10    Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Agency Outline

The Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment helps build a strong and economically vibrant State, by facilitating and supporting Tasmania’s competitive strengths across primary industries and the environment.

The Department’s objectives are to:

·       facilitate the sustainable development of Tasmania’s marine and freshwater resources;

·       cultivate prosperity in Tasmania’s primary industries and food sectors;

·       secure a healthy and productive environment for all Tasmanians;

·       manage the sensitive and appropriate use and enjoyment of Tasmania’s National Parks and Reserves;

·       protect, conserve and promote Tasmania’s Aboriginal, natural and historic heritage;

·       build on and protect the Tasmanian brand credentials;

·       oversee the integrity and support the viability of the racing industry; and

·       deliver access to secure land tenure, land and resource information.

The Department reports to:

·       the Minister for Environment, the Minister for Heritage, and the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, Hon Roger Jaensch MP;

·       the Minister for Parks, Hon Jacquie Petrusma MP;

·       the Minister for Primary Industries and Water, Hon Guy Barnett MP; and

·       the Minister for Racing, Hon Jane Howlett MLC.

This chapter provides the Department’s financial information for 2021‑22 and the Forward Estimates (2022‑23 to 2024‑25). Further information on the Department is provided at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au.

Key Deliverables

Table 10.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimates allocations for key deliverables being undertaken by the Department.

Table 10.1:       Key Deliverables Statement

 

2021‑22

 

Budget

2022‑23

Forward

Estimate

2023‑24

Forward

Estimate

2024‑25

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Election Commitments

 

 

 

 

10 Year Recreational Sea Fishing Strategy

175

175

....

....

Aboriginal Cultural Fisheries

125

125

....

....

Agricultural Development Fund

750

750

750

750

Ben Lomond ‑ A Year‑Round Destination1

....

400

....

800

Biosecurity Officers

375

375

....

....

Cape Bruny Car Park and Access Upgrade1

....

....

....

200

Cat Management Plan

175

175

....

....

Cockle Creek Camping and Access Upgrade1

125

125

500

1 000

Crumbed Rubber Roads1

200

800

1 000

1 000

DairyTas ‑ Cows out of Creeks Program

25

25

25

25

East Coast Rock Lobster Translocation Program

75

75

....

....

Economic and Social Value Study ‑ Recreational Hunting and Sporting Shooting

50

....

....

....

Edge of the World Revitalisation1

....

....

....

750

Emerging Marine Industry Support

125

125

....

....

Farm Debt Mediation Scheme

....

125

125

125

Flinders Island Bio‑security

88

88

88

88

Flinders Island Camping Upgrades and RV Access1

200

....

....

400

Flinders Island Veterinarian Accommodation and Equipment

490

490

....

....

Freycinet National Park New Visitor Gateway1

....

....

....

4 000

Fruit Growers Tasmania

125

125

125

125

Hastings Thermal Pool Revitalisation1

100

100

2 800

....

Horsetail Falls Walk

600

....

....

....

Industry Training Initiative

500

500

500

500

Inland Fisheries Infrastructure2

250

250

250

250

Junior Inland Angling Fee Waiver2

18

19

19

19

King Island Biosecurity Officer

87

87

88

88

Landcare Action Grants Program

225

225

225

225

Livestock Traceability

90

90

90

90

Living Next Door to a Farmer Campaign

37

37

38

38

Maria Island Re‑discovered Project1

....

....

1 000

1 800

Mt Field National Park New Arrival Concourse1

....

....

....

200

North East Parks and Reserves Upgrades1

....

....

465

....


 

Table 10.1:       Key Deliverables Statement (continued)

 

2021‑22

 

Budget

2022‑23

Forward

Estimate

2023‑24

Forward

Estimate

2024‑25

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Election Commitments (continued)

 

 

 

 

Oyster Industry Levy Relief

350

....

....

....

Plastic Free Tasmania

250

250

250

250

Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority ‑ Convict Heritage Hub, Penitentiary

250

1 000

....

....

Protect Tasmania’s Disease‑free Status

575

575

575

575

Raptor Refuges

10

10

10

10

Rural Business Resilience Package

866

867

867

....

Rural Water Use Strategy Implementation

375

375

375

375

Safe Farming Tasmania

112

112

113

113

Seafood Trails Site

50

50

50

....

Spion Kop Road and Black River Day Use Area1

35

....

....

....

Strategic Industry Partnership Program

500

500

500

500

Supporting Recreational Sea Fishing in Local Communities

1 000

1 000

....

....

Swift Parrot Recovery Plan

250

250

250

250

Tamar Island Wetlands Boardwalk Replacement1

....

....

....

500

TARFish Peak Body Support

80

160

160

....

Tasman Arch and Devils Kitchen Revitalisation1

....

....

500

1 000

Tasmanian Agricultural Precinct1

500

7 000

7 500

....

Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Bodies

....

1 400

1 400

1 400

TFGA Support of Enhanced Biosecurity

87

87

88

88

Thoroughbred and Harness Breeding Initiatives

....

....

....

350

Threatened Species Strategy

....

....

150

150

Training Subsidy ‑ Safe Harvesting and Meat Handling Certification

25

25

....

....

Trout Promotion2

50

50

....

....

Wild Fallow Deer Management Plan

125

125

....

....

Wild Fisheries Action Plan

1 000

1 000

....

....

Wine Tasmania

25

25

25

25

 

 

 

 

 

Other Initiatives

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania

55

55

....

....

Analytical Services

....

1 500

1 500

1 500

Arthur‑Pieman Conservation Area Track Upgrade1

1 000

5 000

4 000

....

COVID‑19 Response ‑ Border and Biosecurity Control Costs

1 000

....

....

....

COVID‑19 Response ‑ Circular Economy

5 000

5 000

....

....

COVID‑19 Response ‑ Seafood Industry Recovery Initiatives

537

....

....

....

COVID‑19 Response ‑ Traveller Management System

270

....

....

....

Injured and Orphaned Wildlife

115

115

115

115


 

Table 10.1:       Key Deliverables Statement (continued)

 

2021‑22

 

Budget

2022‑23

Forward

Estimate

2023‑24

Forward

Estimate

2024‑25

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Other Initiatives (continued)

 

 

 

 

National Trust

300

....

....

....

Save the Tasmanian Devil

....

450

450

450

Support for the Major Aboriginal Policy Reform Initiatives

710

260

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This initiative is also included in Table 10.11 Capital Investment Program.

2.    This initiative will be delivered by Inland Fisheries Service. Refer to chapter 23 of this Budget Paper for further information.

Election Commitments

10 Year Recreational Sea Fishing Strategy

This initiative will implement Tasmania’s first ever 10 Year Recreational Sea Fishing Strategy, including a Flathead for the Future Program and making fishing easier for youth, women, and people of all abilities.

Aboriginal Cultural Fisheries

This initiative will support consultation with Tasmanian Aboriginal communities, as well as commercial and recreational fishers, to identify options for indigenous and cultural fisheries development in Tasmania.

Agricultural Development Fund

This initiative will support research and development for all Tasmanian agriculture sectors that contribute to the AgriVision 2050 target.

Ben Lomond ‑ A Year‑Round Destination

This initiative will deliver a contemporary Management Plan for the Ben Lomond National Park that has a focus on year‑round activities, which includes a feasibility study on snow making. In addition, priority on‑ground works are to be undertaken on both existing and new walking track infrastructure, and assets to promote year‑round activities.

Biosecurity Officers

This initiative will provide additional biosecurity officers for two years dedicated to Tasmania’s livestock sector to manage risks to animal welfare, market access, and biosecurity.

Cape Bruny Car Park and Access Upgrade

This initiative will enable the continuation of the existing Cape Bruny project to improve vehicle access and car parking facilities with upgrades to day use areas, and finalisation of a site plan in support of visitors and commercial operators.

Cat Management Plan

This initiative will support the delivery of Tasmania’s first comprehensive Cat Management Plan and implement changes to the Tasmania’s Cat Management Act 2009.

Cockle Creek Camping and Access Upgrade

This initiative will support Stage 2 of the Cockle Creek Gateway project, which will deliver a road realignment and new camping areas for motor homes, caravans and camping trailers.

Crumbed Rubber Roads

This initiative provides an investment in the construction of a rubber crumbing plant to turn end‑of‑life tyres into products that can be utilised in the Government’s road infrastructure program. This investment will be critical to support the industry’s transition to using recovered materials in new infrastructure programs.

DairyTas ‑ Cows out of Creeks Program

This initiative provides additional funding to DairyTas to support the continuation of the Cows out of Creeks program to help farmers improve river health.

East Coast Rock Lobster Translocation Program

This initiative extends the East Coast Rock Lobster Translocation Program and accelerates the development of a new East Coast Stock Rebuilding Zone strategy for rock lobster.

Economic and Social Value Study ‑ Recreational Hunting and Sporting Shooting

This initiative will enable further study into the economic and social value of recreational hunting and shooting in Tasmania.

Edge of the World Revitalisation

This initiative will redevelop the ‘Edge of the World’ visitor site at the mouth of Arthur River as a visitor destination on the west coast, consisting of a new all-weather visitor shelter, interpretive materials (in consultation with the Aboriginal Communities), new and increased car parking infrastructure, and toilets and amenity improvements.

Emerging Marine Industry Support

This initiative will provide new opportunities for existing industries as well as supporting the development of new industries, including marine bioproducts and biotechnology.

Farm Debt Mediation Scheme

This initiative will implement the proposed legislated Farm Debt Mediation Scheme in Tasmania to help farmers in financial stress deal with their creditors.

Flinders Island Bio‑security

This initiative will provide funding to strengthen biosecurity on Flinders Island, ensuring all biosecurity positions on the Island are made full‑time and permanent.

Flinders Island Camping Upgrades and RV Access

This initiative will revitalise parks assets including the replacement of the stairs at Trousers Point Beach, to be delivered by June 2022, and the upgrade of campground facilities and access roads for RV access to camp facilities, to be delivered by June 2026.

Flinders Island Veterinarian Accommodation and Equipment

This initiative will provide funding towards new veterinarian facilities and equipment to help attract a veterinarian to Flinders Island.

Freycinet National Park New Visitor Gateway

This initiative provides funding towards the ongoing development of the Freycinet Visitor Gateway in addition to Australian Government funding. Works will include a new state of the art Visitor Gateway and transport hub, with a shuttle bus service to the Wineglass Bay Car Park to minimise traffic and parking issues.

Fruit Growers Tasmania

This initiative provides funding to Fruit Growers Tasmania to support increased industry and community awareness and education of priority agricultural pests and disease.

Hastings Thermal Pool Revitalisation 

This initiative will deliver improvements to the Hastings thermal pool to create a contemporary visitor facility.

Horsetail Falls Walk

This initiative provides additional funding to complete the Horsetail Falls walk, providing another spectacular attraction to cement the West Coast as a destination for nature‑based tourism experiences. The project will be delivered by the West Coast Council.

Industry Training Initiative

This initiative will enable the delivery of improved training for jockeys and other racing industry career opportunities.

King Island Biosecurity Officer

This initiative provides full‑time permanent biosecurity staff on King Island to assist with strategies to tackle weeds, pests and other issues affecting agricultural production and local biosecurity, and coordinate passenger arrivals to uphold strong borders.

Landcare Action Grants Program

This initiative continues the Tasmanian Government’s Landcare Action Grants Program with an expanded scope for carbon farming initiatives, on‑ground works for sustainable agriculture, and river care activities.

Livestock Traceability

This initiative will support industry to improve livestock traceability and enhance systems for primary produce traceability through education campaigns and facilitating improvements in the livestock traceability framework.

Living Next Door to a Farmer Campaign

This initiative continues the Living Next Door to a Farmer campaign to engage the community, increase understanding of farming activities, and clearly explain everyone’s rights and responsibilities when living near agricultural producers.

Maria Island Re‑discovered Project

This initiative will deliver Stage 3 of the Maria Island Re‑discovered project to improve amenities for visitors as well as commercial operators.

Mt Field National Park New Arrival Concourse

This initiative will deliver a new arrival concourse at Mt Field National Park, with works planned for commencement in 2024‑25.

North-East Parks and Reserves Upgrades

This initiative will support the upgrade of assets within National Parks and Reserves across the north east of the State.

Oyster Industry Levy Relief

This initiative provides funding to oyster growers for levy relief for the Shellfish Market Access Program.

Plastic Free Tasmania

This initiative will develop an implementation plan, collaborate with local government, draft legislation, and support businesses through the transition of addressing the impacts of problematic single use plastics in the Tasmanian environment.

Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority ‑ Convict Heritage Hub, Penitentiary

This initiative supports the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority establish a Convict Heritage Hub in the National Trust‑owned Penitentiary Chapel in Hobart. The Convict Heritage Hub will provide an immersive virtual presentation of Tasmania’s vast convict history records and enable both local and international tourists to trace convict movements throughout the State and across the globe, and to learn the stories of their ancestors.

Protect Tasmania's Diseasefree Status

This initiative provides additional funding to strengthen resources and expertise in supporting Tasmania's disease‑free claims and protecting industries through import risk and pest analysis.

Raptor Refuges

This initiative supports the Raptor Refuge to run their dedicated telephone hotline for reporting and rescue of injured birds.

Rural Business Resilience Package

This initiative delivers the Rural Business Resilience package to support farmers with the tools needed to manage drought and a changing climate through the Farm Business Resilience program, delivered by the Department; and supporting community‑led partnerships through the Regional Drought Resilience Planning program, delivered by the Department of Premier and Cabinet. As part of this initiative, funding will also be provided to Rural Business Tasmania for the continuation of the Rural Financial Counselling Service.

Rural Water Use Strategy Implementation

This initiative will deliver the Rural Water Use Strategy, with funds for a river health advisory project and industry communications, streamline dam management and safety improvements and scoping of license and permit monitoring and metering.

Safe Farming Tasmania

This initiative extends the Safe Farming Tasmania program to raise awareness of farm safety issues and provide advice and resources to help farmers develop work health and safety practices.

Seafood Trails Site

This initiative supports the Tasmanian Seafood Industry Council to continue promotion and development of the Tasmanian Seafood Trails site - www.seafoodtrails.com.au - that supports the ability of consumers to find quality Tasmanian seafood service outlets and experiences.

Spion Kop Road and Black River Day Use Area

This initiative will improve access to the Black River day use area by upgrading Spion Kop Road at South Forest.

Strategic Industry Partnership Program

This initiative is a continuation of the Strategic Industry Partnership Program to support co‑investment with agricultural peak bodies to support sustainable industry growth to reach a farm gate value of $10 billion by 2050.

Supporting Recreational Sea Fishing in Local Communities

This initiative will provide a new grant fund to improve local community amenities, and making recreational sea fishing more accessible to fishers, families, and those who are mobility‑impaired or living with disability.

Swift Parrot Recovery Plan

This initiative will enable the implementation of actions identified in the Swift Parrot Recovery Plan.

Tamar Island Wetlands Boardwalk Replacement

This initiative will improve visitor infrastructure, including the replacement of existing boardwalk, bird hide and bridges at the Tamar Island Wetlands.

TARFish Peak Body Support

This initiative will support the peak recreational fishing body TARFish, to review and implement governance and sustainable funding models and provide information and education services for recreational sea fishers.

Tasman Arch and Devils Kitchen Revitalisation 

This initiative will provide funding towards the Tasman Arch‑Devil’s Kitchen Stage 2 Project, including an iconic suspension bridge across the chasm. The Government is seeking an Australian Government contribution for the remaining funding for this exciting project.

Tasmanian Agricultural Precinct

This initiative will progress the development of a nation leading Tasmanian Agricultural Precinct in Launceston, in partnership with the University of Tasmania, to bring together best practice in research, skills and development across industry, government, and academia.

Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Bodies

This initiative maintains increased funding to the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management bodies (NRM North, NRM South and Cradle Coast Authority) to June 2025, and provides for an update of the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Framework 2002 to reflect Tasmania’s contemporary NRM arrangements. 

TFGA Support of Enhanced Biosecurity

This initiative will support the continuation of enhanced on‑farm biosecurity engagement within the industry and awareness of good on‑farm biosecurity practices.

Thoroughbred and Harness Breeding Initiatives

This initiative will extend the thoroughbred and harness breeding program into 2024‑25.

Threatened Species Strategy

This initiative will enable a thorough review of the Threatened Species Strategy.

Training Subsidy ‑ Safe Harvesting and Meat Handling Certification

This initiative provides subsidised training through TasTAFE to obtain safe harvesting and meat handling certification, and preparation skills to enable wild shot deer to be processed for personal use.

Wild Fallow Deer Management Plan

This initiative implements a new Wild Fallow Deer Management Plan for Tasmania, reinvigorates property‑based game management plans, expands wild fallow deer populations, and continues wildlife population monitoring.

Wild Fisheries Action Plan

This initiative will deliver a Wild Fisheries Action Plan to support the sector in making boat improvements and adopt new technologies, re‑skill and upskill workers, value‑add and diversify, and develop markets and supply.

Wine Tasmania

This initiative will provide funding to Wine Tasmania to improve resilience in the wine sector and fund emergency smoke testing.

Other Initiatives

Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania

This initiative provides additional funding to support the Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania.

Analytical Services

This initiative supports the ongoing work of Tasmania’s only environmental analytical testing laboratory, enabling the maintenance of service to government, industry and the public. The laboratory provides essential services to the Director of the Environment Protection Authority and the Director of Public Health.

Arthur‑Pieman Conservation Area Track Upgrade

This initiative will deliver a wide variety of recreational driving improvements within the Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area including improving the existing roads and open tracks in the region, providing much needed campgrounds and amenities, and developing new facilities or developing new tracks outside of the Western Tasmania Aboriginal Cultural Landscape.

COVID‑19 Response - Border and Biosecurity Control Costs

This initiative will support the State’s ongoing border control response to the COVID‑19 pandemic.

COVID‑19 Response - Circular Economy

This initiative will support a strategic investment in waste management and resource recovery, to build the infrastructure needed to collect and sort recyclable waste, to support other waste initiatives and to create jobs.

COVID‑19 Response - Seafood Industry Recovery Initiatives

This initiative will support seafood industry growth and recovery, including a review of the Living Marine Resource Management Act 1995 and a study into the Tasmanian Ocean Business Incubator concept.

COVID‑19 Response - Traveller Management System

This initiative provides for the development of a new traveller management solution. The Project’s objective is to create a single cloud-based system capable of managing incoming travellers to Tasmania across their life cycle, from application, arrival and management requirements afterwards. This will replace two existing systems being used for this purpose, namely the G2G pass system and the Tas e-Travel system. The Department is leading this project in conjunction with a range of stakeholders across the Tasmanian State Service.

Injured and Orphaned Wildlife

This initiative will provide ongoing funding to facilitate the provision of care and services for injured and orphaned wildlife across the State.

National Trust

This initiative will support the operations of the National Trust (Tasmania) in managing its portfolio of significant heritage properties and to facilitate strategic business transformation activities.

Save the Tasmanian Devil

This initiative continues to support the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program. This will ensure the continued strategic transition to a sustainable program that effectively manages for a resilient wild devil population into the future.

Support for the Major Aboriginal Policy Reform Initiatives

This initiative provides additional funding to support major Aboriginal policy reform initiatives, including drafting new Aboriginal heritage legislation, and finalising the Review into the Model for Returning Land. This funding has been provided following the Review of the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1975 and the clear statement by the Government that a comprehensive new Act is required to provide better protection of Aboriginal Heritage in Tasmania.

The funding will support reform work to develop and consult on a more contemporary Act, in line with other jurisdictions and anticipated changes at the National level resulting from the review of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The return of land to the Aboriginal people of Tasmania is a priority for the Government. Funding has been provided to allow development of amendments to the Aboriginal Lands Act 1995, including consultation, to address long standing concerns of Tasmanian Aboriginal people and facilitate land returns.

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 ‑ Land Tasmania;

·       Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries;

·       Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage;

·       Output Group 4 ‑ Water Resources;

·       Output Group 5 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy;

·       Output Group 6 ‑ Biosecurity Tasmania;

·       Output Group 7 ‑ Environment Protection and Analytical Services;

·       Output Group 8 ‑ Parks and Wildlife Management;

·       Output Group 89 ‑ Public Building Maintenance Program; and

·       Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery.

Table 10.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department.

Output Group Updates

As a result of the Administrative Arrangements Order 2021, the following output changes have occurred in the Department:

·       Output 3.3 Aboriginal Heritage has been renamed Aboriginal Heritage and Land.

 


 

Table 10.2:       Output Group Expense Summary

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 AgriGrowth Tasmania1

11 003 

13 455 

12 024 

10 699 

9 885 

2.2 Marine Resources2

15 778 

19 066 

17 318 

13 811 

13 666 

2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops

615 

633 

646 

663 

677 

 

27 396 

33 154 

29 988 

25 173 

24 228 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Resource Management and Conservation

13 676 

13 657 

14 243 

14 452 

14 616 

 

13 676 

13 657 

14 243 

14 452 

14 616 

Output Group 4 ‑ Water Resources

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Water Resource Management3

8 802 

7 904 

7 988 

8 013 

8 131 

 

8 802 

7 904 

7 988 

8 013 

8 131 

Output Group 6 ‑ Biosecurity Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Biosecurity4

28 771 

32 178 

29 625 

29 024 

28 001 

6.2 Product Integrity

3 715 

3 178 

3 497 

3 562 

3 610 

 

32 486 

35 356 

33 122 

32 586 

31 611 

Output Group 89 ‑ Public Building Maintenance Program

 

 

 

 

 

89.1 Public Building Maintenance Program5

4 500 

2 129 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

4 500 

2 129 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.2 Seafood Industry Growth and Recovery

500 

702 

165 

.... 

.... 

90.6 Agricultural Workforce Resilience

1 050 

1 274 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

1 550 

1 976 

165 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

6 551 

7 054 

6 775 

6 425 

6 425 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.5 Threatened Species

3 484 

3 813 

3 825 

4 055 

4 116 

 

3 484 

3 813 

3 825 

4 055 

4 116 

Output Group 7 ‑ Environment Protection and Analytical Services

 

 

 

 

 

7.1 Environmental Management and Pollution Control6

20 964 

27 579 

21 987 

16 851 

16 565 

7.2 Analytical Services

6 179 

6 298 

6 259 

6 327 

6 375 

 

27 143 

33 877 

28 246 

23 178 

22 940 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.2:       Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.3 Aboriginal Heritage and Land7

3 029 

4 170 

3 758 

3 500 

3 544 

 

3 029 

4 170 

3 758 

3 500 

3 544 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.2 Historic Heritage Services8

3 564 

3 862 

4 041 

3 107 

3 156 

 

3 564 

3 862 

4 041 

3 107 

3 156 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

4 038 

4 179 

4 325 

4 494 

4 633 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Parks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Land Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

13 910 

14 438 

14 584 

14 880 

14 803 

1.2 Valuation Services

5 982 

6 033 

6 133 

6 237 

6 190 

 

19 892 

20 471 

20 717 

21 117 

20 993 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.4 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens9

6 990 

3 078 

3 169 

3 271 

3 358 

 

6 990 

3 078 

3 169 

3 271 

3 358 

Output Group 8 ‑ Parks and Wildlife Management

 

 

 

 

 

8.1 Parks and Wildlife Management10

67 158 

74 977 

72 702 

75 091 

75 243 

8.2 Crown Land Services

12 534 

13 176 

12 622 

12 729 

12 818 

 

79 692 

88 153 

85 324 

87 820 

88 061 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.5 Improving Crown Lands Transaction Turnaround Time

950 

950 

650 

.... 

.... 

90.7 Parks Support10

7 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

7 950 

950 

650 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

120 

128 

131 

133 

136 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

556 

726 

556 

556 

556 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.2:       Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Racing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Racing Regulation and Policy

5 615 

5 775 

5 679 

5 424 

5 870 

 

5 615 

5 775 

5 679 

5 424 

5 870 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

31 826 

32 704 

33 277 

32 977 

32 977 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

288 860 

303 116 

285 979 

276 281 

275 351 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in AgriGrowth Tasmania in 202122 primarily reflects new funding for initiatives, including the Agricultural Development Fund, Rural Business Resilience Package and the Strategic Industry Partnership Program. The decrease in 202223 and 202324 reflects the completion of Taking Agriculture to the Next Level initiatives. The decrease in 202425 reflects the completion of the Rural Business Resilience Package.

2.    The increase in Marine Resources in 202122 reflects new funding for initiatives, including Supporting Recreational Sea Fishing in Local Communities and the Wild Fisheries Action Plan. The decrease in 202223 reflects the funding profile for the Industry Led Abalone Productivity Improvement Program. The decrease in 202324 reflects the completion of the Supporting Recreational Sea Fishing in Local Communities initiative, Wild Fisheries Action Plan and the Industry Led Abalone Productivity Improvement Program.

3.    The decrease in Water Resource Management in 202122 reflects a reallocation of overheads and an internal transfer of management responsibilities across AgriGrowth Tasmania and Water and Marine Resources areas of the Department.

4.    The increase in Biosecurity in 2021‑22 reflects new funding for initiatives, including COVID‑19 Response ‑ Border and Biosecurity Control Costs, Protecting Tasmania’s Pest Free Status, and Flinders Island Veterinarian Accommodation and Equipment. The decrease in 202223 reflects completion of the COVID19 Response Border and Biosecurity Control Costs.

5.    The decrease in Public Building Maintenance Program from 2021‑22 reflects the completion of projects under this Program.

6.    The increase in Environmental Management and Pollution Control in 202122 primarily reflects additional funding for the COVID19 Response Circular Economy. The decrease in 202223 primarily reflects the funding profile for the Waste Action Plan Implementation. The decrease in 202324 reflects the completion of the COVID19 Response Circular Economy.

7.    The variation in Aboriginal Heritage and Land reflects additional funding for the Support for the Major Aboriginal Policy Reform initiatives.

8.    The variation in Historic Heritage Services reflects additional funding for the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority Convict Heritage Hub, Penitentiary initiative.

9.    The decrease in Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens in 202122 reflects the completion of capital upgrades provided as grant funding to the Gardens in 202021.

10.  The variation in Parks and Wildlife Management in 2021‑22 reflects funding no longer being split between this Output and the COVID‑19 Response and Recovery Measure Output 90.7 ‑ Parks Support.


 

Output Group 1:    Land Tasmania

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

This Output provides a secure land titling system; an effective policy and legislative framework for land administration; and services that underpin land management and support the development of Tasmania's spatial data infrastructure. This Output also produces, maintains and integrates a wide range of land information data sets, which are easily accessible through the Land Information System Tasmania web interface and TASMAP products.

1.2 Valuation Services

This Output provides an authoritative valuation service for Government on acquisition, purchase, sale and rental of property, including quality control of statutory property valuations. This Output also administers and delivers a uniform and consistent valuation system to support rating and taxing in Tasmania. Supplementary valuation services for municipal areas in Tasmania are also either undertaken by the Office of the Valuer‑General or subcontracted to valuation firms.

Table 10.3:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality of Tasmania’s land survey and valuation services

 

 

 

 

 

Complying surveys lodged1

%

96

96

96

94

Objections resulting in an amended valuation2

%

0.23

0.26

0.07

<2.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of land registration processes

 

 

 

 

 

Sealed plans lodged that comply with the Early Issue Scheme registered within 10 working days of lodgement of the original plan3

%

68

92

na

na

Sealed plans lodged in compliance with the Priority Final Plan Scheme registered within the statutory timeframe4

%

na

na

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of quality land information to support decision making

 

 

 

 

 

Number of land related data sets available via the LIST5

Number of data sets

2 157

2 593

2 731

2 850

Availability of LIST website and LIST services to government, industry and public6

%

na

99

99

99

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level of government, industry and public use of LIST

 

 

 

 

 

Level of government, industry and public use of LIST website7

Number sessions

(million)

2.37

2.5

2.86

3.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.    This measure was introduced in 2015‑16 following revisions of the Surveyors Act 2002 and Surveyors Regulations 2014 that enabled the Surveyor‑General to implement a targeted audit program.

2.    This measure represents the percentage of total valuation notices issued in a financial year that have an amended valuation following the lodgement of an objection. It reflects the quality and consistency of valuations completed.

3.    This measure will be removed from 2021‑22. The Early Issue Scheme was replaced by the Building and Construction (Regulatory Reform Amendments) Act (No. 2) 2020 Priority Final Plan Scheme. The new Scheme commenced operation on 30 November 2020.

4.    This is a new measure. The Early Issue Scheme was replaced by the Building and Construction (Regulatory Reform Amendments) Act (No. 2) 2020 Priority Final Plan Scheme. The new Scheme commenced operation on 30 November 2020.

5.    This measure reflects the number of layers available via LISTmap and includes layers secured and accessible by specific clients such as emergency service organisations. Operational responses to biosecurity incidents, integration of layers from ABS and other government data projects has resulted in the year‑on‑year increases to the available LISTmap layers.

6.    This measure was introduced in 2019‑20 to measure the overall annual (24/7/365) system availability of the LIST website and LIST services relevant to outages within the control of the Department.

7.    This measure captures the volume of client web sessions (i.e. numbers of times clients access the LIST website and its components) using standard web browsers.

Output Group 2:    Primary Industries

2.1 AgriGrowth Tasmania

This Output supports the Government’s commitment to grow the value of the agricultural sector in Tasmania tenfold to $10 billion by 2050. It oversees the delivery of Tasmania’s Sustainable Agri‑Food Plan 2019‑23. The majority of the agricultural research, development and extension services delivered via the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture are reflected in this Output. It also includes Game Services Tasmania, which delivers game and browsing animal management services to landholders, farmers and hunters.

2.2 Marine Resources

This Output supports the orderly and sustainable development and management of the Tasmanian marine farming industry and develops and implements management policies and plans for Tasmania’s wild fisheries to ensure that both commercial and recreational fishing are sustainable. This Output also includes advice and direction to the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies to assist aquaculture and fisheries research and support for Tasmanian Government engagement in the Blue Economy CRC.

2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops

This Output aims to maintain a securely regulated poppy industry through responsibility for the licensing, inspection, supervision and management of poppy crops. This Output ensures that the cultivation of poppy crops is performed in accordance with the Poisons Act 1971, ensuring policy coordination and preparation of advice to the Government, liaison with private enterprise, government agencies, growers and other stakeholder bodies.

The Output is also responsible for ensuring the licensing, inspection and testing of all industrial hemp crops is undertaken in accordance with the Industrial Hemp Act 2015 and Regulations.


 

Table 10.4:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value of primary industries sector

 

 

 

 

 

Gross value of agricultural and fish production

 

 

 

 

 

Wild fisheries1

$ million

183.7

147.6

110

120

Aquaculture2

$ million

862.4

930.7

950

981

Agriculture3

$ million

1 637.5

1 878

1 885

1 998

Food production value added4

$ million

4 864.2

na

5 330

5 850

Exports of food, agriculture and fisheries

 

 

 

 

 

Overseas exports5

$ million

767.6

952

810

900

Interstate food trade6

$ million

3 051.9

na

3 340

3 760

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of fishers’ licensing processes

 

 

 

 

 

Fishers’ licensing transaction times7

% completed in 3 working days

95

95

95

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

External funds leveraged from Government investment in primary industries research8

 

 

 

 

 

External funds received by TIA9

$ million

5.5

7.5

6.18

8

External funds received by IMAS‑SMRCA10

$ million

5.69

5.7

6.47

5.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of information to support farmers to run their businesses

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of emails or calls to FarmPoint responded to within 1 business day11

%

na

99

95

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of Poppy Advisory Control Board per licence issued12

$

1 454

1 385

1 436

1 721

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support for GMO moratorium

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of former GM canola sites monitored or audited13

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The target for this measure is based on the total allowable commercial catches set for the relevant licensing years, which do not coincide with financial years. Similarly, actuals relate to the licensing year ending in the relevant financial year. The 2019‑20 actual value for aquaculture has been updated following a revised value for Salmonids (the previous figure was based on the 2018‑19 value as 2019‑20 data was not available at the time of reporting). The 2020‑21 wild fisheries figure is an estimated value extrapolated on previous fishing patterns. The downward trend for 2020‑21 and the 2021‑22 target value for wild fisheries is largely due to the impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic on domestic and international markets and the ongoing closure of the Chinese market to rock lobster imports from Tasmania.

2.    Due to variable market and production trends over the 2019‑20 period (predominately associated with the COVID‑19 pandemic), the 2020‑21 actual value and the 2021‑22 target value are estimates only and may vary significantly. The 2019‑20 actual value has been revised from that reported in the 2020‑21 Budget Papers, to reflect updated production information.

3.    This measure includes food and non‑food agricultural production. The targets assume a growth rate from 2012‑13 that results in the gross value reaching $10 billion by 2050, consistent with the Tasmanian Government’s AgriVision 2050 target. The 2019‑20 actual value was released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics on 14 May 2021.

4.    This measure is reported in the Tasmanian Agri‑Food ScoreCard, which is published by the Department. It is calculated from data sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the Department, primary producers, industry bodies and major food processors. The 2019‑20 value is not yet available. The 2020‑21 actual value is an estimate.

5.    This measure is sourced from ABS overseas export data and incorporates meat, dairy, fish, and fruit and vegetables. Targets assume conformity with long‑term production trends and no significant change in the value of the Australian dollar.

6.    The net value of interstate trade is calculated by the Department and reported in the Tasmanian Agri‑Food ScoreCard. It is the residual value of food production added after overseas exports and Tasmanian consumption are accounted for. The 2019‑20 value is not yet available. The 2020‑21 actual value is an estimate.

7.    This measure reflects the response time for processing of routine applications. As part of the COVID‑19 relief measures, various licenses and fees were waived or reimbursed in 2020 and 2021. The impact of these COVID‑19 relief measures are not included in this performance measure.

8.    The funds received by Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA) and the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies ‑ Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration Agreement (IMAS‑SMRCA) are calculated on a calendar year basis. For example, 2018‑19 refers to the total amount of funds received during the 2019 calendar year. These measures exclude the contribution by the University of Tasmania.

9.    This measure is only one measure of the success of the Joint Venture Agreement with the TIA. The TIA Strategic Plan identifies the priorities for the Institute, including supporting the Government’s plan to increase the contribution of agriculture to the Tasmanian economy.

10.  Target funding for SMRCA external funding is designed to match the approximate level of State Government contributions annually, which is approximately $3.5 million in 2020‑21. IMAS has historically exceeded that minimum match level.

11.  This was a new measure for 2019‑20 and performance data is not available for previous years. The new FarmPoint helpline and email were launched in 2019 and complement the FarmPoint website, which was modernised in 2019. Collectively, FarmPoint provides easy access to information to support farmers to run their business. The measure is based on response times to calls and emails received through FarmPoint.

12.  This is a measure of the total costs of the Poppy Advisory Control Board per annum divided by the number of licences issued and/or active in that year. The increase over 2020‑21 and 2021‑22 in cost per licence issued or active is primarily the result of a reduction in the number of poppy growers in Tasmania in response to stable global stocks and the need to balance supply and demand. The cost of the PACB is primarily a fixed cost and is borne by Government. Poppy cultivation licences are no longer issued annually, but for a period of up to five years.

13.  This was a new measure in 2019‑20, however, performance data is available for previous years. All former GM canola trial sites are routinely monitored, and any volunteer plants are destroyed in accordance with the State’s GMO policy. The Department is currently working with TIA to develop an inspection program that balances farm activity with ongoing monitoring requirements in accordance with a risk‑based approach to management/inspection and response actions.

Output Group 3:    Natural and Cultural Heritage

3.1 Resource Management and Conservation

This Output provides for the conservation and sustainable use of Tasmania’s natural values and land resources. The Output manages the State’s terrestrial and marine natural values to ensure their sustainable use and conservation.

3.2 Historic Heritage Services

This Output works to recognise, protect and ensure the sound statutory management of places of historic cultural heritage significance to Tasmania. Assistance and advice is provided to the Tasmanian Heritage Council to administer the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995; to all three levels of government; and to heritage property owners, site managers, and sector organisations. It aims to facilitate the sustainable use, development adaptive reuse and interpretation of places of State heritage significance, and an understanding and appreciation of the social, economic and environmental benefits of historic heritage to Tasmania and the visitor economy.


 

3.3 Aboriginal Heritage and Land

This Output aims to protect, conserve and promote Tasmania’s unique Aboriginal heritage. It seeks to increase community understanding and valuing of Aboriginal heritage by providing training, education and interpretation materials. The Output administers the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1975 and supports organisations and individuals in fulfilling their responsibilities under the Act. Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania provides administrative support to the Minister’s statutory advisory body, the Aboriginal Heritage Council. The Cultural Management Group, established within Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania, oversees implementation of the cultural aspects of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) Management Plan 2016. In the 2021‑22 Budget, this Output also administers the Aboriginal Land Council Elections Act 2004, Native Title (Tasmania) Act 1994 and the Aboriginal Lands Act 1995, which provides for land returns and establishes the Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania.

3.4 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

This Output represents the Government’s contribution towards the operation of the Gardens and supports the management, conservation and enhancement of the Gardens, in accordance with the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens Act 2002. Further information on the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens is provided in chapter 25 of this Budget Paper.

3.5 Threatened Species

This Output provides for the management and protection of threatened species and whales. It aims to ensure that threatened species are protected and retained in the wild and to prevent further species becoming threatened. This output administers the Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 and Whales Protection Act 1988.

Table 10.5:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of Tasmanian land reserved

 

 

 

 

 

Land protected either by legislation or by contract in conservation reserves, under covenant or heritage regimes1

%

50.3

50.3

50.3

50.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area of Tasmanian private land reserved for a nature conservation purpose

 

 

 

 

 

Private land covered by voluntary binding conservation agreements2

Hectares

 '000

108.8

106

105.9

107

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of information to support natural resource management and development decisions

 

 

 

 

 

Level of use of the Natural Values Atlas (page hits)3

Pages '000

160.6

223

268

250

Total number of downloads from Natural Values Atlas4

Number

na

na

6 022

6 000


 

Table 10.5:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of threatened species covered by a listing statement5

 

%

47.1

47

47

48

 

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in status of threatened species

 

 

 

 

 

Threatened species showing a decline in status6

Number

3

0

3

na

Threatened species showing an improved status6

Number

6

0

 

1

na

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment of threatened species status

 

 

 

 

 

The number of species for which the Scientific Advisory Committee (Threatened Species) has made a final recommendation on listing status to the Minister7

Number

na

na

7

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

Genetic diversity of the Tasmanian devil

 

 

 

 

 

Extent of genetic diversity of the Tasmanian devil insurance population8

%

98.95

98.62

98.56

>95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management of the wild Tasmanian devil population

 

 

 

 

 

Number of devils within secure meta (wild) population9

Number

146

140

>140

na

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historic Heritage Services

 

 

 

 

 

Number of places permanently entered on the Tasmanian Heritage Register10

Number

5 033

5 030

5 003

5 000

Percentage of places on the Tasmanian Heritage Register actively managed11

%

18.7

13.5

20

12

Proportion of development applications determined within the statutory timeframe12

%

100

100

99

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal Heritage and Land

 

 

 

 

 

Permit recommendations provided to the Director of National Parks and Wildlife within 20 working days13

%

100

98

98

na

Permit recommendations provided to the Director of National Parks and Wildlife that include evidence of community engagement

%

100

100

100

100

Table 10.5:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Response to applicant or their consultant within 10 working days in relation to Aboriginal Heritage Search or Desktop Assessment14

%

99

98

98

na

Referrals to undertake due diligence via the Dial Before You Dig service15

Number

na

na

46 401

45 000

Number of Aboriginal community members involved in cultural values projects16

Number

na

na

130

200

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

 

 

 

 

 

Total visitors17

Number

'000

524

429

420

420

Tasmanian Seed Conservation Centre, number of collections held in seed store18

Number

1 860

1 876

1 949

1 990

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The land protected by legislation or contract is based on the preliminary Tasmanian Reserve Estate layer, which consists of current formal and private reserves and informal reserves from the best available data. The total land area of Tasmania used is 6.8 million hectares, based on the mean high‑water mark. This includes Macquarie Island and other Tasmanian offshore islands. Only the terrestrial portion of reserves is reported on. The use of the preliminary Tasmanian Reserve Estate layer may result in slight variances in the annual figures quoted as they are subject to revision based on the final reserve data.

2.    Voluntary binding conservation agreements include both conservation covenants and management agreements, except for offset and compensation covenants. The measure represents the cumulative total for reservation.

3.    These are the number of page requests from the Natural Values Atlas (NVA) website. In recent years NVA data is also being accessed through other channels such as the LIST, the Threatened Species Link, and the Atlas of Living Australia, which do not register as NVA page hits.

4.    This is a new measure. The measure is an indicator of people using the NVA to download information. It is the sum of the total number of exports of raw data and reports run from the NVA but does not include NVA information downloaded through the LIST.

5.    This measure indicates the availability of information to support decisions about threatened species management and recovery. It includes approved Listing Statements as well as more comprehensive Recovery Plans. It does not include species information contained in note sheets and other media.

6.    This measure will be removed from 2021‑22. This performance measure has been discontinued because changes in threat status occur for a range of reasons that are not within the control, and therefore a measure of performance of the Department (e.g. new information, taxonomic changes, and focus of interest to the Scientific Advisory Committee members).

7.    This is a new measure from 2021‑22. The measure demonstrates that the Department is providing administrative and specialist support to the Threatened Species Scientific Advisory Committee, ensuring it meets regularly to consider nominations and provide recommendations to the Minister regarding threatened species listing status changes, and thereby delivering obligations under the Threatened Species Protection Act 1995.

8.    This measure is aimed at assessing the extent of genetic variation within the devil insurance population. Maintaining 95 per cent genetic diversity is considered desirable to minimise the likelihood of inbreeding within the population and to ensure that animals remain fit for release at a later date, as and if required. The assessment is done annually after the breeding season. It examines the genetic characteristics of the insurance population compared with the founder insurance animals. The actual figures are sourced from the Zoo and Aquarium Association’s Annual Reports. Note that this does not reflect genetic diversity in the wild but rather is a measure of the genetic diversity of the original founders for the captive population.

9.    This measure will be removed from 2021‑22. This measure is being removed as it cannot be accurately measured, nor represented by a meaningful target (e.g. Maria Island population is actively managed up and down depending upon a range of unpredictable variables).


 

10.  This measure reflects the number of places permanently entered on the Tasmanian Heritage Register, subject to the works approval process in Part 6 of the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995. Fluctuation in the number of places entered on the Register reflects the Heritage Council’s strategic focus on adding, reviewing, amending, removing, and replacing existing entries. This includes the introduction of single consolidated replacement entries for places that extend over multiple titles, where each individual title has previously been separately entered on the Register.

11.  This measure reflects the percentage of places on the Register where Heritage Tasmania had an active role in the management during the reporting period. These are places where a statutory decision was made in the registration or works areas or where a grant is being actively managed by Heritage Tasmania. It does not recognise the non‑statutory effort this work entails, including pre‑lodgement advice on proposed developments; the provision of pre‑purchase advice; pre‑statutory engagement in the registration program; or the review and assessment of Heritage entries. The increase in the 2020‑21 actual percentage reflects bulk amendments undertaken to improve location data and finalise provisional registrations.

12.  This measure tracks the Heritage Council’s ability to determine a discretionary permit application within the statutory timeframes prescribed in Part 6 of the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995.

13.  This measure will be removed from 2021‑22 as it cannot be accurately tracked within the Aboriginal Heritage Register and is no longer a relevant measure for the permitting process due to changes to that process.

14.  This measure will be removed from 2021‑22 as it cannot be accurately tracked within the Aboriginal Heritage Register.

15.  This is a new measure from 2021‑22. Referrals received via the Dial Before You Dig service is one measure that reflects effectiveness in the protection and management of Aboriginal cultural values.

16.  This is a new measure from 2021‑22. Aboriginal community involvement in projects helps promote greater health and wellbeing, improved relationships with Government, better heritage outcomes and progresses joint land management intent.

17.  This measure has been affected by the impacts of the COVID‑19 pandemic during 2019‑20 and 2020‑21. The actual figure for 2020‑21 reflects this impact and the target for 2021‑22 has also been lowered to reflect reduced visitor numbers.

18.  A ‘collection’ is defined as a quantity of seeds collected for a particular species, from a particular location, in a particular year. The data records viable seed collections held in the seed store each year. Collections found to be nonviable or used up for conservation programs or research purposes are routinely removed from the collections list.

Output Group 4:    Water Resources

4.1 Water Resource Management

This Output develops and implements a range of legislation and policies for water management to ensure the equitable, efficient and sustainable allocation and use of surface and ground‑water resources and the safety of dams. It supports the development and coordination of policies relating to the regulation of the urban water and sewerage industry. It also provides services to assess, monitor, report and provide advice on the health, condition and state of Tasmania’s water resources for the community, industry and government.

Table 10.6:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amount of water available for irrigation

 

 

 

 

 

Total volume of water licensed for irrigation1

Megalitres (ML)

'000

837

870

922

960

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of dam permit processing2

 

 

 

 

 

Average time for processing applications for Division 4 dam works permit approvals

Days

7

6

9

14

Average time for processing applications for Division 3 dam works permit approvals

Days

52

46

43

84


 

Table 10.6:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality of water information

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of streamflow sites that meet quality assurance standards3

%

99.8

99.2

99.4

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This measure refers to the volume of water licensed and should be read as a cumulative total. A further approximately 130 000 ML is available through other statutory water entitlements, which are not recorded on the Department’s register. The target for this measure is indicative only.

2.    The statutory timeframe for processing dam applications under the Water Management Act 1999 is 84 days. Interpretation of these measures needs to take account of the introduction of an integrated process for dealing with environmental issues at proposed dam sites. Amendments to the Act, that took effect on 1 January 2016, provide for a new process for low‑risk dams under Division 4. The legislation provides 14 days for a decision on whether an application is required under Division 3.

3.    The targets for this measure are set to the nationally accepted benchmark which is 95 per cent.

Output Group 5:    Racing Regulation and Policy

5.1 Racing Regulation and Policy

This Output delivers probity and integrity services to the Tasmanian racing industry through the Office of Racing Integrity. This is achieved by:

·       registering race clubs;

·       licensing and registering industry participants and racing animals;

·       providing handicapping and grading services;

·       providing stipendiary stewards;

·       enforcing national and local rules of racing for each racing code;

·       registering and regulating on‑course bookmakers and their agents;

·       setting the integrity conditions applicable to all Tasmanian race field information publication approvals;

·       providing administrative support to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board;

·       undertaking high‑level research and analysis on a range of issues relating to the Tasmanian racing industry;

·       developing, implementing and evaluating racing policy in Tasmania, with reference to local and national developments in the sector;

·       representing the State and the local racing industry on national bodies and in national forums, in relation to racing integrity and related matters; and

·       ensuring compliance with the requirements of the Racing Regulation Act 2004.


 

Table 10.7:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 5

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drug Detection1

 

 

 

 

 

Swabs taken by stewards

Number

4 226

3 070

4 249

3 500

Positive swabs to swabs taken

%

0.28

0.42

0.31

0.30

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suspensions, disqualifications, fines and appeals2

 

 

 

 

 

Suspensions, disqualifications and fines imposed by stewards on licensed persons

Number

385

423

544

450

Suspensions, disqualifications and fines appealed to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board

Number

15

17

20

20

Appeals to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board where conviction quashed

%

6.6

23

15

15

Appeals to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board where penalty varied

%

40

35

45

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

Licensing and Registration

 

 

 

 

 

Persons licenced or registered

Number

1 295

1 334

1 341

1 400

Licence and registration applications (not referred to Licensing Panel) approved within 14 days

%

94

99

100

100

Licencing and registration decisions appealed to the Tasmania Racing Appeal Board

Number

4

1

2

0

Appeals to the Tasmanian Racing Appeals Board where licensing or registration decision overturned.

Number

1

1

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Handicapping3

 

 

 

 

 

Races handicapped

Number

722

550

724

770

Races handicapped requiring a redraw after publication of the fields, due to errors

%

2.49

4

2.49

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grading3

 

 

 

 

 

Races graded

Number

1 660

1 252

1 558

1 650

Races graded requiring a redraw after publication of the fields, due to errors

%

0.72

0.4

0.32

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Swabs include both animals and humans.

2.    These measures are difficult to forecast and largely beyond the control of the Office of Racing Integrity, although ORI continues to communicate and work with licence holders in an effort to minimise non‑compliance.

3.    The total number of races conducted is determined by Tasracing. The harness races are handicapped, and the greyhound races are graded by ORI.

Output Group 6:    Biosecurity Tasmania

6.1 Biosecurity

This Output supports Tasmania’s Sustainable Agri‑Food Plan 2019‑23 by providing scientific risk‑based systems to exclude, eradicate or effectively manage pests and diseases that jeopardise the relative pest and disease‑free status of Tasmania. The Output delivers diagnostic services to support sustainable pest and disease control measures and to validate the State's relative pest and disease‑free status with scientific evidence. This Output also ensures animal welfare practices are consistent with legislative requirements and community expectations.

6.2 Product Integrity

This Output provides a framework to regulate and manage food safety in the primary production and processing sectors and to identify and trace the movement of livestock. This Output also includes services aimed at ensuring that agricultural chemical use is consistent with legislative requirements and community expectations.

Table 10.8:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 6

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriateness of import requirements for plants and animals

 

 

 

 

 

Current and relevant import requirements in place for plants and plant products1

%

100

100

100

100

Import permits and conditions for animals and animal products reviewed2

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Responses to notifications of weeds, pests and diseases are undertaken in accord with State and national protocols

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of notifications requiring further regulatory action ‑ weeds3

%

<1

5.8

<1

<1

Proportion of notifications followed up ‑ pests and diseases4

%

100

100

100

100

Compliance with response protocols5

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effectiveness of Diagnostic Services

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with the relevant International Standard as applied to veterinary and plant testing laboratories6

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barrier inspections conducted to appropriate standards

 

 

 

 

 

Effective screening of all passenger transfers from Bass Strait ferries and major airports7

%

100

100

100

100

Table 10.8:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 6 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effective Approved Quarantine Places

 

 

 

 

 

Fully compliant Approved Quarantine Places8

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with food safety standards by primary producers and processors

 

 

 

 

 

Eligible primary producers/processors accredited annually by DPIPWE ‑ cumulative9

Number

273

256

276

280

Audits of high‑risk food safety areas without significant findings10

%

99

99

99

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with animal welfare standards

 

 

 

 

 

Audits of high‑risk animal use undertaken without significant findings11

%

93

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with chemical usage legislation

 

 

 

 

 

Audits of agricultural and veterinary chemical usage without significant findings12

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This measure refers to the percentage of import requirements that are current and relevant. The requirements are reviewed on an ‘as‑needs’ basis.

2.    For this measure, requirements are reviewed within three years according to program specifications.

3.    This measure is calculated on the number of regulatory follow‑ups (e.g. requirement notices and infringement notices) required once a landowner has been formerly notified that they have a declared weed on their property and should begin action to control it. It is calculated as the total number of enforcement actions (requirement or infringement notices) as a percentage of the total number of Weed Management Act 1999 compliance activities. The lower the percentage of required follow‑ups, the higher the proportion of compliance.

4.    The biosecurity system includes processes to follow‑up notifications of quarantine plant pests and diseases and notifiable animal diseases. This occurs as a result of public or industry reports and detections and diagnostic investigations in the Tasmanian biosecurity laboratories. This measure reports the percentage of notifications that were followed‑up.

5.    Plant and animal biosecurity response protocols apply at state and national levels and are used in the event of a detection of a quarantine plant/animal pest or disease. This measure reports compliance with these response protocols.

6.    For plant health laboratories, this measure applies to the plant virology laboratory only. Entomology, plant pathology and molecular laboratories are currently working towards meeting the international standard as part of a long‑term strategy of laboratory modernisation.

7.    This measure describes contemporary biosecurity approaches to screening of passengers and goods. ‘Effective screening’ may include both pre‑border and border activities to reduce the risk of the introduction of pests and diseases via ferry and airplane passengers. The target of 100 per cent relates to the results of audits and checks of internal processes and systems rather than 100 per cent of individual passengers.

8.    This measure describes the proportion of the Registered Quarantine Places (currently registered under the Plant Quarantine Act 1997 but in future under the Biosecurity Act 2019) for quarantining biosecurity matter that are compliant with conditions of registration.

9.    This measure was modified from 2019‑20, although data is available for prior years. All primary producers of regulated produce must be accredited by the Department and comply with the requirements of the applicable Food Safety Scheme under the Primary Produce Safety Act 2011. This is a measure of the number of eligible primary producers required to comply with the standard. The reduction in 2019‑20 compared to 2018‑19 is attributed to feed price (eggs), industry consolidation (shellfish), and retirements and businesses ceasing production of regulated products.


 

10.  High‑risk areas relate to aspects of primary food production that, if not controlled adequately by the operator, are likely to present a food safety risk to consumers. A significant finding is a contravention on the part of a producer that presents an imminent and serious risk to the safety of primary produce intended for sale, or that would cause significant unsuitability of the primary produce. During an audit, minor non‑compliances may be detected and corrective action taken. Such non‑compliances do not represent a significant risk to food safety.

11.  High‑risk animal use refers to intensive terrestrial species farming activities that, if not controlled adequately and in accordance with standards, can present an animal welfare risk.

12.  A relatively new risk‑based audit program is in place to ensure controls on the handling and use of agricultural chemicals are being complied with.

Output Group 7:    Environment Protection and Analytical Services

7.1 Environmental Management and Pollution Control

This Output undertakes activities to develop high quality, contemporary policies and strategies for the protection of the environment; ensure development proposals meet appropriate guidelines and standards; regulate, via a risk‑based approach, environmental impacts of large industrial and municipal activities and monitor environmental performance.

7.2 Analytical Services

This Output focuses on providing a range of scientific and analytical services in order to support the delivery of best practice environmental management and the management of environmental incidents.

Table 10.9:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 7

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality1

 

 

 

 

 

Hobart ‑ exceeds PM2.5 standard

No. of days

1

5

2

0

Hobart ‑ exceeds PM10 standard

No. of days

0

0

1

0

Launceston ‑ exceeds PM2.5 standard

No. of days

10

4

11

0

Launceston ‑ exceeds PM10 standard

No. of days

0

0

3

0

Devonport ‑ exceeds PM2.5 standard

No. of days

1

1

2

0

Devonport ‑ exceeds PM10 standard

No. of days

0

0

3

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment and Regulation of Activities

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Environment Protection Notices, Environmental Licences, Environmental Approvals, Registration Certificates and Contaminated Sites Notices issued2

Number

215

204

166

200

Percentage of assessments undertaken within statutory timeframe3

%

88

100

93.34

100

Percentage of planned audits of premises undertaken within scheduled timeframe4

%

87

49

82

100


 

Table 10.9:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 7 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analytical Services Tasmania5

 

 

 

 

 

Number of analyses performed

'000

212

251

281

275

Jobs reported on time

%

76.4

85.6

83.4

85

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The ambient air quality measure is calculated on a calendar year basis. For example, 2018‑19 in the above table refers to performance against the standard during the 2018 calendar year. During 2020‑21 in Hobart, the PM10 exceedance and one of the PM2.5 exceedances occurred in January 2020 due to smoke from bushfires on the Australian mainland. All three PM10 exceedances in Launceston and Devonport also arose from these bushfires, as did four of Launceston’s PM2.5 exceedances. Data collection in April, May and June 2020 was significantly affected by COVID‑19 restrictions.

2.    This measure identifies the number of key notices, approvals, licences (excluding renewals) and registrations issued (including variations) under the Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994. These legal instruments are issued as required, and the target figure therefore represents an expected number based on current practice rather than a desirable target.

3.    This measure indicates activity performance against section 27H of the Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994, which sets timeframes for the completion of the assessments. Timeframes in sections 27C, 27D and 27FA are not included in these totals.

4.    This measure addresses planned audits only (a total of 23 planned audits were completed in 2020‑21). An additional 12 unplanned audits were completed during 2020‑21, but these are not included in this measure.

5.    Analytical Services Tasmania received 17 per cent more analyses to conduct than projected in 2020‑21. Staff numbers were increased to ensure turnaround times could be maintained, with resulting turnaround times being 3.4 per cent better than projected. The laboratory suffered issues with instrument reliability that impacted turnaround times. The Tasmanian Government has provided additional funding for instrument replacement in 2021‑22.

Output Group 8:    Parks and Wildlife Management

8.1 Parks and Wildlife Management

This Output aims to protect, promote and manage Tasmania's world‑renowned parks and reserve system. These areas provide significant environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits and experiences. This Output provides for their sustainable use through maintenance, appropriate infrastructure, high‑quality visitor experiences and a culture that promotes visitor safety. It also manages significant biodiversity restoration programs complemented by the development and implementation of enhanced biosecurity measures.

8.2 Crown Land Services

This Output manages Crown land, ensuring its suitable use and development. It also provides specialist Crown property‑related advice to government and the private sector.

Table 10.10:      Performance Information ‑ Output Group 8

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management Plans

 

 

 

 

 

Protected land covered by approved management plans1

%

 

65

65

65

65


 

Table 10.10:      Performance Information ‑ Output Group 8 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level of volunteer support

 

 

 

 

 

Registered community volunteer organisations2

Number

105

99

17

80

Volunteer attendance (hours volunteered) with Parks and Wildlife Service3

Number

na

na

na

37 650

Wildcare Inc. registered members4

Number

6 430

6 617

na

na

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visitor numbers5

 

 

 

 

 

Cradle Mountain

'000

284

217

169

255

Freycinet

'000

317

264

265

286

Gordon River

'000

80

69

23

59

Lake St Clair

'000

92

77

72

83

Mole Creek Caves

'000

 58

43

25

25

Mt Field

'000

204

167

170

183

Narawntapu

'000

54

48

55

57

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property Services

 

 

 

 

 

Value of sales completed per year6

$ million

2.56

0.4

1.18

0.7

Number of lease and licence agreements issued7

No.

513

463

 

450

400

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This measure refers to protected land managed under the National Parks and Reserves Management Act 2002 by the Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS). It does not include private sanctuaries or private nature reserves. It also does not include the Port Arthur or Coal Mines Historic Sites, which have a management plan in place but are managed by another authority. Protected land includes both reserved inland and marine waters.

2.    This measure was previously reported as “Registered volunteer partner organisations”; the name change better describes this measure. The Parks framework for managing community volunteer organisations has recently been revised. To implement the revised framework, all volunteer organisations are required to re‑register. This process commenced in late 2020‑21. By 30 June 2021, 17 volunteer organisations had registered under the revised framework and this is expected to increase to 80 organisations during 2021‑22 (an increase on the previously reported target of 77 for 2020‑21). This measure will continue to capture all volunteering organisations, including Wildcare Inc.

3.    This is a new measure from 2021‑22. The hours volunteered more accurately reflects the efforts and services provided by volunteers and is a measure that can be positively influenced by PWS engagement.

4.    This measure will be removed from 2021‑22. The total volunteer number is controlled by Wildcare Inc., an incorporated not‑for‑profit organisation, and is no longer considered a measure of performance by PWS. Membership numbers for 2020‑21 were not available at the time of preparation.

5.    The PWS does not count visitors to every national park or reserve. An estimate is made of the number of visitors to selected sites, including those in the table. Data for the Gordon River is collected in the Tasmanian Visitor Survey (Tourism Tasmania) and therefore only includes visitors to Tasmania. Data for some sites was not available to the end of 30 June 2021 at the time this report was prepared. Data for Cradle Mountain, Lake St Clair, Freycinet, and Mt. Field is estimated for part of June 2021 and will be revised when actual data is available. Data for Narawntapu and Gordon River (cruises) is available for 12 months ending March 2021 and will be revised when actual data is available. Mole Creek Caves ‑ final data is available to the end of June 2021. All targets are subject to unknown and unpredictable changes in travel because of the impacts of the COVID‑19 pandemic; a reduction in visitors was experienced in 2019‑20 and 2020‑21 due to these impacts. Visitor numbers are expected to increase in 2021‑22, however, are likely to remain under pre‑COVID‑19 levels for 2021‑22. Some of the targets for 2020‑21 have been revised from those previously reported based on current information available.

6.    Sales revenue fluctuates depending on market conditions and number of applications received.

7.    This measure includes lease and licence agreements that are either new, conversion, transfer, renewal, variation, or transfer and conversion. The value provided for 2020‑21 is an estimate.

Capital Investment Program

Table 10.11 provides financial information for the Department’s Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 10.11:      Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

Total

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Infrastructure Commitments1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment

 

 

 

 

 

Crumbed Rubber Roads2

4 000 

200 

800 

1 000 

1 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Parks

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur‑Pieman Conservation Area Track Upgrade

10 000 

1 000 

5 000 

4 000 

.... 

Ben Lomond ‑ A Year‑Round Destination2

2 800 

.... 

400 

.... 

800 

Cape Bruny Car Park and Access Upgrade2

1 700 

.... 

.... 

.... 

200 

Cockle Creek Camping and Access Upgrade2

3 000 

125 

125 

500 

1 000 

Edge of the World Revitalisation2

2 750 

.... 

.... 

.... 

750 

Flinders Island Camping Upgrades and RV Access2

900 

200 

.... 

.... 

400 

Freycinet National Park New Visitor Gateway2

14 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

4 000 

Hastings Thermal Pool Revitalisation 

3 000 

100 

100 

2 800 

.... 

Maria Island Re‑discovered Project2

6 800 

.... 

.... 

1 000 

1 800 

Mt Field National Park New Arrival Concourse2

1 800 

.... 

.... 

.... 

200 

North‑East Parks and Reserves Upgrades

465 

.... 

.... 

465 

.... 

Spion Kop Road and Black River Day Use Area

35 

35 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Tamar Island Wetlands Boardwalk Replacement2

2 800 

.... 

.... 

.... 

500 

Tasman Arch and Devils Kitchen Revitalisation 

1 500 

.... 

.... 

500 

1 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Agricultural Precinct

15 000 

500 

7 000 

7 500 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing Infrastructure Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment

 

 

 

 

 

Analytical Services Tasmania

1 000 

1 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Waste Action Implementation

1 000 

1 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 10.11:      Capital Investment Program (continued)

 

Estimated

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

Total

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Parks

 

 

 

 

 

Community Recovery Fund ‑ Parks Infrastructure

8 300 

2 150 

1 500 

.... 

.... 

Cradle Mountain Experience2,3

61 040 

2 000 

5 000 

12 700 

21 000 

Cradle Mountain Visitor Experience

25 710 

4 010 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Crown Land Services ‑ Structural Asset Upgrades

Ongoing 

726 

556 

556 

556 

Crown Lands Transaction Turnaround Time

300 

300 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Freycinet Peninsula Wastewater

8 400 

3 500 

4 800 

.... 

.... 

Freycinet Tourism Icons Project3

7 200 

3 000 

3 000 

.... 

.... 

Improved Statewide Visitor Infrastructure

16 000 

1 850 

1 000 

.... 

.... 

National and World Heritage Projects3

4 804 

3 114 

1 500 

.... 

.... 

National Parks ‑ Maintenance Boost

8 000 

1 356 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Next Iconic Walk

20 000 

500 

.... 

.... 

16 700 

Recreational Fishing ‑ Improved boat and trailer parking

2 200 

590 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

Biosecurity Risk Management and Truck and Machinery Washes

2 000 

1 625 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Fisheries Digital Transition Project

6 150 

1 750 

700 

.... 

.... 

Implementing the Bee Industry Futures Report

500 

500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Modernise our Research Farms

7 000 

1 000 

1 000 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

32 131

32 481

31 021

49 906

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Descriptions of new infrastructure projects are provided in the Key Deliverables section of this chapter.

2.    This project includes funding beyond the 2021‑22 Budget and Forward Estimates.

3.    This item includes Australian Government funding.

Analytical Services Tasmania

This initiative will support the activities of Tasmania’s only environmental analytical testing laboratory by providing for capital purchases of equipment.

Waste Action Implementation

This initiative will provide for waste data infrastructure that will support the Government’s strategic investment in waste management and resource recovery.


 

Community Recovery Fund Parks Infrastructure

Infrastructure and associated assets within reserves managed by the Parks and Wildlife Service were significantly impacted by fires that commenced in late 2018. Funding has been provided through the Community Recovery Fund to assist the restoration and reinstatement of Park’s assets and infrastructure damaged or destroyed as a result of the fires. The Australian Government is providing funding to cover up to 50 per cent of the cost of this deliverable under the Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements.

Cradle Mountain Experience/Cradle Mountain Visitor Experience

The Government has a vision that will take iconic Cradle Mountain to the next level. The unprecedented investment in the region by the Tasmanian Government, and the Australian Government’s commitment of $30 million, aligns with the Cradle Mountain Experience Master Plan and builds on the popularity of Cradle Mountain as an iconic destination, elevating the Cradle Mountain visitor experience to one that rivals World Heritage sites around the world. It will further build the Tasmanian brand, boost the visitor economy and create jobs.

The Cradle Mountain Visitor Experience initiative includes a new commercial/retail precinct, car parking, shuttle bus transit stations and significantly improved visitor facilities. Works have been completed at the Visitor Gateway site and works have commenced on the Dove Lake Shelter, with construction scheduled for completion in 2021‑22.

Further investment is provided through the Cradle Mountain Experience initiative to facilitate the development of a Cradle Mountain cableway, ensuring visitors have all‑year, all‑weather access to Dove Lake. As part of this commitment, funding has been provided to support the development of a sensitive and appropriate iconic tourism experience in partnership with the private sector, on Crown land adjacent to the World Heritage Area.

Crown Land Services Structural Asset Upgrades

Ongoing funding is provided for the removal or remediation of physical structures and land that present public liability risks, for statutory maintenance, and for essential and preventative maintenance to buildings.

Crown Lands Transaction Turnaround Time

The Department is responsible for managing over 51 per cent of Tasmania’s land area and plays a critical role in the State’s economy through services related to sales, leases and licences both on Reserved and Crown land. Funding has been provided to support capital improvements to associated business systems.

Freycinet Peninsula Wastewater

The recent Freycinet Peninsula Master Plan highlighted wastewater as a priority issue facing the area. A subsequent Freycinet Peninsula Wastewater Feasibility Study identified a range of engineering solutions to address the wastewater management issues. Funding was provided in the 2020‑21 Budget to mitigate the issues within the National Park that were identified in the recent Master Plan. This enabled the construction of a new sewage pumping station and rising main to transfer sewage from the Wineglass Bay Trailhead to the sewage treatment lagoons, which will also undergo upgrades to improve functionality. The funding will also provide the local council with the ability to increase its existing Environmental Health Office resources, which will be critical during the delivery of the project.

Freycinet Tourism Icons Project

In 2019‑20, the Australian Government committed funding for sustainable visitor infrastructure that enhances tourism facilities, amenities and experiences at Freycinet. This includes funding a new Visitor Gateway transit hub, a second lookout over Wineglass Bay, a new foreshore walk connecting Coles Bay to the National Park, and implementing an Aboriginal education program that assists Tasmanian Aboriginal communities to increase the cultural understanding of visitors and tourism providers.

Improved Statewide Visitor Infrastructure

This initiative will improve visitor infrastructure across the State, which provides significant investment in our iconic national parks experiences and assets. Works currently underway include upgrades to popular camping areas on the East Coast, new car parks, toilets and walkways at Tasman Arch. Recently completed works include a new car park, toilets, visitor centre and other infrastructure improvements at Cockle Creek to create a gateway to the South West National Park, and a new second lookout over Wineglass Bay at Coles Bay and loop track to manage visitor congestion and offer an improved visitor experience.

National Parks Maintenance Boost

The Parks and Wildlife Service manages in excess of $1 billion of assets which service visitor needs and experiences within our national parks and reserves across the State. Ongoing maintenance of the asset portfolio is a critical part of the work undertaken by the Parks and Wildlife Service. This initiative, which commenced in 201819, provides funding to support essential asset repairs and maintenance work to ensure that our parks are safe and presented to a standard that visitors expect.

National and World Heritage Projects

Funding was provided by the Australian Government in 2020-21 for environmental restoration and recovery measures through the COVID-19 Relief and Recovery Fund. Projects include redevelopment of huts on the Overland Track and a new camping area and amenities for the Walls of Jerusalem recreation zone, all within the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.

Next Iconic Walk

This 2018‑19 Budget initiative is investing funding to deliver Tasmania’s next iconic multi‑day, hut‑based walk. The Tyndall Range has been selected out of 35 sites as the preferred location, with a feasibility study being conducted to maximise the economic and community benefits for Tasmanians. Future stages of this project include the planning stage to develop the visitor experience and delivery, to construct the infrastructure, market the experience to visitors and set up the enterprise to operate this walk.

Recreational Fishing Improved Boat and Trailer Parking

This initiative provides for improvements to parking facilities at a number of key locations for recreational fishing. In conjunction with local councils, the Government is providing funding for upgrades to current parking facilities at key boat ramps and look to develop overflow parking opportunities for these sites. Works completed to date include new boat parking facilities and support infrastructure at Coles Bay; additional boat parking on the road to Pirates Bay boat ramp on the Tasman Peninsula; and expansion of the boat trailer parking along the foreshore at Swansea. The formalisation and hardening of boat trailer marking areas at Burns Bay near St Helens is planned for 2021‑22.

Biosecurity Risk Management and Truck and Machinery Washes

Funding has been provided for a network of truck and machinery wash down stations to be delivered in partnerships with farmers, agribusiness, nongovernment organisations and local government. The network of wash down stations will contribute to improvements in biosecurity and farm hygiene.

Fisheries Digital Transition Project

The Fisheries Digital Transition Project commenced in 2018 and builds on the development of the comprehensive licensing database known as FILMS. The project will support transition of the Tasmanian commercial wild‑capture fisheries to digital platforms. Revision of all catch and effort reporting forms used in commercial fisheries in Tasmania has been completed and legislative amendment to support digital licensing and reporting is underway. FishPort, an online licensing website, has been successfully launched and digital tools to support electronic reporting of catch and effort data is in the design phase. In recognition of the technical complexity of change being implemented, the project is now scheduled to finish in June 2023.

Implementing the Bee Industry Futures Report

This initiative will support the implementation of priorities identified in the Government’s Bee Industry Futures Report, by delivering selected infrastructure upgrades to maintain access to floral resources for beekeepers.

Modernise Our Research Farms

This initiative will support the modernisation of Crown and Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture research farm assets and make our research farms the centre of excellence for practical research and demonstration.

 


 

Detailed Budget Statements

Table 10.12:      Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating1

168 837 

176 285 

166 519 

155 229 

155 018 

Appropriation revenue ‑ capital

44 956 

22 891 

27 981 

25 321 

44 606 

Other revenue from government

9 946 

8 414 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants2

49 715 

19 271 

14 734 

15 675 

14 412 

Sales of goods and services3

20 862 

30 389 

32 710 

32 845 

33 243 

Fees and fines

13 599 

14 460 

14 548 

14 687 

14 737 

Interest

196 

196 

196 

196 

196 

Other revenue

2 708 

2 608 

2 608 

2 608 

2 608 

Total revenue

310 819 

274 514 

259 296 

246 561 

264 820 

Net gain/(loss) on non‑financial assets

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

Total income

313 133 

276 828 

261 610 

248 875 

267 134 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

130 194 

135 003 

132 312 

132 639 

133 447 

Depreciation and amortisation

14 162 

14 081 

14 000 

13 991 

13 701 

Supplies and consumables4

62 753 

62 406 

57 470 

59 191 

59 916 

Grants and subsidies5

35 163 

43 761 

33 888 

22 480 

20 185 

Borrowing costs

47 

39 

32 

25 

.... 

Other expenses

4 006 

4 011 

4 019 

4 176 

4 181 

Total expenses

246 325 

259 301 

241 721 

232 502 

231 430 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

66 808 

17 527 

19 889 

16 373 

35 704 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

Total other comprehensive income

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

69 068 

19 787 

22 149 

18 633 

37 964 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating in 2021‑22 primarily reflects new funding for initiatives detailed in the Key Deliverables Statement including COVID-19 Response - Circular Economy, COVID-19 Response - Border and Biosecurity Control Costs, Wild Fisheries Action Plan and Supporting Recreational Sea Fishing in Local Communities. The decrease across the Forward Estimates reflects the completion of some of these new and existing initiatives.

2.    The decrease in Grants in 2021‑22 primarily reflects revised timing of Australian Government funding for the following capital projects: Cradle Mountain Experience, Three Capes Track - Stage 3, Freycinet Tourism Icons Package, and the National and World Heritage Projects. The variation across the Forward Estimates reflects the timing of the Department’s capital projects.

3.    The increase in Sales of goods and services in 2021‑22 primarily relates to the return of normal activity from the impacts of the COVID‑19 pandemic in the previous year, and associated travel restrictions on income received through entry fees and various business enterprises conducted within the State’s National Parks and Reserves.

4.    The decrease in Supplies and consumables in 2022‑23 reflects the completion of projects under the Public Building Maintenance Program and the completion of existing initiatives.

5.    The increase in Grants and subsidies in 2021‑22 primarily reflects new initiatives, including the COVID‑19 Response - Circular Economy. The decrease in Grants and subsidies in 2022‑23 primarily reflects completion of the COVID‑19 Response and Recovery Measure - Agricultural Workforce Resilience, and the completion of initiatives including the Industry Led Abalone Productivity Improvement Program, Nyrstar Groundwater Management and Waste Action Plan Implementation. The decrease in 2023‑24 primarily reflects the completion of a number of 2021 election commitments and the COVID‑19 Response - Circular Economy initiative.


6. 

Table 10.13:      Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating

42 535 

43 815 

44 258 

43 779 

43 921 

Sales of goods and services

20 136 

20 549 

21 063 

21 588 

22 129 

Fees and fines

18 501 

19 621 

20 095 

20 503 

20 999 

Other revenue

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

Total administered revenue

88 494 

91 307 

92 738 

93 192 

94 371 

Total administered income

88 494 

91 307 

92 738 

93 192 

94 371 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies

42 535 

43 815 

44 258 

43 779 

43 921 

Transfers to the Public Account

45 959 

47 492 

48 480 

49 413 

50 450 

Total administered expenses

88 494 

91 307 

92 738 

93 192 

94 371 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered net result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered comprehensive result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.14:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 AgriGrowth Tasmania1

10 105 

12 949 

11 679 

10 402 

9 588 

2.2 Marine Resources2

6 864 

9 378 

8 904 

5 397 

5 249 

2.3 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops

598 

617 

630 

647 

661 

 

17 567 

22 944 

21 213 

16 446 

15 498 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Resource Management and Conservation

9 976 

10 567 

11 191 

11 400 

11 564 

 

9 976 

10 567 

11 191 

11 400 

11 564 

Output Group 4 ‑ Water Resources

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Water Resource Management3

7 095 

6 176 

6 260 

6 285 

6 425 

 

7 095 

6 176 

6 260 

6 285 

6 425 

Output Group 6 ‑ Biosecurity Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Biosecurity4

22 408 

25 282 

24 044 

22 857 

22 561 

6.2 Product Integrity

2 551 

2 615 

2 568 

2 633 

2 681 

 

24 959 

27 897 

26 612 

25 490 

25 242 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.2 Seafood Industry Growth and Recovery

500 

702 

165 

.... 

.... 

90.6 Agricultural Workforce Resilience

1 050 

1 274 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

1 550 

1 976 

165 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

6 551 

7 054 

6 775 

6 425 

6 425 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program5

5 600 

4 875 

8 700 

7 500 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

67 698 

76 614 

72 216 

66 046 

65 154 

Capital Services

5 600 

4 875 

8 700 

7 500 

.... 

 

73 298 

81 489 

80 916 

73 546 

65 154 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.5 Threatened Species

3 439 

3 768 

3 780 

4 010 

4 071 

 

3 439 

3 768 

3 780 

4 010 

4 071 


 

Table 10.14:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 7 ‑ Environment Protection and Analytical Services

 

 

 

 

 

7.1 Environmental Management and Pollution Control6

18 587 

23 628 

20 823 

15 687 

15 401 

7.2 Analytical Services

3 739 

3 843 

3 804 

3 872 

3 920 

 

22 326 

27 471 

24 627 

19 559 

19 321 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

.... 

2 200 

800 

1 000 

1 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

25 765 

31 239 

28 407 

23 569 

23 392 

Capital Services

.... 

2 200 

800 

1 000 

1 000 

 

25 765 

33 439 

29 207 

24 569 

24 392 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.3 Aboriginal Heritage and Land7

2 226 

3 367 

2 955 

2 697 

2 741 

 

2 226 

3 367 

2 955 

2 697 

2 741 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

2 226 

3 367 

2 955 

2 697 

2 741 

 

2 226 

3 367 

2 955 

2 697 

2 741 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.2 Historic Heritage Services8

2 788 

3 403 

3 899 

2 965 

3 014 

 

2 788 

3 403 

3 899 

2 965 

3 014 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

4 038 

4 179 

4 325 

4 494 

4 633 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

6 826 

7 582 

8 224 

7 459 

7 647 

 

6 826 

7 582 

8 224 

7 459 

7 647 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Parks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Land Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

11 423 

11 804 

11 941 

12 237 

12 160 

1.2 Valuation Services

4 028 

4 116 

4 154 

4 258 

4 341 

 

15 451 

15 920 

16 095 

16 495 

16 501 


 

Table 10.14:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Natural and Cultural Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

3.4 Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens9

6 990 

3 078 

3 169 

3 271 

3 358 

 

6 990 

3 078 

3 169 

3 271 

3 358 

Output Group 8 ‑ Parks and Wildlife Management

 

 

 

 

 

8.1 Parks and Wildlife Management

36 653 

37 849 

35 634 

36 490 

36 627 

8.2 Crown Land Services10

4 541 

5 183 

4 629 

4 736 

4 825 

 

41 194 

43 032 

40 263 

41 226 

41 452 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.5 Improving Crown Lands Transaction Turnaround Time

950 

950 

650 

.... 

.... 

90.7 Parks Support

7 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

7 950 

950 

650 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

120 

128 

131 

133 

136 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program5

39 356 

15 816 

18 481 

16 821 

43 606 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

71 705 

63 108 

60 308 

61 125 

61 447 

Capital Services

39 356 

15 816 

18 481 

16 821 

43 606 

 

111 061 

78 924 

78 789 

77 946 

105 053 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Racing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Racing Regulation and Policy

5 326 

5 486 

5 390 

5 135 

5 581 

 

5 326 

5 486 

5 390 

5 135 

5 581 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

31 826 

32 704 

33 277 

32 977 

32 977 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

37 152 

38 190 

38 667 

38 112 

38 558 

 

37 152 

38 190 

38 667 

38 112 

38 558 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

 

 

 

 

 

Total Operating Services

211 372 

220 100 

210 777 

199 008 

198 939 

Total Capital Services

44 956 

22 891 

27 981 

25 321 

44 606 

 

256 328 

242 991 

238 758 

224 329 

243 545 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.14:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Rollover

9 946 

8 414 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

266 274 

251 405 

238 758 

224 329 

243 545 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

223 739 

207 590 

194 500 

180 550 

199 624 

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

42 535 

43 815 

44 258 

43 779 

43 921 

 

266 274 

251 405 

238 758 

224 329 

243 545 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in AgriGrowth Tasmania in 202122 primarily reflects new funding for initiatives, including the Agricultural Development Fund, Rural Business Resilience Package and the Strategic Industry Partnership Program. The decrease in 202223 and 202324 reflects the completion of Taking Agriculture to the Next Level initiatives. The decrease in 202425 reflects the completion of the Rural Business Resilience Package.

2.    The increase in Marine Resources in 202122 reflects new funding for initiatives, including Supporting Recreational Sea Fishing in Local Communities and the Wild Fisheries Action Plan. The decrease in 202324 reflects the completion of the Supporting Recreational Sea Fishing in Local Communities initiative, Wild Fisheries Action Plan and the Industry Led Abalone Productivity Improvement Program.

3.    The decrease in Water Resource Management in 2021‑22 reflects a reallocation of overheads and an internal transfer of management responsibilities across AgriGrowth Tasmania and Water and Marine Resources areas of the Department.

4.    The increase in Biosecurity in 202122 reflects new funding for initiatives, including COVID19 Response Border and Biosecurity Control Costs, Protecting Tasmania’s Pest Free Status and Flinders Island Veterinarian Accommodation and Equipment. The decrease in 202223 reflects completion of the COVID19 Response Border and Biosecurity Control.

5.    The variation in Capital Investment Program across the Forward Estimates reflects the timing of the Department’s capital projects as detailed in Table 10.11 Capital Investment Program.

6.    The increase in Environmental Management and Pollution Control in 202122 primarily reflects additional funding for the COVID‑19 Response - Circular Economy. The decrease in 202223 reflects the funding profile for the Waste Action Plan Implementation. The decrease in 202324 reflects the completion of the COVID‑19 Response - Circular Economy.

7.    The variation in Aboriginal Heritage and Land reflects the cash flows for the Support for the Major Aboriginal Policy Reform initiatives.

8.    The variation in Historic Heritage Services reflects additional funding for the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority Convict Heritage Hub, Penitentiary initiative.

9.    The decrease in Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens in 2021‑22 reflects the completion of capital upgrades provided as grant funding to the Gardens in 2020‑21.

10.  The increase in Crown Land Services in 202122 reflects additional funding for the Okines/Lewisham Foreshore Works initiative. The decrease in 202223 reflects the completion of this initiative.


 

Table 10.15:      Administered Revenue

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Public Account

 

 

 

 

 

Abalone Licences

6 257 

6 426 

6 586 

6 750 

6 919 

Environment Fees

4 171 

4 181 

4 285 

4 393 

4 502 

Land Information Charges

99 

104 

107 

109 

112 

Lands Titles Office Dealings

18 794 

19 171 

19 650 

20 141 

20 645 

Marine Farms Fees and Recoveries

1 243 

1 274 

1 306 

1 338 

1 372 

Other Regulatory Fees1

4 513 

5 371 

5 485 

5 599 

5 723 

Other Revenue

5 000 

5 000 

5 000 

5 000 

5 000 

Quarantine Fees

1 436 

1 467 

1 509 

1 475 

1 512 

Royalty Income

2 322 

2 322 

2 322 

2 322 

2 322 

Water Licence Fees

2 124 

2 176 

2 230 

2 286 

2 343 

 

45 959 

47 492 

48 480 

49 413 

50 450 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation

42 535 

43 815 

44 258 

43 779 

43 921 

 

42 535 

43 815 

44 258 

43 779 

43 921 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

88 494 

91 307 

92 738 

93 192 

94 371 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The increase in Other Regulatory Fees in 202122 reflects the cessation of the Fisheries Industry Support initiative.


2.     

Table 10.16:      Administered Expenses

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution to Commonwealth, State and Industry Organisations

470 

470 

470 

470 

470 

Grant to Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies1

2 805 

2 905 

2 905 

2 605 

2 605 

Grant to Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture

1 958 

1 958 

1 958 

1 958 

1 958 

Inland Fisheries Service ‑ Government Contribution2

1 318 

1 471 

1 192 

1 142 

1 142 

Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority

4 038 

4 179 

4 325 

4 494 

4 633 

Tasmanian Racing Assistance

31 826 

32 704 

33 277 

32 977 

32 977 

Wellington Park Contribution

120 

128 

131 

133 

136 

 

42 535 

43 815 

44 258 

43 779 

43 921 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Public Account

45 959 

47 492 

48 480 

49 413 

50 450 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

88 494 

91 307 

92 738 

93 192 

94 371 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Grant to Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies in 202122 reflects additional funding for further research into the fishing and marine farming industries and ongoing support for the assessment of new and sustainable fisheries opportunities. The decrease in 202324 reflects the completion of this initiative.

2.    The increase in Inland Fisheries Service ‑ Government Contribution in 202122 reflects funding received for trout promotion and increased funding for the Anglers Access Program. The decrease in 202223 reflects the completion of the Anglers Access Program and the Cheaper To Go Trout Fishing initiative.

Contribution to Commonwealth, State and Industry Organisations

This funding is the State’s contribution to cost sharing arrangements, as agreed at meetings of the Agriculture Ministers’ Forum and in relation to nationally agreed initiatives, particularly for biosecurity programs and projects. The funding contributes to activities under Output Group 2 Primary Industries, Output Group 3 Natural and Cultural Heritage and Output Group 6 Biosecurity Tasmania.

Grant to the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies

In 2010, the Department entered into the Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration Agreement with the University of Tasmania’s Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, to assist aquaculture and fisheries research. The Government provides its contribution to the joint venture by way of an annual grant. Activities of IMAS contribute to Output Group 2 Primary Industries.

Grant to the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture

The Department and the University of Tasmania have an agreement in place for the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture to undertake agricultural research, development, extension and education. The activities of TIA contribute to Output Group 2 Primary Industries and the balance of Government funding is reflected in that Output.

Inland Fisheries Service ‑ Government Contribution

This funding represents the community service functions of the Inland Fisheries Service in relation to the conservation, protection and management of Tasmania’s native freshwater fauna and the carp management program.

Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority

This funding represents the Government’s contribution to the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority to support the agreed conservation funding program for the Port Arthur, Coal Mines and Cascades Female Factory Historic Sites.

Tasmanian Racing Assistance

The Government separately funds the Tasmanian Racing Industry under a deed which provides secure funding and creates certainty for the Industry. The annual funding allocation allows Tasracing Pty Ltd to facilitate key administration roles and functions, including the responsibility for the corporate governance, strategic direction and funding of the Tasmanian Racing Industry, as well as ratification of national rules, the making of local rules and the setting of licence standards and criteria.

Wellington Park Contribution

The allocation represents the Government’s contribution to the cost of administering Wellington Park through a grant to the Wellington Park Management Trust.


 

Table 10.17:      Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2021 

2022 

2023 

2024 

2025 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

81 381 

76 848 

77 205 

76 292 

75 827 

Investments

7 719 

7 216 

7 216 

7 216 

7 216 

Receivables2

4 271 

5 178 

5 247 

5 316 

5 385 

Equity investments

3 296 

3 562 

3 562 

3 562 

3 562 

Other financial assets2

1 071 

2 573 

2 573 

2 573 

2 573 

 

97 738 

95 377 

95 803 

94 959 

94 563 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non‑financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories

1 131 

1 167 

1 202 

1 237 

1 272 

Property, plant and equipment2

1 260 769 

1 333 986 

1 335 176 

1 335 366 

1 331 575 

Infrastructure2

445 679 

363 323 

384 292 

404 001 

446 595 

Heritage and cultural assets

2 525 

2 525 

2 750 

2 975 

3 200 

Intangibles2

15 593 

13 437 

13 140 

12 843 

12 546 

Other assets3

4 188 

15 629 

15 364 

15 108 

15 142 

 

1 729 885 

1 730 067 

1 751 924 

1 771 530 

1 810 330 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

1 827 623 

1 825 444 

1 847 727 

1 866 489 

1 904 893 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables2

5 458 

4 598 

4 715 

4 832 

4 949 

Interest bearing liabilities3

2 088 

13 735 

13 429 

13 118 

13 118 

Provisions

7 874 

7 870 

7 870 

7 870 

7 870 

Employee benefits2

31 846 

35 301 

35 623 

35 945 

36 267 

Other liabilities

12 470 

11 367 

11 368 

11 369 

11 370 

Total liabilities

59 736 

72 871 

73 005 

73 134 

73 574 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

1 767 887 

1 752 573 

1 774 722 

1 793 355 

1 831 319 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Reserves2

526 000 

599 163 

601 423 

603 683 

605 943 

Accumulated funds2

324 281 

235 803 

255 692 

272 065 

307 769 

Other Equity

917 606 

917 607 

917 607 

917 607 

917 607 

Total equity

1 767 887 

1 752 573 

1 774 722 

1 793 355 

1 831 319 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Cash and deposits in 2022 reflects a reduction in Parks and Wildlife Service retained revenue due to the impacts of the COVID19 pandemic, and expenditure incurred with completion of the Southern Accommodation Project.

2.    The variation in this item in 2022 reflects updated estimates based on the 30 June 2020 actuals.

3.    The variation in Other assets and Interestbearing liabilities primarily reflects a change in the accounting treatment for the recognition of leases for regional office buildings, and plant and equipment embedded in service agreements.


 

Table 10.18:      Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June - Administered

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

26 

60 

60 

60 

60 

Receivables1

2 074 

1 623 

1 623 

1 623 

1 623 

Other financial assets1

1 939 

1 799 

1 799 

1 799 

1 799 

 

4 039 

3 482 

3 482 

3 482 

3 482 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

4 039 

3 482 

3 482 

3 482 

3 482 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables1

3 507 

2 817 

2 817 

2 817 

2 817 

Other liabilities1

532 

665 

665 

665 

665 

Total liabilities

4 039 

3 482 

3 482 

3 482 

3 482 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total equity

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The variation in this item in 2022 reflects updated estimates based on the 30 June 2020 actuals.

 


 

Table 10.19:      Statement of Cash Flows

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ operating

168 837 

176 285 

166 519 

155 229 

155 018 

Appropriation receipts ‑ capital

44 956 

22 891 

27 981 

25 321 

44 606 

Appropriation receipts ‑ other

9 946 

8 414 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants

49 715 

19 271 

14 734 

15 675 

14 412 

Sales of goods and services

20 862 

30 389 

32 710 

32 845 

33 243 

Fees and fines

13 599 

14 460 

14 548 

14 687 

14 737 

GST receipts

10 800 

10 800 

10 800 

10 800 

10 800 

Interest received

196 

196 

196 

196 

196 

Other cash receipts

2 639 

2 539 

2 539 

2 539 

2 539 

Total cash inflows

321 550 

285 245 

270 027 

257 292 

275 551 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

(115 226)

(119 537)

(116 602)

(116 286)

(116 567)

Superannuation

(14 647)

(15 145)

(15 389)

(16 032)

(16 559)

Borrowing costs

(47)

(39)

(32)

(25)

.... 

GST payments

(10 800)

(10 800)

(10 800)

(10 800)

(10 800)

Grants and subsidies

(35 163)

(43 761)

(33 888)

(22 480)

(20 185)

Supplies and consumables

(62 753)

(62 406)

(57 470)

(59 191)

(59 916)

Other cash payments

(3 956)

(3 961)

(3 969)

(4 126)

(4 131)

Total cash outflows

(242 592)

(255 649)

(238 150)

(228 940)

(228 158)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

78 958 

29 596 

31 877 

28 352 

47 393 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets1

(86 485)

(33 103)

(33 528)

(31 268)

(50 172)

Proceeds from the disposal of non‑financial assets

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(84 171)

(30 789)

(31 214)

(28 954)

(47 858)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings2

(472)

(339)

(306)

(311)

.... 

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

(472)

(339)

(306)

(311)

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(5 685)

(1 532)

357 

(913)

(465)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.19:      Statement of Cash Flows (continued)

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

87 066 

78 380 

76 848 

77 205 

76 292 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

81 381 

76 848 

77 205 

76 292 

75 827 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Payments for acquisition of nonfinancial assets in 202122 and across the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the timing of the Department’s capital projects, including Cradle Mountain Experience, Next Iconic Walk, Freycinet Peninsula Wastewater and Freycinet Tourism Icons Project.

2.    The variation in Net borrowings in 202122 and across the Forward Estimates reflects the accounting treatment for the recognition of leases for regional office buildings, and plant and equipment embedded in service agreements.


 

Table 10.20:      Statement of Cash Flows - Administered

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ operating

42 535 

43 815 

44 258 

43 779 

43 921 

Sales of goods and services

20 136 

20 549 

21 063 

21 588 

22 129 

Fees and fines

18 501 

19 621 

20 095 

20 503 

20 999 

Other cash receipts

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

Total cash inflows

88 494 

91 307 

92 738 

93 192 

94 371 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies

(42 535)

(43 815)

(44 258)

(43 779)

(43 921)

Transfer to the Public Account

(45 959)

(47 492)

(48 480)

(49 413)

(50 450)

Total cash outflows

(88 494)

(91 307)

(92 738)

(93 192)

(94 371)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

26 

60 

60 

60 

60 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

26 

60 

60 

60 

60