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserved by Law

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution towards Construction of Streets in Towns by Municipal Councils (Local Government Act 1993)

52 

52 

52 

52 

52 

 

52 

52 

52 

52 

52 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

548 929 

611 489 

606 102 

594 139 

632 747 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

484 089 

570 495 

564 754 

550 845 

589 943 

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

64 840 

40 994 

41 348 

43 294 

42 804 

 

548 929

611 489

606 102

594 139

632 747

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Skills Development primarily reflects cash flows of existing commitments including grants to TasTAFE for the Agricultural Centre of Excellence and the Trades and Water Centre of Excellence, as well as the new funding for the Skilled Workforce to Meet Industry Demand initiative.

2.    In 2019‑20 funding of $92.3 million will be provided as a grant to TasTAFE to support training activity and operations. This gives effect to the Government’s commitment to ensure a minimum 70 per cent of training funding is provided to TasTAFE.

3.    The decrease in Infrastructure Strategy across 2019‑20 and the Forward Estimates reflects the cash flows of 2018 election commitments; Supporting Tasmania’s Road Users and the inclusion of the Hobart-Strahan Air Service in 2019‑20.

4.    Funding has been reallocated between Output Group 6 Subsidies and Concessions, Output 2.4 Passenger Transport and the Administered Expense item Student‑Only Passenger Services to more accurately reflect the manner in which the cost of general access and school bus services is incurred.

5.    The decrease in Energy Policy and Advice in 2020‑21 primarily reflects the cash flow for Advancing the Case for a Second Interconnector.

6.    The variation in Coordinator‑General reflects the cash flows of Industry Assistance Grants and Northern Cities Major Development Initiatives. This Output also includes funding for Enterprize Hubs, which is the responsibility of the Minister for Science and Technology.

7.    The variation in Industry and Business Development primarily reflects the cash flow of new initiatives as detailed in the key deliverables Table 11.1, as well as other deliverables including: the Community Infrastructure Fund; Employment Partnership: Jobs Action Package; and Improving Mobile Coverage for the Great Eastern Drive.

8.    This Output also includes funding that relates to strategies and activities that are the responsibility of the Minister for Advanced Manufacturing and Defence Industries, Minister for Science and Technology and Minister for Trade.

9.    The decrease in Forestry Policy and Reform in 2021‑22 primarily reflects the cash flow of the commitment for Strategic Growth Plan for Tasmania’s Forest Industry.

10.  The decrease in Mineral Resources in 2020‑21 reflects the completion of the relocation of Mineral Resources Tasmania to Burnie in 2019‑20 and the cash flow of the Mining Exploration Grants Program.

11.  The increase in Events and Hospitality in 2019‑20 and 2020‑21 primarily reflects additional funding for Mona Foma, ICC Twenty20 World Cup and Taste of Tasmania Support.

12.  The variation in Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery reflects the additional funding for the Permanent Children’s Exhibition at TMAG, offset by a reduction in the cash flow for Organisation Reform funding.

13.  The variation in Screen Industry Development reflects the cash flow of additional funding for the Screen Innovation Fund.


 

Table 11.12:      Administered Revenue

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Public Account

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth Capital Grants

80 

80 

80 

80 

80 

Drivers Licences

7 090 

7 209 

7 318 

7 477 

7 664 

Fines

12 

12 

12 

12 

13 

MAIB Commission

2 588 

2 653 

2 719 

2 787 

2 857 

Motor vehicle taxes and fees

43 784 

45 536 

47 362 

49 264 

51 221 

Other Regulatory Fees

1 078 

1 084 

1 091 

1 104 

1 111 

Other Revenue

Other Sales of Services

2 229 

2 250 

2 272 

2 294 

2 316 

Personalised and Custom Plates

465 

477 

490 

501 

513 

Photo Licence Fees

1 750 

1 780 

1 807 

1 846 

1 892 

Royalty Income1

34 100 

33 000 

28 000 

27 000 

27 000 

Sales of Goods

33 

32 

33 

37 

37 

Vehicle Inspection Services Fees

48 

49 

50 

51 

53 

 

93 265 

94 170 

91 242 

92 461 

94 765 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation2

64 840 

40 994 

41 348 

43 294 

42 804 

 

64 840 

40 994 

41 348 

43 294 

42 804 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agency Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Commonwealth Recurrent Grants3

462 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

462 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

158 567

135 164

132 590

135 755

137 569

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Royalty income from 2019‑20 reflects an adjusted forecast based on information from mining companies about expected Royalty payments, analysis of commodity prices and 2018‑19 receipts.

2.    The decrease in Annual Appropriation reflects the reallocation of funding from Student-Only Passenger Services to Output Group 6 Subsidies and Concessions and Output 2.4 Passenger Transport to more accurately reflect the manner in which the cost of general access and school bus services is incurred.

3.    The decrease in Commonwealth Recurrent Grants in 2019‑20 reflects the cessation of Australian Government funding for Exporter Assistance.


 

Table 11.13:      Administered Expenses

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution to Marine and Safety Tasmania1

2 613 

1 793 

2 463 

2 523 

1 003 

Conveyance Allowance

1 630 

1 630 

1 630 

1 630 

1 630 

Exporter Assistance2

462 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Government Contribution to the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

1 519 

1 519 

1 519 

1 643 

1 676 

National Transport Commission: Local Government Contribution

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

Payments for Forest Practices Authority

1 503 

1 533 

1 563 

1 594 

1 626 

Pensioner Air Travel Subsidy

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

Private Forests Tasmania

1 583 

1 615 

1 647 

1 680 

1 714 

Student-Only Passenger Services3

27 207 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Sustainable Timber Tasmania CSO4

12 000 

10 000 

8 000 

8 000 

8 000 

Tasmanian Icon Program - Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd5

8 100 

10 100 

11 600 

13 100 

13 900 

Ten Days on the Island

1 301 

1 326 

1 353 

1 380 

1 407 

Theatre Royal

856 

870 

883 

971 

990 

Transport Access Scheme

4 518 

4 518 

4 518 

4 518 

4 518 

West Coast Wilderness Railway6

.... 

4 080 

4 162 

4 245 

4 330 

 

65 302 

40 994 

41 348 

43 294 

42 804 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Public Account

93 265 

94 170 

91 242 

92 461 

94 765 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

158 567

135 164

132 590

135 755

137 569

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Contribution to Marine and Safety Tasmania reflects the cash flow of the Taking Recreational Boating and Fishing to the Next Level policy.

2.    The decrease in Exporter Assistance in 2019‑20 relates to the cessation of Australian Government funding.

3.    Funding has been reallocated from Student-Only Passenger Services to Output Group 6 Subsidies and Concessions and Output 2.4 Passenger Transport to more accurately reflect the manner in which the cost of general access and school bus services is incurred.

4.    The Community Service Obligation payment to Sustainable Timber Tasmania is to be adjusted to $10 million in 2019‑20 and to $8 million in each year of the Forward Estimates to reflect STT’s improved financial outlook.

5.    The increase in Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd reflects additional funding for below rail infrastructure.

6.    The increase in West Coast Wilderness Railway reflects additional funding in the 2019‑20 Budget for the replacement of rail, maintenance of bridges, upgrade of rolling stock and the introduction of a further steam locomotive.


 

Contribution to Marine and Safety Tasmania

This contribution supports Marine and Safety Tasmania in carrying out its functions of managing the Government’s non-commercial marine facilities and Tasmania’s marine regulatory environment.

Conveyance Allowance

The Department administers allowances paid to parents and guardians of students who do not have access to Government subsidised public passenger transport services for travel to and from school. It is intended to assist with the cost of providing private transport to the nearest bus stop or school. Allowances are also paid to Bass Strait Islands residents to assist with the cost of flights and ground travel to mainland Tasmania to access education.

Government Contribution to the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

The Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, one of the world’s finest small orchestras, continues to receive State Government support. The TSO plays to audiences throughout the State and its award-winning recordings are heard throughout the world. A versatile orchestra, the TSO is renowned for its expertise in music of the classical and early romantic periods, and is recognised internationally as a champion of Australian music.

National Transport Commission: Local Government Contribution

Under the reform measures that abolished local road tolls in favour of national heavy vehicle charges, $1.5 million is provided annually from motor tax receipts to local government to compensate for loss of revenues from heavy vehicles.

Payment for Forest Practices Authority

This payment represents the Government’s contribution to the Forest Practices Authority. The role of the FPA is to advance the objective of the State’s forest practices system and to foster a cooperative approach towards policy implementation and management.

Pensioner Air Travel Subsidy

Aged pensioner residents of the Bass Strait Islands are entitled to an air fare subsidy when travelling between the Bass Strait Islands and Northern Tasmania. The subsidy is a 50 per cent concession on one return airfare from their Island residence to Northern Tasmania each financial year.

Private Forests Tasmania

This payment represents the Government’s contribution to Private Forests Tasmania. The role of PFT is to facilitate and expand the development of the private forest resource in Tasmania in a manner that is consistent with sound forest land management practice.

Student-Only Passenger Services

This Administered Expense relates to contract payments to suppliers of fare charging student-only bus services during the school year. From 2019‑20, this funding has been incorporated into Outputs 6.2 Metropolitan General Access Services and Output 6.3 Rural and Special Needs School Bus Services to more accurately reflect the cost of these categories of services.

Sustainable Timber Tasmania CSO

This provision will ensure that permanent timber production zone land continues to be managed and is accessible and available for multiple uses. It includes funding for maintenance of the forestry road network to allow for continued community, tourism and firefighting access, management of public recreation sites, provision of forest education activities, special species timber management and ongoing facilitation of forestry research.

Tasmanian Icon Program - Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

The Tasmanian Icon Program is designed to utilise world-class Tasmanian talent to promote the State both nationally and internationally. Currently, funded icons are the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, Menzies Institute for Medical Research and the Tasmanian Tigers State Cricket Team (the latter two being funded through other agencies).

Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd

This payment represents the Government’s grant contribution to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd. The payment allows TasRail to manage, maintain and operate the Tasmanian rail network on a sustainable basis, and also provides for essential annual maintenance of rolling stock assets.

Ten Days on the Island

Ten Days on the Island is Tasmania’s premier arts festival. The Government will continue to support Ten Days on the Island to deliver a festival of excellence with a particular focus on regional Tasmania.

Theatre Royal

The Theatre Royal is Australia’s oldest continually operating theatre. The Government’s commitment in funding the Theatre Royal recognises the Theatre Royal as a significant piece of Tasmania’s history, part of the new Hedberg development and a centre for performing arts presentation.

Transport Access Scheme

The Scheme provides for payments to operators of taxis including wheelchair accessible taxis to support fare concessions and subsidies made available to eligible persons with permanent disabilities or medical conditions that significantly restrict their personal mobility.

West Coast Wilderness Railway

The West Coast Wilderness Railway is an iconic West Coast attraction that helps attract visitors to the region and Queenstown. This funding supports capital works and the maintenance of the Railway’s operations.


 

Table 11.14:      Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2019 

2020 

2021 

2022 

2023 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

58 651 

63 356 

61 521 

63 034 

65 047 

Investments2

89 915 

54 412 

48 112 

45 612 

43 112 

Receivables

6 625 

6 380 

6 376 

6 372 

6 368 

Equity investments

50 

50 

75 

100 

125 

Other financial assets

125 

146 

146 

146 

146 

 

155 366 

124 344 

116 230 

115 264 

114 798 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories

349 

352 

362 

372 

382 

Property, plant and equipment

179 777 

181 161 

182 862 

184 502 

186 153 

Infrastructure3

4 800 918 

5 670 791 

6 024 994 

6 376 035 

6 889 691 

Heritage and cultural assets

428 744 

428 986 

439 126 

449 266 

459 406 

Investment property

586 

586 

879 

1 172 

1 465 

Intangibles3,4

1 222 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Other assets5

12 739 

42 037 

39 958 

38 012 

36 301 

 

5 424 335 

6 323 913 

6 688 181 

7 049 359 

7 573 398 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

5 579 701 

6 448 257 

6 804 411 

7 164 623 

7 688 196 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

9 097 

10 630 

10 748 

10 866 

10 984 

Interest bearing liabilities6

84 116 

79 476 

70 857 

68 643 

66 634 

Provisions3

2 514 

4 461 

4 421 

4 381 

4 341 

Employee benefits

20 055 

20 935 

21 355 

21 775 

22 195 

Other liabilities3

8 761 

898 

858 

818 

778 

Total liabilities

124 543 

116 400 

108 239 

106 483 

104 932 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

5 455 158 

6 331 857 

6 696 172 

7 058 140 

7 583 264 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Contributed capital7

417 334 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Reserves

2 132 235 

2 927 040 

3 076 987 

3 226 934 

3 376 881 

Accumulated funds7

2 905 589 

3 404 817 

3 619 185 

3 831 206 

4 206 383 

Total equity

5 455 158 

6 331 857 

6 696 172 

7 058 140 

7 583 264 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Cash and deposits over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects administering loan schemes including programs funded by the Australian Government.

2.    The decrease in Investments in 2019‑20 primarily reflects the current estimate of loan advances including the Agri-growth Loan Scheme and Commonwealth Administered Farm Assistance Loan Schemes.

3.    The variation in these items includes revised estimates based on 30 June 2018 actuals.

4.    Intangibles are anticipated to be fully amortised during 2019‑20.

5.    The increase in Other assets primarily relates to the application of the new Australian Accounting Standard AASB 16 Leases from 1 July 2019.

6.    The decrease in Interest bearing liabilities from 2019‑20 reflects repayment of Tasmania Development and Resources borrowings, offset by the application of the new Australian Accounting Standard AASB 16 Leases from 1 July 2019.

7.    Contributed Capital has been reflected in Accumulated Funds from 2019‑20 onwards.

Table 11.15:      Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June - Administered

 

2019 

2020 

2021 

2022 

2023 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

3 910 

11 069 

11 069 

11 069 

11 069 

Receivables

112 

137 

137 

137 

137 

Other financial assets

72 

83 

83 

83 

83 

 

4 094 

11 289 

11 289 

11 289 

11 289 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Property, plant and equipment

.... 

14 

14 

14 

14 

Other assets

12 

 

12 

22 

22 

22 

22 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

4 106 

11 311 

11 311 

11 311 

11 311 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

1 173 

1 134 

1 134 

1 134 

1 134 

Employee benefits

386 

339 

339 

339 

339 

Other liabilities1

1 277 

17 

17 

17 

17 

Total liabilities

2 836 

1 490 

1 490 

1 490 

1 490 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

1 270 

9 821 

9 821 

9 821 

9 821 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated funds

1 270 

9 821 

9 821 

9 821 

9 821 

Total equity

1 270

9 821

9 821

9 821

9 821

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The variation in these items reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2018 actuals.


 

Table 11.16:      Statement of Cash Flows

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - operating1

329 914 

373 257 

349 297 

333 146 

329 979 

Appropriation receipts - capital2

154 175 

197 238 

215 457 

217 699 

259 964 

Grants3

163 338 

137 556 

170 800 

161 714 

283 798 

Sales of goods and services

4 260 

4 260 

4 260 

4 260 

4 260 

Fees and fines

14 012 

14 476 

14 862 

14 862 

14 862 

GST receipts

16 898 

16 898 

16 898 

16 898 

16 898 

Interest received

2 380 

2 380 

2 380 

2 380 

2 380 

Other cash receipts

1 972 

2 172 

1 972 

1 972 

1 972 

Total cash inflows

686 949 

748 237 

775 926 

752 931 

914 113 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

(58 797)

(61 998)

(62 624)

(62 350)

(63 456)

Superannuation

(6 602)

(7 101)

(7 174)

(7 167)

(7 305)

Borrowing costs

(1 760)

(1 760)

(1 760)

(1 760)

(1 760)

GST payments

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

Grants and subsidies4

(256 794)

(306 992)

(280 949)

(263 819)

(259 322)

Supplies and consumables

(102 572)

(108 115)

(102 485)

(98 699)

(100 012)

Other cash payments5

(6 078)

(2 578)

(102)

(891)

(898)

Total cash outflows

(449 502)

(505 443)

(471 993)

(451 585)

(449 652)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

237 447 

242 794 

303 933 

301 346 

464 461 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non-financial assets6

(240 115)

(244 975)

(305 304)

(301 867)

(464 482)

Proceeds from the disposal of non-financial assets

Net advances paid7

(27 884)

3 800 

6 300 

2 500 

2 500 

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(267 995)

(241 171)

(299 000)

(299 363)

(461 978)


 

Table 11.16:      Statement of Cash Flows (continued)

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings8

14 530 

(7 630)

(6 768)

(470)

(470)

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

14 530 

(7 630)

(6 768)

(470)

(470)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(16 018)

(6 007)

(1 835)

1 513 

2 013 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

74 669 

69 363 

63 356 

61 521 

63 034 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

58 651 

63 356 

61 521 

63 034 

65 047 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Appropriation receipts ‑ operating primarily reflects additional funding for 2019‑20 key deliverables and the cash flows of existing funding commitments including 2018 election commitments.

2.    The variation in Appropriation receipts ‑ capital primarily reflects the cash flows of additional 2018 election commitments funding provided for the Capital Investment Program. Refer to Table 11.8 for further information on capital projects.

3.    The variation in Grants in 2019‑20 and over the Forward Estimates reflects cash flows for Australian Government funding, in particular relating to the Roads Program.

4.    The variation in Grants and subsidies over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the cash flow of funding commitments, including Northern Cities Major Development Initiative projects, Community Infrastructure Fund, Coastal Pathway Project and grants to TasTAFE for the Agriculture Centre of Excellence and the Trades and Water Centre of Excellence. It also includes funding reallocated from the Administered Expense item Student-Only Passenger Services.

5.    The decrease in Other cash payments in 2019‑20 primarily reflects cash flows for Australian Government infrastructure funding that is not capitalised.

6.    The variation in Payments for acquisition of non-financial assets primarily reflects additional 2018 election commitment funding provided for the Capital Investment Program. Refer to Table 11.8 for further information on capital projects.

7.    The variation in Net advances paid reflects the cash flows associated with Tasmania Development and Resources lending activity.

8.    The variation in Net borrowings reflects the cash flows associated with administering loan schemes including loan schemes funded by the Australian Government.


 

Table 11.17:      Statement of Cash Flows - Administered

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - operating1

64 840 

40 994 

41 348 

43 294 

42 804 

Grants

542 

80 

80 

80 

80 

Taxation

43 784 

45 536 

47 362 

49 264 

51 221 

Sales of goods and services

5 315 

5 412 

5 514 

5 619 

5 723 

Fees and fines

9 978 

10 134 

10 278 

10 490 

10 733 

Other cash receipts

34 108 

33 008 

28 008 

27 008 

27 008 

Total cash inflows

158 567 

135 164 

132 590 

135 755 

137 569 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

(462)

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants and subsidies1

(64 704)

(40 858)

(41 212)

(43 158)

(42 668)

Transfers to the Public Account

(93 265)

(94 170)

(91 242)

(92 461)

(94 765)

Supplies and consumables

(136)

(136)

(136)

(136)

(136)

Total cash outflows

(158 567)

(135 164)

(132 590)

(135 755)

(137 569)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

3 910 

11 069 

11 069 

11 069 

11 069 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

3 910 

11 069 

11 069 

11 069 

11 069 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The decrease in these items reflects the reallocation of the Administered Item Student-Only Passenger Services to controlled Outputs.