2     Department of Communities Tasmania

Agency Outline

The Department of Communities Tasmania is committed to creating strong, active and inclusive communities that enable Tasmanian children, families and communities to thrive and be strong and resilient.

The Department reports to the Minister for Education, Children and Youth and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, Hon Roger Jaensch MP; Minister for Sport and Recreation and Minister for Community Services and Development, Hon Nic Street MP; Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing and Minister for Veterans’ Affairs, Hon Guy Barnett MP; Minister for Disability Services and Minister for Women, Hon Jo Palmer MLC; and Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence, Hon Jacquie Petrusma MP.

Service delivery is achieved through direct provision of services by the Department or in close partnership with the community through service agreements or contracts with provider organisations.

The principal responsibilities of the Department include:

·       supporting individuals, families and carers to have greater control over matters that directly affect the lives and circumstances of people living with disability;

·       statutory responsibilities for children and young people in relation to child safety, out of home care and youth justice, including operation of the Ashley Youth Detention Centre;

·       funding a range of community services for children and their families, including early intervention, family violence counselling and family support services;

·       delivering and funding secure, affordable and appropriate housing and support to low income Tasmanians, as well as accommodation and support for people experiencing homelessness;

·       developing and supporting opportunities for all Tasmanians to participate in community life, sport and recreation;

·       working closely with peak bodies and stakeholders across all population groups including youth, older people, the multicultural community, veterans, carers and the LGBTIQ+ community to enhance access and participation;

·       improving social, cultural and economic outcomes for Tasmanian Aboriginal people and promoting greater understanding, and respect of Aboriginal culture;

·       contributing to the development and implementation of policy that increases financial security, leadership and participation, safety, health and wellbeing and gender equity for women and girls;

·       leading the coordinated whole‑of‑government response to family and sexual violence in Tasmania; and

·       supporting and acknowledging the role of Tasmanian veterans and ex‑serving personnel through policy advice, liaison with ex‑service organisations, and delivery of the Teddy Sheean VC Memorial grant program and other commitments.

The Department also provides administrative support to the Tasmanian Community Fund which is separately accountable and reports directly to the Parliament of Tasmania.

This chapter provides the Department’s financial information for 2022‑23 and over the Forward Estimates (2023‑24 to 2025‑26). Further information about the Department is provided at www.communities.tas.gov.au.

Agency Restructure

On 24 February 2022, the Government announced it would strengthen departmental administrative structures to deliver better services and outcomes. The changes will be phased from 1 July 2022, in a staged approach to be completed by 30 September 2022. The Department of Communities Tasmania will not exist after this date, subject to the passage of legislation for a new Housing statutory authority.

Major functions pertaining to children and young people will move to the Department of Education, which will be renamed the Department of Education, Children and Young People. Housing Tasmania will be made a Statutory Authority reporting directly to the Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing. The remaining functions of the Department will be reviewed and then transferred to the Department of State Growth and the Department of Premier and Cabinet. These functions include Disability Services, Women, Office of Aboriginal Affairs, Family Violence Prevention, Veterans’ Affairs, and Community Services, Community Development, Sport and Recreation including the Tasmanian Institute of Sport, the Silverdome and grants management.

A restructure of the 2022‑23 Budget and Forward Estimates will be undertaken during 2022‑23 to reflect the departmental changes.

Refer to chapter 1 of this Budget Paper for further information.


 

Key Deliverables

Table 2.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimates allocations for key deliverables being undertaken by the Department.

Table 2.1:         Key Deliverables Statement

 

2022‑23

 

Budget

2023‑24

Forward

Estimate

2024‑25

Forward

Estimate

2025‑26

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Australian Rules History and Heritage Museum

 250

....

....

....

Bethlehem House Emergency Response

 172

....

....

....

Bracknell Hall

 400

....

....

....

CCYP additional staff to support Ashley Youth Detention Centre

 131

 131

 66

....

CCYP additional staff to support the Commission of Inquiry

 66

....

....

....

Continuation of COVID Housing Support Measures

9 672

1 592

....

....

Continuation of Investment into the Child Safety Service System

1 500

1 300

1 300

1 300

Continuation of Transition to Independence (T2i)

2 977

2 977

....

....

Cricket Tasmania

1 060

1 060

....

....

Devonport Men's Shelter

 355

 710

 710

 710

Equal Remuneration Order

 266

 243

 217

 217

Food Relief Place‑based Pilot Program

 300

....

....

....

Housing and Accommodation Support Initiative (HASI)

 85

 85

 85

....

Intensive Family Engagement Services

4 175

....

....

....

Ironman Series

 250

 250

 250

 250

Kentish House ‑ additional funding

 100

 200

....

....

Netball Boost

 200

....

....

....

New Housing Package

....

5 000

10 000

20 000

Out of Home Care Accreditation and Carer's Register

....

1 354

 409

 409

Phoenix House

74

....

....

....

Private Rental Incentives Program

3 250

4 000

2 000

....

Reclink

 75

 75

....

....

Response to Many Colours One Direction Program Review

2 000

....

....

....

Safeguarding Volunteering

 220

 220

....

....

Seniors Week and Active Ageing Plan

 260

 355

 315

 315

Sport Development Funding for State Organisations

 300

....

....

....

St Helens Pump Track

 400

....

....

....

Tasmanian Bike Collective

 85

 85

....

....

Tasmanian Closing the Gap Implementation Plan

2 000

....

....

....

Tasmanian Disability Services Commissioner

 100

 100

 100

 100

Tasmanian Multicultural Policy and Action Plan

 180

....

....

....

Tasmanian Women's Strategy 2022‑27

 200

 200

 200

 200

Tasmania's Third Family and Sexual Violence Action Plan

12 500

....

....

....


 

Table 2.1:         Key Deliverables Statement (continued)

 

2022‑23

 

Budget

2023‑24

Forward

Estimate

2024‑25

Forward

Estimate

2025‑26

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Women and Girls in Sport Strategy

 185

 185

 185

 185

 

Youth Justice Facilities

2 500

17 500

20 000

....

 

Youth Justice System Reform

 650

 650

....

....

 

Youth Network of Tasmania

 202

....

 25

....

 

 

 

 

 

 

Australian Rules History and Heritage Museum

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 for the development of a new Australian Rules History and Heritage Museum to house and preserve Tasmanian football memorabilia.

Bethlehem House Emergency Response

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 for the continued operation of 18 units of crisis accommodation managed by Bethlehem House (St Vincent de Paul Society) in North Hobart. The temporary units have been funded by the Tasmanian Government under its $5 million Emergency Homelessness Response since 2019 and administered by the Department of Communities Tasmania.

Bracknell Hall

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 to complete the replacement of Bracknell Hall to provide a community space and hall for youth club activities and sporting clubs.

CCYP additional staff to support Ashley Youth Detention Centre

Funding is provided over three years for additional staff in the Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People to assist the Commissioner to provide additional advocacy services for young people and support young people during the transition to new facilities.

CCYP additional staff to support the Commission of Inquiry

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 for additional staff in the Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People to support the Commission of Inquiry into the Tasmanian Government’s responses to child sexual abuse in institutional settings.

Continuation of COVID Housing Support Measures

Funding will be provided over two years to continue COVID Housing Support Programs including: $3.2 million over two years for Youth to Independence (Y2I) Homes; $6.9 million in 2022‑23 for Statewide Safe Spaces; $950 000 in 2022‑23 for Family Violence Rapid Rehousing; and $277 000 in 2022‑23 for the Hobart Women’s Shelter Emergency Response.

Continuation of Investment into the Child Safety Service System

Funding is provided over four years to continue investment in the Child Safety Service System to meet increased demand and continue to support improved outcomes under the Strong Families Safe Kids Child Safety Redesign. This will include additional front line workers in both the Advice and Referral Line and the Child Safety Service.

Continuation of Transition to Independence (T2i)

Funding is provided over two years to continue to support young people exiting care to build independence skills to maintain engagement in education and learning as a pathway for improved wellbeing outcomes. The specific funding allocation for these services will be based on demand, and the Department is currently assessing the appropriate long‑term funding allocation.

Cricket Tasmania

Funding is provided over two years for Cricket Tasmania to support the development of high performance and professional streams of cricket in Tasmania.

Devonport Men’s Shelter

Ongoing funding is provided to operate the new Devonport Men’s Shelter. The shelter is a new eight unit facility for homeless men which includes a family unit to accommodate men with children.

Equal Remuneration Order

Additional ongoing funding is provided to ensure that the Department is fully funded for the cost of providing grants to community organisations in accordance with the ERO.

Food Relief Place‑based Pilot Program

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 to support place‑based food solutions identified in the Food Relief to Food Resilience Action Plan, which focuses on supporting community food resilience solutions and collaborative partnerships by connecting the Tasmanian food sector. These initiatives are in addition to existing funding for emergency food relief and include community gardens and programs and education and awareness campaigns.

Housing and Accommodation Support Initiative (HASI)

Funding is provided over three years for five homes to support the Housing and Accommodation Support Initiative for people leaving mental health inpatient care.

Intensive Family Engagement Services

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 to support the Intensive Family Engagement Service to ensure the safety of children and help to prevent them from entering statutory care. The specific funding allocation for these services will be based on demand and the Department is currently assessing the appropriate long‑term funding allocation.

Ironman Series

This initiative provides $250 000 per annum for five years to assist the delivery of IRONMAN 70.3 Tasmania from 2023 to 2027.

Kentish House ‑ additional funding

This initiative provides funding over two years for a new purpose‑built facility for Kentish House. Kentish House works with the community and local service providers to deliver tailored programs and services, including playgroup, links and referrals to other services, parenting workshops, emergency relief and youth activities.

Netball Boost

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 for Netball Tasmania to support netball at the grassroots and elite levels.

New Housing Package

The Government has announced a 10‑year $1.5 billion commitment that will deliver 10 000 new social and affordable homes by 2032. It is anticipated that this funding commitment will be delivered by a new Housing authority, subject to the passage of legislation. The 2022‑23 Budget and Forward Estimates includes an initial allocation of $35 million in funding towards this commitment.

Out of Home Care Accreditation and Carer’s Register

Funding is provided over three years from 2023‑24 to establish a system of accreditation to improve standards and monitoring of the out of home care service sector in response to recommendations made by the Royal Commission into Institutional Child Sexual Abuse.

Phoenix House

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 for Phoenix Community House, which incorporates the King Island Men’s Shed and the King Island Community Garden, to provide improved support to the King Island community.

Private Rental Incentives Program

Funding is provided over three years for the Private Rental Incentives Program. The program provides a financial incentive to property owners to make their homes available for affordable rent to eligible Housing Register applicants on low incomes. The program provides stable housing for Tasmanians renting in the private market with two‑year lease terms designed to support families and reduce housing stress.

Reclink

Funding is provided over two years for Reclink to continue support for at‑risk and disadvantaged Tasmanians to enjoy sporting activities by extending its Reclink Community Series to the North and North West of Tasmania.

Response to Many Colours One Direction Program Review

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 to deliver initiatives that respond to the recommendations from the Many Colours One Direction Expert Panel Report.

Safeguarding Volunteering

Funding is provided over two years to extend Volunteering Tasmania’s Safeguarding Volunteering Project to support communities to address projected increases in the demand for volunteering and expected decreases in volunteering rates.

Seniors Week and Active Ageing Plan

Funding is provided over four years to enable the Council on the Ageing Tasmania to continue to conduct Seniors Week annually and implement activities that align with the current and future iterations of the Tasmanian Government’s Active Ageing Plan.

Sport Development Funding for State Organisations

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 for the Sport and Recreation Grants program, which supports the continued capacity growth of the sector and ongoing provision of safe, fair and inclusive sport and recreation in the State.

St Helens Pump Track

Total funding of $500 000 is provided for the construction of a new St Helens Pump Track to facilitate use by scooters, skateboards, BMX and mountain bikes. Funding of $100 000 was provided in 2021‑22 and $400 000 will be provided in 2022‑23.

Tasmanian Bike Collective

Funding is provided over two years for the Tasmanian Bike Collective to deliver the Bike Collective program in Risdon Vale and the Huon Valley. The program provides a safe and supportive environment for young people aged 10 to 18 years to grow and develop practical skills in bike restoration, repair and maintenance.

Tasmanian Closing the Gap Implementation Plan

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 towards the National Agreement on Closing the Gap. As a signatory to the National Agreement, the Tasmanian Government has committed to address the priority reform areas and targets in the Agreement aimed at improving life outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Tasmanian Disability Services Commissioner

This initiative provides funding over four years to further support the Tasmanian Disability Services Commissioner, enabling continuous improvement in the delivery of supports and services for people with disability.

Tasmanian Multicultural Policy and Action Plan

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 to support implementation of the Tasmanian Government’s Multicultural Policy and 2021‑23 Action Plan and the development of the next iteration of the Plan (2023‑2026). The Multicultural Policy and Action Plan is a whole‑of‑government commitment to support a multicultural state.

Tasmanian Women’s Strategy 2022‑27

Funding is provided over four years to support the implementation of the Tasmanian Women’s Strategy, including activities and actions targeted at cultural change to achieve gender equality.

Tasmania’s Third Family and Sexual Violence Action Plan

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 for the Government’s commitment to develop Tasmania’s third Family and Sexual Violence Action Plan. The Plan will build on, and embed successful initiatives implemented through Safe Homes, Families, Communities: Tasmania’s action plan for family and sexual violence 2019‑2022 and Tasmania’s first Action Plan: Safe Homes, Safe Families 2015‑2019.

The Action Plan will ensure the voice of victim‑survivors is at the forefront of ongoing policy development and service delivery; further target and refine efforts to ensure that prevention and response activities meet current demands and diverse needs; and enhance prevention of family and sexual violence ‑ stopping it before it starts.

Women and Girls in Sport Strategy

Funding is provided over four years for a strategy to increase female participation in sport, and to achieve outcomes aligned to the National Policy Framework for Girls and Women in Sport. The strategy will consider and address all aspects of sporting participation including coaching, officiating, leadership, administration, player support and participation.

Youth Justice Facilities

Funding is allocated for new Youth Justice Facilities to replace the Ashley Youth Detention Centre.

Youth Justice System Reform

Funding is provided over two years to continue the work of the project team to implement Tasmania’s Youth Justice Reform Transition Plan. The reform will deliver a contemporary, integrated and therapeutic youth justice service system for Tasmania with a focus on prevention, early intervention, diversion and rehabilitation. It includes the development of the Youth Justice Blueprint and the closure of the Ashley Youth Detention Centre and the opening of new facilities.

Youth Network of Tasmania

Funding is provided in 2022‑23 and 2024‑25 for the Youth Network of Tasmania to support young people aged 18 to 25 years to transition to adulthood. This funding will support the development of an Action Plan aligned with It Takes a Tasmanian Village: Child and Youth Wellbeing Strategy and two Tasmanian Youth Sector Symposiums.


 

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of Communities Tasmania are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 ‑ Children Services;

·       Output Group 2 ‑ Independent Children’s and Young Persons’ Review Service;

·       Output Group 3 ‑ Housing Services;

·       Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development;

·       Output Group 5 ‑ Safe Homes, Families, Communities;

·       Output Group 89 ‑ Public Building Maintenance Program; and

·       Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery.

Table 2.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department.


 

Table 2.2:         Output Group Expense Summary

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Sport and Recreation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.7 Sport and Recreation1

50 954 

43 417 

19 846 

17 497 

14 205 

 

50 954 

43 417 

19 846 

17 497 

14 205 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.17 Improving the Playing Field

5 393 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

5 393 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

20 666 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.4 Aboriginal Affairs2

2 446 

4 747 

1 417 

1 414 

1 443 

 

2 446 

4 747 

1 417 

1 414 

1 443 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Women

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.5 Women's Policy3

2 653 

1 987 

747 

399 

288 

 

2 653 

1 987 

747 

399 

288 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Disability Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.2 Disability Services

257 446 

268 815 

278 070 

284 002 

289 798 

 

257 446 

268 815 

278 070 

284 002 

289 798 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 2.2:         Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Veterans' Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.6 Veterans' Affairs4

1 195 

1 019 

623 

621 

430 

 

1 195 

1 019 

623 

621 

430 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.9 Returned Service League Support

22 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

22 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Safe Homes, Families, Communities

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Safe Homes, Families, Communities: Tasmania's action plan for family and sexual violence

14 299 

17 637 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

14 299 

17 637 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.7 Family Violence Prevention

824 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

824 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Community Services and Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Community Services5

37 408 

39 687 

33 878 

34 085 

33 561 

4.3 Community Development ‑ Policy Advice and Ongoing Community Development6

44 033 

28 829 

15 861 

6 426 

6 561 

 

81 441 

68 516 

49 739 

40 511 

40 122 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.2 Community Support Fund

6 730 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.3 Emergency Relief Payments

478 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.4 Emergency Accommodation Support

24 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.11 Support for Temporary Visa Holders

330 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.15 TasCOSS

175 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.16 Emergency Food Relief Providers

775 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

32 488 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2.2:         Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

7 176 

7 320 

7 466 

7 615 

7 767 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Housing Services

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Housing Services7

158 838 

178 410 

159 803 

156 570 

155 181 

 

158 838 

178 410 

159 803 

156 570 

155 181 

Output Group 89 ‑ Public Building Maintenance Program

 

 

 

 

 

89.1 Public Building Maintenance Program

461 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

461 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.1 Private Rental Incentive Scheme

1 578 

750 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.10 Statewide Safe Spaces

11 627 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

13 205 

750 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

37 540 

111 954 

39 882 

23 391 

18 391 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education, Children and Youth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Children Services

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Children Services8

155 806 

160 855 

156 313 

153 344 

151 012 

 

155 806 

160 855 

156 313 

153 344 

151 012 

Output Group 2 ‑ Independent Children's and Young Persons' Review Service

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People9

1 386 

1 764 

1 677 

1 648 

1 617 

 

1 386 

1 764 

1 677 

1 648 

1 617 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.6 Child Safety System

1 611 

950 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

1 611 

950 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

846 350 

868 641 

716 083 

687 512 

680 754 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Sport and Recreation in 2022‑23 primarily reflects one‑off grant payments for 2021‑22 Budget initiatives, including the Local Community Facilities Fund and Improving the Playing Field. The decrease over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives and one‑off grants.

2.    The increase in Aboriginal Affairs in 2022‑23 primarily reflects expenditure for the Tasmanian Closing the Gap Implementation Plan initiative.

3.    The decrease in Women’s Policy in 2022‑23 primarily reflects one‑off expenditure in 2021‑22 for the COVID-19 Response Tasmanian Women’s Strategy 2018‑2021, partly offset by an increase in expenditure in 2022‑23 for the Tasmanian Women’s Strategy 2022‑27. The decrease across the Forward Estimates reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives.

4.    The decrease in Veterans’ Affairs in 2022‑23 primarily reflects one‑off expenditure in 2021‑22 for the Local Community Facilities Fund. The decrease over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives, including the Dago Point Veterans’ Retreat, and RSL Upgrades.

5.    The increase in Community Services in 2022‑23 primarily reflects the 2021‑22 Budget initiative for the Neighbourhood Houses Capital Improvement Program. The decrease in 2023‑24 primarily reflects the completion of prior year Budget initiatives.

6.    The decrease in Community Development in 2022‑23 and over the Forward Estimates reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives.

7.    The increase in Housing Services in 2022‑23 primarily reflects the Continuation of COVID Housing Support Measures, and the re-profile of expenditure for 2021‑22 Budget Public Housing Initiatives ‑ Energy Efficiency program.

8.    The increase in Children Services in 2022‑23 primarily reflects expenditure for the Response to the Many Colours One Direction Program Review, Continuation of Investment into the Child Safety Service System, Intensive Family Engagement Services and Continuation of Transition to Independence (T2i). The decrease in Children Services over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the re-profile of expenditure for Out of Home Care provided in the 2020‑21 Budget. This is partly offset by funding for 2021‑22 Budget initiatives.

9.    The increase in Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People in 2022‑23 primarily reflects expenditure for staff to support the Commission of Inquiry and the Ashley Youth Detention Centre transition.


 

Output Group 1:    Children Services

1.1 Children Services

This Output provides services to children, young people and their families through a range of programs within the Strong Families Safe Kids Advice and Referral Line, the Child Safety Service, Out of Home Care and Youth Justice Services.

Table 2.3:         Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

2022‑23 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children Services

 

 

 

 

 

Contacts to the Strong Families Safe Kids Advice and Referral Line1

 

Number

 

12 222

 

14 111

 

15 100

 

15 500

Children in notifications (per 1 000 of population)1

 

Rate

 

14.8

 

15.8

 

15.6

 

15.0

Contacts to the Advice and Referral Line resolved with a referral to family support or other services1

 

 

Number

 

 

824

 

 

1 141

 

 

1 055

 

 

1 100

Referrals to the Child Safety Service for Assessment1,2

 

Number

 

 797

 

855

 

760

 

800

Average daily children pending Child Safety Service assessment

 

Number

 

 41.0

 

54.4

 

60.0

 

60.0

Assessment outcome determined within 28 days1,3

 

%

 

6.8

 

13.7

 

15.0

 

15.0

Children who were the subject of a substantiation during the previous year, who were the subject of a subsequent substantiation within 12 months

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

 15.7

 

 

 

16.3

 

 

 

15.0

 

 

 

15.0

Average daily children in Out of Home Care1

Number

 1 102.9

1 086.4

1 060.0

1 030.0

Children with approved case and care plans

%

98.5

98.3

96.0

96.0

Foster care households with five or more foster children4

 

%

 

4.7

 

4.8

 

4.0

 

3.5

Children in Out of Home Care who had 3+ non‑respite placements in the last 12 months

 

 

%

 

 

4.1

 

 

4.0

 

 

4.0

 

 

4.0

 

Custodial Youth Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Average daily young people in Youth Justice detention1

 

Number

 

 15.4

 

9.4

 

10.0

 

10.0

Distinct number of young people in Youth Justice detention1

 

Number

 

 54

 

47

 

40

 

40

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 2.3:         Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

2022‑23 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Youth Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Average daily young people in Community Youth Justice1

 

Number

 

 193.2

 

156.4

 

150.0

 

150.0

Distinct number of young people in Community Youth Justice

 

Number

 

 391

 

360

 

300

 

300

Community Service Orders completed before the statutory expiry date

 

 %

 

67.0

 

93.2

 

90.0

 

90.0

Youth Justice Community conferences held within six weeks of receipt of referral for conference

 

 

 %

 

 

 70.8

 

 

77.2

 

 

90.0

 

 

90.0

 

Program Support

 

 

 

 

 

Planned strategic projects with milestones achieved

 

 %

 

 90

 

90

 

95

 

100

Planned regular operational performance reviews completed addressing key issues within the remit of Children Services

 

 

 %

 

 

 94

 

 

76

 

 

100

 

 

100

Planned quality appraisals completed within relevant timeframes5

 

 %

 

 25

 

100

 

100

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2021‑22 and 2022‑23 targets for these measures are a projection rather than a target, reflecting the different processes, including trend analysis, which were used for some measures to identify relevant values.

2.    This measure is the number of referrals from the Advice and Referral Line to the Child Safety Service for a Child Safety Assessment.

3.    From 2020‑21, this performance measure only calculates time taken to complete an assessment once the matter has been referred to the Child Safety Service for a full child safety assessment.

4.    The target for this measure corresponds to the latest national average, which increased to 3.5 per cent in 2019‑20. Foster care households with five or more foster children is reported as at 30 June of the given financial year.

5.    Re‑assignment of Workforce Development staff to frontline Child Safety Service work as part of the COVID‑19 response resulted in reduced capacity to complete scheduled Quality Appraisals in 2019‑20.

Performance Information Comments

Children Services

The Strong Families Safe Kids reform represents the Tasmanian Government’s long‑term commitment to prioritise the safety and wellbeing of children and young people in Tasmania. Investments in the Advice and Referral Line, intensive family engagement and early intervention, a focus on permanency and stability for children and young people in Out of Home Care and cross agency collaboration is delivering improved outcomes for children, young people and their families.


 

Youth Justice

The number of young people engaged with Community or Custodial Youth Justice Services is predominantly influenced by external services. The factors affecting activity levels include referral practices and diversionary programs implemented by Tasmania Police, as well as the effectiveness of prosecutions and sentencing options selected by the Courts.

Output Group 2:    Independent Children’s and Young Persons’ Review Service

2.1 Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People

The Commissioner for Children and Young People is an independent statutory office established under the Commissioner for Children and Young People Act 2016. Activities provided in this Output include promoting the rights and wellbeing of children and young people and examining the policies, practices and services provided for children and any law affecting the health, welfare, care, protection and development of children.

Performance Information Comments

The Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People is an independent, statutory office responsible to the Parliament of Tasmania. Details of the Commissioner for Children and Young People’s activities are available in the Commissioner’s Annual Reports, which can be accessed from its website at www.childcomm.tas.gov.au.

Output Group 3:    Housing Services

3.1 Housing Services

This Output provides services relating to planning, developing and managing affordable housing and homelessness programs throughout the State. This includes all functions relating to the delivery and management of public housing, capital development, housing reform, community housing, specialist homelessness services including new homelessness initiatives, private rental assistance and the management of community sector organisations providing outsourced services.


 

Table 2.4:         Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22

Target

2022‑23 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Housing Services

 

 

 

 

 

Housing portfolio owned and/or managed by the community sector1

%

 40.8

40.4

56.0

56.0

Public housing occupancy rate

%

 99.3

99.4

98.0

98.0

Applicants housed2

Number

 1 060

816

900

1 000

New allocations to those in greatest need

%

 97.4

96.8

97.5

97.0

Households assisted through Private Rental Assistance3

Number

 2 153

1 547

1 750

1 750

Applicants on Housing Register4

Number

 3 373

4 144

4 500

5 025

Average wait time for people who are housed (year to date)

Weeks

 61.8

68.0

62

41.5

Average time to house priority social housing applicants (quarterly)5

Weeks

48.4

53.6

36.0

36.0

Net recurrent cost per dwelling6

$

8 876

8 333

8 700

8 700

Turnaround time7

Days

20.4

29.2

28.0

28.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The targets for 2021‑22 and 2022‑23 reflect new social housing supply being delivered by community housing providers and the transfer of further stock for management under the Community Housing Growth Program. This is reflected against the whole housing portfolio, including all housing types where the Director of Housing has an interest.

2.    This indicator includes applicants housed into public or community housing from the Housing Register. The 2020‑21 actual was influenced by the COVID‑19 pandemic moratorium on rental increases and evictions that reduced turnover in the private sector, leading to fewer exits from public housing. The tight private rental market also contributed to this.

3.    Private Rental Assistance has been trending down with the increase in assistance through other programs such as Rapid Rehousing and Private Rental Incentives. As a result, the targets for 2021‑22 and 2022‑23 reflect trends in actual assistance, as well as recent significant investment in private rental assistance.

4.    The targets for 2021‑22 and 2022‑23 have been calculated differently to previous years targets, with the targets now reflecting how Tasmania is performing compared with other jurisdictions. The target is set at 25 per cent below the national average for the proportion of applicants versus size of the housing portfolio. Tasmania is generally performing much better when compared to other jurisdictions. Latest data from 2020‑21 shows that the applicants as a proportion of the housing portfolio in Tasmania was 29.5 per cent, compared to the national average of 50.3 per cent. If Tasmania’s proportion was equivalent to the national average, it would result in more than 7 000 applicants on the Housing Register.

5.    As reflected in the 2021‑22 Budget, this performance indicator was amended from only applying to public housing applicants, to applicants housed in all social housing. As such, figures are not comparable to previously reported figures.

6.    Figures from previous years have been updated to reflect comparable data based on 2020‑21 dollars.

7.    The target of 28.0 days turnaround has been agreed at a national level. Tasmania has achieved positive turnaround times well below the target in the past three years. The 2021‑22 figure fluctuated during the month of June 2021, with a much lower rolling 12 month average of 22.6 days across the year.

Performance Information Comments

The Tasmanian Government’s housing plan is delivering even more homes for Tasmanians in need. Over the next ten years, $1.5 billion will be invested into social and affordable housing and homelessness across the state. This will provide an additional 6 500 homes and units on top of the previous target of 3 500, leading to a total of 10 000 new social houses to be built by 2032. To deliver this unprecedented investment, the Tasmanian Government is establishing a new Housing authority subject to the passage of legislation through Parliament.

Similar to other jurisdictions and across the nation, Tasmania has experienced significant economic growth that has led to increased housing prices and increased demand for social and affordable housing.

In addition to building more social housing, the Tasmanian Government has scaled up other housing assistance programs and introduced initiatives to ease housing market pressure including:

·       boosting the First Home Owner Grant;

·       investing in comprehensive reviews of Tasmania’s three regional land use strategies;

·       investing in a ‘Headworks Holiday’ for new residential subdivisions to unlock new land supply;

·       investing additional funding into HomeShare (Housing Market Entry Program) to support low‑income Tasmanians buy their own home; introducing land tax and stamp duty reforms to enable more affordable homes to be developed;

·       expanding the Private Rental Incentives Program;

·       increasing housing supply with the ancillary dwelling incentive program;

·       investigating a build‑to‑rent scheme, safeguards for rent‑to‑buy schemes and working with Councils to open up ‘shop‑top’ accommodation; and

·       considering better utilisation of Government‑owned dwellings and social housing stock.

There is also a significant level of building activity occurring in the private market and in new social housing that will assist in easing the demand and affordability pressures being experienced in Tasmania.

Since the commencement of the Affordable Housing Strategy in 2015 and to the end of January 2022, 1 254 new long‑term homes have been built, which includes 1 121 social housing properties and 133 units of supported accommodation, including 276 in the past year. An additional 69 units of homeless accommodation have been completed for Tasmanians who are experiencing or face homelessness. There are currently a further 1 342 long‑term homes and units of homeless accommodation in the pipeline.

Overall, a total of 3 285 households have been assisted into affordable homes. This includes the new supply of affordable lots and homes outlined above, as well as helping households into safe and affordable housing through initiatives like HomeShare, Streets Ahead, Private Rental Incentives and Rapid Rehousing. This information is reported monthly on the Housing Dashboard.

The Community Housing Growth Program continues to be a key tool in growing social housing stock and expanding the role of community housing providers in Tasmania. It builds on and improves Better Housing Futures and has transferred a further 2 000 properties statewide to registered community housing providers. Critically, the CHGP also includes a growth strategy with the release of around $100 million in capital grants to construct social housing that will contribute to Tasmania’s social and economic recovery from the COVID‑19 pandemic. The CHGP is on track to deliver up to 1 000 new social housing units by June 2023.

In addition, stock owned by the Director of Housing is used to deliver a range of housing programs that are managed by non‑government organisations including additional community housing and supported accommodation. Around 56 per cent of Director of Housing owned properties are now managed by non‑government organisations.

 

The management of social housing by the community sector results in many positive outcomes including access to Commonwealth Rent Assistance and GST savings, which allows for greater investment in maintenance and the upgrade of social housing properties. Under new long‑term agreements, community housing providers will be able to access a total of around $300 million in Commonwealth Rent Assistance to improve homes and build more homes. There is also greater flexibility in supporting tenants with special needs, the ability to provide a social mix of tenants and a range of community initiatives.

The Tasmanian Government has committed a further $2 million to develop a comprehensive Tasmanian Housing Strategy to drive practical actions to deliver a more sustainable housing market for all Tasmanians. Improving the housing system means investigating potential improvements to the housing market. This will consider demand across both the public and private housing sectors and formulate strategies to deliver sustainable outcomes for Tasmanians. This will provide the strategic direction for additional investment and priorities.

Output Group 4:    Disability Services and Community Development

4.1 Community Services

This Output provides services relating to planning, developing and managing family and community support services throughout the State. This includes funding for the Neighbourhood Houses Program, integrated family support services, the gambling support program and a range of other counselling and support services. All of these services are provided by community sector organisations.

4.2 Disability Services

Tasmania fully transitioned into the National Disability Insurance Scheme on 1 July 2019, with specialist disability supports funded by the NDIS and administered by the National Disability Insurance Agency. The specialist disability supports provided by the NDIS complement mainstream services provided by the Australian and state and territory governments, such as health, education, housing, transport and safety.

The full scheme Bilateral Agreement between the Australian Government and the State of Tasmania on the NDIS outlines the ongoing funding arrangements. From 1 July 2019, Tasmania committed to a fixed funding contribution. The Australian Government contributes the total cost of administration of the Scheme and will fully provide for all Australian Government financial contributions.

The Tasmanian Government continues to provide:

·       advocacy funding;

·       children’s therapy mainstream component;

·       mainstream services such as health, education and justice; and

·       continuity of support for people eligible under the Tasmanian Disability Services Act 2011 but not eligible for the NDIS.

With the advent of full NDIS, the role of the State Government changed to the delivery of strategic policy; regulation, including the continued authorisation of restrictive practices under the Disability Services Act; and continued collaboration with people with disability, their families, carers and providers.

Importantly, the State Government remains a key stakeholder of the NDIS. As such, the State Government has a governance role, which includes working with the NDIA to agree policy direction, and an operational role to resolve implementation issues and improve the interface with mainstream services, and to monitor the delivery of the scheme in Tasmania to achieve the best possible outcomes for Tasmanians.

4.3 Community Development ‑ Policy Advice and Ongoing Community Development

This Output supports community capacity building through the provision of policy advice to Government and the administration of a diverse range of grant programs to meet the needs of Tasmanians.

Initiatives delivered through this Output include policy development (and some associated grant programs) such as Accessible Island: Tasmania’s Disability Framework for Action 2018‑2021; Tasmanian Carer Action Plan 2021‑24; Strong, liveable communities: Tasmania’s Active Ageing Plan 2017‑2022; and Tasmania’s Multicultural Policy and Action Plan 2019‑2022. The Output works closely with, and administers funding to, peak bodies including Council on the Ageing Tasmania, Youth Network of Tasmania, Volunteering Tasmania, Carers Tasmania, Multicultural Council of Tasmania, and the Tasmanian Men’s Shed Association.

Executive support is also provided to the Premier’s Disability Advisory Council, the Carer Issues Reference Group, the LGBTIQ+ Whole‑of‑Government Reference Group and the Multicultural Consultative Reference Group.

The Output is responsible for administering the Companion Card and Seniors Card programs.

4.4 Aboriginal Affairs

This Output implements the Government’s Aboriginal affairs policies and programs and administers a range of funding agreements with Tasmanian Aboriginal community‑controlled organisations. Key aspects of this include working with Tasmanian Aboriginal organisations, the Australian Government and other jurisdictions to deliver the Tasmanian Implementation Plan under the National Agreement on Closing the Gap.

4.5 Women’s Policy

This Output contributes to the development and implementation of policy that increases social and economic participation of women and girls, and promotes gender equity and opportunities for women’s leadership and participation, financial security, safety, and health and wellbeing. Initiatives delivered through this Output include the Tasmanian Women’s Strategy and related action plans, the Women on Boards Strategy and scholarships for women’s leadership development, and an associated grant programs for International Women’s Day.

This Output is delivering 2021‑22 Budget initiatives to increase women’s economic participation, including the development of a Modern Workplaces Framework, a Women in Building and Construction Strategy, a Girls in Property Pilot Program, and the Women’s Workforce Participation initiative, including the inaugural Supporting Women to Succeed Industry Grant Program, to encourage more women into non‑traditional fields of employment. Executive support is also provided to the Tasmanian Women’s Council.

4.6 Veterans’ Affairs

This Output supports and acknowledges the role of Tasmanian veterans and ex‑serving personnel through policy advice, liaison with ex‑service organisations, and delivery of the Teddy Sheean VC Memorial grant program, the Veteran Wellbeing Voucher Program and other commitments.

This Output is responsible for intergovernmental work to progress national initiatives, such as the work of the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide. It also works closely with, and administers funding to, RSL Tasmania as the peak body for veterans. Executive support is also provided to the Veterans’ Reference Group.

4.7 Sport and Recreation

This Output contributes to a number of Tasmanian Government objectives through the delivery of a range of policies, programs and services to encourage all Tasmanians to participate in sport, recreation and physical activity. It also administers a range of funding agreements and grants programs.

Some of the key deliverables include: increasing the capacity and governance capability of sporting organisations; developing and implementing plans to increase participation in safe, fair and inclusive sport and recreation by all Tasmanians; delivering the Ticket to Play and Improving the Playing Field programs; and leading the planning and development of facilities and infrastructure to meet contemporary sport and recreations needs. The Output is also responsible for providing the best possible opportunities for Tasmania’s elite athletes in support of their performances at international events, with a focus on sports that compete at the Olympic or Paralympic Games, Commonwealth Games and World Championships.

Table 2.5:         Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

2022‑23 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Services

 

 

 

 

 

Number of targeted funding agreement meetings with contracted service providers annually1,2

%

88

18

55

55

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disability Services

 

 

 

 

 

Active NDIS participants2,3

Number

8 858

10 650

11 671

11 866

Number of Authorised restrictive practices (% of active NDIS participants)4

%

0.4

1.1

0.73

1.0

Number of Autism Assessments Completed2

Number

217

264

217

220

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Development ‑ Policy Advice and Ongoing Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of applicants satisfied with public grants program administration2

%

97

95

95

95

New Seniors Cards issued2,5

Number

6 923

6 079

6 500

6 600

New Companion Cards issued2,5

Number

394

250

300

350

New Companion Seniors card Program Business Partners5

Number

52

36

40

30

Number of new business, venues, events affiliated with the Companion Card program

Number

2

2

3

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2.5:         Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

2022‑23 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Aboriginal Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

 Actions on schedule against the milestones and timeframes identified in the Aboriginal Reset2,6

%

84

82

85

85

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veterans' Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

Number of applications submitted to the Frank MacDonald Memorial Prize Essay Competition7

 

 

Number

 

 

na

 

 

na

 

 

100

 

 

75

Number of applications submitted to the Teddy Sheean VC Memorial Grants Program8

 

 

Number

 

 

na

 

 

na

 

 

40

 

 

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women's Policy

 

 

 

 

 

Representation of women on Government boards and committees

 

%

 

46

 

48

 

50

 

50

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sport and Recreation

 

 

 

 

 

Performance of Tasmanian athletes at benchmark international sporting events9

Number

16

na

9

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    There are currently 58 contracted providers. The 2019‑20 figure is based on meetings with 59 contracted providers. The 2020‑21 funding agreement meetings were impacted by the COVID‑19 pandemic.

2.    The 2020-21 figures published in the 2021-22 Budget were estimated outcomes and have been revised in this Budget to be the final actual outcome.

3.    The 2022-23 Target for Active NDIS Participants is an estimated actual.

4.    The number of authorised restrictive practices is calculated as the number of unique people with an authorised restrictive practice as a percentage of the total number of active NDIS participants. This activity is a requirement under the Disability Services Act and a commitment under the National Framework for Reducing and Eliminating the Use of Restrictive Practices in the Disability Service Sector.

5.    Targets for the Seniors Card Program and Companion Card Program reflect the likely ongoing impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic on small businesses in Tasmania.

6.    This performance measure is to be reviewed to consider the Reset initiatives and new commitments under the National Agreement on Closing the Gap to better reflect the full range of activities and services being undertaken by the Government. The Government’s commitments under the Agreement have expanded the deliverables across Government departments and are therefore not only the responsibility of the Department of Communities Tasmania.

7.    This was a new performance measure in 2021‑22. The Frank MacDonald Memorial Prize is an essay competition for Tasmanian Year 9 students. The Departments of Communities Tasmania and Education jointly deliver the FMMP. In 2021, the competition was open to the 2020 and 2021 Year 9 cohorts as the competition was not held in 2020 due to the COVID‑19 pandemic.

8.    This was a new performance measure in 2021‑22. The Teddy Sheean VC Memorial Grants Program is held over two rounds each financial year.

9.    Tasmanian athletes were unable to access international level competition during 2020‑21 due to the impacts of the COVID‑19 pandemic, and had limited opportunities to access international level competition during 2021‑22 outside of the Olympic/Paralympic Games, which has impacted on these results. Opportunities will increase during 2022‑23 due to the Commonwealth Games being held and the gradual return to the holding of World Championships for many sports.


Output Group 5:    Safe Homes, Families, Communities

5.1 Safe Homes, Families, Communities: Tasmania’s action plan for family and sexual violence

This Output facilitates the actions being delivered by Government agencies under Tasmania’s Family and Sexual Violence Action Plan that is the coordinated, whole‑of‑government response to family violence and sexual violence in Tasmania.

The Safe Homes, Families, Communities initiatives are focused on changing the attitudes and behaviours that lead to family and sexual violence; supporting families and individuals affected by family violence and sexual violence; and strengthening the Government’s legal responses to family and sexual violence to hold perpetrators to account for their violent behaviours.

This Output also includes funding for family and sexual violence responses outside of the Action Plan, including additional funds received under the National Partnership Agreement on COVID‑19 Domestic and Family Violence responses.

Table 2.6:         Performance Information ‑ Output Group 5

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2019‑20 Actual

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Target

2022‑23 Target

 

Safe Homes, Families, Communities1

 

 

 

 

 

Actions on schedule against the milestones and timeframes identified in the Safe Homes, Families, Communities Implementation Plan2

%

99

97

97

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Specific family violence data, for example the number of family violence incident reports, is measured by other agencies, including the Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management.

2.    The 2022‑23 Target relates to Tasmania’s third Family and Sexual Violence Action Plan that commences in July 2022.


 

Capital Investment Program

Table 2.7 provides financial information for the Department’s Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 2.7:         Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Projects

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education, Children and Youth

 

 

 

 

 

Youth Justice Facilities1

40 000 

2 500 

17 500 

20 000 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing

 

 

 

 

 

New Housing Package1,2

1 100 000 

.... 

5 000 

10 000 

20 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing Projects

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing

 

 

 

 

 

Community Housing Growth Program2

100 000 

65 400 

21 100 

…. 

.... 

Extended Social Housing Build2

280 000 

90 567 

23 000 

13 000 

14 433 

Housing ‑ New Projects

Ongoing 

19 703 

87 838 

83 039 

40 727 

Supported Accommodation Facilities2

20 000 

.... 

1 000 

5 000 

10 000 

Tasmania's Affordable Housing Action Plan 2

125 000 

25 610 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Youth Housing Initiatives ‑ Modular Youth Housing and Dispersed Youth Foyer

5 200 

2 950 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

206 730 

155 438 

131 039 

85 160 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    These projects are included in the Key Deliverables section of this chapter.

2.    These initiatives comprise the Government’s $1.5 billion 10‑year housing package to supply 10 000 new dwellings by 2032.

Community Housing Growth Program

Funding is allocated to the Community Housing Growth Program over three years, commencing in 2021‑22. This program will support the delivery of up to 1 000 new social housing dwellings and existing initiatives aimed at increasing the supply of social and affordable housing across Tasmania.

Extended Social Housing Build

This initiative will extend the building program of new social housing. The initiative will build 2 000 new homes by 2027, in addition to the 1 500 to be built by June 2023 from existing programs. This will bring the total to 3 500 new homes by 2027. Funding of $120 million is allocated beyond the Forward Estimates to deliver this initiative.

Housing ‑ New Projects

Funding of $19.7 million is allocated in 2022-23 for Housing Tasmania’s capital program. This includes the balance of funding to 2022-23 made available under the former Commonwealth-State Housing Agreement Debt Waiver Agreement.

Supported Accommodation Facilities

Funding is provided for the construction of two new supported accommodation facilities for older Tasmanians in the North and North West of the State. The program will commence in 2023‑24, with expected completion in 2026‑27. Funding of $4 million is allocated beyond the Forward Estimates to complete this project.

Tasmania’s Affordable Housing Action Plan 2

Funding is allocated in 2022‑23 to continue the delivery of the second stage of Tasmania’s Affordable Housing Action Plan.

Youth Housing Initiatives ‑ Modular Youth Housing and Dispersed Youth Foyer

Funding of $3 million is provided in 2022‑23 to complete the $5.2 million investment in new youth housing and homelessness initiatives. The 2021 election commitment provided $4.3 million to deliver modular youth housing for 16 to 24 year‑olds transitioning to independence from a variety of contexts including exiting Ashley Youth Detention Centre, Out of Home Care or shelters. The initiative will provide 20 modular youth homes across four sites around the State. Funding will also be provided for new ‘Youth Coaches’ who will provide ‘readiness for independence’ support across key life domains including education, employment, health and wellbeing and community participation.

Funding of $1 million will provide a ‘Dispersed Youth Foyer’ initiative that will identify 10 Housing Tasmania properties suitable for conversion into three to four‑bedroom share housing properties for young people.


 

Detailed Budget Statements

Table 2.8:         Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating1

650 251 

619 290 

551 002 

540 637 

538 870 

Appropriation revenue ‑ capital

94 127 

181 975 

73 174 

53 200 

49 264 

Other revenue from government

20 306 

24 212 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants2

11 822 

7 666 

717 

32 

32 

Sales of goods and services

45 312 

45 769 

45 769 

45 770 

45 770 

Interest

Other revenue

29 972 

30 804 

30 784 

30 784 

30 781 

Total revenue

851 798 

909 724 

701 454 

670 431 

664 725 

Net gain/(loss) on non‑financial assets

7 118 

19 640 

74 900 

70 492 

28 180 

Other gains/(losses) from other economic flows

3 591 

3 591 

3 591 

3 591 

3 591 

Total income

862 507 

932 955 

779 945 

744 514 

696 496 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits3

80 259 

100 629 

98 361 

97 133 

97 897 

Depreciation and amortisation

38 860 

39 342 

39 445 

39 445 

39 445 

Supplies and consumables4

154 373 

159 099 

148 374 

149 090 

149 532 

Grants and subsidies5

561 915 

560 736 

420 962 

392 790 

384 717 

Borrowing costs

19 

11 

12 

12 

Other expenses6

3 248 

1 004 

966 

927 

884 

Total expenses

838 674 

860 821 

708 117 

679 397 

672 487 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

23 833 

72 134 

71 828 

65 117 

24 009 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

42 999 

44 367 

44 935 

44 935 

44 935 

Total other comprehensive income

42 999 

44 367 

44 935 

44 935 

44 935 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

66 832 

116 501 

116 763 

110 052 

68 944 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating primarily reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives and fixed‑term funding.

2.    The decrease in Grants in 2022‑23 primarily relates to the completion of fixed‑term funding for the Public Building Maintenance Program; the NPA on COVID‑19 Domestic and Family Violence Responses; the NPA on Remote Indigenous Housing; and funding from the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program for the Integrated Client Information Program.


 

3.    The increase in Employee benefits in 2022‑23 primarily reflects funding for initiatives requiring additional staff costs, including Intensive Family Engagement Services, Continuation of Transition to Independence (T2i), Continuation of Investment into the Child Safety Service System, Youth Justice System Reform, and Women and Girls in Sport Strategy. The increase also includes a correction to the Department’s budget allocation between expense categories.

4.    The increase in Supplies and consumables in 2022‑23 and decrease in 2023‑24 primarily reflects the additional funding for the Public Housing Initiatives ‑ Energy Efficiency program, which will be completed in 2022‑23.

5.    The decrease in Grants and subsidies in 2023‑24 and across the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives.

6.    The decrease in Other expenses in 2022‑23 relates to a correction to the Department’s budget allocation between expense categories.

Table 2.9:         Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating

7 676 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

Other revenue1

10 800 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Total administered revenue

18 476 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

Total administered income

18 476 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies

7 676 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

Transfers to the Public Account1

10 800 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Total administered expenses

18 476 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered net result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered comprehensive result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    Other revenue relates to the estimated income to be received from charging quarantining guests for their stay at COVID‑19 quarantine hotels, and the income received from the Victorian Government in relation to quarantining seasonal workers on behalf of the Victorian Government. This revenue is transferred to the Public Account.


 

Table 2.10:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Sport and Recreation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.7 Sport and Recreation1

45 257 

31 528 

16 215 

13 915 

10 623 

 

45 257 

31 528 

16 215 

13 915 

10 623 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.17 Improving the Playing Field

5 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

5 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

35 666 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

50 757 

32 028 

16 715 

14 415 

11 123 

Capital Services

35 666 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

86 423 

32 028 

16 715 

14 415 

11 123 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.4 Aboriginal Affairs2

2 008 

3 822 

1 405 

1 410 

1 439 

 

2 008 

3 822 

1 405 

1 410 

1 439 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

2 008 

3 822 

1 405 

1 410 

1 439 

 

2 008 

3 822 

1 405 

1 410 

1 439 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Women

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.5 Women's Policy3

2 450 

1 434 

745 

399 

291 

 

2 450 

1 434 

745 

399 

291 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

2 450 

1 434 

745 

399 

291 

 

2 450 

1 434 

745 

399 

291 


 

Table 2.10:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Disability Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.2 Disability Services

256 231 

267 037 

277 200 

283 426 

289 222 

 

256 231 

267 037 

277 200 

283 426 

289 222 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

256 231 

267 037 

277 200 

283 426 

289 222 

 

256 231 

267 037 

277 200 

283 426 

289 222 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Veterans' Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.6 Veterans' Affairs4

1 064 

609 

621 

621 

430 

 

1 064 

609 

621 

621 

430 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.9 Returned Service League Support

22 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

22 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

1 086 

609 

621 

621 

430 

 

1 086 

609 

621 

621 

430 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Safe Homes, Families, Communities

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Safe Homes, Families, Communities: Tasmania’s action plan for family and sexual violence

8 692 

12 812 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

8 692 

12 812 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

8 692 

12 812 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

8 692 

12 812 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 


 

Table 2.10:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Community Services and Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Disability Services and Community Development

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Community Services5

33 514 

34 427 

30 537 

30 752 

30 228 

4.3 Community Development ‑ Policy Advice and Ongoing Community Development6

43 569 

24 148 

15 781 

6 415 

6 550 

 

77 083 

58 575 

46 318 

37 167 

36 778 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.2 Community Support Fund

6 500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.4 Emergency Accommodation Support

24 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.15 TasCOSS

175 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.16 Emergency Food Relief Providers

775 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

31 450 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

108 533 

58 575 

46 318 

37 167 

36 778 

 

108 533 

58 575 

46 318 

37 167 

36 778 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Housing Services

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Housing Services7

64 805 

80 353 

57 560 

54 670 

53 421 

 

64 805 

80 353 

57 560 

54 670 

53 421 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.1 Private Rental Incentive Scheme

750 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.10 Statewide Safe Spaces

8 210 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

8 960 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

56 316 

190 475 

55 674 

33 200 

49 264 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

73 765 

80 353 

57 560 

54 670 

53 421 

Capital Services

56 316 

190 475 

55 674 

33 200 

49 264 

 

130 081 

270 828 

113 234 

87 870 

102 685 

 


 

Table 2.10:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education, Children and Youth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Children Services

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Children Services8

145 470 

149 510 

149 305 

147 419 

145 087 

 

145 470 

149 510 

149 305 

147 419 

145 087 

Output Group 2 ‑ Independent Children's and Young Persons' Review Service

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People9

1 398 

1 660 

1 633 

1 610 

1 579 

 

1 398 

1 660 

1 633 

1 610 

1 579 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.6 Child Safety System

361 

950 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

361 

950 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

2 145 

2 500 

17 500 

20 000 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

147 229 

152 120 

150 938 

149 029 

146 666 

Capital Services

2 145 

2 500 

17 500 

20 000 

.... 

 

149 374 

154 620 

168 438 

169 029 

146 666 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Communities Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

Total Operating Services

650 751 

608 790 

551 502 

541 137 

539 370 

Total Capital Services

94 127 

192 975 

73 174 

53 200 

49 264 

 

744 878 

801 765 

624 676 

594 337 

588 634 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserved by Law

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Community Fund (Tasmanian Community Fund Act 2005)

7 176 

7 320 

7 466 

7 615 

7 767 

 

7 176 

7 320 

7 466 

7 615 

7 767 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Rollover

20 306 

24 212 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

772 360 

833 297 

632 142 

601 952 

596 401 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

764 684 

825 477 

624 176 

593 837 

588 134 

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

7 676 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

 

772 360 

833 297 

632 142 

601 952 

596 401 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Sport and Recreation in 2022‑23 primarily reflects one‑off grant funding provided for 2021‑22 Budget initiatives, including the Local Community Facilities Fund and Improving the Playing Field. The decrease over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives and one‑off grants.

2.    The increase in Aboriginal Affairs in 2022‑23 primarily reflects the additional funding for the Tasmanian Closing the Gap Implementation Plan initiative.

3.    The decrease in Women’s Policy in 2022‑23 primarily reflects one‑off funding in 2021‑22 for the Tasmanian Women’s Strategy 2018‑2021, partly offset by an increase for the Tasmanian Women’s Strategy 2022‑27. The decrease across the Forward Estimates reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives.

4.    The decrease in Veterans’ Affairs in 2022‑23 primarily reflects one‑off funding in 2021‑22 for the Local Community Facilities Fund. The decrease over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives.

5.    The increase in Community Services in 2022‑23 primarily reflects funding for the 2021‑22 Budget initiative for Neighbourhood Houses Tasmania ‑ Capital Improvement Program. The decrease in 2023‑24 primarily reflects the completion of prior year Budget initiatives.

6.    The decrease in Community Development in 2022‑23 primarily reflects additional funding in 2021‑22 for 2021‑22 Budget initiatives. The decrease over the Forward Estimates reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives.

7.    The increase in Housing Services in 2022‑23 primarily reflects new funding  for the Continuation of COVID Housing Support Measures and funding for the 2021‑22 Budget Public Housing Initiatives ‑ Energy Efficiency program.

8.    The increase in Children Services in 2022‑23 primarily reflects additional funding for the Response to the Many Colours One Direction Program Review, Continuation of Investment into the Child Safety Service System, Intensive Family Engagement Services and the Transition to Independence (T2i) program. The decrease in Children Services over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the profile of funding for Out of Home Care provided in the 2020‑21 Budget. This is partly offset by funding provided for 2021‑22 Budget initiatives.

9.    The increase in Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People in 2022‑3 primarily reflects additional funding for staff to support the Commission of Inquiry and the Ashley Youth Detention Centre transition.


 

Table 2.11:       Administered Revenue

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

Reserved by Law

7 176 

7 320 

7 466 

7 615 

7 767 

 

7 676 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agency Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Other Revenue1

10 800 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

10 800 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

18 476 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    Other revenue relates to the estimated income to be received from charging quarantining guests for their stay at COVID‑19 quarantine hotels and the income received from the Victorian Government in relation to quarantining seasonal workers on behalf of the Victorian Government, which is transferred to the Public Account.

 

Table 2.12:       Administered Expenses

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Community Fund

7 176 

7 320 

7 466 

7 615 

7 767 

Tasmanian Icon Program ‑ State Cricket Team

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

 

7 676 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfers to the Public Account1

10 800 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

18 476 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    Transfers to the Public Account relates to the income collected and then transferred to the Public Account in relation to the estimated income from charging quarantining guests for their stay at COVID‑19 quarantine hotels and the income received from the Victorian Government in relation to quarantining seasonal workers on behalf of the Victorian Government.


 

Table 2.13:       Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2022 

2023 

2024 

2025 

2026 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

57 616 

50 561 

44 424 

40 812 

36 831 

Investments2

441 

1 347 

1 347 

1 347 

1 347 

Receivables2

7 408 

15 676 

15 502 

15 328 

15 154 

Equity investments3

41 704 

48 237 

53 717 

59 197 

64 677 

Other financial assets2

543 

2 727 

2 740 

2 753 

2 766 

 

107 712 

118 548 

117 730 

119 437 

120 775 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non‑financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Assets held for sale

1 093 

1 108 

1 108 

1 108 

1 108 

Property, plant and equipment4

2 584 902 

2 869 848 

2 987 127 

3 096 496 

3 164 986 

Heritage and cultural assets

53 

53 

53 

53 

53 

Intangibles5

7 188 

4 209 

4 979 

4 564 

4 149 

Other assets2

3 855 

2 101 

2 187 

2 273 

2 359 

 

2 597 091 

2 877 319 

2 995 454 

3 104 494 

3 172 655 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

2 704 803 

2 995 867 

3 113 184 

3 223 931 

3 293 430 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

12 073 

14 938 

15 325 

15 712 

16 099 

Interest bearing liabilities

644 

615 

614 

754 

754 

Employee benefits

21 541 

23 036 

23 116 

23 196 

23 276 

Superannuation

7 854 

7 333 

7 619 

7 905 

8 191 

Other liabilities2

6 939 

12 151 

11 953 

11 755 

11 557 

Total liabilities

49 051 

58 073 

58 627 

59 322 

59 877 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

2 655 752 

2 937 794 

3 054 557 

3 164 609 

3 233 553 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Reserves

715 477 

842 572 

887 507 

932 442 

977 377 

Accumulated funds

1 940 275 

2 095 222 

2 167 050 

2 232 167 

2 256 176 

Total equity

2 655 752 

2 937 794 

3 054 557 

3 164 609 

3 233 553 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Cash and deposits in 2023 and across the Forward Estimates primarily reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2021 actuals and updated estimates to reflect increased expenditure in 2022 on major items including the capital program.

2.    The variation in this item in 2023 and across the Forward Estimates primarily reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2021 actuals.

3.    The increase in Equity investments primarily reflects the 2021 State of the State commitment for HomeShare ‑ Additional Contribution expenditure over the 2022‑23 Budget and Forward Estimates.

4.    The increase in Property, plant and equipment in 2023 and across the Forward Estimates primarily reflects additional capital expenditure related to Housing construction programs, and includes the value of Service Concession Assets. This differs from the presentation in the General Government Sector Balance Sheet, where Service Concession Assets are included in Other non‑financial assets.

5.    The variation in Intangibles in 2023 and over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the timing of expenditure related to the Integrated Client Information Program, funded from the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program and amortisation.


 

Table 2.14:       Statement of Cash Flows

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ operating

650 251 

619 290 

551 002 

540 637 

538 870 

Appropriation receipts ‑ capital

94 127 

181 975 

73 174 

53 200 

49 264 

Appropriation receipts ‑ other

20 306 

24 212 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants

11 822 

7 666 

717 

32 

32 

Sales of goods and services

45 124 

45 581 

45 581 

45 582 

45 582 

GST receipts

31 597 

31 597 

31 597 

31 597 

31 597 

Interest received

Other cash receipts

29 972 

30 804 

30 784 

30 784 

30 781 

Total cash inflows

883 207 

941 133 

732 863 

701 840 

696 134 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

(70 976)

(88 592)

(86 297)

(85 179)

(85 739)

Superannuation

(9 095)

(11 848)

(11 692)

(11 582)

(11 786)

Borrowing costs

(19)

(11)

(9)

(12)

(12)

GST payments

(31 298)

(31 298)

(31 298)

(31 298)

(31 298)

Grants and subsidies

(561 915)

(560 736)

(420 962)

(392 790)

(384 717)

Supplies and consumables

(154 217)

(158 943)

(148 218)

(148 934)

(149 376)

Other cash payments

(3 260)

(1 016)

(978)

(939)

(896)

Total cash outflows

(830 780)

(852 444)

(699 454)

(670 734)

(663 824)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

52 427 

88 689 

33 409 

31 106 

32 310 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets1

(65 018)

(93 082)

(112 556)

(103 461)

(62 582)

Proceeds from the disposal of non‑financial assets

7 118 

19 640 

74 900 

70 492 

28 180 

Equity injections and cash flows from restructuring2

(10 480)

(10 480)

(5 480)

(5 480)

(5 480)

Net receipts/(payments) for investments

3 591 

3 591 

3 591 

3 591 

3 591 

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(64 789)

(80 331)

(39 545)

(34 858)

(36 291)

 

 


 

Table 2.14:       Statement of Cash Flows (continued)

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings

(1 059)

(268)

(1)

140 

.... 

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

(1 059)

(268)

(1)

140 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(13 421)

8 090 

(6 137)

(3 612)

(3 981)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

71 037 

42 471 

50 561 

44 424 

40 812 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

57 616 

50 561 

44 424 

40 812 

36 831 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Payments for acquisitions of non‑financial assets reflects the expenditure profile of the Department’s Capital Investment Program.

2.    The variation in Equity injections and cash flows from restructuring primarily reflects the 2021 State of the State commitment for HomeShare ‑ Additional Contribution of $5 million in 2021‑22 and 2022‑23.

 

Table 2.15:       Statement of Cash Flows ‑ Administered

 

2021‑22 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ operating

7 676 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

Other cash receipts

10 800 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Total cash inflows

18 476 

7 820 

7 966 

8 115 

8 267 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies

(7 676)

(7 820)

(7 966)

(8 115)

(8 267)

Transfers to the Public Account

(10 800)

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Total cash outflows

(18 476)

(7 820)

(7 966)

(8 115)

(8 267)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

....