10    Department of State Growth

Agency Outline

The Department of State Growth’s role is to support diverse and sustainable economic growth and facilitate the creation of job opportunities for the benefit of the Tasmanian community. In doing so, the Department has five key objectives:

·       work with Tasmanian businesses, industries and communities to support sustainable growth and strategic workforce opportunities;

·       contribute to Tasmania’s brand as the best place in the country to live, work, visit, study, invest and raise a family;

·       strategically develop infrastructure, digital networks, transport and renewable energy systems to support industry, businesses and the community;

·       enhance resilience and rapid recovery from economic, environmental and social shocks and stresses across industry, businesses and the community; and

·       continue to build the Department’s organisational capacity by working collaboratively and developing staff, safety, culture and systems, including the use of technology.

In addressing these objectives, the Department will work with businesses, industries and communities to reduce Tasmania’s greenhouse gas emissions and build resilience to the effects of climate change.

The Department provides portfolio support to the following Ministers:

·       Minister for Trade and Minister for Tourism, Hon Jeremy Rockliff MP;

·       Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Hon Michael Ferguson MP;

·       Minister for the Arts, Hon Elise Archer MP;

·       Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing and Minister for Energy and Renewables, Hon Guy Barnett MP;

·       Minister for Environment and Climate Change, Hon Roger Jaensch MP;

·       Minister for Hospitality and Events and Minister for Sport and Recreation, Hon Nic Street MP;

·       Minister for Small Business, Minister for Science and Technology and Minister for Advanced Manufacturing and Defence Industries, Hon Madeleine Ogilvie MP; and

·       Minister for Resources and Minister for Skills, Training and Workforce Growth, Hon Felix Ellis MP.


 

The Department is organised into key areas of: Business and Jobs; Business Services; Culture, Arts and Sport; Resources, Strategy and Policy; and Transport and Infrastructure. The Department also supports the Office of the Coordinator‑General and Renewables, Climate and Future Industries Tasmania.

The Department works collaboratively and in partnership with other Government departments to achieve growth in the Tasmanian economy. In delivering services to Tasmania and growing the State, the Department is client centric, collaborative, values based, results driven, innovative, creative, adaptable, agile, efficient, welcoming and supports diversity in the organisation.

The Government, through the Department, administers the Tasmanian Vocational Education and Training system and purchases training from Registered Training Providers (including TasTAFE) to support the Tasmanian economy and community.

This chapter provides the Department’s financial information for 2023‑24 and over the Forward Estimates (2024‑25 to 2026‑27). Further information on the Department is provided at www.stategrowth.tas.gov.au.


 

Key Deliverables

Table 10.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimates allocations for key deliverables being undertaken by the Department.

Table 10.1:       Key Deliverables Statement

 

2023‑24

 

Budget

2024‑25

Forward

Estimate

2025‑26

Forward

Estimate

2026‑27

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Accelerating Trade Program

390

390

....

....

Basketball Tasmania Development Officers

200

200

....

....

Boag’s Brewery Visitor Centre

500

....

....

....

Business Energy Efficiency Scheme

1 525

1 150

775

....

Business Events Tasmania

....

150

150

150

Collingwood Magpies Netball team in Tasmania

410

410

110

....

Common Ticketing1

14 622

8 568

2 500

2 500

Corridor Studies 

1 300

....

....

....

Cultural and Creative Industry Operational Assistance

....

....

1 200

1 200

Delivering the Renewable Energy Agenda

2 000

1 750

....

....

Elphinstone International Defence Infrastructure

5 000

....

....

....

Employer of Choice

....

600

600

600

Energy Saver Loan Scheme

1 228

2 509

760

....

Events Tasmania Support

1 000

....

....

....

Farm Debt Mediation Scheme

....

....

63

63

Flinders Island Boat Ramp Upgrade2

30

....

....

....

Football Tasmania

....

....

450

....

Freer Farm Centre of Excellence3

1 500

....

....

....

Hawthorn Football Club Partnership

1 100

....

....

....

Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity4

7 817

4 500

5 110

....

Huntingfield Roundabout Improvements

4 500

1 003

....

....

Infrastructure Tasmania Operational Funding

....

1 000

....

....

Jobs Hub Initiative

....

2 750

2 750

....

Macquarie Point Urban Renewal

15 000

30 000

60 000

125 000

Major Industrials and Other Investor Client Service
Model

250

250

250

....

Northern Suburbs (Launceston) Community Recreation Hub Project

22 500

5 000

....

....

Northern Suburbs Transit Corridor5

1 000

4 000

8 500

....

Physical Disability Sports Programs ‑ ParaQuad

....

50

50

50

Reclink

....

167

167

167

Regional Connectivity Program Round 2

....

615

....

....

Residential Land Rebate Scheme

3 000

....

....

....

Science and Technology Initiatives

1 750

....

....

....

Screen Innovation Funding

500

500

....

....

Skills Tasmania Data Systems6

600

....

....

....

Table 10.1:       Key Deliverables Statement (continued)

 

2023‑24

 

Budget

2024‑25

Forward

Estimate

2025‑26

Forward

Estimate

2026‑27

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Small Business Growth Strategy Grants Program

455

230

....

....

Special Partnerships ‑ Events Tasmania

3 425

....

....

....

Sporting Organisations

300

....

....

....

Summer Sports Carnivals

....

....

300

....

Surf Life Saving Tasmania ‑ Marine Rescue Vehicles, Trailers and Vessels

....

....

250

....

Surf Life Saving Tasmania ‑ Support

....

....

500

....

Targeting Congestion Package

5 600

6 289

5 991

2 917

Tasmanian Active Infrastructure Grants Program

5 000

5 000

....

....

Tasmanian AFL Package ‑ High Performance Centre

10 000

40 000

10 000

....

Tasmanian AFL Team Package

10 850

5 850

5 800

12 000

Tasmanian Defence Advocate

....

300

300

300

Tasmanian Defence Industry Strategy

500

750

750

750

Tasmanian Green Hydrogen Hub (Project Resources)

300

300

300

....

Tasmania’s Aboriginal Heritage

....

250

250

....

TasTAFE Priority Infrastructure Upgrades3

1 000

2 000

....

....

Taste of Summer 2023‑26

1 500

1 200

1 200

....

Ticket to Play

....

1 000

1 000

1 000

TMAG Building Maintenance

500

1 000

500

....

Tourism and Hospitality Supply

1 100

....

....

....

West Coast Wilderness Railway

1 250

....

....

....

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This initiative will be funded from the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program within Finance-General from 2024‑25.

2.    This initiative will be paid as a grant payment to Marine and Safety Tasmania to deliver the project. Refer to chapter 24 of this Budget Paper for more information.

3.    This initiative will be paid as a grant payment to TasTAFE to deliver the project. Refer to chapter 27 of this Budget Paper for more information.

4.    This item includes Australian Government funding of $13.9 million from the Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity Program.

5.    The funding allocation for this initiative is a 50:50 matching Australian Government commitment, with Australian Government funding beyond the Forward Estimates.

6.    This initiative will be funded through the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program within Finance-General.

Accelerating Trade Program

This initiative provides funding over two years to the Accelerating Trade Program, enabling Tasmanian businesses to access support to secure trade opportunities, participate in national and global trade events, missions and activities and expand international influence through developing Tasmania’s trade relations, as a key priority under the Tasmanian Trade Strategy 2019‑2025.

Basketball Tasmania Development Officers

This initiative will provide funding to Basketball Tasmania over two years to employ additional sport development officers across the State to support the increase in basketball participation.

Boag’s Brewery Visitor Centre

This initiative will deliver improvements to the James Boag’s Brewery Tours and Visitor Centre in Launceston, ensuring they can be expanded and enhanced to play an important role in northern Tasmania’s visitor economy.

Business Energy Efficiency Scheme

This initiative supports up to $50 million in loans for large electricity users to invest in energy efficiency initiatives. The scheme provides interest subsidies to deliver no‑interest loans of up to three years, for a maximum loan of $10 000; and low interest loans of up to three years, for a maximum loan of $50 000.

Business Events Tasmania

This initiative will deliver continued funding to Business Events Tasmania, ensuring the hosting and attraction of business events remain an important contributor to Tasmania’s economy.

Collingwood Magpies Netball team in Tasmania

This initiative will support the agreement from 2023 to 2025 for the Collingwood Magpies Netball team to play Suncorp Super Netball League games in Tasmania. The partnership provides development opportunities through coaching and clinics in the State and promotes Tasmania through the Collingwood Football Club’s marketing channels.

Common Ticketing

This initiative will deliver a contemporary common ticketing solution for Tasmania’s General Access Public Transport Network, including real time information, over four years to 2026‑27.

Corridor Studies

This initiative is for the continued development of corridor studies that identify and prioritise improvement opportunities for the state road network. These studies enable the development of 10 year action plans for Tasmania’s major roads, which guide strategic investment in projects that improve the safety, capacity and resilience of Tasmanian roads, as well as active and passenger transport networks.

Cultural and Creative Industry Operational Assistance

This initiative will continue support to arts organisations to deliver programs of high‑quality arts and cultural production and services while improving their financial sustainability and developing their capacity to develop programs and activities.

Delivering the Renewable Energy Agenda

This initiative will provide additional funding to progress the Government’s Renewable Agenda, particularly Project Marinus, onshore and offshore renewable energy developments, Battery of the Nation projects and the implementation of Renewable Energy Zones in the State.


 

Elphinstone International Defence Infrastructure

This initiative will provide co‑investment funding to build a facility that will enable current and future exports, and domestic sophisticated defence contracts from regional Tasmania. The grant will support the business and its existing Tasmanian supply chain to diversify into new international defence markets.

This initiative will support Elphinstone Group to expand its machining and production capability to be able to deliver significant defence contracts.

Employer of Choice

This initiative will deliver the Employer of Choice Program over an additional three years. The program, delivered by Jobs Tasmania, supports employers to attract and retain a workforce.

Energy Saver Loan Scheme

This initiative delivers no interest, fee‑free loans of up to $10 000 for up to three years for small electricity customers (residences and small businesses) to invest in prescribed products to help lower their electricity bills, including solar PV systems, batteries, glazing, insulation and energy‑efficient appliances.

Events Tasmania Support

This initiative will provide for Events Tasmania to support events under its current programs in 2023‑24.

Farm Debt Mediation Scheme

This initiative will extend the Farm Debt Mediation Scheme on an ongoing basis.

Flinders Island Boat Ramp Upgrade

This initiative will support the completion of upgrades to boat ramps on Flinders Island. This funding complements funding provided for this initiative in 2021‑22.

Football Tasmania

This initiative will extend funding for an additional year to 2025‑26 to Football Tasmania to deliver grassroots participation, referee, coach playing and club development opportunities.

Freer Farm Centre of Excellence

This initiative will enable TasTAFE to support growth in the agriculture industry through a modern training facility that uses contemporary equipment and infrastructure.

The additional funding in this Budget complements funding previously allocated for the project in the 2019‑20 Budget and was referred to as the Agricultural Centre of Excellence.

Hawthorn Football Club Partnership

This initiative supports the extension of the agreement with the Hawthorn Football Club to deliver four home games each season in Launceston.

Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity

This initiative includes the Tasmanian Government contribution to deliver a package of heavy vehicle driver rest areas on key highways and ongoing Australian Government funding for the Heavy Vehicle and Safety Productivity Program to fund road infrastructure projects to improve safety outcomes of heavy vehicles.

Huntingfield Roundabout Improvements

This initiative will support the delivery of improvements associated with the Huntingfield roundabout.

Infrastructure Tasmania Operational Funding

This initiative continues funding in 2024‑25, to support the enhanced role of Infrastructure Tasmania to facilitate the delivery of government infrastructure projects.

Jobs Hub Initiative

The Regional Jobs Hubs Program has already delivered more than 3 000 job outcomes, engaged more than 5 500 employers, and supported 1 200 training outcomes. While the implementation phase is still under evaluation in 2023, at this stage the Government has committed to extend the Program until 2025‑26.

Macquarie Point Urban Renewal

This initiative will deliver the State Government’s contribution to the new multi‑purpose arts, entertainment and sporting precinct at Macquarie Point in Hobart which will enhance and support wider urban renewal projects across Greater Hobart.

The project will unlock considerable economic activity both during construction and when in use. It will enable Tasmania to compete for arts and cultural events including major concerts, conferences, exhibitions and sporting fixtures, whose organisers currently do not consider Tasmania as an option due to the lack of world class venue facilities and capacity constraints.

It is anticipated that the facility will be completed by the end of 2028. The State Government’s total funding commitment to the project is $375 million.

Major Industrials and Other Investor Client Service Model

This initiative will deliver focused client services to support existing major industrials, as well as those seeking to do business in the State.

Northern Suburbs (Launceston) Community Recreation Hub Project

This initiative will support the development and delivery of an indoor community and multi‑purpose sporting facility for Launceston’s northern suburbs that will enable a range of people of all ages and abilities to participate in social and physical activity.

Northern Suburbs Transit Corridor

This initiative will provide further key planning and design work for the ongoing development and activation of the Northern Suburbs Transit Corridor. In addition, it will deliver some early works that ready the corridor and commuters for construction.

Physical Disability Sports Programs ‑ ParaQuad

This initiative will provide funding to ParaQuad Tasmania to continue to deliver its Physical Disability Sports Programs.

Reclink

This initiative will provide funding to Reclink to continue support for at‑risk and disadvantaged Tasmanians to participate in community sporting activities.

Regional Connectivity Program Round 2

This initiative will provide funding toward Telstra constructing and operating four new macro base stations at Deddington, Royal George, Lake Leake and Pelham in 2024‑25.

Residential Land Rebate Scheme

This initiative will extend the Residential Land Rebate Scheme to provide utility cost rebates to eligible applicants to boost residential land supply in 2023‑24.

Science and Technology Initiatives

This initiative will deliver funding to progress investment into subsea digital cable connectivity for Tasmania, and projects and partnerships that will drive strategic outcomes for Tasmania’s space sector in 2023‑24.

Screen Innovation Funding

This initiative will provide further funding to Screen Tasmania through the Screen Innovation Fund for another two years. This supports screen production activity, which delivers substantial economic benefits to the State. Following major Tasmanian screen projects released, or due to be released, in 2023 such as Deadloch, Bay of Fires, Alone Australia and The Survival of Kindness, this measure will enable Screen Tasmania to continue to invest in productions of scale.

Skills Tasmania Data Systems

This initiative will provide funding to plan and scope the replacement of Skills Tasmania’s core data systems to a contemporary standard and ensure capacity to meet national VET data requirements.

Small Business Growth Strategy Grants Program

This initiative will provide grants to businesses and organisations for the delivery of projects that align with the Small Business Growth Strategy 2026.

Special Partnerships ‑ Events Tasmania

This initiative will provide support for Tasmania’s special event partnerships. These partnerships support the visitor economy and ensure a rich, diverse and year‑round events portfolio.


 

Sporting Organisations

This initiative will support the existing level of funding for state sports organisations to administer and develop their sport or recreation, and deliver services in Tasmania.

Summer Sports Carnivals

This initiative will extend funding to the Sports Carnivals Association of Tasmania to secure the future of Tasmania’s Summer Sports Carnivals. It will provide an additional year of funding for the popular carnival series including the Burnie, Devonport, Launceston and Hobart carnivals.

Surf Life Saving Tasmania ‑ Marine Rescue Vehicles, Trailers and Vessels

This initiative will extend funding for one year for marine rescue vehicles, trailers and vessels.

Surf Life Saving Tasmania ‑ Support

This initiative will extend funding for one year for support towards the provision of surf life saving services.

Targeting Congestion Package

This initiative will provide a funding boost over four years to key projects to deliver relief to urban congestion, including funding for capital projects focused on addressing congestion, and facilitating public transport uptake and accessibility.

Tasmanian Active Infrastructure Grants Program

This initiative will provide grants to the sports and recreation sector to build new, and upgrade existing, sport and recreation infrastructure over two years. It builds on the success of the Leveling the Playing Field and Improving the Playing Field grant programs.

Tasmanian AFL Package ‑ High Performance Centre

This initiative will deliver a new high performance training and administration centre to accommodate and support the new Tasmanian AFL and AFLW teams following the granting of a Tasmanian team licence. The Government’s funding commitment to this project is $60 million.

The vision for the facility is to provide the players (men and women), coaches and administrators with every opportunity to be successful, both on and off the field. In addition, the facility is anticipated to be accessed for community use purposes and for use by Tasmanian elite athletes. The ability to further develop community partnerships and programs is an important element of the vision for the facility.

The facility will include external and internal training facilities as well as office spaces and facilities for football and administrative staff. It is anticipated that the facility will be ready for occupation in 2026, to enable the new team to prepare for their commencement in the 2028 AFL season.

Tasmanian AFL Team Package

This initiative will support the establishment and initial operations of an AFL and AFLW club based in Tasmania. The initiative also includes a commitment to support club participation in the AFL Competition and AFLW Competition from 2027‑28.

Tasmanian Defence Advocate

This initiative will support the Defence Advocate to continue working with existing and prospective Tasmanian defence industry businesses to grow Tasmania’s contribution to defence industry markets.

Tasmanian Defence Industry Strategy

This initiative will provide continued support for initiatives and activities to further grow Tasmania’s defence industry activities, including a refresh of the existing defence strategy.

Tasmanian Green Hydrogen Hub (Project Resources)

This initiative will deliver additional project resources to progress the Tasmanian Green Hydrogen Hub at Bell Bay over the next three years.

Tasmania’s Aboriginal Heritage

This initiative will deliver funding for Aboriginal heritage projects, including wukalina Walk over two years.

TasTAFE Priority Infrastructure Upgrades

This initiative will provide funding over two years to address priority infrastructure upgrades across TasTAFE facilities, as identified by the recently completed review of physical infrastructure and resolve immediate priority maintenance issues.

Taste of Summer 2023‑26

This initiative supports the delivery of the landmark Taste of Summer event each year in Hobart until 2026, ensuring the festival drives visitation right across the State.

Ticket to Play

This initiative will provide funding to continue to provide means‑tested Ticket to Play vouchers for children aged five to 18 years. The vouchers offset the membership costs for a range of sports and recreation activities.

TMAG Building Maintenance

This initiative will address priority works at Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery buildings over the next three years to ensure continued public safety in and around TMAG.

Tourism and Hospitality Supply

This initiative will continue support to the Tourism and Hospitality Unit for an additional year to deliver on supply-side tourism development, as well as the coordination of government policy and governance on industry issues.

West Coast Wilderness Railway

This initiative will continue support for the operation of the iconic West Coast Wilderness Railway for an additional year.

Output Group Restructure

In February 2022, the Government announced that the Department of Communities Tasmania would be restructured and abolished.

The restructure was undertaken in accordance with State Service Restructuring Orders made during 2022‑23 and resulted in the progressive transfer of functions from the former Department of Communities Tasmania to a number of other agencies, including the Department of State Growth.

A further State Servicing Restructure Order was tabled to transfer responsibility for the functions of Renewables, Climate and Future Industries Tasmania from the Department of Treasury and Finance to the Department of State Growth.

At an output level, the restructures resulted in the following output changes for the Department:

·       as at 1 July 2022, Output 5.6 ‑ Sport and Recreation was created; and

·       as at 1 October 2022, Output Group 7 ‑ Renewables, Climate and Future Industries Tasmania was created.

Chapter 1 of this Budget Paper provides further information on these restructures.

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of State Growth are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 ‑ Industry and Business Growth;

·       Output Group 2 ‑ Infrastructure and Transport Services;

·       Output Group 3 ‑ Skills, Training and Workforce Growth;

·       Output Group 4 ‑ Resources Policy and Regulatory Services;

·       Output Group 5 ‑ Cultural and Tourism Development;

·       Output Group 6 ‑ Subsidies and Concessions;

·       Output Group 7 ‑ Renewables, Climate and Future Industries Tasmania;

·       Output Group 89 ‑ Public Building Maintenance Program; and

·       Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery.

Table 10.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department.


 

Table 10.2:       Output Group Expense Summary

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

Minister for Infrastructure and Transport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 ‑ Infrastructure and Transport Services

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania1

73 970 

53 428 

17 891 

3 533 

3 614 

2.2 Road User Services2

27 389 

32 554 

35 668 

35 836 

29 189 

2.3 Passenger Transport3

19 775 

36 854 

27 891 

13 135 

9 753 

 

121 134 

122 836 

81 450 

52 504 

42 556 

Output Group 6 ‑ Subsidies and Concessions

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

1 245 

1 270 

1 295 

1 322 

1 348 

6.2 General Access Services

68 107 

69 754 

71 443 

73 175 

74 951 

6.3 School Bus Services

40 661 

41 393 

42 140 

42 902 

43 680 

6.4 Construction of Streets in Towns

52 

52 

52 

52 

52 

 

110 065 

112 469 

114 930 

117 451 

120 031 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.16 International Air Freight Assistance

1 290 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.23 Waratah‑Wynyard Coastal Pathway

3 000 

9 000 

500 

.... 

.... 

90.28 Airport Infrastructure

4 050 

1 900 

2 250 

.... 

.... 

 

8 340 

10 900 

2 750 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

26 903 

24 226 

22 971 

23 003 

23 035 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program4

189 606 

237 209 

250 245 

225 762 

230 205 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Sport and Recreation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Cultural and Tourism Development

 

 

 

 

 

5.6 Sport and Recreation5

39 517 

24 050 

22 481 

15 430 

13 943 

 

39 517 

24 050 

22 481 

15 430 

13 943 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Energy and Renewables

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 7 ‑ Renewables, Climate and Future Industries Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

7.1 Energy and Renewables6

16 782 

31 026 

19 627 

10 200 

6 891 

 

16 782 

31 026 

19 627 

10 200 

6 891 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 10.2:       Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.2 Mineral Resources

9 488 

9 273 

9 382 

8 585 

8 542 

 

9 488 

9 273 

9 382 

8 585 

8 542 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Cultural and Tourism Development

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

11 067 

11 262 

11 518 

11 816 

12 094 

5.2 Arts Industry Development

9 419 

9 985 

10 222 

9 514 

9 730 

5.3 Screen Industry Development

1 730 

1 782 

1 806 

1 836 

1 862 

 

22 216 

23 029 

23 546 

23 166 

23 686 

Output Group 89 ‑ Public Building Maintenance Program

 

 

 

 

 

89.1 Public Building Maintenance Program

1 805 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

1 805 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

4 774 

4 855 

4 938 

5 024 

5 110 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Small Business

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.22 Peak Body Support Fund

400 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.24 Small Business Sustainability and Recovery Assistance Package

130 

130 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

530 

130 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Hospitality and Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Cultural and Tourism Development

 

 

 

 

 

5.4 Events and Hospitality7

23 548 

26 987 

14 205 

8 194 

6 649 

 

23 548 

26 987 

14 205 

8 194 

6 649 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.2:       Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

Minister for Tourism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Cultural and Tourism Development

 

 

 

 

 

5.5 Visitor Economy Support8

14 644 

14 812 

2 766 

861 

416 

 

14 644 

14 812 

2 766 

861 

416 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Skills, Training and Workforce Growth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Skills, Training and Workforce Growth

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Skills and Workforce Growth9

179 466 

180 845 

179 847 

158 734 

142 505 

 

179 466 

180 845 

179 847 

158 734 

142 505 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.2 Rapid Response Skills Initiative

1 500 

2 150 

2 000 

1 000 

.... 

90.26 Expansion of the Apprentices and Trainees Small Business Grant

10 550 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

12 050 

2 150 

2 000 

1 000 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Industry and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Office of the Coordinator‑General10

32 780 

17 957 

15 115 

9 384 

3 546 

1.2 Industry and Business Development11,12

90 892 

108 499 

57 572 

43 408 

46 663 

 

123 672 

126 456 

72 687 

52 792 

50 209 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.3 Business Support Loan Scheme ‑ Interest Costs

500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment and Climate Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 7 ‑ Renewables, Climate and Future Industries Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

7.2 Climate Change13

7 541 

7 708 

8 537 

4 157 

2 792 

 

7 541 

7 708 

8 537 

4 157 

2 792 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

913 081 

959 461 

832 862 

707 363 

677 070 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Infrastructure Tasmania over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the Australian Government funding profile for the Launceston City Deal and the delivery of initiatives including: Tamar Estuary initiatives; Inbound Tourism Support, AFL Team Task Force, Stadium Feasibility Study, and operational grant funding to support the commencement of Stadiums Tasmania.

2.    The variation in Road User Services reflects the funding profile of the Automated Traffic Enforcement initiative.

3.    The variation in Passenger Transport primarily reflects the timing of funding for the Common Ticketing initiative.

4.    The increase in the Capital Investment Program in 2023‑24 reflects revised depreciation estimates based on 30 June 2022 actuals. The variation over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects assumptions on components of the Roads Programs that will be classified within Expenses.

5.    The decrease in Sport and Recreation in 2023‑24 primarily reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives, election commitments and one‑off grants, including the Local Community Facilities Fund and Improving the Playing Field. The decrease in the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the fixed-term Tasmanian Active Infrastructure Grants program initiative in 2023‑24 and 2024‑25.

6.    The variation in Energy and Renewables reflects the funding profile of Budget initiatives including the Hydrogen Industry Fund, Government Boiler Replacement Program and Delivering the Renewable Energy Agenda.

7.    The decrease in Events and Hospitality from 2024‑25 reflects the funding profile of Budget initiatives including Events Support and Attraction Fund, Securing Tasmania’s Iconic Events, Collingwood Magpies Netball Team in Tasmania and V8 Supercars.

8.    The decrease in Visitor Economy Support from 2024‑25 reflects the funding profile of Budget initiatives including Tourism and Hospitality Supply, Transformer Dark Lab, Business Events Attraction Fund and Innovation and Development Grants.

9.    The decrease in Skills and Workforce Growth from 2025‑26 reflects the funding profile of Budget initiatives including TasTAFE Facility Upgrades and Transition Fund, Sorell Trade Training Centre, Working Tasmania, High Vis Army and Strategic Growth initiatives.

10.  The decrease in Office of the Coordinator‑General over the Forward Estimates reflects the funding profile of the Northern Cities Major Development Initiative ‑ Launceston.

11.  The increase in Industry and Business Development in 2023‑24 reflects funding included in the 2023‑24 Budget for the Tasmanian AFL Team Package, Elphinstone International Defence Infrastructure and Science and Technology Initiatives. The decrease from 2024‑25 reflects the funding profile of existing Budget initiatives including Macquarie Point ‑ Operating Costs, Residential Land Rebate, Royal Agricultural Society of Tasmania Hobart Showground Redevelopment, Supporting Jobs at INCAT and Building Projects Supply Program.

12.  This Output includes funding that relates to strategies and activities that are the responsibility of the Minister for Advanced Manufacturing and Defence Industries, the Minister for Science and Technology, the Minister for Small Business and the Minister for Trade.

13.  The variation in Climate Change over the Forward Estimates reflects the timing of funding provided for existing Budget initiatives, including the Climate Change Action Plan and the Emission Reduction Loan Scheme.


 

Output Group 1:    Industry and Business Growth

1.1 Office of the Coordinator‑General

The Office of the Coordinator‑General is Tasmania’s principal entity to attract and support investment in the State. The activities of the Office are a fundamental element of the Government’s agenda of promoting investment for Tasmania and creating jobs. Outcomes of the Office are achieved for clients and for Tasmania by working collaboratively across the broader Department of State Growth, other state and Australian Government agencies, statutory authorities and local government.

The Office operates broadly across four interconnected areas: Investment Attraction and Promotion; Major Project Facilitation; Northern Cities; and Red Tape Reduction, which incorporates the role of a Small Business Advocate who assists small businesses trying to resolve issues and disputes with larger organisations.

1.2 Industry and Business Development

This Output focuses on maximising growth and job creation through business and industry including:

·       the administration of business and skilled migration programs;

·       providing a statewide interface to engage with Tasmanian businesses and support the State’s industries to capitalise on their competitive strengths;

·       providing a range of services that support the growth of Tasmanian businesses and emerging sectors including support for small to medium business through business development services and tools, and information on starting, running and growing a business; and

·       providing a range of targeted international engagement programs and advocacy functions to promote Tasmania including trade support, economic diplomacy, and business and skilled migration facilitation.

Table 10.3:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office of the Coordinator‑General

 

 

 

 

 

Publish the Annual Red Tape Reduction Report and continue to reduce red tape by addressing issues identified in the report1

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Investment facilitated by the Office of the Coordinator‑General2

$ million

382

328

330

330

 

 

 

 

 

 

Industry and Business Development

 

 

 

 

 

International students commencing their studies in Tasmania3

Number

6 751

5 649

5 535

5 535

Supporting access to a skilled workforce through State nomination of skilled migrants4

Number

2 661

3 300

3 300

3 500

Table 10.3:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 1 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grow the value of Tasmania’s premium exports to international markets5

$ million

3 231

4 040

3 823

3 976

Provision of information and advisory services to SMEs6

Number

18 632

19 211

6 000

3 050

Policy, project and program advice and implementation meets the expectations of stakeholders7

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The Annual Red Tape Reduction Report produced and published each year lists red tape issues identified for Government to act on and reports the progress against these actions.

2.    This measure includes investment where the Office of the Coordinator‑General has: directly engaged with an entity to promote or support new, or retain, investment in Tasmania; provided investment facilitation services including advice, process identification and navigation, and engagement with linked parties; or provided recommendations to Government resulting in financial or other support to a project.

3.    Travel restrictions and border closures in response to the COVID‑19 pandemic have had a significant impact on the international education sector and student numbers nationally. Further impacts to student numbers may continue in 2023‑24 due to a range of factors. This makes it difficult to anticipate future trends. A review of the Global Education Growth Strategy is currently underway. The target for 2023‑24 may change to align with the outcome of that activity.

4.    Figures include nominations under the Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190) and Skilled Work Regional visa (subclass 491). The ability to achieve the 2023‑24 target will be dependent upon the number of nomination places allocated to Tasmania by the Australian Government for the 2023‑24 financial year.

5.    The 2021‑22 actual has been adjusted based on the Department’s 2021‑22 Annual Report to include the figure for June 2022. The 2022‑23 target figure has been revised as actual export values for the first seven months of the financial year were higher than expected. A further four per cent growth has been estimated in determining the 2023‑24 target figure. The value of premium merchandise exports is calculated as total goods exports less iron ores and concentrates.

6.    This measure captures the number of advice services and assistance packages provided by Business Tasmania to small to medium‑sized enterprises. The 2021‑22 actual outcome reflects a significant increase in enquiries to Business Tasmania in response to the COVID‑19 pandemic. This number does not include Digital Ready engagements, which it has previously.

7.    Satisfaction and outcomes are measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients. The feedback focuses on the quality, relevance and timeliness of advice.

Output Group 2:    Infrastructure and Transport Services

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania

This Output provides a strategic, coordinated, and statewide approach to the planning and delivery of major infrastructure to support economic growth and Tasmanias development.

It is achieved through engagement, leadership and innovation, and demonstrating best practice in infrastructure policy, development, planning and delivery including:

·       providing independent and objective advice about infrastructure development and reform proposals to the Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Treasurer and Cabinet as required, including on legislative and governance reforms;

·       providing strategic advice and specific infrastructure strategy, planning, procurement, and construction solutions, including the delivery and maintenance of a 10 year infrastructure pipeline and project assurance system, in collaboration with industry and government agencies;

·       demonstrating best practice planning, delivery and outcomes for high‑profile and/or major projects as referred to Infrastructure Tasmania by the Tasmanian Government;

·       leading government engagement with the transport industry to improve freight and supply chains to address strategic issues and constraints, including management and innovation in relation to heavy vehicle access across the state road network;

·       coordinating agency input into statutory land use planning issues;

·       managing the performance, and maximising the capacity of the state road network, and delivering traffic management activities including operating the statewide Traffic Management Centre;

·       developing corridor strategies, a 10 year forward roads program, and identifying roads projects for State Roads to deliver, including the consideration and incorporation of alternative transportation options like active and public transport; and

·       supporting the Transport Commissioner, including review and improvement of Tasmania’s transport networks.

2.2 Road User Services

This Output provides the legislation, regulatory policies, and practices to support an efficient, safe, and reliable land transport system that connects people, and supports state growth, with a focus on:

·       supporting the delivery of Tasmania’s Towards Zero ‑ Tasmanian Road Safety Strategy 2017‑2026; providing strategic road safety policy advice; providing secretariat, policy and research support to the Road Safety Advisory Council; developing and delivering road safety public education; and administering the School Crossing Patrol Officer program;

·       delivery of all registration and licensing services to the Tasmanian community including, but not limited to: developing and maintaining legislation, business policies, practices and procedures; providing information, collection of fees; and delivering services relating to the registration of vehicles and licensing of drivers; and

·       developing, encouraging, and enforcing compliance with state‑based regulations for roadworthiness, vehicle standards, dimensions and mass limits, loading and operation of vehicles; and undertaking management of approved inspection station schemes.

2.3 Passenger Transport

This Output manages the regulation and delivery of passenger transport services that support the efficient, equitable and safe movement of people, including the administration of targeted transport assistance schemes and subsidies for students, the unemployed, aged pensioners and persons living with a disability, with a focus on:

·       the sustainable delivery of passenger transport services;

·       administering contracts for the delivery of regular passenger transport services across the state; and

·       initiatives to support the uptake of passenger transport, particularly where transport congestion is an emerging issue.

Table 10.4:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infrastructure Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmania’s 10 Year Infrastructure Pipeline online dashboard updated at least twice a year1

Yes/No

na

Yes

Yes

Yes

Percentage of Tier 1 major projects that have undergone an independent project assurance review coordinated by Infrastructure Tasmania2

%

na

100

100

100

Speed limit reviews on the state road network completed within 28 days of request3

%

60

59

80

80

Number of road corridor strategies on the state road network completed during the reporting period4

Number

na

1

2

2

Average consent request response time for heavy vehicle access permit applications on the state road network5

Days

na

6.4

10

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

Road User Services

 

 

 

 

 

Provision of effective support to the Government by providing road safety and road policy advice and information to enable informed decision making6

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Motor Registry System availability

%

99

99.9

99

99

Vehicles found to be unregistered of those checked7

%

0.83

0.72

0.65

0.65

Number of serious casualties from road crashes8

Number

318

293

266

245

 

 

 

 

 

 

Passenger Transport

 

 

 

 

 

Wheelchair accessible taxis licensed

Number

68

64

68

68

Average bus age on contracted services9

Number

14.4

11.58

15.4

16.0

Number of route and timetable reviews undertaken of the general access bus network in Tasmania10

Number

na

8

3

3

Percentage of scheduled and timetabled trips delivered per operator for the general access bus network11

%

na

99

98

98

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.4:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 2 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Program

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of customer requests relating to maintenance on state roads responded to within prescribed timeframes12

%

na

na

95

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 10 Year Infrastructure Pipeline is now being published through an online database. The information is gathered from the asset owners, including Tasmanian Government agencies, government businesses, relevant statutory authorities, local government and includes several known major private sector projects.

2.    This measure has been amended to capture Tasmanian Government agency projects that are determined to be Tier 1 major projects under the Infrastructure Tasmania Project Assurance Framework to better reflect a whole‑of‑government approach. Tier 1 major projects are those assessed under the framework as being ‘High Risk, High Value’ projects following a weighted risk score matrix and risk criteria. The 2021‑22 actual result has been reported against this amended measure.

3.    This measure was amended in 2021‑22 to apply only to speed limit reviews on the state road network. Accordingly, the 2021‑22 result is not comparable to previously reported figures. This measure is calculated from the date a request is made to undertake a speed limit review to the date the technical review is signed off and a decision has been made by the Transport Commissioner.

4.    The Department is working towards the goal of having a road corridor strategy in place for every state road in Tasmania as part of its strategic approach to transport planning.

5.    The statutory timeframe for responding to heavy vehicle access permit applications under section 156 of the Heavy Vehicle National Law is 28 days.

6.    Satisfaction and outcomes are largely measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office, Secretary, relevant Deputy Secretary and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients. The feedback focuses on the quality, relevance and timeliness of advice.

7.    This data is based on four automatic number plate recognition cameras installed on transport safety vehicles with a target of collecting 50 000 images per month.

8.    The 2020‑21 actual result has been amended, with a number now included reflecting changes in reported fatal and serious injuries across the period. Serious casualties include road fatalities and road serious injuries (admitted to hospital for 24 hours or longer).

9.    This is a measure of the effectiveness of government strategies to ensure that the average age of buses on government contracted services is appropriate. This target reflects that the average bus age varies over the duration of bus contracts. The lowest average bus age is generally at the commencement of contracts due to incentives for the purchase of newer fleet vehicles with the average age then increasing over the course of the contract.

10.  Network reviews are an important way for the Department to ensure that general access bus services are fit for purpose and being delivered in the most efficient manner. This measure includes reviews of both trial and existing services, with reviews varying in size and complexity (classified as minor, moderate and major).

11.  This measure is based on reporting of dropped trips by non‑metro general access operators. This does not include force majeure events such as weather impacts and medical emergencies.

12.  Reporting of actuals against this measure will commence in 2022‑23. The timeliness of responding to customers about maintenance requests on state roads is a key measure of the Department’s success in meeting customer needs. Depending on the nature of the maintenance request, the prescribed timeframes differ.

Output Group 3:    Skills, Training and Workforce Growth

3.1 Skills and Workforce Growth

Skills Tasmania is responsible for:

·       managing Tasmania’s training and workforce development system, to support the Tasmanian Government’s vision for a high‑quality system that is accessible, responsive and job focused;

·       providing strategic guidance to the Tasmanian Government in relation to TasTAFE;

·       subsidising training and workforce development activities that supports Tasmanians into training and jobs;

·       working with industry and other stakeholders to facilitate partnerships and to identify current and future workforce and training opportunities;

·       managing Tasmania’s apprenticeship and traineeship system; and

·       engaging with the Australian, state and territory governments on national skills policy and funding and policy matters.

Jobs Tasmania is responsible for:

·       working with and across governments, the community and businesses to increase employment outcomes, workforce participation and re‑engagement with work, education or training for all Tasmanians; and

·       establishing the Regional Jobs Hub Network and a range of complementary employment and participation programs that support job seekers in gaining meaningful work opportunities and connect businesses to a job ready workforce.

Table 10.5:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 3

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skills and Workforce Growth

 

 

 

 

 

VET Graduates employed after training1

% of total

72.8

77.5

79.7

82.7

VET Graduates with improved employment status after training2

% of total

62.6

68.2

71.3

71.1

Apprentice/Trainee in training3

Number

11 549

13 511

11 670

11 800

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The data for VET graduates employed after training was sourced from National Centre for Vocational Education Research Limited Student Outcomes Survey 2021, which was released in December 2021. This data relates to government funded VET graduates (qualification completers) from 2020.

2.    The data for government funded VET graduates (qualification completers) with improved employment status after training was sourced from NCVER Limited Student Outcomes Survey 2021, which was released in December 2021. Improved employment status after training, is employment status changing from not employed before training to employed after training, or employed at a higher skill level after training, or received a job‑related benefit as reported by the graduate.

3.    Apprentice/Trainee in training represents the number of Tasmanian apprentices and trainees undertaking training as at 30 June. The 2021‑22 actual data reflects additional activity resulting from post‑COVID‑19 subsidy programs and is sourced from Skills Tasmania internal data as at 3 August 2022.

Output Group 4:    Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

4.2 Mineral Resources

This Output facilitates mineral exploration and mining development and fosters and encourages responsible land management in Tasmania, with a focus on:

·       improving the quality and quantity of geoscience information, essential to the encouragement of mineral exploration and responsible land management;

·       promoting Tasmania nationally and internationally as being highly prospective for mineral exploration and mining through targeted and strategic marketing; and

·       providing information for sustainable land use planning and infrastructure development decisions through activities such as direct engagement in statewide planning reforms, geohazard mapping, resource identification to protect against sterilisation and management and rehabilitation of abandoned mining lands.

This Output also ensures the responsible management of Tasmania’s mineral resources and a fair and sustainable return to the community when a resource of metallic, construction, industrial and fuel minerals is developed.

Table 10.6:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mineral Resources

 

 

 

 

 

Project management, policy advice and analysis is consistent with stakeholder expectations1

Satisfaction

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Satisfied

Tasmania’s percentage of industry’s mineral exploration expenditure in Australia2

%

0.5

0.7

1.3

1.2

Area covered by modern geoscientific data collection techniques with subsequent 1:25 000 geological mapping coverage3

%

78

68

70

71

Programmed abandoned mining lands rehabilitation projects completed

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Satisfaction and outcomes are measured by feedback from the Minister’s Office, Secretary, relevant Deputy Secretary and, where appropriate, colleagues and clients. The feedback focuses on the quality, relevance and timeliness of advice.

2.    Statistics are derived from the three quarters of each financial year from Australian Bureau of Statistics exploration data.

3.    The definition of modern remote sensing data and mapping is defined as data created from 1996 onwards.

Output Group 5:    Cultural and Tourism Development

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery is the state museum and art gallery with a Tasmania‑wide remit. This Output aims to share unique stories that exhilarate and provoke, by connecting art, science, culture, and the environment.

TMAG creates opportunities that enable participation, reflection, learning, dialogue, and debate. Its strategic objectives are to: be accessible to the Tasmanian and global community; tell unique stories that exhilarate and provoke through strong collections; and have engaged and involved communities by enabling participation, reflection, learning, and discussion.

TMAG plays a key role in positioning Tasmania as a globally significant cultural centre.


 

5.2 Arts Industry Development

This Output focuses on working with Tasmanian artists and arts organisations to support this sector of the cultural and creative industries. It aims to build the sustainability of arts businesses, broaden the engagement of Tasmanians in the arts and highlight the State’s diverse arts and cultural sector. This result is achieved through a range of industry development programs, initiatives, and projects.

This Output includes funding for individual artists, arts organisations, and major Tasmanian cultural institutions to plan and realise projects and to develop and present new work. These projects generate economic activity, create employment opportunities and opportunities for audiences and enhance Tasmania’s reputation as a cultural tourism destination.

As a key part of the Government’s ongoing commitment to the preservation of the State’s moveable cultural heritage, this Output also includes investment, funding, and professional assistance to Tasmanian museums (other than TMAG), art galleries and moveable cultural heritage organisations.

5.3 Screen Industry Development

This Output aims to build on the success that has occurred in the sector through increased local, interstate and international screen production in the State. It also provides support for professional and project development, and the development of interactive games. In doing so, it seeks to promote Tasmanian talent and stories to a worldwide audience and provide employment and increased economic activity in the State.

This Output also aims to position Tasmania as a centre for the creation and development of quality content in the digital media environment as an important part of the growing creative industries sector.

5.4 Events and Hospitality

This Output aims to support and sustain a strong hospitality and events sector across the State, maximising the value and return on investment of events supported by the Government, and managing key industry partnerships that support development of the supply side of the visitor economy. Hospitality investment aims to support industry development through the provision of strategic advice and the development and administration of partnerships and programs.

For events, the aims are to: develop a seasonally balanced portfolio that brings people to Tasmania; get people moving around the State; encourage positive conversation about Tasmania; create job opportunities; benefit communities through economic stimulus; and make Tasmania the boutique events capital of Australia.

This Output includes oversight of Princes Wharf No.1 Shed, a key event venue on the Hobart waterfront.

5.5 Visitor Economy Support

This Output provides strategic advice, funding, and industry development programs, while also developing key partnerships that support the supply‑side opportunities and challenges of the visitor economy. Actions are guided by T21 as a well‑established partnership between government and industry through the T21 Visitor Economy Action Plan and includes collaboration across government to progress priority projects through policy, and program development and delivery, with a particular focus on workforce strategies.

Future initiatives and actions of the Tourism and Hospitality Unit will be guided by the release of the 2030 Visitor Economy Strategy later in 2023.

5.6 Sport and Recreation

This Output contributes to Tasmanian Government objectives through the delivery of a range of policies, programs and services to encourage all Tasmanians to actively participate in sport and recreation. It also administers a range of funding agreements and grants programs.

Some of the key deliverables include:

·       implementation of Active 2030;

·       an audit of sport and recreation facilities;

·       leading the planning and development of facilities and infrastructure to meet contemporary sport and recreations needs;

·       increasing the capacity and governance capability of sport and recreation organisations;

·       working with the sport and recreation sector to increase participation in safe, fair and inclusive sport and recreation by all Tasmanians; and

·       delivering Ticket to Play and other Tasmanian Government funded programs.

The Output is also responsible for providing the best possible opportunities for Tasmania’s elite athletes in support of their performances at international events, with a focus on sports that compete at the Olympic Games, Paralympic Games, Commonwealth Games and World Championships.

This Output also has responsibility for the Silverdome which is one of the larger indoor sports venues in Tasmania, with a 3 000 square metre sprung timber arena floor and a 286 metre indoor cycling track. The facility is located in Launceston and focuses on providing national and international level sporting and event opportunities whilst retaining involvement and investment in amateur and local events. It is anticipated that the Silverdome will transfer to Stadiums Tasmania.

Table 10.7:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 5

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

 

 

 

 

 

TMAG Total Visitors1

Number

128 168

163 500

230 000

145 000

TMAG Total Visitor Engagement2

Number

369 607

212 500

345 000

300 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts Industry Development

 

 

 

 

 

Attendance at selected cultural venues3

Number

46 623

59 291

150 000

172 000

Contribution to Gross State Product of selected arts industries4

$ million

 

131.69

111.23

118

125

Attendance at selected performing arts events5

Number

 

133 750

164 356

 

260 000

230 000

Number of artists, arts and museum‑workers supported6

Number

2 247

3 865

 

2 500

2 600

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 10.7:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 5 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screen Industry Development

 

 

 

 

 

Developed projects that advance into production7

Ratio

 

3.1:1

4.6:1

 

10:1

10:1

Leveraged spend in the State8

Ratio

4.61:1

4.79:1

4:1

4:1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sport and Recreation

 

 

 

 

 

Performance of Tasmanian athletes at benchmark international sporting events9

Number

na

7

14

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    TMAG Total Visitors represent the combined number of visits made across the TMAG sites. The new target for 2022‑23 indicates growth in attendance, though not to pre‑COVID‑19 levels. This reflects the slow re‑emergence of attendee and participant confidence.

2.    Total Visitor Engagement represents the visitation and engagement across both physical and digital platforms and includes all visits to museum sites, visits to TMAG websites measured in sessions, social media engagement across all platforms and visits to TMAG programming taking place at other sites.

3.    The decreases in 2020‑21 and 2021‑22 reflect the ongoing impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic and the implementation of the Safe Events and Activities in Tasmania Framework, which places caps on capacity numbers. Although visitation confidence is returning and interstate borders opened on 15 December 2021, the clients supported through the Cultural Heritage Program continued with an emphasis on activities related to conservation and interpretation, with a steady return to public facing activities. The cohort of venues will change from year‑to‑year.

4.    Contribution to the Gross State Product of selected arts industries is taken from the annual Australian Bureau of Statistics publication 5220.0 Australian National Accounts: State Accounts released in November each year. Prior year actual figures are revised in accordance with: Cat.5220.0 Table 7 Expenditure, Income and Industry Components of Gross State Product, Row 161 Column EU, Row 41 = $299 million, multiplied by Arts factor (determined by the Statistics Working Group) of 37.2 per cent = $111.2 million. 2022‑23 figure is the target, as Australian Bureau of Statistics figures for 2022‑23 are to be released in November 2023. The updated historical figures incorporate new and revised national estimates that reflect changes in methods, concepts, classifications and data sources to maintain a consistent time series. The projected increase for 2023‑24 is based on a steady return to more regular programming and cultural activity, incorporating the removal of COVID‑19 emergency government support and the return of small museum sector and volunteer capacity.

5.    Attendance figures from Administered Outputs and identified special projects in Tasmanian State Budget Papers. The reduction in 2020‑21 was due to the combined impact of the Theatre Royal/Hedberg redevelopment and the impact of COVID‑19 restrictions on venue availability and audience capacity. The 2021‑22 financial year was a non‑festival year for Ten Days on the Island. The target for 2023‑24 is reflective of a Ten Days on the Island non‑festival year.

6.    Number of Tasmanian artists, arts workers and museum workers employed on paid engagements in approved applications during the financial year. This total also includes the number of works purchased under the COLLECT Art Purchase Scheme.

7.    The industry standard ratio for developed projects advancing into production is 10:1. A lower ratio is a better result. The ratio varies due to the time taken by some projects to achieve a production outcome. The Key Performance Indicator is calculated as a rolling average over three years. This ratio may result in previously reported actuals being restated to reflect the final actual position.

8.    The calculation of the actual Tasmanian spend leveraged by productions is updated as projects acquit against investments. This spend may result in previously reported actuals being restated to reflect the final action position.

9.    The KPI result was impacted by the limited access to benchmark international sporting events during 2021 due to the COVID‑19 pandemic.


 

Output Group 6: Subsidies and Concessions

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

This Output relates to payments for the provision of services for the Bruny Island Ferry, Furneaux Islands Group Shipping and King Island Shipping.

6.2 General Access Services

This Output relates to the contract funding provided to suppliers of public bus services, including school day only services.

6.3 School Bus Services

This Output relates to contract payments to suppliers of school bus services.

6.4 Construction of Streets in Towns

This Output contributes to the construction of streets as provided under the Local Government (Highways) Act 1982 and the Local Government Act 1993.

Output Group 7:    Renewables, Climate and Future Industries Tasmania      

7.1 Energy and Renewables

This Output provides advice on matters relating to energy policy and new and emerging industries with an emphasis on growing Tasmania’s renewable energy generation capacity. Areas of focus include:

·       delivering the Tasmanian Renewable Energy Action Plan and the Tasmanian Renewable Hydrogen Action Plan to ensure energy is well placed to contribute to, and enable, economic growth in Tasmania;

·       engaging with Tasmanian businesses and customers to ensure that policy and regulatory settings continue to offer affordable, reliable and clean energy;

·       facilitating key strategic renewable energy projects including Battery of the Nation, Project Marinus, Renewable Hydrogen and onshore and offshore renewable energy development;

·       encouraging new and emerging industries that can leverage off Tasmania’s renewable energy advantage, while supporting existing industries transition to lower emissions energy;

·       supporting Shareholder Minister responsibilities for the State‑owned electricity businesses;

·       advancing Tasmania’s interests in National Electricity Market policy reforms and developments;

·       monitoring Tasmania’s energy security and continuing to improve industry and Government preparedness to deal with any high impact, low probability energy supply emergencies, including cyber security events;

·       ensuring that Tasmania’s regulatory arrangements are contemporary and meet the new and emerging needs of customers and the energy supply industry;

·       managing programs and projects related to decarbonising Tasmania’s gas sector and promoting the development of alternatives such as hydrogen and bio‑energy; and

·       developing and implementing energy efficiency initiatives and programs.

The Department of Treasury and Finance has policy responsibility for energy pricing and concession matters and other matters that fall within the portfolio responsibilities of the Treasurer.

7.2 Climate Change

This Output relates to the provision of whole‑of‑government policy advice on climate change issues and delivery of programs that support Tasmania to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to meet the legislated target of net zero emissions, or lower, by 2030, and build resilience to the impacts of climate change, under the Climate Change (State Action) Act 2008. Key functions include:

·       advising on international, national and whole‑of‑government climate change‑related policy across all sectors of the Tasmanian economy;

·       contributing to national climate change policy development;

·       development and implementation of climate change action plans;

·       development of sector‑based emissions reduction and resilience plans;

·       statewide climate change risk assessment;

·       advising on the impacts of climate change on Tasmania’s environment, economy and communities;

·       advising how Tasmania can improve its capacity to prepare for and respond to the impacts of climate change;

·       delivering programs to help Tasmania reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of a changing climate; and

·       annual reporting on Tasmania’s greenhouse gas emissions and activity.


 

Table 10.8:       Performance Information ‑ Output Group 7

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Renewable Energy Target1

Number (GWh)

na

11 441

10 590

10 635

Proportion of actions completed or on track in the Tasmanian Renewable Energy Action Plan and Tasmanian Renewable Hydrogen Action Plan

% of total

na

90

>90

>90

Total Energy in Storage remained above the High Reliability Level2

Yes/No

na

Yes

Yes

Yes

Progress towards meeting the Government Electric Vehicle Fleet target3

Number

13

39

75

100

Progress towards implementing the initiatives, projects and actions in the Climate Change Action Plan4

%

97

na

na

90

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2021‑22 actual result of 11 441 GWh of renewable generation is sourced from the Tasmanian Economic Regulator’s Energy in Tasmania Report 2021‑22. The targets for the outyears are with reference to the 100 per cent renewable generation baseline of 10 500 GWh, with step increases expected towards 2030 as large‑scale renewables come online.

2.    High Reliability Level is a threshold to which reserve water is held for energy security purposes, where the reserve is sufficient to withstand a six‑month Basslink outage coinciding with a very low inflow sequence and avoid extreme environmental risk for Great Lake.

3.    The term Electric Vehicles includes battery electric vehicles, plug‑in hybrid and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. It does not include non plug‑in hybrid vehicles. Further, it only includes those vehicles held by agencies and not those on order or awaiting delivery. The target established by the Government is 100 per cent of the Government car fleet will be an electric vehicle by 2030.

4.    The 2020‑21 actual relates to Climate Action 21: Tasmania’s Climate Change Action Plan 2017‑2021 which was finalised on 30 June 2021. The Government’s next climate change action plan is scheduled for release in mid-2023.

Capital Investment Program

Table 10.9 provides financial information for the Department’s Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget, Budget Paper No 1.

Table 10.9:       Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure and Transport

 

 

 

 

 

Huntingfield Roundabout Improvements

5 503 

4 500 

1 003 

.... 

.... 

Targeting Congestion Package

20 797 

5 600 

6 289 

5 991 

2 917 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Sport and Recreation

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Suburbs (Launceston) Community Recreation Hub Project

27 500 

22 500 

5 000 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing

 

 

 

 

 

Macquarie Point Urban Renewal1,2

375 000 

15 000 

30 000 

60 000 

125 000 

Tasmanian AFL Package ‑ High Performance Centre2

60 000 

10 000 

40 000 

10 000 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

TMAG Building Maintenance

2 000 

500 

1 000 

500 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure and Transport

 

 

 

 

 

Algona Interchange and Kingston Bypass1,3

60 000 

3 700 

12 800 

18 000 

18 000 

Arthur Highway Upgrades1

50 000 

200 

1 500 

4 500 

12 500 

Bridge Renewal Program

Ongoing 

1 590 

424 

342 

.... 

Bus Stop Upgrades

10 000 

2 500 

2 500 

2 500 

1 836 

Channel Highway Bypass of Huonville4

21 700 

5 887 

5 202 

8 611 

2 000 

Cycling Infrastructure1

6 000 

3 800 

1 000 

1 000 

1 500 

Cygnet Township Safety Upgrade

5 000 

2 400 

.... 

2 300 

.... 

Devonport to Cradle Mountain Road Upgrades1

25 000 

250 

500 

2 500 

7 000 

Domain Highway Planning

5 000 

82 

.... 

.... 

.... 

East and West Tamar Highway Upgrades1,5

84 000 

4 080 

4 000 

2 000 

10 000 

Extending the Great Eastern Drive ‑ Binalong Bay Road

4 500 

1 000 

153 

.... 

.... 

Glenora Road Upgrade

1 000 

250 

250 

250 

250 

 

Table 10.9:       Capital Investment Program (continued)

 

Estimated 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Eastern Drive1,6

131 300 

7 000 

10 000 

10 000 

20 000 

Greater Hobart Traffic Solution7

217 800 

35 695 

44 574 

51 000 

22 199 

Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity8

17 427 

7 817 

4 500 

5 110 

.... 

Infrastructure Maintenance1,9

Ongoing 

108 813 

109 493 

102 171 

99 253 

Infrastructure Stimulus Funding1

86 800 

3 604 

78 

.... 

1 123 

Launceston and Tamar Valley Traffic Vision1

75 100 

549 

1 000 

5 000 

19 632 

Midland Highway

565 000 

31 896 

13 218 

12 344 

3 870 

Network Planning1,10

Ongoing 

3 581 

1 103 

1 125 

1 147 

New Bridgewater Bridge

786 000 

270 100 

180 900 

41 460 

30 000 

New Park and Ride Facilities

20 000 

5 000 

7 000 

7 000 

288 

Program Management1

Ongoing 

8 405 

8 575 

8 759 

9 058 

Road Safety Projects1

Ongoing 

20 846 

20 833 

20 156 

17 348 

Roads of Strategic Importance1,11

1 282 300 

92 471 

115 917 

105 421 

90 529 

Roads Package to Support Tasmania’s Visitor Economy

66 100 

2 079 

526 

.... 

.... 

Rokeby Stage 3 ‑ Pass Road to Oakdowns1,12

55 000 

6 400 

10 000 

12 000 

12 014 

Sideling Upgrades Stage 21

70 000 

1 620 

2 000 

12 000 

15 000 

South East Traffic Solution1,13

66 000 

4 335 

4 000 

6 776 

10 000 

Stanley Highway Tourism Upgrades1

10 000 

500 

500 

1 000 

5 000 

State Road Upgrades ‑ North West and West Coast Region14

50 100 

6 000 

3 000 

3 000 

978 

State Road Upgrades ‑ Northern Region15

54 200 

15 000 

10 648 

1 443 

.... 

State Road Upgrades ‑ Southern Region1,16

129 800 

3 564 

2 803 

.... 

5 000 

Traffic Management and Engineering Services1

Ongoing 

3 679 

3 720 

3 798 

3 940 

Urban Congestion Fund1,17

99 700 

8 348 

12 206 

13 705 

14 357 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing

 

 

 

 

 

Dial Regional Sports Complex

25 000 

.... 

5 000 

20 000 

.... 

Northern Suburbs Multi‑Sports Facility

49 700 

22 904 

25 721 

657 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

754 045 

708 936 

562 419 

561 739 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The Estimated Total Cost for this project reflects funding beyond the 2023‑24 Budget and Forward Estimates.

2.    The Estimated Total Cost for Macquarie Point Urban Renewal and Tasmanian AFL Package - High Performance Centre projects reflect the State Government funding contributions.

3.    This project is funded by both the State and Australian Governments. It will improve the efficiency of this road corridor in an area of growth in Southern Tasmania.

4.    This project includes the Australian Government’s contribution of $13.2 million for Huon Link Road to improve safety and efficiency in Huonville.

5.    This project reflects the State Government’s contribution of $84 million for the Northern Roads Package ‑ Stage 2. The Australian Government’s contribution to this project is reflected in Roads of Strategic Importance.

6.    This project includes the Australian Government’s contribution of $100 million and the State Government's contribution of $31.3 million to support tourism.

7.    This project includes the State and Australian Government’s co‑contribution of $65 million for the Tasman Bridge Upgrade.

8.    This project includes additional State Government contribution of $3.5 million in 2023‑24 to deliver the Heavy Vehicle Rest Areas on key roads.

9.    This project includes the State and Australian Government’s contribution to the Freight Capacity Upgrade. It also contains the State Government commitment for Crumbed Rubber Roads transferred from the Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania.

10.  This project includes an additional State Government contribution of $1.3 million in 2023‑24 to deliver Corridor Studies.

11.  This project includes the Australian Government’s contribution of $336 million for the Northern Roads Package ‑ Stage 2. It also contains the Australian Government contribution of $150 million for the Hobart to Sorell Corridor ‑ Midway Point and Sorell Causeways, as well as funding for the Hobart Airport Interchange and $80 million for the Bass Highway.

12.  This project includes the State and Australian Government’s co‑contribution of $55 million for important efficiency and safety upgrades on the South Arm Highway.

13.  This project includes the State Government contribution of $37 million to the Hobart to Sorell Corridor ‑ Midway Point and Sorell Causeways.

14.  This project includes the State Government contribution for the Roads of Strategic Importance, Bass Highway ‑ Marrawah to Wynyard Upgrade.

15.  This project includes the State Government’s contribution to the Midland Highway.

16.  This project includes the Australian Government’s contribution to the Mornington Roundabout.

17.  This project includes the State and Australian Government’s co‑contribution of $13.5 million for the Northern Suburbs Transit Corridor and contains the State and Australian Government’s co‑contribution of $11.5 million for Intelligent Transport Solutions.

Roads

Funding for roads infrastructure projects over the Budget and Forward Estimates now totals approximately $2.2 billion. The total allocation includes $1.2 billion of Australian Government funding.

The Government is committed to the construction of the New Bridgewater Bridge, which has a target of traffic on the bridge by the end of 2024 and completion in 2025. This timeframe will ensure future infrastructure needs continue to be met by the Government’s strategic investment in important projects for the Tasmanian community.

Road investment is now generally managed on a program basis to allow flexibility in project delivery and enable adjustments to be made in response to stakeholder feedback, approvals timeframes and other external factors. This is an important change that has occurred, which provides greater certainty for both the construction industry and the Department. These programs include:

·       Freight Capacity Upgrade Program;

·       Great Eastern Drive;

·       Greater Hobart Traffic Solution;

·       Launceston and Tamar Valley Traffic Vision;

·       Northern Roads Package;

·       Roads of Strategic Importance;

·       South East Traffic Solution;

·       State Road Upgrades ‑ North West and West Coast Region;

·       State Road Upgrades ‑ Northern Region;

·       State Road Upgrades Southern Region; and

·       Urban Congestion Fund.

Maintenance of the 3 780 kilometres of roads and 1 241 bridges and major culverts on the state road network is ongoing and part of the Capital Investment Program.

For more information in relation to the Roads Program see chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Rail

The Government provides $70.3 million for rail infrastructure in the 2023‑24 Budget for Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd, bringing total funding over the Budget and Forward Estimates to $253 million. This includes $128.4 million of Australian Government funding.

The total funding includes the Tasmanian Government’s commitment to match the Australian Government’s contribution to the Tasmanian Freight Rail Revitalisation Program, the Bell Bay Line ‑ Reconnection to the Bell Bay Wharf, Melba Line Bulk Minerals Rail Hub. The 2023‑24 Budget also includes additional funding for TasRail Road Rail Vehicles. Funding is provided as equity to Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd through FinanceGeneral.


 

Detailed Budget Statements

Table 10.10:      Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating1

587 263 

603 309 

489 670 

400 048 

383 083 

Appropriation revenue ‑ capital

343 062 

366 734 

348 570 

303 186 

329 749 

Other revenue from government

25 382 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants2

442 593 

424 586 

384 515 

271 631 

242 461 

Sales of goods and services

741 

747 

748 

748 

748 

Fees and fines3

16 665 

17 161 

17 672 

18 198 

7 194 

Interest4

4 067 

5 442 

5 802 

5 802 

6 616 

Other revenue5

24 165 

25 901 

7 631 

7 631 

7 631 

Total revenue

1 443 938 

1 443 880 

1 254 608 

1 007 244 

977 482 

Net gain/(loss) on non‑financial assets

Total income

1 443 942 

1 443 884 

1 254 612 

1 007 248 

977 486 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits6

99 182 

117 206 

117 452 

114 936 

102 681 

Depreciation and amortisation7

90 558 

129 855 

131 153 

132 465 

133 789 

Supplies and consumables8

146 523 

167 374 

169 322 

127 297 

137 609 

Grants and subsidies9

540 696 

506 228 

378 085 

296 090 

266 005 

Borrowing costs10

2 686 

8 388 

7 608 

7 208 

7 492 

Other expenses

1 259 

829 

833 

840 

849 

Total expenses

880 904 

929 880 

804 453 

678 836 

648 425 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

563 038 

514 004 

450 159 

328 412 

329 061 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

158 018 

150 835 

150 835 

150 835 

150 835 

Other movements taken directly to equity

30 826 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Total other comprehensive income

188 844 

150 835 

150 835 

150 835 

150 835 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

751 882 

664 839 

600 994 

479 247 

479 896 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating from 2024‑25 reflects the completion of existing Budget initiatives.

2.    The variation in Grants reflects the cash flow of Australian Government funding, largely relating to the Roads Program including the New Bridgewater Bridge.

3.    The decrease in Fees and fines in 2026‑27 reflects the revenue estimate of the Road Safety Levy. Future revenue estimates will be revised in line with the next Tasmanian Road Safety Strategy.

4.    The increases in Interest in 2023‑24 and 2026‑27 primarily reflect the activities of Tasmania Development and Resources in administering loan schemes.

5.    The decrease in Other revenue in 2024‑25 primarily reflects the Australian Government funding profile for the Launceston City Deal.

6.    The increase in Employee benefits in 2023-24 reflects an updated estimate of current employee costs for the Department.

7.    The increase in Depreciation and amortisation in 2023‑24 reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2022 actuals.

8.    The variation in Supplies and consumables primarily reflects the funding profiles of the Common Ticketing system project, Tasmanian AFL Team Package and maintenance projects within the roads program.

9.    The decrease in Grants and subsidies over the Forward Estimates reflects the completion of existing Budget initiatives and 2021 election commitments.

10.  The increase in Borrowing costs primarily reflects the activities of Tasmania Development and Resources in administering loan schemes including the Supporting Jobs at INCAT initiative, Tourism Development Loan Scheme, Business Growth Loan Scheme, Building and Construction Support and AgriGrowth Loan Scheme.

Table 10.11:      Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating

32 177 

29 581 

28 409 

28 527 

28 645 

Taxation

51 420 

52 963 

54 551 

56 189 

57 875 

Sales of goods and services

5 724 

5 832 

5 943 

6 056 

6 173 

Fees and fines

10 733 

10 982 

11 237 

11 499 

11 766 

Other revenue

56 750 

48 250 

44 200 

44 450 

47 450 

Total administered revenue

156 804 

147 608 

144 340 

146 721 

151 909 

Total administered income

156 804 

147 608 

144 340 

146 721 

151 909 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Supplies and consumables

136 

136 

136 

136 

136 

Grants and subsidies

32 041 

29 445 

28 273 

28 391 

28 509 

Transfers to the Public Account

124 627 

118 027 

115 931 

118 194 

123 264 

Total administered expenses

156 804 

147 608 

144 340 

146 721 

151 909 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered net result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered comprehensive result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 10.12:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Infrastructure and Transport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 ‑ Infrastructure and Transport Services

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Infrastructure Tasmania1

22 229 

16 006 

14 639 

4 881 

5 057 

2.2 Road User Services2

16 482 

20 686 

19 800 

16 641 

17 399 

2.3 Passenger Transport3

18 955 

36 434 

18 903 

10 215 

7 033 

 

57 666 

73 126 

53 342 

31 737 

29 489 

Output Group 6 ‑ Subsidies and Concessions

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Shipping and Ferry Subsidies

1 245 

1 270 

1 295 

1 322 

1 348 

6.2 General Access Services

68 107 

69 754 

71 443 

73 175 

74 951 

6.3 School Bus Services

40 661 

41 393 

42 140 

42 902 

43 680 

 

110 013 

112 417 

114 878 

117 399 

119 979 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.16 International Air Freight Assistance

1 290 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

90.23 Waratah‑Wynyard Coastal Pathway

3 000 

9 000 

500 

.... 

.... 

90.28 Airport Infrastructure

4 050 

1 900 

2 250 

.... 

.... 

 

8 340 

10 900 

2 750 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

26 903 

24 226 

22 971 

23 003 

23 035 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

309 569 

295 846 

241 868 

211 778 

204 497 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

202 922 

220 669 

193 941 

172 139 

172 503 

Capital Services

309 569 

295 846 

241 868 

211 778 

204 497 

 

512 491 

516 515 

435 809 

383 917 

377 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Sport and Recreation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Cultural and Tourism Development

 

 

 

 

 

5.6 Sport and Recreation4

29 227 

20 419 

18 899 

11 848 

10 565 

 

29 227 

20 419 

18 899 

11 848 

10 565 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

.... 

22 500 

5 000 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 10.12:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

29 727 

20 919 

19 399 

12 348 

11 065 

Capital Services

.... 

22 500 

5 000 

.... 

.... 

 

29 727 

43 419 

24 399 

12 348 

11 065 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Energy and Renewables

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 7 ‑ Renewables, Climate and Future Industries Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

7.1 Energy and Renewables5

14 046 

29 122 

18 786 

9 503 

6 336 

 

14 046 

29 122 

18 786 

9 503 

6 336 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

14 046 

29 122 

18 786 

9 503 

6 336 

 

14 046 

29 122 

18 786 

9 503 

6 336 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 4 ‑ Resources Policy and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.2 Mineral Resources

8 579 

8 764 

8 873 

8 076 

8 269 

 

8 579 

8 764 

8 873 

8 076 

8 269 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

8 579 

8 764 

8 873 

8 076 

8 269 

 

8 579 

8 764 

8 873 

8 076 

8 269 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Cultural and Tourism Development

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

10 833 

11 028 

11 284 

11 582 

12 229 

5.2 Arts Industry Development

8 642 

9 218 

9 455 

8 747 

9 055 

5.3 Screen Industry Development

1 730 

1 782 

1 806 

1 836 

1 900 

 

21 205 

22 028 

22 545 

22 165 

23 184 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

4 774 

4 855 

4 938 

5 024 

5 110 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

.... 

500 

1 000 

500 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

25 979 

26 883 

27 483 

27 189 

28 294 

Capital Services

.... 

500 

1 000 

500 

.... 

 

25 979 

27 383 

28 483 

27 689 

28 294 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 10.12:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Small Business

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.24 Small Business Sustainability and Recovery Assistance Package

130 

130 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

130 

130 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

130 

130 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

130 

130 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Hospitality and Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Cultural and Tourism Development

 

 

 

 

 

5.4 Events and Hospitality6

21 565 

26 802 

14 020 

8 009 

6 517 

 

21 565 

26 802 

14 020 

8 009 

6 517 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

21 565 

26 802 

14 020 

8 009 

6 517 

 

21 565 

26 802 

14 020 

8 009 

6 517 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Tourism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Cultural and Tourism Development

 

 

 

 

 

5.5 Visitor Economy Support7

12 089 

12 024 

2 766 

861 

416 

 

12 089 

12 024 

2 766 

861 

416 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

12 089 

12 024 

2 766 

861 

416 

 

12 089 

12 024 

2 766 

861 

416 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Skills, Training and Workforce Growth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Skills, Training and Workforce Growth

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Skills and Workforce Growth8

169 583 

162 756 

162 004 

143 371 

135 841 

 

169 583 

162 756 

162 004 

143 371 

135 841 


 

Table 10.12:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.2 Rapid Response Skills Initiative

1 500 

2 150 

2 000 

1 000 

.... 

90.26 Expansion of the Apprentices and Trainees Small Business Grant

5 400 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

6 900 

2 150 

2 000 

1 000 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

176 483 

164 906 

164 004 

144 371 

135 841 

 

176 483 

164 906 

164 004 

144 371 

135 841 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for State Development, Construction and Housing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Industry and Business Growth

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Office of the Coordinator‑General9

32 791 

17 968 

15 126 

9 395 

3 654 

1.2 Industry and Business Development10,11

87 206 

97 008 

45 160 

32 707 

36 141 

 

119 997 

114 976 

60 286 

42 102 

39 795 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.3 Business Support Loan Scheme ‑ Interest Costs

500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

33 500 

47 904 

100 721 

90 657 

125 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

120 497 

114 976 

60 286 

42 102 

39 795 

Capital Services

33 500 

47 904 

100 721 

90 657 

125 000 

 

153 997 

162 880 

161 007 

132 759 

164 795 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment and Climate Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 7 ‑ Renewables, Climate and Future Industries Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

7.2 Climate Change12

7 364 

7 627 

8 450 

4 176 

2 892 

 

7 364 

7 627 

8 450 

4 176 

2 892 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

7 364 

7 627 

8 450 

4 176 

2 892 

 

7 364 

7 627 

8 450 

4 176 

2 892 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.12:      Revenue from Appropriation by Output (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of State Growth

 

 

 

 

 

Total Operating Services

619 381 

632 822 

518 008 

428 774 

411 928 

Total Capital Services

343 069 

366 750 

348 589 

302 935 

329 497 

 

962 450 

999 572 

866 597 

731 709 

741 425 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserved by Law

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution towards Construction of Streets in Towns by Municipal Councils (Local Government Act 1993)

52 

52 

52 

52 

52 

 

52 

52 

52 

52 

52 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Rollover

25 382 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

987 884 

999 624 

866 649 

731 761 

741 477 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

955 707 

970 043 

838 240 

703 234 

712 832 

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

32 177 

29 581 

28 409 

28 527 

28 645 

 

987 884 

999 624 

866 649 

731 761 

741 477 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The decrease in Infrastructure Tasmania  over the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the delivery of initiatives including: Tamar Estuary initiatives; Inbound Tourism Support, AFL Team Task Force, Stadium Feasibility Study, and operational grant funding to support the commencement of Stadiums Tasmania

2.    The variation in Road User Services over the Forward Estimates reflects the funding profile of the Automated Traffic Enforcement initiative.

3.    The increase in Passenger Transport in 2023‑24 primarily reflects funding for the Common Ticketing system project. This project will be funded from the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program within Finance-General on a reimbursement basis from 2024‑25.

4.    The decrease in Sport and Recreation in 2023‑24 primarily reflects the completion of 2021‑22 Budget initiatives and one‑off grants, including the Local Community Facilities Fund and Improving the Playing Field. The decrease in the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the fixed-term Tasmanian Active Infrastructure Grants program initiative in 2023‑24 and 2024‑25.

5.    The increase in Energy and Renewables in 2023‑24 reflects the funding profile of Budget initiatives including the Hydrogen Industry Fund, the Government Boiler Replacement Program and Delivering the Renewable Energy Agenda.

6.    The decrease in Events and Hospitality from 2024‑25 reflects the funding profile of Budget initiatives including Events Support and Attraction Fund, Securing Tasmania’s Iconic Events, Collingwood Magpies Netball Team in Tasmania and V8 Supercars.

7.    The decrease in Visitor Economy Support from 2024‑25 reflects the funding profile of Budget initiatives including Tourism and Hospitality Support, Transformer Dark Lab, Business Events Attraction Fund and Innovation and Development Grants.

8.    The decrease in Skills and Workforce Growth from 2025‑26 reflects the funding profile of Budget initiatives including TasTAFE Facility Upgrades and Transition Fund, Sorell Trade Training Centre, Working Tasmania, High Vis Army and Strategic Growth initiatives.

9.    The decrease in Office of the Coordinator‑General over the Forward Estimates reflects the funding profile for Northern Cities Major Development Initiative ‑ Launceston.

10.  The increase in Industry and Business Development in 2023‑24 reflects additional funding included in the 2023‑24 Budget for the AFL Team Package, Elphinstone International Defence Infrastructure and Science and Technology Initiatives. The decrease from 2024‑25 reflects the funding profile of existing Budget initiatives including Macquarie Point ‑ Operating Costs, Residential Land Rebate, Royal Agricultural Society of Tasmania Hobart Showground Redevelopment, Supporting Jobs at INCAT and Building Projects Support Program.

11.  Industry and Business Development includes funding that relates to strategies and activities that are the responsibility of the Minister for Advanced Manufacturing and Defence Industries, the Minister for Science and Technology, the Minister for Small Business and the Minister for Trade.

12.  The variation in Climate Change over the Forward Estimates reflects the timing of funding provided for existing Budget initiatives, including the Climate Change Action Plan and the Emission Reduction Loan Scheme.


 

Table 10.13:      Administered Revenue

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Public Account

 

 

 

 

 

Drivers Licences

7 664 

7 856 

8 052 

8 254 

8 460 

Fines

12 

12 

12 

13 

13 

MAIB Commission

2 857 

2 928 

3 001 

3 076 

3 153 

Motor vehicle taxes and fees1

51 420 

52 963 

54 551 

56 189 

57 875 

Other Regulatory Fees

1 113 

1 122 

1 131 

1 139 

1 148 

Other Sales of Services

2 317 

2 340 

2 364 

2 388 

2 413 

Personalised and Custom Plates

513 

526 

539 

552 

566 

Photo Licence Fees

1 892 

1 939 

1 988 

2 037 

2 088 

Royalty Income2

56 750 

48 250 

44 200 

44 450 

47 450 

Sales of Goods

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

Vehicle Inspection Services Fees

52 

53 

54 

56 

57 

 

124 627 

118 027 

115 931 

118 194 

123 264 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation

32 177 

29 581 

28 409 

28 527 

28 645 

 

32 177 

29 581 

28 409 

28 527 

28 645 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

156 804 

147 608 

144 340 

146 721 

151 909 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Motor vehicle taxes and fees reflects updated estimates based on information and analysis of motor registry system data.

2.    The variation over the 2023‑24 Budget and Forward Estimates in Royalty Income reflects updated estimates based on information from mining companies about expected royalty payments and analysis of commodity prices.


 

Table 10.14:      Administered Expenses

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Conveyance Allowance

1 630 

1 630 

1 630 

1 630 

1 630 

Government Contribution to the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

2 351 

2 384 

2 418 

2 453 

2 488 

Marine and Safety Tasmania

1 345 

1 418 

1 413 

1 445 

1 477 

National Transport Commission: Local Government Contribution

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

Pensioner Air Travel Subsidy

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

Tasmanian Icon Program ‑ State Cricket Team1

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd

13 900 

13 900 

13 900 

13 900 

13 900 

Ten Days on the Island

1 423 

1 451 

1 480 

1 510 

1 540 

Theatre Royal

1 000 

1 020 

1 040 

1 061 

1 082 

Transport Access Scheme

4 518 

4 518 

4 518 

4 518 

4 518 

West Coast Wilderness Railway

4 000 

1 250 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

32 177 

29 581 

28 409 

28 527 

28 645 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfers to the Public Account

124 627 

118 027 

115 931 

118 194 

123 264 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

156 804 

147 608 

144 340 

146 721 

151 909 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    Funding for the Tasmanian Icon Program - State Cricket Team was transferred to the Department during 2022‑23 as part of the restructure of the former Department of Communities Tasmania.

Conveyance Allowance

This funding provides allowances to parents and guardians of students who do not have access to government‑subsidised public passenger transport services for travel to and from school as well as residents of the Bass Strait Islands to assist with the cost of flights and ground travel to mainland Tasmania to access education.

Government Contribution to the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra

The Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, one of the world’s finest small orchestras, continues to receive State Government support. The TSO plays to audiences throughout the State and its award‑winning recordings are heard throughout the world. A versatile orchestra, the TSO is renowned for its expertise in music of the classical and early romantic periods and is recognised internationally as a champion of Australian music.

Marine and Safety Tasmania

This funding supports Marine and Safety Tasmania in carrying out its functions of managing the Tasmanian Government’s non‑commercial marine facilities and Tasmania’s marine regulatory environment.

National Transport Commission: Local Government Contribution

This funding supports local government for loss of revenues from heavy vehicles following the abolition of local heavy vehicle road tolls in favour of national heavy vehicle charges.

Pensioner Air Travel Subsidy

This funding supports aged pensioner residents of the Bass Strait Islands with a 50 per cent concession on one return airfare from their Island residence to Northern Tasmania each financial year.

Tasmanian Icon Program ‑ State Cricket Team

This funding, through the Tasmanian Icons program, supports the Tasmanian Tigers men’s and women’s teams, as representatives and ambassadors of the State and to promote Tasmania as a destination nationally and internationally.

Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd

This funding supports Tasmanian Railway Pty Ltd to manage, maintain and operate the Tasmanian rail network and provides for essential annual maintenance of rolling stock assets.

Ten Days on the Island

Ten Days on the Island is a biennial statewide arts festival celebrating Tasmania’s unique identity and island culture. The Government will continue to support Ten Days on the Island to deliver a festival of excellence with a particular focus on regional Tasmania.

Theatre Royal

Established in 1837, the Theatre Royal is Australia’s oldest continually operating theatre. The Government’s commitment in contributing to the Theatre Royal recognises the theatre’s significant role in Tasmanian history, as an integral venue for the performing arts in Tasmania, and foundational to the recent Hedberg development.

Transport Access Scheme

This funding supports taxi fare concessions and subsidies for eligible persons with permanent disabilities or medical conditions that significantly restrict their personal mobility.

West Coast Wilderness Railway

This funding supports capital works and the maintenance of the West Coast Wilderness Railway as an iconic West Coast attraction that helps attract visitors to the region.


 

Table 10.15:      Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2023 

2024 

2025 

2026 

2027 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

62 031 

86 148 

77 665 

69 067 

63 506 

Investments2

264 826 

277 768 

235 590 

235 583 

239 432 

Receivables3

12 480 

10 328 

10 329 

10 330 

10 331 

Equity investments

50 

50 

75 

100 

125 

Other financial assets3

331 

676 

676 

676 

676 

 

339 718 

374 970 

324 335 

315 756 

314 070 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non‑financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories4

372 

5 283 

5 293 

5 303 

5 313 

Property, plant and equipment3

308 144 

286 804 

246 771 

205 404 

162 702 

Infrastructure5

6 419 915 

6 976 016 

7 611 944 

8 127 172 

8 638 228 

Heritage and cultural assets

401 875 

401 987 

412 127 

422 267 

432 407 

Intangibles3

703 

667 

580 

515 

461 

Other assets

8 224 

7 766 

7 857 

7 948 

8 039 

 

7 139 233 

7 678 523 

8 284 572 

8 768 609 

9 247 150 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

7 478 951 

8 053 493 

8 608 907 

9 084 365 

9 561 220 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

13 349 

13 433 

13 311 

13 189 

13 067 

Interest bearing liabilities6

247 800 

250 505 

204 583 

200 691 

200 732 

Provisions

7 277 

7 647 

7 607 

7 567 

7 527 

Employee benefits

25 716 

26 952 

27 496 

27 801 

24 921 

Other liabilities7

25 486 

47 792 

47 752 

47 712 

47 672 

Total liabilities

319 628 

346 329 

300 749 

296 960 

293 919 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

7 159 323 

7 707 164 

8 308 158 

8 787 405 

9 267 301 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Contributed capital8

30 826 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Reserves

2 806 261 

3 058 837 

3 209 672 

3 360 507 

3 511 342 

Accumulated funds

4 322 236 

4 648 327 

5 098 486 

5 426 898 

5 755 959 

Total equity

7 159 323 

7 707 164 

8 308 158 

8 787 405 

9 267 301 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Cash and deposits over the 2023‑24 Budget and Forward Estimates primarily reflects the activities of Tasmania Development and Resources in administering loan schemes, together with funds held for the Road Safety Levy, the Provision for Land Acquisition Account and the Mines Deposit Account.

2.    The variation in Investments reflects the current estimates of Tasmania Development and Resources loan advances, including the Supporting Jobs at INCAT initiative, Tourism Development Loan Scheme, Business Growth Loan Scheme, Building and Construction Support and AgriGrowth Loan Scheme.

3.    The variation in this item in 2024 reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2022 actuals.

4.    The increase in Inventories in 2024 primarily reflects the personal protective equipment stockpile held for emergency management reserves.

5.    The increase in Infrastructure from 2024 primarily reflects the Capital Investment Program for roads. Refer to Table 10.9 Capital Investment Program for further information.

6.    The variation in Interest bearing liabilities reflects the forecast for borrowings from Tasmanian Public Finance Corporation to fund the activities of Tasmania Development and Resources.

7.    The increase in Other liabilities primarily reflects monies held in trust, which are held by the Department including Mines Deposit Accounts for mine rehabilitation bonds as well as Provision for Land Acquisitions.

8.    The variation in this item reflects the impact of restructures under State Service Restructuring Orders.

Table 10.16:      Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June ‑ Administered

 

2023 

2024 

2025 

2026 

2027 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

.... 

325 

325 

325 

325 

Receivables1

3 429 

2 496 

2 496 

2 496 

2 496 

 

3 429 

2 821 

2 821 

2 821 

2 821 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

3 429 

2 821 

2 821 

2 821 

2 821 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Other liabilities1,2

3 135 

983 

983 

983 

983 

Total liabilities

3 135 

983 

983 

983 

983 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

294 

1 838 

1 838 

1 838 

1 838 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated funds1

294 

1 838 

1 838 

1 838 

1 838 

Total equity

294 

1 838 

1 838 

1 838 

1 838 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in this item reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2022 actuals.

2.    Other liabilities are primarily third‑party revenues collected by the Department through motor registration receipts held pending transfer to the third‑party including MAIB, State Revenue Office and Tasmania Fire Service.


 

Table 10.17:      Statement of Cash Flows

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ operating

587 263 

603 309 

489 670 

400 048 

383 083 

Appropriation receipts ‑ capital

343 062 

366 734 

348 570 

303 186 

329 749 

Appropriation receipts ‑ other

25 382 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants

442 593 

424 586 

384 515 

271 631 

242 461 

Sales of goods and services

746 

752 

753 

753 

753 

Fees and fines

16 665 

17 161 

17 672 

18 198 

7 194 

GST receipts

16 898 

16 898 

16 898 

16 898 

16 898 

Interest received

4 067 

5 442 

5 802 

5 802 

6 616 

Other cash receipts

24 165 

25 901 

7 631 

7 631 

7 631 

Total cash inflows

1 460 841 

1 460 783 

1 271 511 

1 024 147 

994 385 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

(87 353)

(103 165)

(103 047)

(100 810)

(92 888)

Superannuation

(11 363)

(13 585)

(13 921)

(13 881)

(12 733)

Borrowing costs

(2 776)

(8 478)

(7 698)

(7 298)

(7 582)

GST payments

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

(16 899)

Grants and subsidies

(540 621)

(506 153)

(378 010)

(296 015)

(265 930)

Supplies and consumables

(146 728)

(167 582)

(169 530)

(127 505)

(137 817)

Other cash payments

(1 259)

(829)

(833)

(840)

(849)

Total cash outflows

(806 999)

(816 691)

(689 938)

(563 248)

(534 698)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

653 842 

644 092 

581 573 

460 899 

459 687 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets

(643 328)

(643 138)

(586 316)

(465 616)

(461 444)

Proceeds from the disposal of non‑financial assets

Equity injections and cash flows from restructuring

1 437 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Net advances paid1

(36 027)

(33 018)

42 178 

(3 849)

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(677 914)

(676 152)

(544 134)

(465 605)

(465 289)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings2

33 065 

29 731 

(45 922)

(3 892)

41 

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

33 065 

29 731 

(45 922)

(3 892)

41 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 10.17:      Statement of Cash Flows (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

8 993 

(2 329)

(8 483)

(8 598)

(5 561)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

53 038 

88 477 

86 148 

77 665 

69 067 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

62 031 

86 148 

77 665 

69 067 

63 506 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Net advances paid reflects the current estimates of loan advances including for the Supporting Jobs at INCAT initiative, Tourism Development Loan Scheme, Business Growth Loan Scheme, Building and Construction Support and AgriGrowth Loan Scheme.

2.    The variation in Net borrowings reflects an increase in borrowings from the Tasmanian Public Finance Corporation to fund the activities of Tasmanian Development and Resources, including for the Supporting Jobs at INCAT initiative, Tourism Development Loan Scheme, Business Growth Loan Scheme, Building and Construction Support and AgriGrowth Loan Scheme.


 

Table 10.18:      Statement of Cash Flows ‑ Administered

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ operating

32 177 

29 581 

28 409 

28 527 

28 645 

Taxation

51 420 

52 963 

54 551 

56 189 

57 875 

Sales of goods and services

5 724 

5 832 

5 943 

6 056 

6 173 

Fees and fines

10 733 

10 982 

11 237 

11 499 

11 766 

Other cash receipts

56 750 

48 250 

44 200 

44 450 

47 450 

Total cash inflows

156 804 

147 608 

144 340 

146 721 

151 909 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

GST payments

50 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants and subsidies

(32 041)

(29 445)

(28 273)

(28 391)

(28 509)

Transfers to the Public Account

(124 627)

(118 027)

(115 931)

(118 194)

(123 264)

Supplies and consumables

(186)

(136)

(136)

(136)

(136)

Total cash outflows

(156 804)

(147 608)

(144 340)

(146 721)

(151 909)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

.... 

325 

325 

325 

325 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

.... 

325 

325 

325 

325