5     General Government Revenue

Key Issues

·       Total General Government Sector revenue is expected to be $7 257.5 million in 2021‑22, an increase of $829.4 million compared to the 2020‑21 Budget.

·       There have also been material increases in General Government Sector revenue in the 2020‑21 Preliminary Outcome compared to the 2020‑21 Budget, largely driven by significant upwards revisions to GST pool forecasts by the Australian Government since the 2020‑21 Budget and continued strength in State Taxation revenue, particularly Conveyance Duty receipts.

·       This reflects the stronger than expected economic recovery from the impacts of the COVID‑19 pandemic during 2020‑21.

·       The revenue outlook for 2021‑22 and across the Forward Estimates is positive, but risks associated with the pandemic remain.

·       From 2021‑22 to 2024‑25, revenue is forecast to grow by $793.8 million (or by a compound annual growth rate of 3.5 per cent) mainly due to strong growth in GST revenue and State Taxation.

·       Key components of General Government Sector revenue in 2021‑22 include:

-   GST revenue, which is estimated to be $2 999.7 million, an increase of $787.4 million from the 2020‑21 Budget of $2 212.3 million;

-   Taxation revenue, which is estimated to be $1 448.3 million, an increase of $227.7 million from the 2020‑21 Budget of $1 220.6 million; and

-   Australian Government Payments for Specific Purposes, which are estimated to be $1 593.7 million, a decrease of $211.4 million from the 2020‑21 Budget of $1 805.1 million.

·       Tasmania’s share of revenue from Grants, including GST revenue and Australian Government Payments for Specific Purposes, equates to 64.1 per cent of Total General Government Sector revenue.


 

Total Revenue

This chapter provides an overview of Revenue for the 2021‑22 Budget and Forward Estimates including the 2020‑21 Preliminary Outcome. Table 5.1 lists the major General Government Sector revenue sources.

Table 5.1:         General Government Sector Revenue

 

2020‑21 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

Preliminary

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Outcome 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from transactions

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants

4 066.1 

4 300.9 

4 653.2 

4 922.3 

5 094.5 

5 258.2 

Taxation

1 220.6 

1 336.0 

1 448.3 

1 530.6 

1 608.5 

1 684.6 

Sales of goods and services

433.4 

  440.9 

441.7 

458.5 

469.8 

479.9 

Fines and regulatory fees

102.2 

  100.4 

107.2 

108.3 

109.7 

111.0 

Interest income

14.9 

8.0 

7.9 

12.1 

18.3 

22.9 

Dividend, tax and rate equivalent income

413.1 

  403.6 

383.8 

316.1 

286.1 

308.0 

Other revenue

177.9 

  262.9 

215.3 

194.9 

189.8 

186.6 

 

6 428.1 

6 852.7 

7 257.5 

7 542.7 

7 776.8 

8 051.3 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tasmania’s most significant source of funding is Grants revenue (including GST revenue and Australian Government Payments for Specific Purposes), which comprises 64.1 per cent of total revenue in 2021‑22. State Own‑Source revenue accounts for 35.9 per cent of total revenue.

Chart 5.1 shows the composition of Total General Government Sector revenue over time.

Major revenue risks and sensitivities are discussed in chapter 1 of this Budget Paper. The variances in revenue items are outlined in the Policy and Parameter Statement in chapter 4 of this Budget Paper.


 

Chart 5.1:         Composition of Total Revenue, 2015‑16 to 2024‑251

Title: Composition of Total Revenue, 2015-16 to 2024-25 - Description: The chart shows that GST Grants revenue continues to be the primary source of revenue across the 2021-22 Budget and Forward Estimates period, followed by Other Australian Government Grants.

Notes:

1.    Data reflects actual outcomes for 2015‑16 to 2019‑20 and the Preliminary Outcome for 2020‑21.

2.    Other Australian Government Grants includes Specific Purpose Payments and National Partnership Payments.

3.    Other includes: Sales of goods and services; Fines and regulatory fees; Interest income; Dividend, tax and rate equivalent income; and Other revenue.


Grants

Grants primarily reflect transfers of funding from the Australian Government and are estimated to be $4 653.2 million in 2021‑22.

Table 5.2:         Grants

 

2020‑21 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

Preliminary

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Outcome 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Purpose Payments (Untied Funding)

 

 

 

 

 

 

GST Revenue

2 212.3 

2 604.8 

2 999.7 

3 114.2 

3 288.9 

3 422.3 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for Specific Purposes (Tied Funding)1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Specific Purpose Payments2

1 099.9 

1 087.6 

1 172.4 

1 228.5 

1 287.5 

1 331.5 

National Partnership Payments3

705.2 

  541.5 

421.3 

530.2 

474.4 

465.3 

Total Payments for Specific Purposes

1 805.1 

1 629.1 

1 593.7 

1 758.7 

1 761.9 

1 796.8 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Grant and Subsidies4

48.7 

  67.0 

59.8 

49.4 

43.7 

39.1 

Total Grants

4 066.1 

4 300.9 

4 653.2 

4 922.3 

5 094.5 

5 258.2 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Estimates of Specific Purpose Payments may differ from those published in the Australian Government 2021‑22 Budget due to different assumptions around timing and activity levels.

2.    Specific Purpose Payments include National Health Reform; Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes; National Housing and Homelessness; and National Skills and Workforce Development.

3.    Estimates of National Partnership Payments may differ from those published in the Australian Government 2021‑22 Budget due to the application of Australian Accounting Standard AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers.

4.    Other Grant and Subsidies primarily relates to payments to the State for Commonwealth Own Purpose Expenditure.

 

In accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement on Federal Financial Relations, transfers from the Australian Government fall into two categories:

·       General Purpose Payments, which are ‘untied’ payments that can be used at the State’s discretion. The GST distribution is the only GPP received by Tasmania in 2021‑22; and

·       Conditional (tied) funding in the form of Payments for Specific Purposes, including Specific Purpose Payments and National Partnership Payments. These payments can only be spent for purposes as agreed with the Australian Government.

The Australian Government also provides payments directly to State agencies through Commonwealth Own Purpose Expenditure. Most of these payments will be made to the Department of Health and the Department of Communities Tasmania.

GST Revenue

GST revenue is the largest single source of revenue for Tasmania representing 41.3 per cent of Total General Government Sector revenue in 2021‑22.

In accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement on Federal Financial Relations, all GST revenue collected by the Australian Government is distributed amongst the states and territories. Each jurisdiction’s GST entitlement is dependent on three factors: national GST collections; the state’s per capita relativity; and the state’s share of the national population.

For the 2021‑22 Budget, Treasury has continued to use its own financial model to forecast GST revenues. The model incorporates the latest Commonwealth Grants Commission assessments and recommended relativities, Australian Government forecasts of the GST pool and state and territory populations, and states’ and territories’ own source revenue estimates.

Table 5.3 shows estimates for the national GST pool collections and Tasmania’s GST revenue estimates.

Table 5.3:         Tasmanian GST Revenue Estimates

 

2020‑21

2021‑22

2022‑23

2023‑24

2024‑25

 

Preliminary

 

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Outcome

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

 

 

 

 

 

National GST Collections ($m)

69 760

72 530

75 847

79 215

83 327

Tasmania’s GST Share (%)1

4.0

4.1

4.1

4.1

4.0

Tasmania’s GST Revenue ($m)2,3,4,5

2 604.8

2 999.7

3 114.2

3 288.9

3 422.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    GST shares have been calculated excluding the residual adjustment and the guarantee payments.

2.    The 2020‑21 Preliminary Outcome includes the negative $188.2 million residual adjustment for 2019‑20.

3.    The 2020‑21 Preliminary Outcome and the 2021‑22 Budget is based on the actual relativities recommended by the CGC.

4.    A residual adjustment for 2020‑21 will be recognised once the Australian Government has finalised its 2020‑21 actual GST collections.

5.    Tasmania’s GST revenue includes forecast no‑worse‑off guarantee payments of $60.3 million in 2023‑24 and $51.2 million in 2024‑25. 

 

GST payments to Tasmania are expected to be $2 999.7 million in 2021‑22.

Since the 2020‑21 Budget, GST revenue to Tasmania has increased by $1.3 billion over the four years from 2020‑21 to 2023‑24. This largely reflects the combined impacts of:

·       the Australian Government increasing its forecasts of the GST pool in its 2021‑22 Australian Government Budget by $26 billion, compared to the 2020‑21 Australian Government Budget; and

·       Tasmania’s share of the GST pool increasing from 2021‑22 following the Commonwealth Grants Commission 2021 Update.

This has been partially offset by the impact of updated estimates of states’ and territories’ own source revenues on Tasmania’s forecast relativities.


 

The Australian Government increased its forecasts of the GST pool to reflect stronger than expected recovery in household consumption and dwelling investment at the time of the 2021‑22 Australian Government Budget and recovery of Australian Taxation Office granted deferrals during the COVID‑19 pandemic.

Chart 5.2 compares the 2021‑22 Budget forecasts to the 2020‑21 Budget forecasts. 

Chart 5.2:         GST Revenue to Tasmania, 2014‑15 to 2024‑25

Title: GST Revenue to Tasmania, 2014-15 to 2024-25 - Description: The chart illustrates the difference in the 2020-21 and 2021-22 Budget estimates of GST revenue to Tasmania over the Forward Estimates. It shows that a lower level of GST revenue was forecast in the 2020-21 Budget compared to the 2021-22 Budget due primarily to an estimated increase in receipts. The 2021-22 projections remain positive until 2024-25. Notes:

1.    GST revenue to Tasmania includes a negative $188.2 million residual adjustment in 2020‑21.

2.    The 2021‑22 Budget includes the 2020‑21 Preliminary Outcome for GST revenue.

3.    The 2021‑22 Budget includes forecast no‑worse‑off guarantee payments of $60.3 million in 2023‑24 and $51.2 million in 2024‑25.

4.    A residual adjustment for 2020‑21 will be recognised once the Australian Government has finalised its 2020‑21 actual GST collections.

New GST Arrangements

The Australian Government’s new GST distribution arrangements came into effect from 1 July 2021.

Prior to the new arrangements, GST revenue was distributed on the basis of full Horizontal Fiscal Equalisation. HFE ensures that all states and territories have a similar fiscal capacity to deliver services and infrastructure to their residents to the same standard as any other state, provided they make a similar revenue raising effort.

From 2021‑22, the distribution of the GST will transition to a new lesser standard of HFE.

The changes will be progressively implemented over six‑years and will move from the principle of equalising a state’s fiscal capacities to the level of the strongest state, currently Western Australia, to equalising to the fiscal capacity of the second strongest state (effectively the higher of New South Wales or Victoria).

For Tasmania, the new distribution methodology is expected to reduce GST revenue over the Forward Estimates. However, the Australian Government’s temporary no‑worse‑off guarantee ensures that no State will be worse off in total under the new distribution arrangements during the transition period up to 2026‑27.

2021‑22 is the first year of the six year transition period that phases in these new arrangements. As such, the 2021‑22 State Budget reflects the impact of these new arrangements, including the Australian Government’s no‑worse‑off guarantee payments.

Guarantee payments are paid in the year after a state is recognised as being worse off under the new distribution arrangements, and are reduced by any benefit a state has received under the new arrangements in previous periods.

Under the new GST distribution arrangements, Tasmania is expected to be worse off from 2022‑23 and receive no‑worse‑off guarantee payments of $111.5 million in the last two years of the Forward Estimates.

Further information on the new distribution arrangements is provided in Box 5.1 Impacts of the new GST distribution arrangements.


 

Box 5.1 - Impacts of the new GST distribution arrangements

In 2018, the Australian Government legislated a new way of distributing GST revenue among states and territories. 2021‑22 is the first of the six year transition period that phases in these new arrangements.

When the Australian Government announced the new GST distribution arrangements, it indicated that all states and territories would be better off under the new model, both now and in the future. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that the new GST distribution will direct a larger share of GST to Western Australia at the expense of all other states and territories, including Tasmania.

Under the new arrangements, Western Australia will have a permanent (and growing) advantage over the other states that will allow it to provide a higher standard of services and infrastructure than the other states, or to offer lower taxes to its businesses and residents.

Indicative modelling undertaken by the Department of Treasury and Finance, demonstrates that when the guarantee ends in 2027‑28, Tasmania’s GST revenue will decrease by $83 million in that year under the new arrangements or $147 per person. In comparison, Western Australia is expected to gain $5.6 billion, or $1 945 per person, in GST revenue in 2027‑28 under the new arrangements (shown in Chart 5.3).

Chart 5.3:               Estimated states’ per person change in GST revenue in 2027‑28 after the no‑worse‑off guarantee ends

Title: Estimated states’ per person change in GST revenue in 2027-28 after the no-worse-off guarantee - Description: The chart shows that all States are expected to lose GST revenue except Western Australia, which will gain significant GST revenue.

The loss in GST revenue could significantly impact Tasmania’s ability to provide essential services, such as health, education and emergency services.

Tasmania has consistently argued that the new arrangements will create a system that entrenches a gap between the fiscally strongest state (Western Australia) and the other states.

At the time the GST distribution changes were announced, Tasmania argued that the risk of being worse off under the new arrangements will be ongoing and therefore the no‑worse‑off guarantee should be a permanent arrangement.

The Productivity Commission is to review and report on the operation of the new arrangements by December 2026. Tasmania will continue to advocate for a system that distributes GST equitably across the states, in accordance with full HFE.

Commonwealth Payments for Specific Purposes

Specific Purpose Payments and Reform Funding

SPPs are an ongoing funding arrangement between the Australian Government and the states for service delivery in a particular sector. These include the National Health Reform Agreement, the National School Reform Agreement (Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes), the National Skills and Workforce Development SPP, and the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement.

In 2021‑22, Tasmania will receive an estimated $1 172.4 million in SPPs and Reform Funding. The increase in SPPs and Reform Funding since the 2020‑21 State Budget primarily reflects an increase in Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes funding and National Health Reform funding.

It is noted that estimates of SPPs may differ from those published in the Australian Government 2021‑22 Budget due to different assumptions around timing and activity levels.

National Partnership Payments

NPPs are provided to each state through National Partnership Agreements and Project Agreements. The agreements are usually time‑limited and aim to support the delivery of projects, facilitate reforms within the State or reward the State for delivering on national reforms.

In 2021‑22, NPPs for Tasmania will be an estimated $421.3 million.

Since the 2020‑21 Budget, additional funding has been provided to Tasmania for upgrades to the Tasman Bridge and to extend the HomeBuilder Grants program, public dental services for adults and the JobTrainer Fund.

The Budget also recognises additional funding under the Community Health and Hospitals Program, and the Rail component of the Land Transport Infrastructure Projects.

Since the 2020‑21 Budget, the timing of a number of infrastructure payments, such as Roads of Strategic Importance and the Bridgewater Bridge, has been amended to reflect the Government’s revised infrastructure program.

Table 5.4 details the Payments for Specific Purposes for Tasmania in 2021‑22 and over the Forward Estimates.


 

Table 5.4:         Commonwealth Payments for Specific Purposes1  

 

2020‑21

2020‑21

2021‑22

2022‑23

2023‑24

2024‑25

 

 

Preliminary

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Outcome

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Specific Purpose Payments

 

 

 

 

 

Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Health Reform

 485.5

 468.0 

 522.2

 548.8

 583.6

 605.0

 

 

 

 

 

Education

Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes ‑ Government Schools

 218.5

221.3 

 228.2

 236.8

 244.8

 252.2

Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes ‑ Non‑Government Schools

 329.0

330.8 

 353.8

 373.9

 391.3

 405.8

Total Education Specific Purpose Payments

547.5

552.1

581.9

610.7

636.1

658.0

National Skills and Workforce Development

 32.5

 32.9

 33.1

 33.4

 33.8

 34.2

National Housing and Homelessness

 34.4

 34.6

 35.1

 35.6

 34.0

 34.3

Total Specific Purpose Payments

1 099.9

1 087.6

1 172.4

1 228.5

1 287.5

1 331.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Partnership Payments2

Health

Redevelopment of the Royal Hobart Hospital

 22.3

 0.4

 5.0

....

....

....

Public Dental Services for Adults

 3.8

 3.8

 3.4

....

....

....

Essential Vaccines

 1.1

 0.3

 1.1

 1.1

 1.1

 1.1

Community Health and Hospitals Program

 37.5

 9.5

 35.1

 19.9

 14.9

....

COVID‑19 Public Health Response3

 93.4

 74.8

....

....

....

....

Other4

 11.8

 20.5

 4.3

 1.0

 0.8

 0.5

Total Health National Partnerships

169.9

109.2

48.9

22.1

16.8

1.6


 

Table 5.4:         Commonwealth Payments for Specific Purposes1 (continued)

 

2020‑21

2020‑21

2021‑22

2022‑23

2023‑24

2024‑25

 

 

Preliminary

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Outcome

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Education

Universal Access to Early Childhood Education5

 16.0

 9.1

 6.7

 0.2

....

....

National School Chaplaincy Program

 2.8

 2.4

 2.2

....

....

....

Other6

 1.7

 0.9

 0.2

 0.3

....

....

Total Education National Partnerships

20.4

12.5

9.2

0.4

0.0

0.0

Housing

HomeBuilder

 13.5

 25.2

 47.3

 13.8

....

....

Total Housing National Partnerships

13.5

25.2

47.3

13.8

0.0

0.0

Community Services (including Disability)

DisabilityCare Australia Fund

 23.0

 45.9

 24.1

 25.0

 25.9

....

Family, Domestic and Sexual Violence Responses7

 1.5

 1.6

 2.0

....

....

....

Other8

 2.6

 2.1

 2.5

 1.7

....

....

Total Community Services (including Disability) National Partnerships

27.1

49.5

28.6

26.7

25.9

0.0

Skills and Workforce Development

National Partnership for Skilling Australians Fund

 5.0

 0.8

 5.0

 5.0

 5.0

 5.0

Energising Tasmania

 2.7

 0.9

 2.7

 2.7

 2.0

 2.0

Job Ready Generation Package ‑ North‑West Tasmania

 1.3

 0.8

 1.3

....

....

....

Revitalising TAFE Campuses Across Australia

 2.0

 2.0

 5.0

....

....

....

JobTrainer Fund

 10.5

 0.3

 1.0

 7.4

 2.1

....


 

Table 5.4:         Commonwealth Payments for Specific Purposes1 (continued)  

 

2020‑21

2020‑21

2021‑22

2022‑23

2023‑24

2024‑25

 

 

Preliminary

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Outcome

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

Skills and Workforce Development (continued)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other9

 4.4

 0.1

 1.8

....

....

....

Total Skills and Workforce Development National Partnerships

25.9

5.0

16.8

15.1

9.1

7.0

Infrastructure

Land Transport Infrastructure Projects

Road Component

 39.2

 55.5

 38.0

 29.5

 40.4

 28.6

Rail Component

 36.0

 38.0

 41.0

 45.0

 11.0

....

Black Spot Projects

 3.5

 1.4

 1.4

 2.8

....

 1.4

Bridges Renewal program

 5.1

 1.4

 9.8

 0.6

 3.9

....

Heavy Vehicle Safety & Productivity Program

 6.0

 1.3

 0.2

 0.3

 3.3

....

Roads of Strategic Importance

 88.3

 40.9

 33.4

 93.2

 76.5

 124.5

Bridgewater Bridge

 30.0

 5.3

 18.0

 117.0

 133.8

 154.8

Urban Congestion Fund

 4.1

 0.5

 3.7

 9.5

 12.0

 12.2

Tasman Bridge Upgrade

....

....

....

 5.0

....

 5.0

COVID‑19 Infrastructure Stimulus Funding

 32.6

 18.5

 9.9

....

 3.2

....

Launceston City Deal ‑ Tamar River

 11.3

 6.4

 12.4

 16.3

 7.6

....

Other10

 0.7

 0.2

 0.5

....

....

....

Total Infrastructure National Partnerships

256.8

169.4

168.0

319.1

291.6

326.4

Environment

Sustainable Rural Water Use and Infrastructure Program11

 7.0

7.0

....

....

....

....

Cradle Mountain Experience

 22.0

….

....

....

 5.7

 5.3

Management of the World Heritage Values of the Tasmanian Wilderness

 5.1

4.9

 5.1

 5.1

 5.1

 5.1

National Water Infrastructure Development Fund

 3.0

….

 20.0

 20.0

 20.0

 20.0

Project Marinus

 36.7

16.7

 2.0

 1.7

 0.1

....


 

Table 5.4:         Commonwealth Payments for Specific Purposes1 (continued)  

 

2020‑21

2020‑21

2021‑22

2022‑23

2023‑24

2024‑25

 

 

Preliminary  

Forward

Forward

Forward

 

Budget

Outcome

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

 

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

Environment (continued)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disaster Risk Reduction

 2.1

0.5

 1.0

 1.0

 1.0

 1.5

Pest and Disease Preparedness and Response

 1.2

1.1

 1.2

 0.9

 0.7

....

Cascade Female Factory

 2.0

2.0

....

....

....

....

COVID‑19 National and World Heritage Projects

 5.4

 0.2

 3.4

 1.5

....

....

Other12

 0.8

 0.6

 0.2

 0.0

....

....

Total Environment National Partnerships

85.3

32.9

32.9

30.3

32.7

31.9

Other Services

Financial Assistance to Local Governments ‑ Financial Assistance Grant program13

 38.2

 79.1

 42.4

 84.3

 84.5

 85.5

National Legal Assistance Partnership

12.9

 11.8

 12.1

 12.3

 12.6

 12.8

Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements

44.6

 41.3

 4.8

 2.6

 1.1

 0.0

Small Business Regulatory Reform

 3.1

 1.7

 4.7

....

....

....

COVID‑19 Legal Assistance Funding

 0.9

 0.9

....

....

....

....

Tourism Icon Package ‑ Freycinet

 3.7

 0.1

 3.0

 3.0

....

....

Other14

 2.7

 2.7

 2.7

 0.4

 0.0

....

Total Other Services

 106.2

 137.7

 69.7

 102.5

 98.2

 98.3

Total National Partnership Payments

705.2

541.5

421.3

530.2

474.4

465.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES

1 805.1

1 629.1

1 593.7

1 758.7

1 761.9

1 796.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Estimates of Specific Purpose Payments may differ from those published in the Australian Government 2021‑22 Budget due to different assumptions around timing and activity levels.

2.    Estimates of National Partnership Payments may differ from those published in the Australian Government 2021‑22 Budget due to the application of Australian Accounting Standard AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers.

3.    The 2020‑21 Preliminary Outcome reflects actual receipts for activities reimbursed under the NPA. Estimated receipts for 2021‑22 will be updated during the year, based on actual costs incurred that are eligible for reimbursement.

4.    Includes funding for National Bowel Cancer Screening Program, Expansion of BreastScreen Australia Program, Comprehensive Palliative Care, Lymphedema Compression Garments, Suicide Prevention and Improving Health Services in Tasmania.

5.    The Universal Access to Early Childhood Education Agreement will cease on 31 December 2021. The 2021-22 Budget funding profile reflects expected expenditure in accordance with Accounting Standards.

6.    Includes funding for National Quality Agenda for Early Childhood Education and Care, Online Safety, Supporting Students with Disabilities, Local Schools Community Fund and Independent Public Schools.

7.    This item was previously called COVID‑19 Domestic Violence Support.

8.    Includes funding for Home and Community Care for Veterans and the Municipal and Essential Services Transition Fund.

9.    Includes funding for Infection Control Training, Building Australia's Future Workforce through Vocational Education, the Tasmanian Jobs and Investment Fund and the Industry and Indigenous skills centre.

10.  Includes funding for Temporary Assistance for Tasmanian Exporters and the Regional Tourism Infrastructure and Innovation Fund.

11.  Funding previously included in the Sustainable Rural Water Use and Infrastructure Program is shown as National Water Infrastructure Development Fund.

12.  Includes funding for Prepared Communities, Bushfire Wildlife and Habitat Recovery and On‑Farm Emergency Water Infrastructure.

13.  The 2021‑22 figure reflects approximately 49 per cent of the 2021‑22 Financial Assistance Grant funding receipted from the Australian Government in 2020‑21.

14.  Includes funding for Provision of Fire Services, Women’s Safety Package ‑ Technology Trials, National Bushfire Mitigation Program, Disaster Resilience and Family Law Information Sharing.

State Taxation

The strength in State Taxation reflects the stronger than expected recovery from the impacts of the COVID‑19 pandemic, since the 2020‑21 State Budget. The rebound in State Taxation has also been supported by a number of fiscal and monetary policy measures, which have assisted Tasmanian households and businesses.

In 2021‑22, State Taxation is estimated to be $1 448.3 million, which represents an increase of $227.7 million compared to the 2020‑21 Budget of $1 220.6 million.

The Government has implemented a range of taxation measures, delivering on its State of the State Address and election commitments, including:

·       a reset of Land Tax thresholds to increase the tax free threshold for Land Tax from $24 999 to $49 999, increase the start of the middle tax band threshold to $50 000 and increase the top tax band threshold from $350 000 to $400 000;

·       allow the Commissioner of State Revenue to accept payment of Land Tax in three instalments where the amount of Land Tax payable in any financial year exceeds $500 (previously $1 000);

·       a reduction in the premium component of the interest rate charged on unpaid tax from eight per cent to four per cent;

·       an increased value threshold for the First Home Buyer Duty Concession and Pensioner Duty Concession (from $400 000 to $500 000);

·       a cap on the Motor Accidents Insurance Board premium duty at $20 per annum to enable quarterly payment of vehicle registration bills; and

·       a two‑year waiver of duty on the purchase of new and second hand electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to incentivise the uptake of these vehicles by reducing up‑front costs.

The impact of these measures is included in the 2021‑22 Budget and Forward Estimates.

In addition, Treasury will consult with relevant stakeholders on the Government’s election commitments in relation to the Foreign Investor Land Tax Surcharge and options for capping future Land Tax increases.


 

In line with announcements from other jurisdictions, Tasmania will also introduce a road user charge for zero and low emission vehicles from 1 July 2027 or when zero and low emissions vehicles make up 30 per cent of all new vehicle sales. This will ensure that the market is adequately incentivised to transition to zero and low emissions vehicles during this period while ensuring that drivers of these vehicles contribute their fair share towards the funding of Tasmanian roads.

Given that these policies are in the early stage of development, they are not reflected in the 2021‑22 Budget.

Chart 5.4 compares the 2021‑22 Budget forecasts to the 2020‑21 Budget forecasts.

Chart 5.4:         State Taxation Revenue, 2015‑16 to 2024‑25

Title: State Taxation Revenue, 2015-16 to 2024-25 - Description: The chart shows that the 2020-21 Budget forecasts fall below the 2021-22 Budget forecasts in 2020-21, returning to slightly higher levels from 2021-22. The 2021-22 estimates remain above the 2020-21 estimates. Note:

1.    The 2021‑22 Budget includes the 2020‑21 Preliminary Outcome for State Taxation revenue. The increase in the 2020‑21 Preliminary Outcome compared to the 2020‑21 Budget is mainly due to increases in Conveyance Duty and Payroll Tax.

 

State Taxation is forecast to grow by $236.3 million from 2021‑22 to 2024‑25 (or by a compound annual growth rate of 5.2 per cent).

Conveyance Duty forecasts reflect the continued strength in the Tasmanian property market, with strong growth in residential property prices and high transaction volumes.

Land Tax forecasts reflect the Government’s resetting of Land Tax thresholds and the expiry of the commercial Land Tax waiver which ceased on 30 June 2021. The take‑up of the commercial Land Tax waiver in 2020‑21 was lower than expected.

Payroll Tax forecasts reflect historical growth rates, supported by continued growth in employment and hours worked.

Motor Vehicle Duty forecasts reflects the growth in car sales, supported by Australian Government stimulus measures. These measures are expected to maintain growth in sales over the medium‑term.

Further information on the revenue impact of the policy changes included in the 2021‑22 Budget is detailed in the Policy and Parameter Statement of chapter 4 of this Budget Paper.

Chapter 1 of this Budget Paper provides information around the risks to State Taxation revenue over the Budget and Forward Estimates.

Table 5.5 provides details of the components of the State Taxation estimates.

Table 5.5:         State Taxation

 

2020‑21 

2020‑21

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

Preliminary

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Outcome

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payroll tax

351.9 

  373.5 

403.9 

419.2 

435.1 

451.7 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taxes on property

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land tax

116.7 

  129.8 

141.7 

148.7 

156.2 

164.0 

Fire service levies1

70.1 

  74.3 

75.8 

78.6 

81.5 

84.6 

Government guarantee fees

14.1 

  7.0 

13.4 

15.2 

19.8 

23.4 

Conveyance duty

268.7 

  317.2 

378.0 

421.7 

451.9 

484.4 

 

469.6 

528.3 

608.8 

664.1 

709.5 

756.5 

Taxes on provision of goods and services

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gambling taxes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Wagering Levy

1.5 

  1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.6 

1.6 

Casino tax and licence fees2

45.8 

  53.6 

50.8 

49.9 

49.1 

48.2 

Lottery tax

40.7 

  39.8 

45.3 

47.1 

48.9 

50.9 

Point of Consumption Wagering Tax

12.0 

  15.9 

14.1 

14.5 

14.9 

15.3 

Insurance duty

108.3 

  107.4 

106.0 

107.9 

111.5 

114.8 

 

208.4 

218.2 

217.8 

221.0 

226.0 

230.9 

Taxes on the use of goods and services

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vehicle registration fees

44.8 

  47.9 

48.3 

51.4 

53.5 

55.6 

Motor vehicle fees and taxes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Motor vehicle duty

43.2 

  59.3 

59.5 

60.5 

63.9 

65.8 

Motor tax

93.7 

99.6 

100.5 

104.5 

110.5 

113.9 

Motor vehicle fire levy

9.0 

9.3 

9.6 

9.8 

10.0 

10.2 

 

190.7 

216.1 

217.9 

226.2 

237.9 

245.6 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL STATE TAXATION

1 220.6 

1 336.0 

1 448.3 

1 530.6 

1 608.5 

1 684.6 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Fire service levies are reported as a tax for the purposes of the Uniform Presentation Framework. However, all revenues go directly to the State Fire Commission.

2.    Casino tax and licence fees does not reflect the Government’s Future Gaming Market policy.


 

Tax Expenditure Statement

This statement provides an estimate of the revenue the Government has forgone, or the financial benefit obtained by taxpayers, through concessions, benefits and incentives that the Government provides through the tax system. Tax expenditures have been estimated for the main revenue lines of Payroll Tax, Land Tax and Conveyance Duty.

Methodology

Tax exemptions, rebates and concessions are measured based on the revenue foregone approach, where the value of the revenue that would have been received if the standard rate of tax had been applied is estimated.

The methodology does not allow for any behavioural changes that may result if an exemption, rebate or concession was removed. The approach also does not allow for potential tax rate changes that may result if a tax exemption, rebate or concession were removed.

Where thresholds are removed, the resulting measure of expenditure is labelled a tax free threshold in the table below. The tax expenditure, or revenue foregone, associated with providing tax free thresholds has been calculated for Payroll Tax.

All other expenditure measures included in Table 5.6 are measured as deviations from the current tax settings.

Table 5.6:         Estimated Major Tax Expenditures

 

2020‑21

2021‑22

 

Budget 

Budget

 

$m

$m 

Payroll Tax1

 

 

Tax‑free threshold

154.6

178.6 

Educational institutions exemption

14.8

17.1 

Health care service provider exemptions

5.7

6.6 

Employer Payroll Tax rebate for additional positions created

4.1

6.3 

Payroll Tax waivers2

16.3

.... 

 

195.5

208.6 

Land Tax3,4

 

 

Principal place of residence exemption

188.9

208.9 

Primary production land exemption

95.1

107.6 

Religious bodies, charitable institutions, or educational institutions exemption

9.0

9.5 

Other5

3.6

3.9 

Land Tax waiver for commercial land6

32.3

.... 

 

328.9

329.9 


 

Table 5.6:         Estimated Major Tax Expenditures (continued)

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

 

Budget 

Budget 

 

$m 

$m 

Conveyance Duty7

 

 

Corporate reconstructions

2.2 

.... 

First home buyer duty concession8

7.1 

13.0 

Duty concession for pensioners downsizing9

1.3 

2.5 

Family farm transfers

2.9 

5.1 

Transfer of public road or park/garden to council

3.9 

4.1 

Relationship breakdown or spouse and significant relationship transfers

9.6 

13.8 

Other10

4.2 

4.9 

 

31.2 

43.4 

 

 

 

TOTAL

555.6 

581.9 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The Payroll Tax base consists of all wages paid in Tasmania in 2019‑20 based on annual adjustment returns lodged by taxpayers and WorkCover data for employers who are not required to register for Payroll Tax. Actual Payroll Tax data for 2019‑20 has been used as the basis for the 2021‑22 estimate as it represents the most complete data source at the time of preparing the 2021‑22 Budget.

2.    The Government introduced several Payroll Tax Support measures during 2019‑20 to mitigate the economic impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic in Tasmania. The waiver from Payroll Tax for JobKeeper wages ceased when the JobKeeper Payment program ended on 28 March 2021.    

3.    The Land Tax base is all freehold land in Tasmania in 2021‑22. Land classified as principal place of residence and primary production land is charged a nil rate of Land Tax. Property used for religious, charitable or educational purposes is exempt from Land Tax.

4.    The Land Tax expenditure estimates for 2021‑22 use the new Land Tax thresholds which commenced on 1 July 2021.

5.    Comprises land owned by the Australian Government, aged care providers and charitable organisations and the Land Tax exemptions for both short‑stay accommodation properties and newly built housing that are made available for long‑term rental, until 30 June 2023.

6.    As part of the Government’s taxation related social and economic support measures for 2020‑21, a Land Tax exemption was available for taxpayers who owned commercial land as at 1 July 2020, where they were able to satisfy the Commissioner of State Revenue they have been adversely financially impacted during the COVID‑19 pandemic. Applications for the exemption closed on 30 June 2021.

7.    The Conveyance Duty tax base is comprised of concessional or exempt properties transferred in 2020‑21. Estimates are based on the expected growth in Conveyance Duty revenue. Not all exempt transactions are recorded and not all valuation data is available, therefore the estimates are likely to be understated.

8.    The First home buyer duty concession estimate for 2021‑22 reflects the increase to the dutiable value of property threshold from $400 000 to $500 000.

9.    The pensioner downsizing duty concession estimate for 2021‑22 reflects the increase to the dutiable value of property threshold from $400 000 to $500 000.

10.  Comprises transfers to a special trustee under section 37 of the Duties Act 2001 and instances where there is no change in beneficial ownership.


 

Other Revenue Sources

Sales of Goods and Services

Revenue from the Sales of Goods and Services is estimated to be $441.7 million in 2021‑22.

Table 5.7 details the major components of revenue from the Sales of Goods and Services.

Table 5.7:         Sales of Goods and Services1

 

2020‑21 

2020‑21

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

Preliminary

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Outcome

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Departmental Fees and Recoveries

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communities Tasmania2

53.1 

  55.1 

45.3 

45.3 

45.3 

45.3 

Education

42.2 

  36.4 

43.3 

46.3 

46.9 

47.7 

Finance‑General

2.5 

.... 

1.1 

1.1 

1.2 

1.2 

Health

234.2 

  228.3 

233.9 

241.0 

247.6 

255.3 

Justice

4.5 

2.4 

4.6 

4.7 

4.8 

4.8 

Marine and Safety Tasmania

5.2 

5.9 

4.9 

3.8 

6.0 

5.2 

Office of the Governor

0.1 

0.1 

0.1 

0.1 

0.1 

0.1 

Police, Fire and Emergency Management

3.8 

4.6 

3.9 

4.0 

4.0 

4.1 

Premier and Cabinet

7.7 

3.5 

8.4 

8.4 

8.4 

9.0 

Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment3

38.9 

  51.5 

47.8 

50.5 

51.1 

51.9 

State Fire Commission

6.4 

11.9 

6.4 

6.5 

6.6 

6.8 

State Growth

9.8 

  10.7 

9.9 

10.0 

10.1 

10.2 

Tasmanian Audit Office

5.5 

5.5 

5.6 

5.8 

5.9 

5.9 

TasTAFE4

18.4 

  24.1 

24.8 

27.6 

28.2 

28.8 

 

432.3 

440.0 

439.8 

455.0 

466.2 

476.1 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Sales of Goods and Services

1.1 

0.9 

1.9 

3.5 

3.6 

3.8 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL SALES OF GOODS AND SERVICES

433.4 

440.9 

441.7 

458.5 

469.8 

479.9 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The information provided in this table may differ from the Sales of Goods and Services for each agency in Government Services Budget Paper No 2 due to the elimination of inter‑agency transactions during the consolidation process.

2.    The decrease in 2021‑22 primarily reflects a reduction in rent revenues following the transfer of Housing assets to Community Housing Organisations.

3.    The increase in Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment in 2021-22 compared to 2020‑21, primarily reflects an increase in income received through entry fees and various business enterprises conducted within the State’s National Parks and reserves.

4.    The increase in TasTAFE in 2021-22 compared to 2020‑21, primarily reflects the resumption of commercial short courses and international student revenue to 2018-19 levels by 2023-24.

 

Fines and Regulatory Fees

Revenue from Fines and Regulatory Fees is estimated to be $107.2 million in 2021‑22.

Table 5.8 details the major components of Fines and Regulatory Fees.

Table 5.8:         Fines and Regulatory Fees1

 

2020‑21 

2020‑21

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

Preliminary

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Outcome

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fines2

23.4 

  16.4 

23.4 

23.5 

23.5 

23.6 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fees

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abalone Licences

6.3 

  3.5 

6.4 

6.6 

6.8 

6.9 

Water Licence Fees

2.1 

2.1 

2.2 

2.2 

2.3 

2.3 

Environment Fees

4.2 

  4.7 

4.2 

4.3 

4.4 

4.5 

Driver’s Licences

7.1 

  7.5 

7.5 

7.7 

7.9 

8.1 

Photo Licence Fees

1.8 

  1.7 

1.8 

1.9 

1.9 

2.0 

Vehicle Inspection Services Fees

0.1 

0.5 

0.1 

0.1 

0.1 

0.1 

Quarantine Fees

4.1 

  4.3 

4.1 

4.1 

4.1 

4.1 

Consumer Affairs Office Regulatory Fees

0.6 

0.5 

0.6 

0.6 

0.6 

0.6 

Magisterial Courts Regulatory Fees

0.7 

1.0 

0.7 

0.7 

0.7 

0.7 

Registrar‑General Regulatory Fees

2.0 

2.0 

2.0 

2.0 

2.0 

2.0 

Supreme Court Regulatory Fees

1.2 

3.2 

1.2 

1.2 

1.2 

1.2 

Other Regulatory Fees

48.7 

52.9 

53.0 

53.4 

54.2 

54.9 

 

78.8 

84.0 

83.8 

84.8 

86.2 

87.4 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL FINES AND REGULATORY FEES

102.2 

100.4 

107.2 

108.3 

109.7 

111.0 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The information provided in this section may differ from the Fines and Regulatory Fees for each agency in Government Services Budget Paper No 2 due to the elimination of inter‑agency transactions during the consolidation process.

2.    Includes fines collected by the Department of Justice, Inland Fisheries Service and the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management.


 

Interest Income

Interest income is estimated to be $7.9 million in 2021‑22. The decrease in 202122 primarily reflects a lower interestearning rate on investments compared to the 202021 Budget together with the impact of a lower value of investments following the first instalment payment for the purchase of TTLine’s new vessels.

Dividend, Tax and Rate Equivalent Income

Dividend, tax and rate equivalent income in 2021‑22 is estimated to be $383.8 million.

This estimate reflects improved profitability, in 2020‑21, for a number of government businesses, compared to that which was expected at the time of the 2020‑21 Budget. This is in the context of the uncertain COVID‑19 environment that existed at that time, including uncertainty in relation to the extent to which public health measures to limit the spread of COVID‑19 would continue to impact government business profitability. This improvement in profitability is also expected to positively impact the level of estimated returns over the Forward Estimates.

On an annual basis, dividend, tax and rate equivalent income is forecast to trend downwards over the Forward Estimates, before improving slightly in 2024‑25. The decrease is primarily due to profit forecasts for Hydro Tasmania, reflecting an expectation of less favourable trading conditions in the National Electricity Market, partially offset by increasing returns from the Motor Accidents Insurance Board which has benefited from improved financial markets, resulting in higher investment returns.

Chart 5.5 shows the total dividend, tax and rate equivalent income over time.

Chart 5.5:         Dividend, Tax and Rate Equivalent Income, 2015‑16 to 2024‑251

Title: Dividend, Tax and Rate Equivalent Income, 2015-16 to 2024-25 - Description: The chart shows that returns from Government businesses were historically high in 2019 20 and are forecast to decrease across the 2021-22 Budget and Forward Estimates until 2024-25 when they increase slightly.

Note:

1.    Data is presented on an accruals basis and reflects actual outcomes for 2015‑16 to 2019‑20 and the Preliminary Outcome for 2020‑21.

 

Table 5.9 details the dividend, tax and rate equivalent income in 2021‑22 and over the Forward Estimates.

Table 5.9:         Dividend, Tax and Rate Equivalent Income1

 

2020‑21 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

Preliminary 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Outcome 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividends

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aurora Energy Pty Ltd2

.... 

.... 

10.8 

9.3 

14.1 

12.7 

Hydro Tasmania3

115.0 

115.0 

112.3 

56.7 

27.4 

20.8 

Motor Accidents Insurance Board4

32.6 

32.6 

52.6 

48.7 

45.9 

50.5 

Public Trustee

.... 

0.1 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Sustainable Timber Tasmania5

2.0 

2.0 

.... 

.... 

.... 

6.0 

Tasmanian Networks Pty Ltd6

26.7 

26.7 

15.5 

9.2 

15.5 

19.2 

Tasmanian Ports Corporation Pty Ltd7

4.6 

4.6 

.... 

5.1 

7.6 

6.6 

Tasmanian Public Finance Corporation

11.5 

11.5 

8.5 

5.2 

5.6 

5.9 

TT‑Line Company Pty Ltd8

29.2 

16.2 

.... 

12.3 

4.0 

.... 

 

221.7 

208.8 

199.8 

146.4 

119.9 

121.6 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mersey Community Hospital Dividend

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividend for Mersey Community Hospital

86.6 

86.6 

89.7 

92.8 

96.1 

99.4 

 

86.6 

86.6 

89.7 

92.8 

96.1 

99.4 

Taxation Equivalents

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aurora Energy Pty Ltd

.... 

6.4 

5.5 

7.6 

7.3 

6.9 

Hydro Tasmania3

57.5 

55.3 

28.8 

11.4 

8.5 

11.6 

Motor Accidents Insurance Board

15.5 

8.1 

12.9 

13.1 

12.8 

12.1 

Public Trustee9

.... 

.... 

0.1 

.... 

.... 

0.1 

Sustainable Timber Tasmania

.... 

.... 

0.7 

.... 

2.7 

2.2 

Tasmanian Networks Pty Ltd

24.5 

30.1 

26.6 

28.3 

26.7 

36.8 

Tasmanian Ports Corporation Pty Ltd7

0.1 

0.1 

3.9 

5.0 

4.5 

8.8 

Tasmanian Public Finance Corporation

2.5 

3.6 

2.2 

2.4 

2.5 

2.9 

TT‑Line Company Pty Ltd

.... 

.... 

8.9 

4.2 

.... 

0.4 

 

100.2 

103.6 

89.6 

72.0 

65.1 

81.8 

Rates Equivalents

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydro Tasmania

4.7 

4.6 

4.8 

4.9 

5.0 

5.1 

 

4.7 

4.6 

4.8 

4.9 

5.0 

5.1 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL DIVIDEND TAX AND RATE EQUIVALENT INCOME

413.1 

403.6 

383.8 

316.1 

286.1 

308.0 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.    Dividend, Tax and Rate Equivalent Income is reported on an accrual basis.

2.    The increase in Aurora Energy dividends, in 2021‑22 compared to 2020-21, reflects the impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic on the entity’s 2019‑20 outcome.

3.    The decrease in Hydro Tasmania dividend and taxation equivalent returns largely reflects an expectation of less favourable trading conditions in the National Electricity Market.

4.    The Motor Accidents Insurance Board’s increased dividend in 2021‑22 compared to 2020‑21, reflects higher investment returns as a result of improved financial market performance. As a result of the established dividend smoothing methodology, dividend returns are expected to be maintained at this level over the Forward Estimates.

5.    The 2021-22 Budget assumes the standard dividend policy of 90 per cent of net profits after tax.

6.    The decrease in Tasmanian Networks’ dividends over the Forward Estimates, reflects a lower level of recovery in line with the maximum allowable revenue under the Australian Energy Regulator’s final transmission and distribution revenue determination for the period 2019‑24.

7.    Tasmanian Ports Corporation dividends and taxation equivalents have been impacted by a number of factors as a result of the impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic.

8.    The nil dividend for TT‑Line in 2021‑22 reflects the impact of low passenger volumes in 2020‑21 as a result of the impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic.

9.    Taxation equivalents of $44 000 in 2022‑23 and $49 000 in 2023‑24 are forecast to be received from the Public Trustee. These amounts do not appear in the table due to rounding.


 

Other Revenue

Other Revenue is estimated to be $215.3 million in 2021‑22.

Table 5.10 lists the sources of Other Revenue.

Table 5.10:       Other Revenue1

 

2020‑21 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

Preliminary 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Outcome 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

$m 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mineral Royalties2

35.2 

  60.8 

56.6 

44.8 

40.6 

35.6 

Regional Water Authority Licence Fees

2.3 

  2.5 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

Other Revenue by Agency

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communities Tasmania3

31.7 

  30.9 

40.8 

29.9 

29.9 

29.9 

Education

17.7 

  23.4 

18.7 

19.0 

20.6 

21.5 

Finance‑General

4.7 

5.6 

3.9 

4.8 

3.8 

3.8 

Health

35.6 

65.7 

41.6 

39.2 

39.7 

40.8 

Justice

25.2 

  24.9 

26.6 

30.1 

28.0 

28.6 

Police, Fire and Emergency Management

10.3 

24.8 

10.3 

10.3 

10.3 

10.3 

Premier and Cabinet

3.4 

2.3 

3.1 

3.1 

3.1 

2.2 

Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

2.7 

  12.9 

2.6 

2.6 

2.6 

2.6 

State Fire Commission

1.5 

  4.0 

1.6 

1.6 

1.7 

1.7 

State Growth

3.2 

  2.6 

3.2 

3.2 

3.2 

3.2 

Treasury and Finance

1.5 

0.1 

1.3 

1.3 

1.3 

1.4 

Other

2.7 

2.4 

2.8 

2.8 

2.8 

2.8 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL OTHER REVENUE

177.9 

262.9 

215.3 

194.9 

189.8 

186.6 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The information provided in this table may differ from the Other revenue for each agency in Government Services Budget Paper No 2 due to the elimination of inter‑agency transactions during the consolidation process.

2.    The increase in Mineral Royalties in 2021‑22 compared to the 2020-21 Budget, primarily reflects strong commodity prices.

3.    The increase in Communities Tasmania in 2021‑22 compared to 2020-21, primarily reflects the reimbursement by the Victorian Government of Victorian Seasonal Worker hotel quarantine costs initially incurred by the State Government.