3     Department of Education

Agency Outline

Education is a major contributor to improving social and economic outcomes in Tasmania, including health, happiness, life expectancy and productivity.

The Department of Education is responsible for the delivery of public early years and school education, adult and community education, and library and archive services throughout Tasmania. The Department is responsible to the Hon Jeremy Rockliff MP, Minister for Education and Training.

Education services are delivered across the State through 196 Government schools including early childhood intervention services, 12 child and family centres and 47 libraries. The number of students from pre‑Kindergarten to senior secondary is 60 680 full-time equivalent students.

The Department’s overarching objective is that all learners succeed as connected, resilient, creative and curious thinkers. It is these attributes that research shows will prepare learners for further education and the world of work in the 21st Century.

The 2018‑2021 Department of Education Strategic Plan, Learners First: Every Learner, Every Day, now in its second year of implementation, continues to inform the Department’s culture, priorities, approach to improvement and allocation of resources.

The Strategic Plan articulates the Department’s shared values of aspiration, courage, growth and respect, which guide behaviours, and inform decisions, across the whole Department. It also focusses the Department on the delivery of four evidence-based goals to improve outcomes for all learners: access, participation and engagement; early learning; wellbeing; and literacy and numeracy.

The Department’s efforts toward achievement of these goals is tailored to a learner’s age, ability and aspirations in the areas of: early learning; primary and secondary education; senior secondary education; and adult learning. For school education, supporting our schools to improve outcomes for their learners remains a major focus for all divisions of the Department.

The Government’s priority of continuing to improve education outcomes through the above is reflected:

·       by delivering a record 2019‑20 Budget allocation and continuing to deliver on the Government’s 2018 election commitments that provided a record $324 million over six years into education covering: $145 million in operating funding which provides funding for an additional 358 new staff including 250 new teachers; and $179 million in education infrastructure (across Department of Education and TasTAFE facilities); and

·       in December 2018 the Tasmanian Government signed the National School Reform Agreement, a bilateral agreement with the Australian Government, which committed the Tasmanian Government to provide an additional $340 million to Tasmania’s Government schools over the next 10 years. The Agreement will see an additional $490 million pass to Tasmanian Government schools over 10 years.

 

Early Learning

The evidence is conclusive that early life experiences shape a child’s life course. The early years are a period of rapid brain growth that lay the foundation for learning and development in later life.

As a child’s first educator, families play a vital role as partners in a child’s learning. High quality early learning improves outcomes in later life, particularly for children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The Department of Education early learning environments including: the Early Childhood Intervention Services; Child and Family Centres; Libraries Tasmania and schools, support families with young children to play, learn and grow together. In pursuit of its goal of early learning, the Department of Education provides children from birth to eight years with a great start to learning by:

·       supporting families with children from birth to five years to engage with learning through Launching into Learning (for children pre‑Kindergarten), Learning in Families Together (for children Kindergarten to Year Two), and CFCs;

·       continuing to support schools to deliver learning through play based inquiry from Kindergarten to Year Two;

·       working with the Early Childhood Education and Care sector to establish strong partnerships between the sector and schools, where education and care is co-located on a school site, to better support children and their families;

·       connecting people across the Tasmanian community who are committed to supporting families with young children through the B4 Early Years Coalition; and

·       regulating and quality assuring of ECEC services.

Investment in early learning in 2019-20 will: support finalisation of improvements to Kindergarten facilities to ensure that they are fit for purpose; see the commencement of construction of the new Child and Family Learning Centres; support the roll-out of free pre‑school for three year old children with the greatest need, delivered in partnership with ECEC Services; and continue resourcing to provide more support for learners in Prep to Year Two to engage in play-based, inquiry-led learning.

For more information on the Early Years visit the It’s a Great Start website at https://greatstart.tas.gov.au.

Primary and Secondary Education

Children and young people become increasingly independent learners as they progress through primary and secondary school and engage with the Australian Curriculum. Students benefit from a continued focus on literacy and numeracy alongside experiences that support the development of life‑long skills for problem solving, collaboration and critical and creative thinking.

Student engagement, achievement and wellbeing are intrinsically linked and especially important during periods of transition and change. The middle years (between age nine and 14) are a key developmental stage, where being genuinely engaged in learning and developing high self-esteem has a lasting impact on learning and life outcomes.

The Department of Education continues to focus on all schools improving learning outcomes by identifying a small number of evidence-based priorities that are then supported by the whole Department through the provision of advice, support and materials.

In addition, a number of system-wide priority actions, focussed on achievement of the Department’s goals, are underway, including:

·       improving participation and engagement of school age learners through: ongoing refinement of flexible learning options to support the engagement and re‑engagement of students who find it difficult to learn in mainstream environments; the development of a new model for funding students with a disability; and ongoing implementation of the Education Act 2016;

·       improving literacy and numeracy outcomes through the launch of the Literacy Framework and Plan for Action in 2019, which provides a consistent, evidence‑based, system‑level focus to developing and supporting the use of quality, high‑impact and evidence-based approaches to support literacy from birth to adulthood across the Department of Education; planning for the development of a numeracy framework; and the provision of a Literacy Coach to every school, which commenced at the beginning of 2019; and

·       improving learning outcomes for children and young people by focussing on their wellbeing through: the launch of the Child and Student Wellbeing Strategy; the provision of school nurses in primary, secondary and district schools; the ongoing provision of student support services (psychologists, social workers and speech pathologists) across the State; and providing targeted support to children and young people affected by family violence and those identified at risk by child safety services.

Underpinning this work is the Government’s ongoing focus on improving the quality of teaching, through the Education Workforce Roundtable, and its record investment in education infrastructure.

Investment in 2019-20 in school education will: support the educational adjustments to support the learning of students with disability through the implementation of a new needs based funding model; further deliver on recommendations for children and young people with disability identified by the Ministerial Taskforce; support the development of a Numeracy Framework; improve child and student wellbeing through the delivery of the Mental Wellbeing Action Plan, and targeted support to students and young people affected by trauma and behavioural challenges; more quality teachers in government schools; and ongoing investment in school infrastructure to support learning.

Senior Secondary Education

The successful transition from Year 10 to a meaningful learning pathway, leading to attainment of Year 12 (or equivalent), is vital to a young person’s ongoing engagement in further education, training or employment.

In Years 11 and 12 students move to studying a Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification course, a Vocational Education and Training course, or a combination of both. Flexible and socially inclusive education is essential to engaging a significant proportion of senior secondary learners in Tasmania.

The Department of Education delivers senior secondary education in eight colleges and 43 Extension High Schools, with three further extension schools to commence in 2020.

The Department of Education is working to improve access to, and participation and engagement in, quality senior secondary pathways for young people with diverse learning needs, starting points and interests by:

·       extending government high schools to Year 11 and 12, providing further opportunities for young people to successfully complete senior secondary education;

·       increasing the school leaving age and requirements from 2020 under the new Education Act;

·       providing quality delivery of VET qualifications through Trade Training Centres and Trade Skills Centres;

·       increasing access to school based apprenticeships and traineeships to connect school and employment through learning pathways; and

·       delivering the Years 9 to 12 Project, the purpose of which is to enable all students to achieve their potential through Years 9 to 12 and beyond in further study, training and employment. The Project is a joint initiative of the Department of Education, Catholic Education Tasmania, Independent Schools Tasmania, TasTAFE, the University of Tasmania, Skills Tasmania and the Office of Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification.

Investment in 2019-20 will continue to support access, participation and engagement through: the extension of every Tasmanian high school to Year 12 by 2022, including continued support for innovative partnerships between urban and rural schools and colleges to provide young people with the best opportunities to be job ready; and to strengthen and grow Australian School Based Apprenticeships. Wellbeing of our young people will be supported by a focus on mental health, and further investment in the school nurses program to provide a nurse to each government Senior Secondary College.

Adult Learning

Learning is a lifelong journey and adults pursue learning in Department of Education settings for a range of different reasons, including for careers and employment, personal interests, wellbeing or to support younger learners.

Improved adult literacy and numeracy levels are directly related to better social and economic outcomes and the literacy levels of parents directly impacts on the educational aspirations and attainment of children.

Libraries Tasmania is a statewide network that gives people in Tasmania access to library services, research and information, adult literacy support, community learning, online access, and archive and heritage services.

Libraries Tasmania also supports adult learners to re-engage in learning through adult literacy services and the 26TEN network of organisations and individuals that work together to improve adult literacy and numeracy.

Investment in 2019-20 supports the Department’s goal of access, participation and engagement through the continuation of additional resources to Libraries Tasmania which are being used strategically to focus not only on the purchase of contemporary library resources in a wider range of formats, but also the changing needs of the community.

This chapter provides the Department’s financial information for 2019-20 and over the Forward Estimates period (2020-21 to 2022-23). Further information on the Department is provided at www.education.tas.gov.au.


 

Key Deliverables

Table 3.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimates allocations for the Department’s key deliverables.

Table 3.1:         Key Deliverables Statement

 

2019-20

 

Budget

2020-21

Forward

Estimate

2021-22

Forward

Estimate

2022-23

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Delivering on Election Commitments

 

 

 

 

Education Act Infrastructure

7 400

7 000

....

....

Education Infrastructure1

13 200

28 550

43 500

43 000

Taking Education to the Next Level

24 360

37 060

46 510

46 380

 

 

 

 

 

Additional 2019‑20 Key Deliverables2

 

 

 

 

Assessment of Kindergartens against the National Quality Standards from 2020

410

770

742

746

Cross Sector Regulatory Function Review

2 065

1 945

....

....

Delivering the Education Workforce Roundtable Action Plan

545

680

780

1 030

Educational Adjustments, Disability Funding Meeting Learner Needs

4 000

8 000

11 000

11 000

Family Engagement Review

231

198

186

188

Laboratory Technicians

413

843

860

877

Nurses for Colleges

220

665

900

920

Principal Wellbeing Action Plan

1 197

1 223

1 249

1 273

Regional Sports Coordinators in Schools

350

350

350

350

Supporting Students Impacted by Trauma and with Emotional and Behaviour Challenges

1 250

2 000

2 000

2 000

Years 9 to 12 Education - Australian School Based Apprenticeships

540

395

310

235

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This allocation does not include $15.5 million committed for Education Infrastructure expenditure in TasTAFE.

2.    Funding for these initiatives has been primarily sourced from the additional State contribution under the National School Reform Bilateral Agreement between Tasmania and the Australian Government.

Delivering on Election Commitments

The 2019‑20 Budget continues to deliver on the election commitments of the Government, which invest a record $324 million over six years into education covering:

·       $145 million in operating funding which provides funding for an additional 358 new staff including 250 new teachers; and

·       $179 million in education infrastructure (across Department of Education and TasTAFE facilities).

Funding previously allocated under the Education Act reforms supports additional prep support, free pre‑school for three year olds and infrastructure funding for improving Kindergarten facilities and capacity requirements for the later leaving age.

Education Act Infrastructure

The Government has allocated $18 million in capital funding for Education Act reforms to support improvements to early learning infrastructure by significantly improving Kindergarten facilities, including major refurbishments and replacements. Funding will continue in 2019‑20, and will be used for meeting capacity requirements resulting from the later leaving age and works that facilitate flexible learning options to support the engagement and re-engagement of students. All Kindergarten works will be completed during 2019-20.

Education Infrastructure

The Government committed funding in the 2018‑19 Budget of $179 million over six years for education infrastructure of which $163.5 million was for government school infrastructure. Expenditure totalling $128.3 million has been allocated in 2019‑20 and across the Forward Estimates period, which will provide investment in new schools, school re‑builds, new Early Learning Centres and school farm redevelopments. This takes the total Capital Investment Program over four years to $184.2 million.

Two new schools will be built, with $20 million allocated to build a new primary school at Legana, commencing in 2021-22, and $30 million towards a new Years 7-12 High School at Brighton, commencing in 2020-21. Significant re‑builds will be undertaken at Penguin District School ($20 million, commenced in 2018‑19), Sorell School (an additional $22 million on top of the previously allocated $3.8 million), Cosgrove High School ($20 million commencing in 2021-22) and Devonport High School ($10.5 million commencing in 2020-21).

Funding totalling $7.3 million is being used to support a revitalised network of school farms across the State. This includes allocations towards school farm infrastructure at the Jordan River Learning Federation and Sheffield District School.

Funding of $15.5 million, over four years ($21 million over five years), has been provided to commence construction of six new Child and Family Learning Centres in the communities of Sorell, Kingborough, Glenorchy, East Tamar, West Ulverstone and Waratah‑Wynyard. Centres will provide access to services for families with young children, including health support and outreach and early childhood education and care facilities through partnerships with the ECEC sector. Four of these centres will be operational by 2024, with the first to commence planning for construction in 2019-20.

Taking Education to the Next Level

Funding of $98.6 million over four years is taking education to the next level, providing more staff in government schools, investment in the early years of education, supporting students with disability and continuing targeted support programs in schools. This is in addition to funding totalling $55.7 million previously committed through the Education Act reforms relating to the Working Together for Three Year Olds initiative and Prep support as well as extensions to Autism classrooms.

More staff in Government Schools

This is the Government’s second year of investing in 358 more staff, including 250 additional teachers and 80 additional teacher assistants within six years. This investment has already delivered additional teaching resources that: support principals to focus more on leading high quality teaching and learning in their schools; improve learning and support a network of school farms across Tasmania; and support the continued extension of every Tasmanian high school to Year 12 by 2022.

Early Years Education

Investment in early years, with a focus on early learning, provides the highest return on investment in terms of lifting education outcomes.

Child and Family Learning Centres

Operational funding has been provided for the six new Child and Family Learning Centres with four centres to be operational by 2024. This funding will provide, over six years, 12 new early years staff which includes a teacher in each centre. The centres will service the communities of Sorell, Kingborough, Glenorchy, East Tamar, West Ulverstone and Waratah-Wynyard. The centres will provide access to services for families with young children including health and education support, both within the centre and through outreach. Centres will also include early childhood education and care services delivered in partnership with the ECEC sector.

Free Pre‑School for Three Year Olds

Funding of $8 million is allocated in 2019-20 to support the continued co‑design and implementation stage of the Working Together for Three Year Olds initiative to be delivered in partnership with the ECEC. The 2019 pilot is underway, which will open up 55 funded places in quality early learning centres across five Tasmanian locations. Children are currently being enrolled, and are starting their early learning experience, which has been designed and delivered by the Department of Education’s ECEC partners. Once implemented in 2020, this initiative will provide up to $10.5 million per annum to support free pre‑school for those children who are the most disadvantaged or vulnerable. This funding was previously allocated under the Education Act reforms.

More Support in Prep

To support a play based inquiry led approach to the delivery of the Australian Curriculum in the Prep year, the Government will continue to provide additional teacher assistant support into the Prep year. The support is equivalent to 80 full-time equivalent teacher assistants. The first stage will commence in 2020. Funding for this initiative was previously allocated under the Education Act reforms.

Extend Every Tasmanian High School to Year 12 by 2022 (also Job Ready Generation 2.0)

Recognising the geographic, psychological and social barriers for learners to continue to access, participate or engage in education and training, after Year 10, additional recurrent funding of $31.5 million will continue to fund the Government’s commitment, over four years from 2018‑19, to extend every Tasmanian High School to Year 12 by 2022. 43 schools have already been extended to Year 12, with a further three to commence in 2020, leaving 11 to be extended by the target date of 2022. The extension of schools includes innovative partnerships between urban and rural schools and colleges, providing students with the best opportunities to be job ready. This allocation is in addition to the significant investment already allocated towards supporting this initiative.


 

Additional 2019-20 Key Deliverables

In December 2018 the Tasmanian Government signed the National School Reform Agreement, a bilateral agreement with the Australian Government, which committed the Tasmanian Government to provide an additional $340 million to Tasmania’s Government schools over the next 10 years. The following deliverables are largely supported through this additional funding.

Assessment of Kindergartens against the National Quality Standards from 2020

This initiative delivers on the Government’s commitment that government Kindergartens will be assessed against the National Quality Standards from 2020. The initiative will ensure: project management of the implementation of the NQS in government Kindergartens; ongoing support and professional development for early years educators and principals; systems and tools to track and measure progress and quality improvement; and administration of the NQS Kindergarten assessment system. Additional funding of $410 000 in 2019-20, with $2.7 million over four years, is provided for the initiative.

Cross Sector Regulatory Function Review

The Office of Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification, Teachers Registration Board Tasmania and Office of the Education Registrar support all education sectors in Tasmania. Taking on board cross‑sectoral feedback, the Government is committed to a review which will consider the most appropriate and efficient governance and funding structure for administering the functions of these entities to ensure fully transparent cross‑sectoral advice is provided to the Minister. Currently, each of the entities are experiencing legislative and demand pressures. Funding to meet these pressures has been provided in this initiative for two years, pending the outcomes of the review. This is a further step in the transition of educational regulatory functions across all sectors resulting from the implementation of the Education Act. Funding of $2.1 million in 2019-20 and $2 million in 2020-21 has been allocated in this Budget, which primarily represents funding that will flow directly to the three Statutory Entities.

Delivering the Education Workforce Roundtable Action Plan

This initiative includes three priority elements of the More Teachers, Quality Teaching Action Plan that have been developed in collaboration with the Minister’s Education Workforce Roundtable. Funding of $545 000 in 2019-20, with $3 million over four years will be allocated to: a review of the Teacher Intern Placement program and provision for additional placements; Teacher Success Profile assessments that provide for the establishment of quality assessment protocols that will be applied at critical teaching career touchpoints; and a trial to introduce Highly Accomplished and Lead Teacher certification for Tasmanian teachers.

Educational Adjustments, Disability Funding Meeting Learner Needs

Changes to education identified through the 2014 Ministerial Taskforce to support children and young people with disability will continue to be progressed with funding of $4 million in 2019-20 and $8 million in 2020‑21, increasing to $11 million in 2021‑22 and 2022-23. This funding will support a new needs based funding model for students with disability. This model will see special education funds aligned to the educational adjustments schools make to the teaching and learning programs for students with disability commencing in 2020. This initiative will continue to build on improved access, participation and engagement for students with disability in inclusive school communities.

Family Engagement Review

A total of $803 000 is to be allocated over four years for the implementation of the recommendations from the Government’s review of Department of Education engagement with parents, carers and families. The review involved consultation with the Tasmanian Association of State School Organisations, individual school associations, the Australian Council of State School Organisations, the Commissioner for Children and Young People, the Tasmanian Principals’ Association, Peter Underwood Centre, and Department of Education staff in schools and CFCs.

The implementation of the review recommendations is expected to build on the activity delivered through Community Empowered Schools (e.g. training for parent and community members in participating in school governance).

Laboratory Technicians

Additional funding of $3 million over four years will be allocated to provide an additional 9.3 full-time equivalent laboratory technician staffing allocations in combined and secondary schools and colleges. The new formula recognises the increased emphasis in science, technology, engineering and maths related activities and individual based learning. Funding of $413 000 has been allocated in 2019-20.

Nurses for Colleges

The Government continues to be committed to the introduction of a contemporary model of child and youth health nurses across all Tasmanian Government schools. Previous initiatives have provided 32.7 full‑time equivalent nurses to primary and high schools. This is the final phase of the Government’s School Nurse initiative, which will provide one nurse, a total of eight full-time equivalents, to each government senior secondary college. Additional funding of $2.7 million over four years will provide four full-time equivalents in 2020, and a further four full-time equivalents in 2021. Funding of $220 000 has been allocated in 2019‑20 to commence the initiative.

Principal Wellbeing Action Plan

The Principal Wellbeing Action Plan released in March 2019 recognises that achieving the outcomes we seek for learners depends on supporting principals to flourish, so that they can engage in leading learning and improvement in their schools. The Action Plan sets out a series of practical actions the Department of Education will take to support principal wellbeing over 2019 to 2021. Funding of $1.2 million in 2019-20, with $4.9 million over four years provides for actions that:

·       strengthen supports available to principals, including support for managing and improving underperformance, and a holistic approach to managing critical incidents, including specific debriefing and support for principals;

·       increase opportunities for interested principals to build their personal wellbeing tools, resources and mentoring connections; and

·       clarify the role structure within school leadership teams in the long-term, to better enable principals to focus on teaching and learning.


 

Regional Sports Coordinators in Schools

Earlier this year, the Government and representatives from across the Tasmanian football community announced the establishment of the Football Tasmania Board. One of Football Tasmania Board’s goals is to grow the base, increasing participation in the AFL game at all levels. The Board has been working on how to increase sports participation in schools for young Tasmanians, with the aim that they may one day choose to play AFL.

As a result, the Government will provide three Regional Sports Coordinators, one for each region, to be based in the Department of Education.

The Regional Sports Coordinators’ primary aim will be to drive participation in sport, although they will have a number of roles. Importantly, they will represent all sports. As a first step, the coordinators will encourage participation in sport, be a key point of contact for families and children who want to play sport and will be the primary point of contact for sport leagues and clubs looking to organise access to schools. They will also investigate and coordinate talent pathways, sporting equipment, uniforms, after-school transport options and infrastructure, and after-school training, where possible. In doing so, they may also assist schools to apply for grant funding.

This policy goes hand-in-hand with the Government’s Levelling the Playing Field and Ticket to Play programs which are aimed at increasing participation in sport.

These roles will commence early in the 2019-20 financial year and will be funded from within existing resources.

Supporting Students Impacted by Trauma and with Emotional and Behavioural Challenges

The Government is committed to better protecting our most vulnerable and at risk children and young people through commitments such as Strong Families - Safe Kids, and Safe Homes, Safe Families (Family Violence Action Plan). This initiative provides additional funding of $7.3 million over four years for government schools to increase support for children and young people impacted by trauma, and with emotional and behavioural challenges. This initiative will build capacity within schools including Trauma Informed Practice training and Professional Learning for school staff and student engagement programs. In 2019-20, funding of $250 000 will be allocated towards consultancy, and $1 million, increasing to $2 million permanently, for the provision of additional supports to schools, and to build the capacity of schools. The consultancy will be a critical input to inform a long-term, evidence-based approach to embed inclusive student support systems and practices.

Years 9 to 12 Education - Australian School Based Apprenticeships

For government schools, an initial action from the Years 9 -12 Project is to develop high level strategies to strengthen and grow Australian School Based Apprenticeships for Years 10 to 12, supporting students in government schools to enhance learning pathways to better align with the outcomes of schooling and to develop a local work ready workforce. The initiative aims to increase the utilisation of ASbAs for Years 10 to 12 students, providing benefits to students, industry and the economy. Funding of $540 000 in 2019‑20, with $1.5 million over four years is allocated for this initiative.


 

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of Education are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 - Education; and

·       Output Group 2 - Libraries Tasmania

Table 3.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department.

Table 3.2:         Output Group Expense Summary

 

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

 

Budget

Budget

Forward Estimate

Forward Estimate

Forward Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Education

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 In School Education1

1 019 034

1 067 953

1 108 674

1 154 809

1 198 119

1.2 School Support Services

13 188

13 124

13 297

13 750

13 965

1.3 Early Learning2

11 896

18 610

22 580

21 834

22 472

1.4 Statutory Offices3

4 828

7 607

7 736

5 937

6 037

 

1 048 946

1 107 294

1 152 287

1 196 330

1 240 593

Output Group 2 - Libraries Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Information Services and Community Learning4

37 609

36 952

37 663

39 125

39 002

2.2 Tasmanian Archives4

3 377

3 204

3 269

3 343

3 410

 

40 986

40 156

40 932

42 468

42 412

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies5

354 172

371 821

391 172

405 203

417 096

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

1 444 104

1 519 271

1 584 391

1 644 001

1 700 101

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in In School Education reflects the continuation of the 2018 election commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level including: Extend Every Tasmanian High School to Year 12 by 2022; More staff in Government Schools; School Farm Resourcing; Ministerial Taskforce for the Education of Students with Disability; continued funding for the Education Act Implementation; and Australian Government funding for Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes. The increases across the Forward Estimates also include the increase in State funding for government schools under the National School Reform Agreement. Funding for the Working Together for Three Year Olds initiative has been transferred from Output 1.1 In School Education to Output 1.3 Early Learning.

2.    The increases in Early Learning in 2019-20 and 2020‑21 reflects the transfer of funding for the Working Together for Three Year Olds initiative from Output 1.1 In School Education. The decrease in 2021‑22 reflects the cessation of the Pre‑Implementation component of the Working Together for Three Year Olds initiative.

3.    The increase in Statutory Offices in 2019‑20 reflects the allocation of funding to this Output for legislative and demand pressures pending the outcomes of the Cross Sector Regulatory Function Review to be undertaken.

4.    The decrease in Information Services and Community Learning and Tasmanian Archives in 2019‑20 reflects updated trust revenue and expenditure estimates to better reflect the ongoing level of activity required for Libraries Tasmania from within its own source revenue.

5.    The increase in Grants and Subsidies reflects additional Australian Government funding for Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes and increases in State funding under the National School Reform Agreement.

Output Group 1:    Education

1.1 In School Education

The services provided under this Output focus on the delivery of education to students in schools enrolled in classes from Kindergarten to Year 12. The purpose of this Output is to provide a range of educational services that will help students develop intellectually, socially, morally, emotionally and physically in a stimulating, inclusive and supportive environment. The services provided under this Output are crucial to ensure that Tasmania’s young people obtain the knowledge, skills, behaviour and dispositions necessary to continue their education and training, become job‑ready and lead happy and fulfilling lives. The Output has a strong focus on improving the transition of students from Year 10 and retaining them, so that they gain a meaningful Year 12 qualification, or equivalent.

1.2 School Support Services

The services provided under this Output focus on services provided to schools through Learning Services and Education Performance and Review.

Learning Services has a key role in facilitating the sharing of resources, knowledge, innovation and learning between schools and across the State and responds to schools on the basis of their school improvement needs. Learning Services works collaboratively with networks of schools to implement whole-of-Department and Government initiatives.

Education Performance and Review monitors and measures student outcomes in the pre‑compulsory and compulsory years of schooling including achievement against the national benchmarks established under the National Assessment Plan - Literacy and Numeracy. It also provides statewide support and information on reporting, as well as information and data regarding teacher assessment using the standards of the Australian Curriculum.

1.3 Early Learning

This Output has two focus areas. The first, through the Education and Care Unit, is for approving and regulating education and care services (long day care, outside school hours care and family day care) under national legislation. It is also responsible for the licensing and monitoring of all other child care services under the Child Care Act 2001. This Output also provides assistance and advice to education and care services. Funds are provided to eligible service providers as a contribution towards operating expenses and capital upgrades through the Education and Care Grants Program. The second focus of this Output relates to services delivered through Child and Family Centres.

1.4 Statutory Offices

This Output provides for the operation of independent educational Statutory Authorities administratively supported by the Department that include the Office of Tasmanian Assessment Standards and Certification, Teachers Registration Board, and Office of the Education Registrar. TASC is responsible for Years 11 and 12 accreditation and certification. The TRB manages the registration of all Tasmanian teachers employed in all educational sectors. The OER is responsible for managing the compulsory conciliation process for non‑attendance at school, the registration and monitoring of home education in Tasmania, and for administering the non-government schools registration process.

Table 3.3:         Performance Information - Output Group 11

Performance Measure

Unit of
Measure

2016‑17 Actual

2017‑18 Actual

2018‑19 Target

2019‑20 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Learning

Kindergarten and Prep2

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of children meeting the Kindergarten Development Check

%

 

71.4

 

69.7

 

75.0

 

75.0

Percentage of Prep students achieving: Expected literacy outcomes

%

86.8

 

87.7

87.5

 

88.0

Expected numeracy outcomes

%

86.5

87.3

87.5

88.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Education and Care

 

 

 

 

 

Service quality assessment visits3,4

Number

67

61

75

80

Visits to approved or licensed education and child care services5

Number

141

 

312

375

 

400

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literacy and Numeracy 6,7

Reading

 

 

 

 

 

Reading rates against National Minimum Standard Year 3

% of students at or above the NMS

94.4

 

93.9

94.5

 

94.5

Reading rates against NMS Year 5

%

92.3

92.6

94.0

94.0

Reading rates against NMS Year 7

%

93.1

92.5

95.0

95.0

Reading rates against NMS Year 9

%

88.7

91.9

93.0

93.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numeracy

 

 

 

 

 

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 3

% of students at or above the NMS

96.2

 

96.1

96.3

 

96.3

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 5

%

95.0

95.1

95.0

95.2

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 7

%

94.9

95.2

96.0

96.0

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 9

%

95.4

95.4

96.0

96.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal Students

 

 

 

 

 

Education outcome gap across Years 3,5,7 and 9 reading and numeracy8

%

6.3

 

6.0

5.0

 

5.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Access, Participation and Engagement6,9

 

 

 

 

 

Government school student satisfaction10

%

83.5

82.8

86.5

86.5

Government Schools whose attendance in Years 7-10 is 90% or more11

%

63.4

62.7

65.0

 

65.0

Direct retention rate Years 10‑12 for Government schools12

%

62.6

65.7

65.0

 

67.0

Apparent retention rate Years 10‑12 for Government schools (full-time)13

%

74.1

76.5

75.0

 

77.0


 

Table 3.3:         Performance Information - Output Group 11 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of
Measure

2016‑17 Actual

2017‑18 Actual

2018‑19 Target

2019‑20 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attainment Measures for 15 ‑ 19 year old students:14

 

 

 

 

 

Completed 120 credit points in education and training

Number

5 284

5 186

5 350

5 350

Some vocational education and training

Number

5 012

4 991

6 500

6 500

Tasmanian Certificate of Education

Number

3 871

3 756

4 100

4 150

A Tasmanian Certificate of Education15

%

58.9

58.5

65.0

66.0

A Tertiary Entrance Rank

Number

2 171

2 163

2 450

2 450

A Tertiary Entrance Rank15

%

33.0

33.7

35.0

35.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:  National Assessment Program: Literacy and Numeracy: Achievement in Reading, Writing, Language Conventions and Numeracy 2017, 2018; published at http://reports.acara.edu.au/.

Department of Education Annual Report 2017‑18; and Department of Education records.

Office of Tasmanian Assessment, Standards & Certification records and 2017-18 Annual Report.

Australian Bureau of Statistics, 4221.0 Schools, Australia 2018

National Quality Agenda Information Technology System.

Notes:

1.    The Department will continue to review the performance measures for this Output Group during 2019‑20 with the aim to better reflect performance against the 2018‑2021 Department of Education Strategic Plan, Learners First: Every Learner, Every Day.

2.    Actual performance measures are based on calendar years and include students from government schools only. The 2016‑17 and 2017-18 Actual values are based on assessments at the end of 2016 and 2017 respectively. In recent years, Kindergarten Development Check outcomes have been relatively stable with a modest decline. During the same period, the Department has refined reporting to schools, including links to additional resources to guide assessments, which may have influenced the ways teachers undertake these assessments.

3.    Services are assessed against the seven Quality Areas, 15 standards and 40 elements of the National Quality Standard and ratings are published. A risk based approach to new assessments and reassessments of services informs the targets. The 2017‑18 Actual data was impacted by the implementation of Council of Australian Governments Review changes, in particular those to the NQS. Quality assessment visits were paused prior to the legislative changes to provide time for services to become familiar with the new requirements, which has impacted on the number of visits undertaken in 2017-18.

4.    Actual performance measures are responsive to the emergent demands of the education and care sector, in accordance with the principles of best practice regulation.

5.    The number of visits to approved or licensed education and child care services is in addition to the number of service quality assessments conducted. The Department takes a risk based approach to undertaking visits to approved or licensed education and care (child care) services. Since the expiration of the previous National Partnership Agreement on the National Quality Agenda for Early Childhood Education and Care (and its quality assessment accountability requirements) in December 2018, the Department has reprioritised its activity and increased the number of visits to approved or licensed services as part of its commitment to continuous improvement and best practice regulation. The Department has also increased its staffing allocation to the regulatory authority, which has resulted in an increase in actual visit numbers from 2017-18 onwards. This regular contact with services ensure that the regulatory authority is more accessible and better placed to support improved outcomes for Tasmanian children. In line with this, in the 2019‑20 Budget, the visits to approved or licensed education and child care services 2018-19 target figure has been revised from the 2018-19 Budget Papers figure of 200 to 375.

6.    Actual performance measures are based on calendar years. The measures for the 2016‑17 Actuals are based on the 2017 calendar year, while the measures for 2017‑18 are based on the 2018 calendar year.

7.    Measures include students from government and non‑government schools.

8.    Aboriginal students gap is measured across Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 reading and numeracy: a lower figure represents a better result in closing the gap.

9.    The Performance measure government school senior secondary students (NSSC Census) has been removed as it did not take into account the changing cohort size of senior secondary students. Measures of direct and apparent retention are better indicators.

10.  Student satisfaction is evident in survey data from all government schools and is based on average agreement across 12 nationally agreed items of student satisfaction. Some variations from year to year may be affected by variable sampling across schools. Student satisfaction in 2018 is based on 15 434 students.

11.  Year 7-10 government school attendance level is based on a nationally reported measure of the proportion of government school students attending 90 per cent or more of the Semester 1 period.

12.  Direct retention is based on tracking individual students from the mid-year census of Year 10 in government schools, to the mid‑year census of Year 12 in government schools. The 2016-17 and 2017-18 Actual values are the proportion of the Year 10 students who were retained to Year 12 as at mid-2017 and 2018 respectively.

13.  Apparent retention rates for Years 10‑12 measure the number of Year 12 students in government schools divided by the number of Year 10 students in government schools two years prior, without tracking individual students. Figures relate to full‑time government school students at both year levels. The Australian Bureau of Statistics notes that care should be exercised in the interpretation of apparent retention rates as the method of calculation does not take into account a range of factors, such as movement between the government and non‑government sector and interstate/international migration. The 2016-17 and 2017‑18 Actual values are based on Year 12 numbers as at mid-2017 and 2018 respectively.

14.  Attainment measures include students across education sectors who have attained one or more units of credit in Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification accredited courses or TASC recognised or nationally recognised Vocational Education and Training by the given year. Completion and participation numbers are affected by state‑level cohort sizes. Further, rates of completion and participation are affected by economic circumstances and targets assume these circumstances, especially youth employment opportunities, will remain stable over this period.

15.  The proportion of students who attained a Tasmanian Certificate of Education, and Australian Tertiary Admission Rank, is based on the ABS estimated residential population in Tasmania, proportionally age-weighted to students obtaining TCE, commonly 17 or 18 years old as at 30 June. This proportional measure has been introduced because completion and participation numbers are affected by state‑level cohort sizes. The 2016‑17 and 2017‑18 Actual values are based on TCE assessments at the end of 2017 and 2018 respectively.


 

Output Group 2:    Libraries Tasmania

2.1 Information Services and Community Learning

This Output provides for the lifelong learning of all Tasmanians through the delivery of information, education and training, literacy support and other community services through the Libraries Tasmania network.

2.2 Tasmanian Archives

This Output focuses on the provision of Tasmanian Information Services and the management of Tasmania’s Archival and Heritage Collection.

Table 3.4:         Performance Information - Output Group 2

 

Performance Measure1

Unit of
Measure

2016‑17

Actual

2017‑18

Actual

2018-19

Target

2019-20

Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of people satisfied with Libraries Tasmania services1

%

....

....

90

95

Average of library loans per lending item per annum

Number

5.96

5.48

6.00

5.80

Number of visits to archive and heritage pages on Libraries Tasmania websites2

Number

924 585

1 015 628

1 000 000

925 000

Attendance in Libraries Tasmania programs and events (per annum per 1 000 people)

Number

178

191

200

200

Percentage of people who feel more confident using digital technology after receiving support from Libraries Tasmania staff (including volunteers), or participating in courses1,3

%

more confident

....

....

90

90

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    As was highlighted in the 2018-19 Budget papers, Libraries Tasmania has revised its performance measures to better reflect its strategic focus on client-centred services and programs. Two of the five measures introduced in 2018‑19 are for client outcomes using evidence of client experiences as the basis for continuous performance improvement. Data for the measures ‘Percentage of people satisfied with Libraries Tasmania services’ and ‘Percentage of people who feel more confident using digital technology after receiving support from Libraries Tasmania staff (including volunteers), or participating in courses’ have been collected for the first time in 2018-19. Therefore, there is no actual data for these measures for the 2016-17 and 2017-18 financial years.

2.    Despite an increase in visits between 2016-17 and 2017-18, the target for this measure has been adjusted from one million visits in 2018-19 to 925 000 visits for 2019-20. This is due to online search system improvements made in the 2018-19 financial year. While these system changes enable clients to more easily search for items in the collection, the changes have required a different method for collecting some of the visit data that count towards the measure, which is expected to lead to a decrease in visits in the 2019-20 financial year.

3.    In the 2018-19 Budget, Libraries Tasmania proposed that this measure have the unit of measure: ‘% confident or very confident’. This unit of measure was chosen because, at the time, as it was seen as being best able to be captured through a five‑option Likert scale survey tool, where ‘confident’ and ‘very confident’ responses comprised a ‘more confident’ outcome. In 2019, the survey methodology for this measure was improved by using a simpler and more direct, closed-ended question ‘Do you feel more confident using digital technology after receiving support or attending this course?’. In line with this more effective methodology, this measure’s unit of measure has been changed to ‘% more confident’.


 

Capital Investment Program

Table 3.5 provides financial information for the Department’s Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 3.5:         Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

 

Total

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Cost

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Election Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

Devonport High

10 500

....

500

6 500

3 500

Legana Primary

20 000

....

....

5 000

10 000

New Brighton High School

30 000

....

1 000

2 000

12 000

New K-12 Penguin School

20 000

4 750

7 500

7 500

....

New K-12 Sorell School1

22 000

....

6 000

11 000

5 000

Revitalising Cosgrove High School

20 000

....

....

5 000

7 500

School Farm Redevelopment (Brighton/JRLF)

4 300

300

4 000

....

....

School Farm Redevelopment (Sheffield)

3 000

3 000

....

....

....

School Infrastructure Upgrades

6 770

3 150

3 050

....

....

Six New Child and Family Learning Centres

21 000

500

5 000

5 000

5 000

Year 7-12 Implementation Plan - Capital2

6 000

1 500

1 500

1 500

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Existing Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

East Launceston Primary School

4 500

2 300

....

....

....

Education Act Implementation - Capital

18 000

7 400

7 000

....

....

Hobart College

2 500

2 050

....

....

....

Illawarra Primary School

2 900

450

....

....

....

Lansdowne Crescent Primary School

4 730

1 145

3 585

....

....

Molesworth Primary School

1 890

260

1 630

....

....

Montagu Bay Primary School

1 750

1 550

....

....

....

Riverside High School

12 000

7 100

....

....

....

Snug Primary School

2 500

2 110

....

....

....

Sorell School1

3 750

1 000

2 525

....

....


 

Table 3.5:         Capital Investment Program (continued)

 

Estimated

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

 

Total

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Cost

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Southern Support School

4 300

4 000

....

....

....

Spreyton Primary School

1 655

260

1 395

....

....

Taroona High School

5 000

4 450

....

....

....

Tasmanian Archives

3 000

2 200

....

....

....

Year 7-12 Implementation Plan - Capital2

10 500

1 500

1 500

500

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

50 975

46 185

44 000

43 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2018 election commitment funding of $22 million for the New K-12 Sorell School is in addition to the funding of $3.8 million previously allocated to the project in 2016-17.

2.    The 2018 election commitment funding of $6 million over four years is in addition to the funding of $4.5 million allocated in the 2017-18 Budget to extend this project.

Overview

As part of the Building Your Future election commitments, the Tasmanian Government is delivering more than $179 million in new capital works projects over six years for public education around the State, including two new schools, four major school redevelopments and six new early learning centres. Expenditure totalling $184.2 million has been allocated to these and other important investments over 2019‑20 and the Forward Estimates period.

Through the Get Involved campaign, the Department is undertaking extensive community consultation to help inform planning for these important projects. Education plays a critical role in our children’s future and Get Involved provides an important opportunity for Tasmanians to be part of shaping their local schools and communities. To get involved, visit the Department’s website at www.education.tas.gov.au/get-involved.

To also improve strategic planning, the Department of Education is implementing a new asset management system which, along with the progressive collection of more detailed infrastructure condition assessment data, will enhance decision making in respect of long-term capital investment prioritisation.

Devonport High School Redevelopment

Funding of $10.5 million has been allocated over three years, starting in 2020-21 for a major redevelopment of Devonport High School including the provision of contemporary learning environments, support spaces and administration, and car parking improvements.

East Launceston Primary School

Funding of $2.3 million has been allocated in 2019-20 to finalise a $4.5 million project for the provision of new Kindergarten facilities, general learning areas and a multi‑purpose facility to cater for increased enrolments at East Launceston Primary School.

Education Act Implementation - Capital

Funding of $7.4 million has been allocated in 2019-20 in the second year of the $18 million allocation to the Education Act reforms. This investment is supporting improvements to early learning infrastructure, by significantly improving Kindergarten facilities, including major refurbishments and replacements. Funding is also being used to meet capacity requirements resulting from the later leaving age and works that facilitate flexible learning options to support the engagement and re-engagement of students. All Kindergarten works will be completed during 2019-20.

Hobart College

Funding of $2.1 million has been allocated in the final year of a two year project commencing in 2018-19 to refurbish the Hobart College Theatrette. The works will update the facility providing a contemporary and safe environment for the school and the wider community.

Illawarra Primary School

Funding of $450 000 has been allocated in 2019-20 to finalise a project that will deliver additional learning support areas, and refurbishment of existing classrooms and the administration block at Illawarra Primary School. The total cost of the project is $2.9 million.

Lansdowne Crescent Primary School

Funding totalling $4.7 million has been allocated for a two year project providing for the construction of additional learning areas and amenities, refurbishment of existing classrooms, staff and administration areas and amenities. The project will commence in 2019-20 with an allocation of $1.1 million.

Molesworth Primary School

Funding totalling $1.9 million has been allocated for a two year project to replace a demountable building with permanent contemporary learning and breakout spaces; relocation of the Kindergarten playground; and an upgrade of other infrastructure. This project will commence in 2019-20 with an allocation of $260 000.

Montagu Bay Primary School

Funding of $1.6 million has been allocated in the second year of a two year $1.8 million project for the construction of general learning and support areas and additional car parking at Montagu Bay Primary School to cater for enrolment demand.

New K-12 Penguin District School

Funding of $4.8 million has been allocated in 2019-20 to commence the $20 million redevelopment of Penguin District School to a Kindergarten to Year 12 school. This project will consolidate the current two campuses on a single site and include an Early Childhood Education and Care service, delivered in partnership with an ECEC provider. This project will be completed in 2021-22.

Riverside High School

Funding of $7.1 million has been allocated in 2019-20 to finalise a three year $12 million project to modernise facilities at Riverside High School.

School Farm Redevelopment Brighton

Funding of $300 000 has been allocated in 2019-20 for the redevelopment of the Jordan River Learning Federation Farm, with $4 million in 2020-21 to complete the project.

School Farm Redevelopment Sheffield

Funding of $3 million has been allocated in 2019-20 for the redevelopment of the Sheffield School Farm.

School Infrastructure Upgrades

Funding of $3.2 million has been allocated in 2019-20 in the second year of a three year $6.8 million program to provide infrastructure upgrades at Launceston College, Molesworth Environment Centre, Hellyer College and Ulverstone Primary School.

Six New Child and Family Learning Centres

Total funding of $21 million, with $15.5 million allocated over the 2019‑20 Budget and Forward Estimates period, has been allocated toward the construction of six new Child and Family Learning Centres. The new centres will be located in the Sorell, Kingborough, Glenorchy, East Tamar, West Ulverstone and Waratah‑Wynyard communities and will provide a one-stop shop for services to families with young children. Services at the Child and Family Learning Centres will include health, support and outreach and will include ECEC services designed in partnership with the ECEC sector. Four centres will be operational by 2024.

Snug Primary School

Funding of $2.1 million has been allocated in the final year of a two year project, to construct a new gymnasium and presentation hall at Snug Primary School. Work on this project commenced in 2018-19.

Sorell School

Funding of $1 million has been allocated in 2019-20 to continue the first stage of this $3.8 million project, to provide contemporary learning areas at Sorell School. This is in addition to the $22 million project commencing in 2020-21 for the redevelopment of Sorell School to consolidate the school and create state of the art Kindergarten to Year 12 learning facilities, including a new science, technology, engineering and maths facility. The project also allows for an Early Childhood Education and Care Centre.

Southern Support School

Funding of $4 million has been allocated in 2019-20 to provide additional flexible learning spaces with associated independent learning spaces; additional amenities suitable for people with disabilities, breakout spaces, and staff facilities at the Southern Support School. The total cost of the project is $4.3 million.

Spreyton Primary School

Funding totalling $1.7 million has been allocated for a two year project to provide new Kindergarten learning facilities and for the relocation of the playground at Spreyton Primary School. The project will commence in 2019-20 with an allocation of $260 000.

Taroona High School

Funding of $4.5 million has been allocated in 2019-20 to finalise a $5 million project to provide contemporary learning areas, support spaces and music and drama facilities at Taroona High School.

Tasmanian Archives

Funding of $2.2 million has been allocated in 2019-20 in the second year of a $3 million allocation for the relocation of the Tasmanian Archive Office storage facility to Geilston Bay. Work on this project commenced in 2018-19.

Year 7-12 Implementation Plan - Capital

Funding of $8 million over three years will be expended to continue the Government’s commitment to Extend Every Tasmanian High School to Year 12 by 2022. The number of schools already extended to Year 12 is 43, with a further three to commence in 2020, leaving 11 to be extended by 2022.


 

Detailed Budget Statements

Table 3.6:         Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

 

 

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - operating1

967 460

1 008 997

1 059 339

1 113 238

1 155 689

Appropriation revenue - capital2

59 030

50 975

46 185

44 000

43 000

Grants3

8 121

19 552

16 326

4 829

2 433

Sales of goods and services

37 248

39 634

39 741

39 767

39 744

Fees and fines

200

171

175

178

182

Interest

680

665

660

650

635

Other revenue4

30 688

24 804

24 809

24 809

24 605

Total revenue and other income from transactions

1 103 427

1 144 798

1 187 235

1 227 471

1 266 288

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits5

810 925

861 678

884 441

893 471

930 047

Depreciation and amortisation

51 284

52 979

53 099

53 349

53 349

Supplies and consumables6

203 218

201 474

220 763

256 554

262 360

Grants and subsidies7

12 618

18 406

21 771

22 209

23 652

Borrowing costs8

....

529

465

397

460

Other expenses

11 887

12 384

12 680

12 818

13 137

Total expenses from transactions

1 089 932

1 147 450

1 193 219

1 238 798

1 283 005

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

13 495

(2 652)

(5 984)

(11 327)

(16 717)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows included in net result

 

 

 

 

 

Net gain/(loss) on non-financial assets

243

243

243

243

243

Total other economic flows included in net result

243

243

243

243

243

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

13 738

(2 409)

(5 741)

(11 084)

(16 474)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other economic flows - other non-owner changes in equity

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

33 538

38 768

43 723

43 517

43 517

Total other economic flows - other non-owner changes in equity

33 538

38 768

43 723

43 517

43 517

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

47 276

36 359

37 982

32 433

27 043

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating reflects the continuation of the 2018 election commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level including: Extend Every Tasmanian High School to Year 12 by 2022; More staff in Government Schools; School Farm Resourcing; Ministerial Taskforce for the Education of Students with Disability; continued funding for the Education Act Implementation; and Australian Government funding for Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes. The increases across the Forward Estimates also include the increase in State funding for government schools under the National School Reform Agreement.

2.    The variation in Appropriation revenue - capital reflects the timing of capital projects being undertaken by the Department including 2018 election commitments (refer to Table 3.5 for full details of projects).

3.    The variation in Grants across the Forward Estimates period reflects the finalisation of Australian Government National Partnership funding to the State, which includes the cessation of funding from the Australian Government under the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education - 2020. In the Australian Government’s 2019-20 Budget it was announced that funding for this program will be extended for the full 2020 calendar year.

4.    The decrease in Other revenue primarily reflects a revision to estimated school revenue based on actual revenue trends.

5.    The increase in Employee benefits includes the impact of the 2018 election commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level including: Extend Every Tasmanian High School to Year 12 by 2022; More staff in Government Schools; Improving Literacy and Numeracy; continued funding for the Education Act Implementation; and Australian Government funding for Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes. The increases across the Forward Estimates period also include the increase in State funding for government schools under the National School Reform Agreement.

6.    The increase in Supplies and consumables in 2020‑21 includes the increase in State funding for government schools under the National School Reform Agreement, the 2018 election commitment Taking Education to the Next Level: Ministerial Taskforce for the Education of Students with Disability and continued funding for the Education Act Implementation.

7.    The increase in Grants and subsidies in 2019-20 reflects the half-year effect of the implementation of the $10.5 million allocation for the Working Together for Three Year Olds initiative.

8.    The increase in Borrowing costs reflects the application of the new Australian Accounting Standard AASB16 Leases which recognises interest on leases as borrowing costs.

Table 3.7:         Statement of Comprehensive Income - Administered

 

2018-19 

2019-20 

2020-21 

2021-22 

2022-23 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - operating1

354 172

371 821

391 172

405 203

417 096

Sales of goods and services

391

401

411

421

432

Total revenue and other income from transactions

354 563

372 222

391 583

405 624

417 528

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies1

354 172

371 821

391 172

405 203

417 096

Transfers to the Public Account

391

401

411

421

432

Total expenses from transactions

354 563

372 222

391 583

405 624

417 528

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result from transactions (net operating balance)

....

....

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

....

....

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

....

....

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The increase in these items reflect Australian Government and State Government grants to non‑government schools under Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes as part of the National School Reform Agreement, and funding under the 2018 election commitments for additional Non‑Government Capital Assistance and Non‑Government School Support.

 

Table 3.8:         Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

 

 

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education and Training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 - Education

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 In School Education1

903 617

935 554

981 127

1 035 976

1 077 534

1.2 School Support Services

11 853

11 789

11 962

12 181

12 396

1.3 Early Learning2

10 959

17 338

21 037

20 901

21 535

1.4 Statutory Offices3

4 288

7 067

7 196

5 389

5 489

 

930 717

971 748

1 021 322

1 074 447

1 116 954

Output Group 2 - Libraries Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Information Services and Community Learning

33 695

34 138

34 841

35 541

35 418

2.2 Tasmanian Archives

3 048

3 111

3 176

3 250

3 317

 

36 743

37 249

38 017

38 791

38 735 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies4

354 172

371 821

391 172

405 203

417 096 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program5

59 030

50 975

46 185 

44 000

43 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Education

 

 

 

 

 

Total Operating Services Expenditure

1 321 632

1 380 818

1 450 511

1 518 441

1 572 785

Total Capital Services Expenditure

59 030

50 975

46 185

44 000

43 000

 

1 380 662

1 431 793

1 496 696 

1 562 441 

1 615 785 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

1 380 662

1 431 793

1 496 696 

1 562 441 

1 615 785 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

1 026 490

1 059 972

1 105 524

1 157 238

1 198 689

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

354 172

371 821

391 172

405 203

417 096

 

1 380 662

1 431 793

1 496 696

1 562 441

1 615 785

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in In School Education reflects the continuation of the 2018 election commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level including: Extend Every Tasmanian High School to Year 12 by 2022; More staff in Government Schools; School Farm Resourcing; Ministerial Taskforce for the Education of Students with Disability; continued funding for the Education Act Implementation; and Australian Government funding for Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes. The increases across the Forward Estimates also include the increase in State funding for government schools under the National School Reform Agreement. Funding for the Working Together for Three Year Olds initiative has been transferred from Output 1.1 In School Education to Output 1.3 Early Learning.

2.    The increases in Early Learning in 2019-20 and 2020-21 reflects the transfer of funding for the Working Together for Three Year Olds initiative from Output 1.1 In School Education. The decrease in 2021-22 reflects the cessation of the Pre‑Implementation component of the Working Together for Three Year Olds initiative.

3.    The increase in Statutory Offices in 2019-20 reflects the allocation of funding to this Output for legislative and demand pressures pending the outcomes of the Cross Sector Regulatory Function Review to be undertaken.


 

4.    The increase in Grants and subsidies includes additional Australian Government funding for Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes and increases in State funding under the National School Reform Agreement.

5.    The variation in Capital Investment Program reflects the timing of capital projects being undertaken by the Department including 2018 election commitments (Refer to Table 3.5 for full details).

Table 3.9:         Administered Revenue

 

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

 

 

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Public Account

 

 

 

 

 

Other Sales of Services

391

401

411

421

432

 

391

401

411

421

432

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation1

354 172

371 821

391 172

405 203

417 096

 

354 172

371 821

391 172

405 203

417 096

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

354 563

372 222

391 583

405 624

417 528

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The increase in Annual Appropriation reflects Australian Government and State Government grants to non‑government schools under Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes as part of the National School Reform Agreement, and the continuation of the 2018 election commitments for additional Non‑Government Capital Assistance and Non‑Government School Support.

Table 3.10:       Administered Expenses

 

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

 

 

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Non-government schools: Australian Government funded grants1

275 660

291 500

310 310

323 950

337 260

Non-government schools: State funded capital assistance2

2 673

2 673

2 673

2 673

1 173

Non-government schools: State funded general education grants3

75 839

77 648

78 189

78 580

78 663

 

354 172

371 821

391 172

405 203

417 096

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Public Account

391

401

411

421

432

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

354 563

372 222

391 583

405 624

417 528

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Non‑government schools: Australian Government funded grants reflects Australian Government grants to non‑government schools under Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes as part of the National School Reform Agreement.

2.    The decrease in Non‑government schools: State funded capital assistance in 2022-23 reflects the completion of additional Non‑government Capital Assistance funding provided in 2018-19.


 

3.    The variation in Non‑government schools: State funded general education grants reflects State Government grants to non‑government schools under Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes as part of the National School Reform Agreement. The State Government is currently contributing above the Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes funding level requirements and the Forward Estimates factor in the transition to the prescribed funding level over five years.

Non-Government Schools: Australian Government Funded Grants

This Grant Program represents Australian Government funding relating to non‑government schools. These funds are administered on behalf of the Australian Department of Education and, upon receipt, are forwarded to non‑government schools.

Non-Government Schools: State Funded Capital Assistance

These grants provide funding to non-government schools and non-government school authorities for assistance with eligible capital projects in accordance with the Education Act.

Non-Government Schools: State Funded General Education Grants

This Program covers the cost of grants which are distributed to registered non-government schools in accordance with the Education Act. Since the implementation of the Students First education reforms, funding allocations that had previously been provided to non-government schools under the Student Assistance Scheme are now included within this payment.


 

Table 3.11:       Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

 

 

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits

91 794

91 386

87 415

81 809

75 965

Receivables1

14 235

12 412

13 144

13 876

14 608

 

106 029

103 798

100 559

95 685

90 573

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Assets held for sale2

4 313

1 035

....

....

.... 

Property, plant and equipment3

1 452 051

1 494 875

1 544 133

1 588 367

1 631 601

Heritage and cultural assets

46 431

46 703

48 563

50 423

52 283

Intangibles4

3 732

4 274

3 691

3 691

3 691

Other assets5

11 736

33 005

31 115

28 878

28 230

 

1 518 263

1 579 892

1 627 502

1 671 359

1 715 805

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

1 624 292

1 683 690

1 728 061

1 767 044

1 806 378

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

7 138

6 350

6 471

6 592

6 713

Interest bearing liabilities5

....

21 540

20 289

18 892

19 147

Employee benefits6

147 385

165 901

173 217

181 043

192 958

Other liabilities

6 945

6 540

6 743

6 743

6 743

Total liabilities

161 468

200 331

206 720

213 270

225 561

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

1 462 824

1 483 359

1 521 341

1 553 774

1 580 817

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Reserves

365 482

423 547

467 270

510 787

554 304

Accumulated funds

1 097 342

1 059 812

1 054 071

1 042 987

1 026 513

Total equity

1 462 824

1 483 359

1 521 341

1 553 774

1 580 817

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Receivables in 2020 reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2018 actuals.

2.    The decrease in Assets held for sale in 2021 reflects an updated estimate based on an analysis of the timing of property sales.

3.    The increase in Property, plant and equipment in 2020 reflects further capital investment in schools and the estimated indexation of the asset value base less depreciation.

4.    The increase in Intangibles in 2020 primarily reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2018 actuals, which reflects the one‑off purchase of intangibles relating to systems development in 2018-19.

5.    The variation in Other assets and Interest bearing liabilities reflects the application of the new Australian Accounting Standard AASB 16 Leases which requires property and vehicle leases to be recognised as assets and corresponding liabilities over the life of the lease.

6.    The increase in Employee benefits in 2020 reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2018 actuals.

Table 3.12:       Statement of Cash Flows

 

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

 

 

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - operating1

967 460

1 008 997

1 059 339

1 113 238

1 155 689

Appropriation receipts - capital2

59 030

50 975

46 185

44 000

43 000

Grants3

8 121

19 552

16 326

4 829

2 433

Sales of goods and services

35 982

38 368

38 475

38 501

38 478

Fees and fines

200

171

175

178

182

GST receipts

28 503

28 503

28 503

28 503

28 503

Interest received

680

665

660

650

635

Other cash receipts4

29 688

23 804

23 809

23 809

23 605

Total cash inflows

1 129 664

1 171 035

1 213 472

1 253 708

1 292 525

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits5

(713 225)

(754 983)

(778 695)

(787 743)

(817 672)

Superannuation

(91 237)

(93 395)

(94 881)

(94 353)

(96 911)

Borrowing costs

....

(529)

(465)

(397)

(460)

GST payments

(29 207)

(29 207)

(29 207)

(29 207)

(29 207)

Grants and subsidies6

(12 618)

(18 406)

(21 771)

(22 209)

(23 652)

Supplies and consumables7

(212 360)

(210 616)

(229 905)

(265 696)

(271 502)

Other cash payments

(11 767)

(12 223)

(12 477)

(12 818)

(13 137)

Total cash outflows

(1 070 414)

(1 119 359)

(1 167 401)

(1 212 423)

(1 252 541)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

59 250

51 676

46 071

41 285

39 984

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non-financial assets8

(62 413)

(54 358)

(49 568)

(45 314)

(44 314)

Proceeds from the disposal of non-financial assets9

....

4 693

1 035

....

....

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(62 413)

(49 665)

(48 533)

(45 314)

(44 314)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings10

….

(1 445)

(1 509)

(1 577)

(1 514)

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

....

(1 445)

(1 509)

(1 577)

(1 514)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(3 163)

566 

(3 971)

(5 606)

(5 844)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

94 957

90 820

91 386

87 415

81 809

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

91 794

91 386

87 415

81 809

75 965

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Appropriation receipts - operating reflects the continuation of the 2018 election commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level including: Extend Every Tasmanian High School to Year 12 by 2022; More staff in Government Schools; School Farm Resourcing; Ministerial Taskforce for the Education of Students with Disability; continued funding for the Education Act Implementation; and Australian Government funding for Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes. The increases across the Forward Estimates also include the increase in State funding for government schools under the National School Reform Agreement.

2.    The variation in Appropriation receipts - capital reflects the timing of capital projects being undertaken by the Department including 2018 election commitments. Refer to Table 3.5 for full details of projects.

3.    The variation in Grants across the Forward Estimates period reflects the finalisation of Australian Government National Partnership funding to the State which includes the cessation of funding from the Australian Government under the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education - 2020. In the Australian Government’s 2019‑20 Budget it was announced that funding for this program will be extended for the full 2020 calendar year.

4.    The decrease in Other cash receipts primarily reflects a revision to estimated school revenue based on actual revenue trends.

5.    The increase in Employee benefits includes the impact of the 2018 election commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level including: Extend Every Tasmanian High School to Year 12 by 2022; More staff in Government Schools; Improving Literacy and Numeracy; continued funding for the Education Act Implementation; and Australian Government funding for Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes. The increases across the Forward Estimates also include the increase in State funding for government schools under the National School Reform Agreement.

6.    The increase in Grants and subsidies in 2019-20 includes funding provided for the transitional support package allocated to Support the Education and Care Sector to support the co-design of the Working Together for Three Year Olds initiative.

7.    The increase in Supplies and consumables includes the increase in State funding for government schools under the National School Reform Agreement, the 2018 election commitment Taking Education to the Next Level: Ministerial Taskforce for the Education of Students with Disability and continued funding for the Education Act Implementation.

8.    The variation in Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets reflects the capital purchases associated with the Capital Investment Program.

9.    The variation in Proceeds from the disposal of non‑financial assets reflects the timing of property sales.

10.  The variation in Net borrowings reflects the application of the new Australian Accounting Standard AASB 16 Leases which requires property and vehicle leases to be recognised as assets, and corresponding liabilities over the life of the lease.


 

Table 3.13:       Statement of Cash Flows - Administered

 

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

2022-23

 

 

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - operating1

354 172

371 821

391 172

405 203

417 096

Sales of goods and services

391

401

411

421

432

Total cash inflows

354 563

372 222

391 583

405 624

417 528

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies1

(354 172)

(371 821)

(391 172)

(405 203)

(417 096)

Transfers to the Public Account

(391)

(401)

(411)

(421)

(432)

Total cash outflows

(354 563)

(372 222)

(391 583)

(405 624)

(417 528)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

....

....

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

....

....

....

....

....

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

....

....

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The increase in these items reflect Australian Government and State Government grants to non-government schools under Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes as part of the National School Reform Agreement, and funding under the 2018 election commitments for additional Non‑Government Capital Assistance and Non‑Government School Support.