3†††† Department of Education

Agency Outline

Education is a major contributor to improving social and economic outcomes in Tasmania, including health, happiness, life expectancy and productivity.

The Department of Education is responsible for the delivery of public early years and school education, adult and community education, and library and archive services throughout Tasmania. The Department is responsible to the Hon Sarah Courtney MP, Minister for Education.

Education services are delivered across the State through 195 government schools including early childhood intervention services, 12 child and family learning centres and 47 libraries. The number of students from pre‑kindergarten to senior secondary is 59 445 full‑time equivalent students.

The 2018‑2021 Department of Education Strategic Plan, Learners First: Every Learner, Every Day drives the Departmentís culture, evidence‑based actions, approach to improvement and allocation of resources.

The Strategic Plan articulates the Departmentís shared commitment that all learners succeed as connected, resilient, creative and curious thinkers. It is these attributes that research shows will prepare learners for further education, training and the world of work in the 21st Century.

The Strategic Plan articulates the Departmentís shared values of aspiration, courage, growth and respect, which guide behaviours, and inform decisions in every child and family learning centre, library, school and business unit across the Department. It also focusses the Department on the delivery of goals to improve outcomes for all learners: access, participation and engagement; early learning; wellbeing; and literacy and numeracy.

These goals are based on evidence as to what has the greatest positive impact on learner outcomes, particularly in a Tasmanian context, and together are fundamental to bringing us closer to the Governmentís target of literacy for all Tasmanians.

The Departmentís priorities and key actions are centred on:

       embedding quality teaching for learning in every school through a focus on what we teach, how we teach and how we assess student learning to ensure a yearís growth for every learner;

       aligning and refining practices (both within the Department and in partnership with other Departments and external organisations) to further support the wellbeing of children and young people to allow them to fully engage in learning;

       implementing an Explicit School Improvement Agenda to ensure student learning through and for growth; and

       improving education infrastructure.


 

Within each of the above elements there is a clear focus on delivering the Governmentís 2021 election commitments including investment in additional quality teaching coaches, professional support staff, school health nurses and support for students impacted by trauma, and delivering on the $271.8 million of investment in education infrastructure over 2021‑22 and the Forward Estimates.

Key recommendations outlined in the Premierís Economic and Social Recovery Advisory Councilís Interim and Final Reports relating to education also remain a key focus, in particular:

       helping vulnerable students to remain engaged in learning (PESRAC Interim Report, Recommendation 51); and

       continuing to engage students in Years 9 to 12 with vocational learning aligned with industry needs (PESRAC Final Report, Recommendation 11; PESRAC Interim Report, Recommendation 41).

The safety of children and young people in schools, Child and Family Learning Centres and libraries is of critical importance. To ensure all children and young people are safe and supported to fulfil their potential, the Department is committed to ongoing implementation of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse recommendations and to fulfilling all requirements of the Commission of Inquiry into the Tasmanian Governmentís Responses to Child Sexual Abuse in Institutional Settings.

The Department is also driving modernisation of the regulatory framework for Education in Tasmania to improve educational outcomes for Tasmanian students and young people through its development of the draft Educational Legislation Amendments (Education Regulation) Bill 2021.

The Departmentís efforts towards achieving identified goals are tailored to a learnerís age, ability and aspirations in the areas of: early learning; primary and secondary education; senior secondary education; and adult learning.

Early Learning

The evidence is conclusive that early life experiences shape a childís life course. The early years are a period of rapid brain growth that lay the foundation for learning and development in later life.

As a childís first educator, families play a vital role as partners in a childís learning. High quality early learning improves outcomes in later life, particularly for children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The Department of Education early learning environments including: the Early Childhood Intervention Services; Child and Family Learning Centres (CFLCs); Libraries Tasmania; and schools, support families with young children to play, learn and grow together. In pursuit of its goal of early learning, the Department provides children from birth to eight years with early learning through:

       supporting families with children from birth to five years to engage with learning through Launching into Learning (for children pre‑Kindergarten); Learning in Families Together (for children Kindergarten to Year Two); Baby Play (pre‑crawling babies); Rock and Rhyme (crawlers and toddlers); Storytime (pre‑schoolers); and CFLCs;

       delivering the Working Together initiative with the Early Childhood Education and Care Sector to provide free early learning and wrap around care to support families to overcome a range of complex barriers that prevent young children from engaging in quality learning;

       providing evidence‑based phonics instruction from Prep to Year 2;

       providing differentiated professional learning that embeds effective pedagogies for the early years;

       connecting people across the Tasmanian community who are committed to supporting families with young children through the B4 Early Years Coalition; and

       regulating and quality assuring of ECEC services and working in partnership with the sector to support children and families.

Investment in early learning in 2021‑22 will continue to support: detailed planning for six new CFLCs with construction to commence for three of the new CFLCs during the financial year; the Governmentís election commitment to providing free access to Speech Pathologists, Psychologists and Social Workers in CFLCs; and free pre‑school for three year old children with the greatest need, delivered in partnership with ECEC Services.

For more information on the Early Years visit the Itís a Great Start website at www.greatstart.tas.gov.au.

Primary and Secondary Education

Children and young people become increasingly independent learners as they progress through primary and secondary school and engage with the Australian Curriculum. Students benefit from a continued focus on literacy and numeracy alongside experiences that support the development of life‑long skills for problem solving, collaboration and critical and creative thinking.

There is a growing body of evidence surrounding the relationship between student wellbeing and engagement and specific learning, academic and life outcomes across all years of education, particularly during periods of transition and change.

Tasmania is recognised as being at the forefront of evidentiary work linking wellbeing and education outcomes through the data collected by the annual Student Wellbeing and Engagement Survey.

The Department continues to focus on all schools improving learning outcomes by implementing the Approach to School Improvement, whereby each school identifies a small number of evidence‑based priorities and related actions that are then supported by the Department through the provision of advice, at the shoulder support, professional learning and materials.

In addition, a number of system‑wide priority actions, focused on achievement of the Departmentís four goals, are underway, including:

       improving participation and engagement of school age learners through: ongoing implementation of flexible learning options to support the engagement and re‑engagement of students who find it difficult to learn in mainstream environments; and ongoing implementation of the needs based model for funding students with a disability ĎEducational Adjustmentsí which commenced in 2020;

       improving literacy and numeracy outcomes by embedding consistent high‑impact approaches to support the teaching of literacy from birth to adulthood as set out in the Literacy Framework and Plan for Action, released in 2019; and delivery of the Numeracy Framework and Action Plan in 2021. Schools will continue to be supported by additional in‑school quality literacy coaches and by Lead Literacy Coaches, and based on this model Numeracy Coaches are also being piloted; and


 

       improving learning outcomes for children and young people by focussing on their wellbeing through: the implementation of the Child and Student Wellbeing Strategy and associated action plans covering Mental Wellbeing, Physical Education and the Environment, and Wellbeing and Me (which focuses on belonging and connectedness); the provision of additional school nurses in primary, secondary, and district schools and colleges; the provision of additional student support services (psychologists, social workers and speech pathologists) in CFLCs across the State; and providing targeted support to children and young people affected by trauma and family violence and those identified as at risk by child safety services.

Continuing to underpin this work is the Governmentís ongoing focus on improving the preparation and recruitment of quality teachers, through actions identified by the Education Workforce Roundtable.

Investment in 2021‑22 in school education will: see further increases in funding for educational adjustments to support the learning of students with a disability; build on funding for vulnerable students including targeted support to students and young people affected by trauma and behavioural challenges; support the first phase for improved case management system functionality for vulnerable students; provide more quality teachers in government schools to support the implementation of the literacy and numeracy approaches articulated in the Literacy and Numeracy Framework; and continue ongoing investment in school infrastructure that supports learning.

Senior Secondary Education

The successful transition from Year 10 to a meaningful learning pathway, leading to attainment of Year 12 (or equivalent), is vital to a young personís ongoing engagement in further education, training or employment.

In Years 11 and 12 students move to studying a Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification course, a Vocational Education and Training course, or a combination of both. Flexible and socially inclusive education is essential to engaging more senior secondary learners in Tasmania.

The Department of Education delivers senior secondary education in eight colleges and 56 High Schools (Years 7‑12), with a further High School to deliver Years 11 and 12 in 2022.

The Department is working to improve access to, and participation and engagement in, quality senior secondary pathways for young people with diverse learning needs, starting points and interests by:

       providing quality delivery of VET qualifications through Trade Training Centres and Trade Skills Centres, with an increasing focus on matching qualifications to industry needs;

       increasing access to apprenticeships and traineeships for school‑aged learners to connect school and employment through learning pathways;

       delivering the Years 9 to 12 Project, the purpose of which is to enable all students to achieve their potential through Years 9 to 12 and beyond in further study, training and employment. The Project is a joint initiative of the Department of Education, Catholic Education Tasmania, Independent Schools Tasmania, TasTAFE, the University of Tasmania, Skills Tasmania and the Office of Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification;

       developing highly‑personalised vocational learning and VET opportunities as part of the Vision for Vocational Learning and VET in Tasmanian Schools to 2030; and

       undertaking curriculum renewal to improve rates of attendance, retention, attainment and completion.

Investment in 2021‑22 will continue to support access, participation and engagement through: continued support for innovative partnerships between urban and rural schools and colleges to provide young people with the best opportunities to be job ready; providing increasingly differentiated education supports including packages of learning that have a practical, industry‑focused lens; and supporting the ĎBack on Trackí pilot program which aims to reconnect with young people identified as being disengaged from learning, understanding their barriers to learning and assisting them to re‑engage in education or training.

Wellbeing of children and young people will focus on the Wellbeing and Me action plan, which looks at issues of belonging and connectedness, as well as continuing work previously commenced on mental health. There will also be further additional investment in school health nurses to support preventative health and early intervention initiatives.

Adult Learning

Learning is a lifelong journey and adults pursue learning in Department of Education settings for a range of different reasons, including for careers and employment, personal interests, wellbeing or to support younger learners.

Improved literacy across all age groups, including adults is a clear priority of the Tasmanian Government. Adult literacy and numeracy levels are directly related to better social and economic outcomes and the literacy levels of parents directly impacts on the educational aspirations and attainment of children.

Libraries Tasmania is a statewide network that gives people in Tasmania access to library services, research and information, adult literacy support, community learning, online access, and archival and heritage services.

Libraries Tasmania also supports adult learners to re‑engage in learning through adult literacy services and the 26TEN network of organisations and individuals that work together to improve adult literacy and numeracy.

Adult learners are also supported by Trade Training Centres, where they are able to access quality VET opportunities to meet local industry needs, in partnership with the community.

This chapter provides the Departmentís financial information for 2021‑22 and over the Forward Estimates (2022‑23 to 2024‑25). Further information on the Department is provided at www.education.tas.gov.au.

Key Deliverables

Table 3.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimates allocations for key deliverables being undertaken by the Department.

Table 3.1:†††††††† Key Deliverables Statement

 

2021‑22

 

Budget

2022‑23

Forward

Estimate

2023‑24

Forward

Estimate

2024‑25

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Election Commitments

 

 

 

 

24 Carrot Gardens Project

250

250

250

250

Beacon Foundation

500

....

....

....

Bothwell District School ‑ Agriculture in Schools

100

900

1 000

....

Cambridge Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

100

500

7 000

7 500

Campbell Town District School ‑ Agriculture in Schools

100

900

1 000

....

Contemporary Classrooms1

200

800

3 000

3 000

Eastern Shore Multi‑Sports Facility

500

3 500

4 000

....

Exeter High School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

150

500

3 750

6 600

Glen Dhu Pool

1 500

....

....

....

Hobart City Partner Schools Project (Ogilvie and New Town High)1

800

2 000

7 000

7 000

Improving Literacy Levels for all Tasmanian Students

500

1 600

1 600

1 600

Lauderdale Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

200

2 000

4 300

....

Montello Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

150

2 200

4 750

....

Mt Nelson School Oval

50

....

....

....

Online Senior Secondary Assessments

450

870

1 800

1 600

Providing free access to Speech Pathologists, Psychologists and Social Workers in Child and Family Learning Centres

533

1 080

1 090

1 100

Renewable Energy Schools Program1

250

1 000

1 250

1 250

School Health Nurses

1 170

1 190

1 440

1 560

Stay ChatTY in Schools Program

....

250

250

250

Support School Package including North West School1

2 000

2 200

5 000

7 000

Supporting Safer Schools1

500

1 000

1 500

1 500

Supporting Students Impacted by Trauma

1 000

1 000

2 000

2 000

Trauma Informed Professional Development

1 000

1 000

....

....

Woodbridge School Oval

40

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

Other Initiatives

 

 

 

 

Free Sanitary Items in Schools

80

80

80

80

Wellbeing Lead Teacher and Principal Initiative

250

....

....

....

Youth Mental Health First Aid Training

15

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    These projects include funding beyond the Forward Estimates.

Election Commitments

24 Carrot Gardens Project

The 24 Carrot Gardens program supports schools to establish a garden and adapt kitchen facilities, as a resource to support learning in line with the Australian Curriculum. Funding is provided over four years to extend 24 Carrot Gardens program from fifteen schools to an additional three secondary schools in the South and two primary schools in the North West.

Beacon Foundation

Additional funding is provided to the Beacon Foundation in 2021‑22 to develop a range of high impact services and supports for schools, based on evidence and learnings from the Collective Ed initiative.

Bothwell District School and Campbell Town District School ‑ Agriculture in Schools

Agricultural facilities at Bothwell and Campbell Town District Schools will be upgraded and consolidated to enable these schools to increase and expand their agricultural VET programs, which are continuing to grow in popularity.

Cambridge Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

This project will provide Cambridge Primary School with additional contemporary learning environments, associated support spaces and amenities for a gymnasium, and traffic and car parking improvements.

Contemporary Classrooms

This initiative provides for the commencement of a co‑ordinated statewide program to renew and upgrade outdated classrooms, with a focus on schools in low socio‑economic areas. Contemporary learning spaces are larger and have much greater functionality and flexibility.

Schools included in the upgrade of contemporary learning spaces include: South George Town Primary School; East Derwent Primary School; Dodges Ferry Primary School; Mowbray Heights Primary School; Lilydale District School; Glen Dhu Primary School; Ringarooma Primary School; Port Dalrymple School; Risdon Vale Primary School; Campbell Town District School; Havenview Primary School; and Rosetta Primary School. Funding of $10 million is allocated over five years commencing in 2021‑22.

Eastern Shore Multi‑Sports Facility

The State Government has allocated funding of $8 million over three years towards a new multi‑sports facility to be built at Bayview Secondary College, Rokeby on the Eastern Shore of Hobart. This investment is dependent upon obtaining agreement for matched funding from Local Government and the Australian Government.

Exeter High School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

This project will provide Exeter High School with contemporary learning spaces, associated support spaces and amenities, and specialist facilities such as kitchens, library and arts facilities.

Glen Dhu Pool

This initiative provides for the upgrade and reopening of the Glen Dhu pool.

Hobart City Partner Schools Project (Ogilvie and New Town High)

The 2021‑22 Budget allocates funding for co‑education high school facilities in Hobart, with Ogilvie and New Town High Schools moving to co‑educational provision in 2022 as the next phase of their Hobart City partnership with Elizabeth College.

Funding of $1.6 million is allocated for immediate requirements such as new bathroom amenities and learning area upgrades, with $20 million allocated towards further priority infrastructure requirements identified through the Hobart City Partner Schoolsí masterplan, which is due to be finalised in 2021. This investment will provide for future growth and ensure that students can enjoy new state of the art facilities.

Improving Literacy Levels for all Tasmanian Students

In March 2021, the Government announced a new target that, by no later than 2029, all Year 7 students will meet an expected reading standard that is above the national minimum. The Literacy Coaching initiative connects in‑school coaches, leaders and teachers across schools and colleges to learn together, share and strengthen quality practice.

The 2021‑22 Budget provides funding across four years to increase the number of additional in‑school quality literacy coaches to 40, commencing in 2022. These additional 40 coaches represents a 50 per cent increase in the number of in‑school quality literacy coaches, and will further support the Year 7 literacy target.

In addition, six Lead Literacy Coaches provide professional learning, resources and support to in‑school coaches and teachers, using school and student data to implement evidence‑based literacy practices, inform teaching decisions and to measure impact on learning.

The 2019‑2022 Literacy Framework and Plan for Action is being implemented across Tasmanian Government Schools, Child and Family Learning Centres, early learning hubs, and libraries and provides a system‑level focus on improving literacy outcomes for all learners. The Literacy Framework draws on key educational research to inform consistent and aligned practices. In 2021, the Department released the online Quality Teaching Guide ‑ Literacy, which outlines key messages and quality practices to support effective teaching and learning in literacy, with a focus on oral language, writing and reading.

Lauderdale Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

Significant capital works will be undertaken at Lauderdale Primary School, including the provision of additional contemporary learning spaces, associated support spaces and amenities, and the redevelopment of outdoor play areas.

Montello Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

Montello Primary School will be redeveloped to provide students with contemporary learning environments, associated support spaces and amenities.

Mt Nelson School Oval

This project provides for the upgrade of the Mt Nelson school oval.

Online Senior Secondary Assessments

Funding will be provided over four years to deliver senior secondary assessments and exams in the same way senior secondary students undertake their studies ‑ using technology and online platforms.

There is increasing momentum to move away from paper‑based assessments and this investment will start building and licensing a secure, reliable, fit‑for‑purpose online assessment platform that seamlessly connects to existing student management systems.

Providing free access to Speech Pathologists, Psychologists and Social Workers in Child and Family Learning Centres

The Support and Wellbeing team model in government schools will be replicated in Child and Family Learning Centres to ensure free access to speech and language pathologists, psychologists and social workers for children attending Child and Family Learning Centres. Funding is allocated over four years for this initiative.

Speech and language pathologists, psychologists and social workers are critical to building developmentally appropriate behaviours and skills for all students to ensure an appropriate level of engagement with learning.

Renewable Energy Schools Program

Funding is allocated to deliver a new Renewable Energy Schools program that will roll out solar panels in over 100 government schools. The first works are to commence in the first half of 2022, with the scheme to roll‑out over a four year period. Savings in energy bills will be used to make the program self‑sustaining, through re‑investment back into the Renewable Energy Schools Fund.

School Health Nurses

The School Health Nurses program assists students to manage stress and anxiety, eating disorders and other mental health issues. The 2021‑22 Budget allocates funding over four years to employ an additional 11.4 full‑time Grade 4 nurses, and three full‑time Grade 6 Clinical Nurse Educators.

These additional positions will add to the 42.7 full‑time school nurses already recruited and working to assist students across the State, and will further support health prevention and early intervention initiatives, including amplified efforts to reduce youth smoking and obesity.

Stay ChatTY in Schools Program

Funding is provided across the Forward Estimates to continue the Stay ChatTY in Schools Program. Aimed at students in Years 9‑12, this innovative program focuses on raising mental health awareness, resilience and building student confidence to seek help for themselves, and their peers.

Support School Package including North West School

Funding of $15.5 million is allocated to construct a brand‑new purpose‑built North West support school on a new site to support students across the region. The new support school will meet current needs at an improved location to ensure mobility access for students, including a hydrotherapy pool.

An additional $2.9 million is allocated to fund remaining works required at the Southern Support School, and $1.6 million is provided for upgrades at the North West support school, Burnie campus.

Supporting Safer Schools

This initiative provides for anti‑bullying measures, with the upgrade of toilets at 42 High Schools and District School sites improving the safety of student bathrooms.

Supporting Students Impacted by Trauma and Trauma Informed Professional Development

Trauma can have a significant impact on a studentís ability to learn. Additional funding is provided over four years to meet growing demand for trauma support, with the funding enabling an additional 100 students to be assisted each year, across Tasmanian schools.

This is in addition to funding announced in the 2020‑21 Budget for Inclusive school communities: supporting all students to learn, to support students with trauma and behavioural challenges and is part of a holistic approach to mental health and wellbeing.

Funding is provided over two years to roll‑out professional development in trauma for school leaders, teachers and teacher assistants in Tasmanian Government schools to ensure relevant staff have the knowledge and skills to adapt teaching practices to support the learning of young people impacted by mental health issues and trauma. The funding will prioritise graduate teachers and those in rural and regional schools.

Woodbridge School Oval

This project will upgrade drainage at the Woodbridge District School oval.

Other Initiatives

Free Sanitary Items in Schools

This commitment allocates ongoing funding to provide free sanitary items in all government schools. The initiative will ensure that a lack of access to sanitary products at home is not a barrier for learning.

Wellbeing Lead Teacher and Principal Initiative

This commitment allocates funding in 2021‑22 for the provision of online professional learning for the Wellbeing Lead Teacher and Principal in every government school in Tasmania. The initiative will provide these staff with the tools to focus on student mental health and trauma‑informed approaches.

Youth Mental Health First Aid Training

This commitment allocates funding in 2021‑22 for school health nurses to undertake specialised training in Youth Mental Health First Aid. The training will strengthen nursesí ability to identify and support mental wellbeing, and promote help seeking behaviour in students.


 

Ongoing Key Deliverables

COVID‑19 Response and Recovery Measures

Engaging and empowering our learners to succeed

This ongoing deliverable strengthens the work to meaningfully engage learners in senior secondary education through providing flexible learning pathways to and through Years 9 to 12 with a continued focus on improving industry liaison and school‑based apprenticeships. It directly aligns with PESRAC Interim Report Recommendation 41.

Specifically, the ongoing funding will support: accelerating the Packages of Learning Program that is designed for Year 9 and Year 10 students and is an integrated approach to teaching the Australian Curriculum core learning areas through a practical, industry‑focused lens, with the first additional prioritised package being in ĎHealth and Community Systemsí; the development of a career website with pathway maps and selection guides to support student career planning, preparation and development during and after their schooling years; resources, professional development and systems that support multi‑level, modularised and micro‑credentialed courses (also known as short qualifications) aligned with the Australian Curriculum General Capabilities, which will promote increased engagement in learning by giving students in Years 9 to 12 greater flexibility in what and how they learn, and regular recognition of their learning achievement; strengthening industry liaison and vocational placement through extending services from two sites to four sites in 2022; and the ĎBack on Trackí program supporting the North West, North and South regions, which aims to reconnect with young people (16‑18 years) identified as not engaged in education and training, understanding their barriers to learning and assisting them to re‑engage in education or training.

Inclusive school communities: supporting all students to learn

Recognising the importance of children and young people being safe, well and positive in order to learn, the focus on the wellbeing and engagement of vulnerable children and young people, including those impacted by trauma, is part of a whole‑of‑government effort, which includes commitments such as the Tasmanian Child and Youth Framework; Strong Families ‑ Safe Kids; Safe Homes, Families and Communities; and the Youth Suicide Prevention Plan. As part of the Child and Student Wellbeing Strategy, in the 2019‑20 Budget the Governmentís first phase committed funding for government schools to increase support for children and young people impacted by trauma and with emotional and behavioural needs. In 2020, the Model of Support for Students Impacted by Trauma was developed. Under this initiative, 33 schools have received targeted funding to build capacity in their school to support students impacted by trauma and there has also been a component to support individual students.

The importance of building on this initiative has been accentuated through the COVID‑19 pandemic and the Governmentís second phase of increased funding for the 2021 school year. Increased funding allocated in this Budget through the Governmentís 2021 election commitment for Supporting Students Impacted by Trauma is the third phase of investment.

2021‑22 Agency Funded Deliverables

Delivering the Education Workforce Roundtable Action Plan

The collaborative efforts of the Education Workforce Roundtable continue to work towards building a workforce of talented people to deliver outstanding teaching and learning outcomes. This initiative, which commenced in 2019‑20, includes three priority elements of the More Teachers, Quality Teaching Action Plan, being: a review of the Teacher Intern Placement Program and provision for additional placements; Teacher Success Profile assessments that provide for the establishment of quality assessment protocols that will be applied at critical teaching career touchpoints; and a trial to introduce Highly Accomplished and Lead Teacher certification for Tasmanian teachers. From 2021, improvements to TIPP will focus on: increased support for interns, mentors and schools; a review of financial support for interns; and increased focus on marketing the program. The HALT pilot will be delivered by the government and non‑government sectors in collaboration with the Teacherís Registration Board and the University of Tasmania in 2021. Funding of $780 000 is provided in 2021‑22 and $3.9 million over four years.

Educational Adjustments ‑ Disability Funding Meeting Learner Needs

The Government introduced the Educational Adjustments funding model for students with disability in 2020 with funding of $34 million over four years. This model aligns funding to the educational adjustments schools make to the teaching and learning programs for students with a disability. This Budget provides increased funding with 2021‑22 funding increasing by $3 million to $14 million. This initiative will continue to build on improved access, participation and engagement for students with disability in inclusive school communities.

Engaging parents as partners in student learning

This initiative is a component of the Family Engagement Review and Assessment Strategy, which aims to support and enhance how schools and families work together to maximise student learning. Specifically, this funding supports a systemic approach to engaging parents as partners in student learning, particularly through student learning progress and assessment. This initiative will support improved educational outcomes for students by providing families with greater access to information on their childís progress, giving parents the information they need to support their childís learning and achievement. Funding for this initiative peaks with $840 000 provided in 2021‑22 and a final allocation of $120 000 in 2022‑23.

Output Group Restructure

The Department has implemented an Output restructure for the 2021‑22 Budget, which is effective from 1 July 2021.

The changes to the Output structure are:

       The former Output 1.2 School Support Services has been amalgamated with Output 1.1 In School Education. The former Output 1.3 Early Learning is re‑numbered as Output 1.2;

       The former Output 2.1 Information Services and Community Learning and Output 2.2 Tasmanian Archives have been amalgamated to create Output 2.1 Libraries Tasmania; and

       A new Output Group 3 ‑ Education Regulation has been created and includes Output 3.1 Education Regulation. The former Output 1.4 Statutory Offices has transferred to the new Output 3.1.

The restructure relating to Education Regulation is related to the recommendations endorsed by the Government as part of its review of education regulation.

The consolidation of Libraries Tasmania into a single Output reflects changes within Libraries Tasmania, including the integration of all library and archive functions. This new model has led to a more coordinated approach to programs, services, budgeting and Output measures.

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of Education are provided under the following Output Groups:

       Output Group 1 ‑ Education;

       Output Group 2 ‑ Libraries Tasmania;

       Output Group 3 ‑ Education Regulation;

       Output Group 89 ‑ Public Building Maintenance Program; and

       Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery.

Table 3.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department.


 

Table 3.2:†††††††† Output Group Expense Summary

 

2020‑21

2021‑22

2022‑23

2023‑24

2024‑25

 

Budget

Budget

Forward Estimate

Forward Estimate

Forward Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Education

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 In School Education1

1 154 402 

1 193 191 

1 232 139 

1 281 892 

1 321 767 

1.2 Early Learning2

10 079 

17 445 

22 047 

26 122 

26 800 

 

1 164 481 

1 210 636 

1 254 186 

1 308 014 

1 348 567 

Output Group 2 ‑ Libraries Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Libraries Tasmania

41 240 

42 704 

42 846 

43 624 

44 524 

 

41 240 

42 704 

42 846 

43 624 

44 524 

Output Group 3 ‑ Education Regulation

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Education Regulation

7 918 

7 663 

7 785 

8 005 

8 163 

 

7 918 

7 663 

7 785 

8 005 

8 163 

Output Group 89 ‑ Public Building Maintenance Program

 

 

 

 

 

89.1 Public Building Maintenance Program3

12 536 

5 794 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

12 536 

5 794 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.1 School Excursions4

1 500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

1 500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies5

414 205 

441 159 

460 581 

480 271 

498 312 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

1 641 880 

1 707 956 

1 765 398 

1 839 914 

1 899 566 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in In School Education reflects the Governmentís 2021 election commitments including: Improving Literacy Levels for all Tasmanian Students, School Health Nurses, and Supporting Students Impacted by Trauma; the continuation of previous commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level; and State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Agreement, which funds ongoing initiatives including: Engaging and empowering our learners to succeed; Inclusive school communities: supporting students to learn; Delivering the Education Workforce Roundtable Action Plan; Educational Adjustments ‑ Disability Funding Meeting Learner Needs; and Engaging parents as partners in student learning.

2.    The increase in Early Learning from 2021‑22 reflects revised timing in funding for the Working Together initiative where a staged approach is being taken to rolling out the initiative to ensure that the valuable co‑design process continues to provide the right wrap around care for families. The increase in 2021‑22 also reflects revised timing for operating resources allocated for the Six New Child and Family Learning Centres.

3.    The variation in Public Building Maintenance Program reflects the timing and completion of funding allocated to the Department for school maintenance projects.

4.    The decrease in School Excursions in 2021‑22 reflects one‑off funding for this initiative.

5.    The increase in Grants and Subsidies reflects additional Australian Government funding for Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes and increases in State funding under the National School Reform Agreement for Non‑government schools, Australian Government funded grants, State funded capital assistance and State funded general education grants.


 

Output Group 1:††† Education

1.1 In School Education

The services provided under this Output focus on the delivery of education to students in schools enrolled in classes from Kindergarten to Year 12. The purpose of this Output is to provide a range of educational services that will inspire and support all learners to succeed as connected, resilient, creative and curious thinkers. The services provided under this Output are crucial to ensure that Tasmaniaís young people obtain the knowledge, skills, behaviour and dispositions necessary to continue their education and training, become job‑ready and lead happy and fulfilling lives.

1.2 Early Learning

This Output has three focus areas. The first, through the Education and Care Unit, is for approving and regulating education and care services (long day care, outside school hours care and family day care) under national legislation. It is also responsible for the licensing and monitoring of all other child care services under the Child Care Act 2001. This Output provides assistance and advice to education and care services. Funds are provided to eligible service providers as a contribution towards operating expenses and capital upgrades through the Education and Care Grants Program. The second focus of this Output relates to services delivered through Child and Family Learning Centres. This Output also includes delivering the Working Together initiative with the Early Childhood Education and Care Sector to support free pre‑school for children who are the most disadvantaged or vulnerable.

Table 3.3:†††††††† Performance Information ‑ Output Group 11

Performance Measure

Unit of

†Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Learning

Kindergarten and Prep2

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of government school students meeting the Kindergarten Development Check

%

67.8

67.1

 

60.7

 

67.7

Percentage of Prep government school students achieving:
Expected literacy outcomes

%

 

86.0

 

84.7

85.4

 

na

Expected numeracy outcomes

%

86.3

85.7

84.1

na

 

 

 

 

 

 

Education and Care3

 

 

 

 

 

Service quality assessment visits4

Number

74

49

61

80

Visits to approved or licensed education and child care services5

Number

 

421

 

278

 

579

 

300

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 3.3:†††††††† Performance Information ‑ Output Group 11 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

†Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literacy and Numeracy6

Reading

 

 

 

 

 

Reading rates against National Minimum Standard Year 3

% of students at or above the NMS

 

94.6

 

na

 

na

 

95.0

Reading rates against NMS Year 5

%

92.7

na

na

94.0

Reading rates against NMS Year 7

%

92.0

na

na

95.0

Reading rates against NMS Year 9

%

89.3

na

na

93.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numeracy

 

 

 

 

 

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 3

% of students at or above the NMS

 

95.5

 

na

 

na

 

96.3

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 5

%

93.9

na

na

95.2

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 7

%

91.8

na

na

96.0

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 9

%

95.2

na

na

96.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal Students

 

 

 

 

 

Education outcome gap across Years 3,5,7 and 9 reading and numeracy7

%

 

7.8

 

na

 

na

 

5.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Access, Participation and Engagement8,9

 

 

 

 

 

Government school students in Years 7‑10 whose attendance is 90% or more10

%

60.2

58.2

na

63.2

Direct retention rate Years 10‑12 for government schools11

%

66.2

66.0

na

68.0

Apparent retention rate Years 10‑12 for government schools (full‑time)11

%

80.4

79.5

na

82.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attainment Measures for 15 ‑ 19 year old students:9,12

 

 

 

 

 

Completed 120 credit points in education and training

Number

4 971

4 896

na

5 200

Some vocational education and training

Number

5 420

5 416

na

6 000

Tasmanian Certificate of Education

Number

3 672

3 673

na

na

Tasmanian Certificate of Education

%

58.0

59.6

na

63.0

Australian Tertiary Admission Rank

Number

2 108

2 050

na

na

Australian Tertiary Admission Rank

%

33.3

33.3

na

35.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Sources: Department of Education Annual Report 2019‑20; and Department of Education records.

†National Quality Agenda Information Technology System.

National Assessment Program: Literacy and Numeracy reported at

https://reports.acara.edu.au/Home/TimeSeries

†Attendance and apparent retention reported at

https://www.acara.edu.au/reporting/national‑report‑on‑schooling‑in‑australia/national‑report‑on‑schooling‑in‑australia‑data‑portal

Office of Tasmanian Assessment, Standards & Certification reported at

https://www.tasc.tas.gov.au/about/reports‑and‑publications/strategy‑and‑reporting/

Notes:

1.    Due to the timing of the Budget, 2020‑21 Actuals were not available for some measures. The Department will undertake a comprehensive review of all performance measures for Output Group 1 following the 2021‑22 Budget, with the aim to better reflect performance against the Department of Education Strategic Plan, Learners First: Every Learner, Every Day. As such, reporting of some measures may change in the future.

2.    Early Learning performance measures are based on calendar years. The 2020‑21 Actual values are based on assessments at the end of 2020.

-       Kindergarten Development Check during 2020 was affected by the COVID‑19 pandemic, with no preliminary mid‑year assessment undertaken. The 2020 result reflects end‑of‑year final assessment only, therefore the measure may not be directly comparable to previous years.

-       Prep literacy and numeracy assessments were based on a revised instrument in 2020, compared to previous years, which required definition of an expected standard score for that instrument. From 2021, a new assessment instrument will provide a revised data set and targets for 2021‑22 onwards. Targets will be determined in 2022, once data from the end of 2021 is available.

3.    The Department remains responsive to the emergent issues within the education and care sector, in accordance with the principles of best practice regulation. The number of visits is an indication of the Departmentís connections with services to promote and improve quality. Visits to services between April and September 2020 were limited due to COVID‑19. As part of the COVID‑19 recovery plan for the Tasmanian education and care sector, where appropriate, Ďvisitsí were also conducted through virtual mechanisms.

4.    Services are assessed against the seven Quality Areas, 15 standards and 40 elements of the National Quality Standard and ratings published. A risk based approach to new assessments and reassessments of services informs the targets. The 2019‑20 and 2020‑21 actual data were impacted by COVID‑19 and the related decision by the Education Council that regulatory authorities would suspend assessment and rating. Assessment and rating visits in Tasmania recommenced in September 2020. Virtual visits were incorporated as a component of the assessment and rating process (the face to face visit remaining, but shorter in length). These virtual visits have not been included in the data as they do not reflect increased effort. The data continues to be comparable over time.

5.    The number of visits to approved or licensed education and child care services is in addition to the number of service quality assessments conducted. The Department takes a risk‑based approach to undertaking these visits to approved or licensed education and child care services. The 2019‑20 and 2020‑21 actual data were impacted by COVID‑19, as visits to services from April through June 2020 were prioritised for high risk matters only. In 2020‑21, some visits to services were replaced by virtual visits and are included in this data. This has allowed an increased number of connections with services, which was particularly important in the period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021 due to the COVID‑19 pandemic. The target for 2021‑22 reflects a rebalancing of workload.

6.    Literacy and Numeracy performance measures are based on calendar years. The 2020‑21 Actual values are based on assessments in May 2021, with values not available at the time of publication.

-       Literacy and Numeracy measures based on National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy include students from government and non‑government schools.

-       As NAPLAN 2020 was not administered nationally in May 2020, actual values for 2019‑20 are not available.

7.    Aboriginal students education outcomes gap is measured across Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 reading and numeracy: a lower figure represents a better result in closing the gap.

8.    The performance measure ĎGovernment school students satisfaction measuredí has not been included in the 2021‑22 performance information, as 2019 was the final year of Student Satisfaction recording due to the introduction of the Student Wellbeing measurement. The new measurement has not been included in the 2021‑22 performance information as it does not have a public target.

9.    2019‑20 Actuals that were not available at the time of the 2020‑21 Budget are published in this Budget.

10.  The Year 7‑10 government school attendance level is based on a nationally reported measure of the proportion of government school students attending 90 per cent or more of the Semester 1 period. The 2019‑20 value is actual for Semester 1 2020.

-       Attendance during 2020 was affected by COVID‑19 and learning from home practices during parts of 2020. Consequently, attendance data for 2019‑20 excludes Term 1 Week 7 Ė Term 2 Week 6 inclusive.

11.  The 2019‑20 Actual values are based on Year 12 numbers as at mid‑2020. The retention rate Actual values for 2020‑21 are based on retention to mid‑year 2021, however values are not available at the time of publication.

-       Direct retention is based on tracking individual students from the mid‑year census of Year 10 in government schools, to the mid‑year census of Year 12 in government schools.

-       Apparent retention rates for Years 10‑12 measure the number of Year 12 students in government schools divided by the number of Year 10 students in government schools two years prior, without tracking individual students. Figures relate to full‑time government school students at both year levels.

-       The Australian Bureau of Statistics notes that care should be exercised in the interpretation of apparent retention rates as the method of calculation does not take into account a range of factors, such as movement between the government and non‑government sector and interstate/international migration.

12.  Attainment measures are based on calendar years: 2019‑20 Actual values are based on attainment at the end of 2020.

-       Attainment measures include students across education sectors who have attained one or more units of credit in Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification accredited courses, and TASC recognised or nationally recognised Vocational Education and Training.

-       Credit points and VET measures are based on numbers of Year 12/13 students in the given year, for studies undertaken in that year or prior. These measures may count students in multiple calendar years, based on participation across the 15‑19 year old age range. Completion of 120 credit points or more, by the end of that calendar year, represents two years of full‑time studies.

-       Attainment percentages are an important way to monitor the level of qualifications that young people are achieving. There are many qualifications and certificates that young people can pursue and achieve depending on their interests and planned future pathway. Observations on attainment should also consider achievement of the Qualifications Certificate (issued at the end of senior secondary studies) and VET attainment (particularly Certificate III and above).

-       The proportions of students who attained a Tasmanian Certificate of Education and/or Australian Tertiary Admission Rank are based on the ABS estimates for the number of persons aged 15‑19 years in Tasmania. This age cohort would include young people undertaking other education and training pathways and/or not in their final year of school. As the number of students fluctuates each year, attainment percentages (rather than numbers) are preferable for comparison.

Output Group 2:††† Libraries Tasmania

2.1 Libraries Tasmania

This Output provides for the lifelong learning of all Tasmanians through the delivery of information, education and training, literacy support and other community services through the Libraries Tasmania network, and focuses on the provision of Tasmanian Information Services.

As part of the Departmentís Output restructure this Output now also includes the management of Tasmaniaís Archival and Heritage Collection.

Table 3.4:†††††††† Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2

Performance Measure

Unit of

†Measure

2018‑19 Actual

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of people satisfied with Libraries Tasmania services

%

93.4

92.5

95.2

 

95.0

Average of library loans per lending item per annum1

Number

5.90

5.22

5.74

5.80

Number of visits to archive and heritage pages on Libraries Tasmania websites2

Number

977 861

1 300 084

1 276 340

 

1 200 000

Attendance in Libraries Tasmania programs and events (per annum per 1 000 people)1

Number

205.50

128.20

95.00

 

125.00

Percentage of people who feel more confident using digital technology after receiving support from Libraries Tasmania staff (including volunteers), or participating in courses3

%

more confident

86.45

84.80

80.60

†85.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2019‑20 Actual was impacted by the closure to the public of physical library sites from 25 March 2020 to 18 June 2020, due to the impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic.

2.    The 2019‑20 and 2020‑21 actuals were impacted by the closure to the public of physical library sites and physical restrictions, due to COVID‑19, which led to an increase in online visits.

3.    The 2020‑21 Actual includes individuals who sought incidental, general IT support, in addition to those who participated in a genuine learning activity aimed at building their digital skills.

Output Group 3:††† Education Regulation

3.1 Education Regulation

This Output provides for the operation of the independent regulatory authorities for education including: the Teacherís Registration Board; Office of Tasmanian Assessment Standards and Certification; the Office of the Education Registrar; and the Non‑Government Schools Registration Board. These authorities regulate and drive quality in the Tasmanian education system across all sectors including: government; Catholic; independent school sectors; some parts of the Vocational Education and Training sector; and Home Education.

The regulators impact: the quality of teaching that learners experience; how student learning is assessed and recognised; the quality and safety of learning environments; and the extent to which students are participating and engaged in learning pathways.

Performance measures will be developed for this new Output and reported in future publications.


 

Capital Investment Program

Table 3.5 provides financial information for the Departmentís Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 3.5:†††††††† Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

Total

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Infrastructure Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education1

 

 

 

 

 

Bothwell District School ‑ Agriculture in Schools

2 000 

100 

900 

1 000 

.... 

Cambridge Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

15 100 

100 

500 

7 000 

7 500 

Campbell Town District School ‑ Agriculture in Schools

2 000 

100 

900 

1 000 

.... 

Contemporary Classrooms2

10 000 

200 

800 

3 000 

3 000 

Eastern Shore Multi‑Sports Facility

8 000 

500 

3 500 

4 000 

.... 

Exeter High School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

11 000 

150 

500 

3 750 

6 600 

Glen Dhu Pool

1 500 

1 500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Hobart City Partner Schools Project (Ogilvie and New Town High)2

21 600 

800 

2 000 

7 000 

7 000 

Lauderdale Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

6 500 

200 

2 000 

4 300 

.... 

Montello Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

7 100 

150 

2 200 

4 750 

.... 

Mt Nelson School Oval

50 

50 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Renewable Energy Schools Program2

5 000 

250 

1 000 

1 250 

1 250 

Support School Package including North West School2

20 000 

2 000 

2 200 

5 000 

7 000 

Supporting Safer Schools2

6 300 

500 

1 000 

1 500 

1 500 

Woodbridge School Oval

40 

40 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing Infrastructure Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education

 

 

 

 

 

Devonport High

10 500 

4 602 

.... 

.... 

.... 

East Launceston Primary School

4 500 

624 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Education Act Implementation ‑ Capital

18 000 

1 800 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Lansdowne Crescent Primary School

4 730 

127 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Legana Primary School

24 000 

2 570 

8 000 

13 150 

.... 

Montagu Bay Primary School

1 750 

36 

.... 

.... 

.... 

New Brighton High School

50 000 

2 000 

10 000 

16 410 

18 700 

New K‑12 Penguin School

20 000 

5 719 

6 500 

.... 

.... 

New K‑12 Sorell School

22 000 

3 500 

9 000 

8 500 

.... 

Revitalising Cosgrove High School

20 000 

550 

7 500 

8 000 

3 500 

School Farm Redevelopment (Brighton/JRLF)

4 300 

3 787 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Table 3.5:†††††††† Capital Investment Program (continued)

 

Estimated

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

Total

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School Farm Redevelopment (Sheffield)

3 000 

242 

.... 

.... 

.... 

School Infrastructure Upgrades

6 770 

1 700 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Six New Child and Family Learning Centres

28 000 

6 000 

8 590 

11 990 

.... 

Sorell School

3 750 

2 836 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Southern Support School

4 300 

355 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Springfield Gardens Primary School

1 450 

1 425 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Year 7‑12 Implementation Plan ‑ Capital

16 500 

2 515 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

47 028 

67 090 

101 600 

56 050 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    These projects are included in Table 3.1 in the Key Deliverables section of this chapter, along with a description for each project.

2.    These projects include funding beyond the Forward Estimates.

Overview

Expenditure totalling $271.8 million has been allocated to education infrastructure over the 2021‑22 Budget and Forward Estimates. This comprises:

       funding for new infrastructure commitments of $101.5 million over the 2021‑22 Budget and Forward Estimates period to undertake an extensive renewal program to revitalise learning spaces in schools and colleges across the State; and

       funding for existing infrastructure commitments of $170.2 million over the 2021‑22 Budget and Forward Estimates.

Through the Get Involved campaign, the Department is undertaking extensive community consultation to help inform planning for these important projects. Education plays a critical role in our childrenís future and Get Involved provides an important opportunity for Tasmanians to be part of shaping their local schools and communities. To get involved, visit the Departmentís website at www.education.tas.gov.au/get‑involved.

Existing Infrastructure Commitments

Devonport High School Redevelopment

This project continues to deliver the $10.5 million major redevelopment of Devonport High School including the provision of contemporary learning environments, support spaces and administration, and car parking improvements.

East Launceston Primary School

Remaining funding allocated in 2021‑22 will finalise works associated with the $4.5 million project for the provision of new Kindergarten facilities, general learning areas and a multi‑purpose facility to cater for increased enrolments at East Launceston Primary School.

Education Act Implementation ‑ Capital

Funding is allocated in 2021‑22 to finalise the $18 million allocation to the Education Act reforms. This investment is supporting improvements to early learning infrastructure, by significantly improving Kindergarten facilities, including major refurbishments and replacements. All Kindergarten works will be completed during 2021‑22. The balance of funding relates to finalising works to meet capacity requirements resulting from the later leaving age and works that facilitate flexible learning options to support the engagement and re‑engagement of students.

Lansdowne Crescent Primary School

Remaining funding allocated in 2021‑22 will finalise the $4.7 million project providing for the construction of additional learning areas and amenities, refurbishment of existing classrooms, staff and administration areas and amenities.

Legana Primary School

This project continues a $24 million investment to build a new primary school in Legana.

Montagu Bay Primary School

Remaining funding allocated in 2021‑22 will finalise the $1.8 million project for the construction of general learning and support areas and additional car parking at Montagu Bay Primary School to cater for enrolment demand.

New Brighton High School

This project continues a $50 million investment to build a new Years 7‑12 High School at Brighton.

New K‑12 Penguin District School

This project continues the $20 million redevelopment of Penguin District School to a Kindergarten to Year 12 school. This project will consolidate the current two campuses on a single site.

New K‑12 Sorell School

Remaining funding of $2.8 million has been allocated in 2021‑22 to complete the first stage of the $3.8 million project to provide contemporary learning areas at Sorell School. In addition, $3.5 million is allocated in 2021‑22 to continue the $22 million project for the redevelopment of Sorell School to consolidate the school and create state of the art Kindergarten to Year 12 learning facilities.

Revitalising Cosgrove High School

This project continues a $20 million investment to revitalise Cosgrove High School, creating a contemporary school providing education to Year 12.

School Farm Redevelopment Brighton

Remaining funding allocated in 2021‑22 will complete the $4.3 million redevelopment of the Jordan River Learning Federation Farm.

School Farm Redevelopment Sheffield

Remaining funding allocated in 2021‑22 will finalise the $3 million redevelopment of the Sheffield School Farm.

School Infrastructure Upgrades

Funding of $1.7 million has been allocated in 2021‑22 to complete the $6.8 million program to provide infrastructure upgrades at Launceston College, Molesworth Environment Centre, Hellyer College and Ulverstone Primary School.

Six New Child and Family Learning Centres

Funding of $28 million was committed for the construction of six new Child and Family Learning Centres.

The new centres will be located in the Sorell, Kingborough, Glenorchy, East Tamar, West Ulverstone and Waratah‑Wynyard communities and will provide a one‑stop shop for services to families with young children. Services at the Child and Family Learning Centres will include health, support and outreach. Additional recurrent resources are also provided to ensure that the new centres are appropriately resourced.

Southern Support School

Remaining funding allocated in 2021‑22 will finalise additional flexible learning spaces with associated independent learning spaces; additional amenities suitable for people with disabilities, breakout spaces, and staff facilities at the Southern Support School. The total cost of the project is $4.3 million.

In addition, the Governmentís 2021 election commitment for a Support School Package includes an allocation of $2.9 million to fund remaining works required at the Southern Support School.

Springfield Gardens Primary School

This project continues a $1.5 million extension to the multi‑purpose hall and support services at Springfield Gardens Primary School.

Year 7‑12 Implementation Plan ‑ Capital

This initiative continues the Governmentís commitment to ensure all Tasmanian High Schools are offering Year 11 and Year 12 by 2022. The number of schools already offering Year 11 and Year 12 is 56, with one more to commence in 2022.


 

Detailed Budget Statements

Table 3.6:†††††††† Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating1

1 062 594 

1 124 611 

1 172 408 

1 229 002 

1 268 239 

Appropriation revenue ‑ capital

46 027 

35 017 

67 090 

101 600 

56 050 

Other revenue from government

13 901 

12 011 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants2

35 376 

17 390 

2 881 

2 285 

1 885 

Sales of goods and services3

41 836 

45 966 

49 006 

49 676 

50 435 

Fees and fines4

175 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Interest

400 

219 

158 

150 

144 

Other revenue3

20 750 

18 707 

19 005 

20 625 

21 450 

Total revenue

1 221 059 

1 253 921 

1 310 548 

1 403 338 

1 398 203 

Net gain/(loss) on non‑financial assets

243 

243 

243 

243 

243 

Total income

1 221 302 

1 254 164 

1 310 791 

1 403 581 

1 398 446 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits5

918 898 

964 392 

1 001 154 

1 047 911 

1 083 169 

Depreciation and amortisation

55 222 

56 900 

58 575 

60 001 

58 756 

Supplies and consumables6

224 199 

218 442 

216 142 

218 892 

226 511 

Grants and subsidies7

15 728 

13 424 

15 055 

18 726 

18 726 

Borrowing costs8

115 

91 

68 

60 

39 

Other expenses

13 513 

13 548 

13 823 

14 053 

14 053 

Total expenses

1 227 675 

1 266 797 

1 304 817 

1 359 643 

1 401 254 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

(6 373)

(12 633)

5 974 

43 938 

(2 808)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

43 723 

43 517 

43 517 

43 517 

43 517 

Total other comprehensive income

43 723 

43 517 

43 517 

43 517 

43 517 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

37 350 

30 884 

49 491 

87 455 

40 709 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating reflects 2021 election commitments including: Improving Literacy Levels for all Tasmanian Students, School Health Nurses, and Supporting Students Impacted by Trauma; the continuation of previous commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level; and State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Agreement, which funds ongoing initiatives including: Engaging and empowering our learners to succeed; Inclusive school communities: Supporting all students to learn; Delivering the Education Workforce Roundtable Action Plan; Educational Adjustments ‑ Disability Funding Meeting Learner Needs; and Engaging parents as partners in student learning.


 

2.    The decrease in Grants reflects the completion of Public Building Maintenance Program funded school maintenance projects, and the finalisation of National Partnership funding to the State, including funding through the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education ‑ 2022. In its 2021‑22 Budget, the Australian Government guaranteed Universal Access through a new four‑year agreement from 2022 to 2025. However, the Agreement is yet to be negotiated with the States.

3.    The variation in Sales of goods and services and Other revenue reflects the reclassification of revenue received by the Department under the Corporate Service Charge arrangement with TasTAFE from Other revenue to Sales of goods and services.

4.    The decrease in Fees and fines reflects the Governmentís decision to abolish Library book fines.

5.    The increase in Employee benefits reflects 2021 election commitments; the increase in the Superannuation Guarantee Contribution rate from 2021‑22; the continuation of previous commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level; and State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Agreement, which funds ongoing initiatives including: Engaging and empowering our learners to succeed; Inclusive school communities: supporting all students to learn; Delivering the Education Workforce Roundtable Action Plan; Educational Adjustments ‑ Disability Funding Meeting Learner Needs; and Engaging parents as partners in student learning.

6.    The decrease in Supplies and consumables in 2021‑22 reflects the profile of funding allocated for the Public Building Maintenance Program and School Excursions. The variation across the Forward Estimates reflects the profile of 2021 election commitments; the profile of State funding for government schools under the National School Reform Agreement, which funds ongoing initiatives including: Inclusive school communities: supporting all students to learn; Engaging and empowering our learners to succeed; and Engaging parents as partners in student learning.

7.    The variation in Grants and subsidies includes the impact of funding for the Working Together initiative; the finalisation of Australian Government National Partnership funding to the State; and 2021 election commitments, including Beacon Foundation and 24 Carrot Gardens Project.

8.    The decrease in Borrowing costs reflects the accounting treatment for leases in accordance with AASB 16 Leases.


 

Table 3.7:†††††††† Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating1

413 976 

441 038 

460 581 

480 271 

498 312 

Other revenue from government

229 

121 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Sales of goods and services

411 

423 

434 

444 

455 

Total administered revenue

414 616 

441 582 

461 015 

480 715 

498 767 

Total administered income

414 616 

441 582 

461 015 

480 715 

498 767 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies1

414 205 

441 159 

460 581 

480 271 

498 312 

Transfers to the Public Account

411 

423 

434 

444 

455 

Total administered expenses

414 616 

441 582 

461 015 

480 715 

498 767 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered net result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered comprehensive result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The increase in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating and Grants and subsidies reflects State and Australian Government grants to non‑government schools under Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes as part of the National School Reform Agreement, and funding for previous commitments for additional Non‑Government Capital Assistance and Non‑Government School Support.


 

Table 3.8:†††††††† Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Education

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 In School Education1

1 005 741 

1 062 258 

1 104 755 

1 156 040 

1 193 541 

1.2 Early Learning2

9 204 

16 563 

21 607 

25 931 

26 609 

 

1 014 945 

1 078 821 

1 126 362 

1 181 971 

1 220 150 

Output Group 2 ‑ Libraries Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Libraries Tasmania

38 851 

39 232 

39 378 

40 156 

41 056 

 

38 851 

39 232 

39 378 

40 156 

41 056 

Output Group 3 ‑ Education Regulation

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Education Regulation

7 298 

6 558 

6 668 

6 875 

7 033 

 

7 298 

6 558 

6 668 

6 875 

7 033 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.1 School Excursions3

1 500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

1 500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies4

413 976 

441 038 

460 581 

480 271 

498 312 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

46 027 

35 017 

67 090 

101 600 

56 050 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Education

 

 

 

 

 

Total Operating Services

1 476 570 

1 565 649 

1 632 989 

1 709 273 

1 766 551 

Total Capital Services

46 027 

35 017 

67 090 

101 600 

56 050 

 

1 522 597 

1 600 666 

1 700 079 

1 810 873 

1 822 601 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Rollover

14 130 

12 132 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

1 536 727 

1 612 798 

1 700 079 

1 810 873 

1 822 601 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

1 122 522 

1 171 639 

1 239 498 

1 330 602 

1 324 289 

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

414 205 

441 159 

460 581 

480 271 

498 312 

 

1 536 727 

1 612 798 

1 700 079 

1 810 873 

1 822 601 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in In School Education reflects 2021 election commitments including: Improving Literacy Levels for all Tasmanian Students, School Health Nurses and Supporting Students Impacted by Trauma; the continuation of previous commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level; and State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Agreement, which funds ongoing initiatives including: Engaging and empowering our learners to succeed; Inclusive school communities: supporting all students to learn; Delivering the Education Workforce Roundtable Action Plan; Educational Adjustments ‑ Disability Funding Meeting Learner Needs; and Engaging parents as partners in student learning.


 

2.    The increase in Early Learning from 2021‑22 reflects revised timing in funding for the Working Together initiative, where a staged approach is being taken to rolling out the initiative to ensure that the valuable co‑design process continues to provide the right wrap around care for families. The increase in 2021‑22 also reflects revised timing for operating resources allocated for the Six New Child and Family Learning Centres.

3.    Funding for School Excursions was a one‑off allocation in 2020‑21.

4.    The increase in Grants and Subsidies reflects additional Australian Government funding for Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes and increases in State funding under the National School Reform Agreement for Non‑government schools, Australian Government funded grants, and State funded capital assistance and general education grants.


 

Table 3.9:†††††††† Administered Revenue

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Public Account

 

 

 

 

 

Other Sales of Services

411 

423 

434 

444 

455 

 

411 

423 

434 

444 

455 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation1

413 976 

441 038 

460 581 

480 271 

498 312 

Appropriation Rollover

229 

121 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

414 205 

441 159 

460 581 

480 271 

498 312 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

414 616 

441 582 

461 015 

480 715 

498 767 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The increase in Annual Appropriation reflects State and Australian Government grants to non‑government schools under Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes as part of the National School Reform Agreement, and the continuation of previous election commitments for additional Non‑Government Capital Assistance and Non‑Government School Support.

 


 

Table 3.10:†††††† Administered Expenses

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Non‑government schools: Australian Government funded grants1

329 010 

353 760 

373 890 

391 270 

405 790 

Non‑government schools: State funded capital assistance2

2 902 

2 794 

1 173 

1 173 

1 173 

Non‑government schools: State funded general education grants3

82 293 

84 605 

85 518 

87 828 

91 349 

 

414 205 

441 159 

460 581 

480 271 

498 312 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer to the Public Account

411 

423 

434 

444 

455 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

414 616 

441 582 

461 015 

480 715 

498 767 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Non‑government schools: Australian Government funded grants reflects Australian Government grants to non‑government schools under Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes as part of the National School Reform Agreement.

2.    The variation in Non‑government schools: State funded capital assistance in 2021‑22 reflects the variance between rollovers of unexpended appropriation from 2019‑20 and 2020‑21. The decrease in 2022‑23 reflects the completion of additional Non‑government Capital Assistance funding provided in the 2018‑19 Budget.

3.    The increase in Non‑government schools: State funded general education grants reflects State Government grants to non‑government schools under Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes as part of the National School Reform Agreement. The State Government is currently contributing above the Quality Schools, Quality Outcomes funding level requirements and the Forward Estimates factor in the transition to the prescribed funding level over five years.


 

Table 3.11:†††††† Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2021 

2022 

2023 

2024 

2025 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

64 412 

64 119 

57 714 

56 540 

53 707 

Investments2

5 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Receivables

10 761 

8 882 

8 942 

9 080 

8 946 

Other financial assets3

7 658 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

87 831 

73 001 

66 656 

65 620 

62 653 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non‑financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Assets held for sale4

2 164 

2 819 

1 436 

435 

.... 

Property, plant and equipment5

1 556 312 

1 611 180 

1 673 998 

1 768 417 

1 816 720 

Heritage and cultural assets

47 116 

47 192 

49 052 

50 912 

52 772 

Intangibles3,6

6 646 

2 377 

1 066 

127 

433 

Other assets3

13 880 

26 774 

27 275 

28 005 

28 235 

 

1 626 118 

1 690 342 

1 752 827 

1 847 896 

1 898 160 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

1 713 949 

1 763 343 

1 819 483 

1 913 516 

1 960 813 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

10 507 

11 531 

11 598 

11 895 

12 192 

Interest bearing liabilities3

6 056 

7 455 

6 731 

5 488 

4 255 

Employee benefits

189 386 

209 868 

217 174 

224 698 

232 222 

Other liabilities

6 492 

5 855 

5 855 

5 855 

5 855 

Total liabilities

212 441 

234 709 

241 358 

247 936 

254 524 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

1 501 508 

1 528 634 

1 578 125 

1 665 580 

1 706 289 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Reserves

467 818 

527 709 

571 226 

614 743 

658 260 

Accumulated funds

1 033 690 

1 000 925 

1 006 899 

1 050 837 

1 048 029 

Total equity

1 501 508 

1 528 634 

1 578 125 

1 665 580 

1 706 289 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Cash and deposits reflects the impacts of the Departmentís School Finance Project, which has been focused on schools utilising their bank balances to ensure that the funds are spent on the current cohort of students.

2.    Investments in 2021 reflects a loan to TasTAFE for the Alanvale Campus that will be repaid to the Department by 30 June 2022.

3.    The variation in these items reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2020 actuals.

4.    The variation in Assets held for sale reflects an updated estimate based on an analysis of the timing of property sales.

5.    The increase in Property, plant and equipment reflects further capital investment in schools and the estimated indexation of the asset value base less depreciation.

6.    The variation across the Forward Estimates reflects the estimated timing of the amortisation of intangibles relating to systems development.

Table 3.12:†††††† Statement of Cash Flows

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - operating

1 062 594 

1 124 611 

1 172 408 

1 229 002 

1 268 239 

Appropriation receipts - capital

46 027 

35 017 

67 090 

101 600 

56 050 

Appropriation receipts - other

13 901 

12 011 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants

35 376 

17 390 

2 881 

2 285 

1 885 

Sales of goods and services

40 570 

44 700 

47 740 

48 410 

49 169 

Fees and fines

175 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

GST receipts

28 503 

28 503 

28 503 

28 503 

28 503 

Interest received

400 

219 

158 

150 

144 

Other cash receipts

19 750 

17 707 

18 005 

19 625 

20 450 

Total cash inflows

1 247 296 

1 280 158 

1 336 785 

1 429 575 

1 424 440 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits1

(796 577)

(845 710)

(875 258)

(914 272)

(942 137)

Superannuation2

(99 316)

(108 679)

(115 679)

(123 204)

(130 597)

Borrowing costs

(115)

(91)

(68)

(60)

(39)

GST payments

(29 207)

(29 207)

(29 207)

(29 207)

(29 207)

Grants and subsidies

(15 728)

(13 424)

(15 055)

(18 726)

(18 726)

Supplies and consumables

(232 321)

(226 118)

(224 520)

(227 118)

(234 465)

Other cash payments

(13 310)

(13 548)

(13 823)

(14 053)

(14 053)

Total cash outflows

(1 186 574)

(1 236 777)

(1 273 610)

(1 326 640)

(1 369 224)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

60 722 

43 381 

63 175 

102 935 

55 216 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets3

(64 619)

(48 342)

(68 404)

(102 914)

(57 364)

Proceeds from the disposal of non‑financial assets

1 035 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Net advances paid4

(5 000)

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Net receipts/(payments) for investments4

.... 

5 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(68 584)

(43 342)

(68 404)

(102 914)

(57 364)

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings

(1 109)

(1 143)

(1 176)

(1 195)

(685)

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

(1 109)

(1 143)

(1 176)

(1 195)

(685)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 3.12:†††††† Statement of Cash Flows (continued)

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(8 971)

(1 104)

(6 405)

(1 174)

(2 833)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

73 383 

65 223 

64 119 

57 714 

56 540 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

64 412 

64 119 

57 714 

56 540 

53 707 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Employee benefits reflects 2021 election commitments; the continuation of previous commitments for Taking Education to the Next Level; and State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Agreement, which funds ongoing initiatives including: Engaging and empowering our learners to succeed; Inclusive school communities: supporting all students to learn; Delivering the Education Workforce Roundtable Action Plan; Educational Adjustments ‑ Disability Funding Meeting Learner Needs; and Engaging parents as partners in student learning.

2.    The increase in Superannuation primarily reflects the increase in the Superannuation Guarantee rate from 2021‑22.

3.    The variation in Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets reflects the capital purchases associated with the Capital Investment Program.

4.    Net advances paid and Net receipts/(payments) for investments reflects the timing of a loan to TasTAFE for the Alanvale Campus, and the repayment of the loan.


 

Table 3.13:†††††† Statement of Cash Flows ‑ Administered

 

2020‑21 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ operating

413 976 

441 038 

460 581 

480 271 

498 312 

Appropriation receipts ‑ other

229 

121 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Sales of goods and services

411 

423 

434 

444 

455 

Total cash inflows

414 616 

441 582 

461 015 

480 715 

498 767 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies

(414 205)

(441 159)

(460 581)

(480 271)

(498 312)

Transfer to the Public Account

(411)

(423)

(434)

(444)

(455)

Total cash outflows

(414 616)

(441 582)

(461 015)

(480 715)

(498 767)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

....