2†††† Department for Education, Children and Young People

Agency Outline

In October 2022, the new Department for Education, Children and Young People was established, bringing together the functions of the Department of Education, and Child, Youth and Family Services from the former Department of Communities Tasmania.

The Department for Education, Children and Young People is responsible for the delivery of public early years and school education, and library and archive services throughout Tasmania, as well as Youth Justice Services, Child Safety Services, Out of Home Care and Adoptions and Permanency Services. The Department is responsible to the Minister for Education, Children and Youth, Hon Roger Jaensch MP.

The Department takes a leadership role in ensuring every child and young person is known, safe, well and learning, in partnership with children and young people, their families, carers and communities, and other service providers.

For 2023‑24, the Department will do this by:

Known

Supporting children and young people being known, by establishing a strong collaborative culture across the Department and aligning systems and processes that assist staff to access the information that they need to make informed decisions to better support the children and young people. This will include commencing the integration of data sets and systems to deliver improved data and information about children and young people.

The Department will also work in partnership with children and young people to understand their aspirations, strengths and the additional supports they require to achieve their goals.

Safe and Well

Supporting children and young people to be safe and well, by:

       continuing to build a culture where every staff member knows how to recognise and respond to potential child sexual abuse, supporting the Governmentís response to the Commission of Inquiry into the Tasmanian Governmentís Responses to Child Sexual Abuse in Institutional Settings;

       continuing to build a Child Safety System that positively benefits children and young people and their families;

       continuing to implement initiatives that support children and young people to stay with their immediate or extended family where possible;

       continuing to improve Tasmaniaís out of home care system for children who cannot remain with their family; and

       developing an innovative youth justice system that supports the safety, wellbeing and learning of children and young people whilst addressing the underlying drivers of offending behaviours, reducing offending and improving community safety.

Learning

Supporting children and young people to learn by:

       commencing a pathway to provide universal access to pre‑school, in the year before kindergarten, for every child to help set them up for a great start in life and learning. In 2024, the Government will complement the delivery of Working Together with the expansion of access for three year‑old children to early learning that is responsive to local community needs. Whilst Early Childhood Education and Care services are the preferred setting, other options may be explored, including Child and Family Learning Centres, schools, and local libraries, where there is community support and the capacity to do so;

       focusing on improving school attendance, including reviewing part‑time attendance policies, to ensure children and young people remain engaged in learning; and

       improving student reading outcomes by responding to the recommendations of the Premierís Literacy Advisory Panel.

The Department receives funding from the Australian Government through the National School Reform Agreement, a joint agreement between the Australian Government, states and territories to lift student outcomes across Australian schools through to the end of 2024. Parties to the NSRA agree to build on existing efforts in three reform areas of supporting students, student learning and achievement; supporting teaching, school leadership and school improvement; and enhancing the national evidence base.

These reform directions are progressed nationally through national policy initiatives that build on existing activities that are shown to be lifting outcomes for students and take into account jurisdictional and sectoral contexts. In recognising the jurisdictional context, Tasmania has a bilateral agreement in place with the Australian Government that sets out four areas of improvement activities which broadly align with the national direction, being quality teaching; effective leadership; school improvement and support; and school community partnerships. Implementing the improvement activities within the bilateral agreement is a condition of Australian Government funding. The funding administered through the bilateral agreement will go towards addressing these improvement activities, with such outcomes including the implementation of recommendations from Tasmaniaís Years 9‑12 Review, strengthening the school workforce pipeline, improving school improvement frameworks and driving continuous improvement in family engagement in schools.

This chapter provides the Departmentís financial information for 2023‑24 and over the Forward Estimates
(2024‑25 to 2026‑27). Further information about the Department is provided at www.decyp.tas.gov.au.


 

Key Deliverables

Table 2.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimates allocations for key deliverables being undertaken by the Department.

Table 2.1:†††††††† Key Deliverables Statement

 

2023‑24

 

Budget

2024‑25

Forward

Estimate

2025‑26

Forward

Estimate

2026‑27

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Additional In Class Support ‑ Teacher Assistants and Education Support Specialists1

7 098

8 744

10 227

10 483

Additional Professional Support Staff1

1 645

2 245

2 306

2 364

Continuation of Investment into the Child Safety Service System

.... 

.... 

.... 

1 300

Intensive Family Engagement Service

4 175

4 175

.... 

.... 

Safeguarding Children and Young People ‑ Responding to Recommendations from the Commission of Inquiry and the DOE Inquiry2

8 465

9 637

11 993

12 242

School Lunch Program Extension

.... 

120

120

120

Supporting Targeted School Improvement1

2 949

4 030

4 141

4 244

Student Systems Renewal ‑ Phase Two2

3 495

4 301

2 396

2 444

Tasmanian Autism Diagnostic Service ‑ Provider Panel

160

.... 

.... 

.... 

Tasmanian Autism Diagnostic Service

.... 

.... 

350

.... 

Teacher Attraction and Retention1

4 690

4 647

4 778

4 898

Transition to Independence (T2i)

.... 

2 977

.... 

.... 

Universal Access to Early Learning for Three Year-Olds3

1 533

 1 388

 1 499

1 619

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This is a new initiative with funding sourced from growth in State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Bilateral Agreement.

2.    This is an existing initiative with funding sourced from growth in State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Bilateral Agreement.

3.    This initiative will be funded from within the Departmentís existing Budget allocation.

Additional In Class Support ‑ Teacher Assistants and Education Support Specialists

Additional funding has been provided to increase in class support with a mixture of broader system and school‑based initiatives and direct classroom support to provide additional administrative support to assist teachers. Additional assistance will be provided to teachers through the provision of 66 extra positions in 2023, increasing to 100 extra positions in 2025. In addition, there is provision for 25 Education Support Specialist positions in 2023 in combined schools to focus on Year 7 reading, with the benefit of also building on the Education Support Specialist career pathway for teacher assistants in those schools.

Additional Professional Support Staff

Additional funding is allocated to increase the number of professional support staff available, to provide support to learners to be safe and well, so that they can learn, and to assist with supporting teachers to have more time to teach.

Continuation of Investment into the Child Safety Service System

Ongoing funding is provided for the continued investment in the Child Safety Service System to meet increased demand and continued support of improved outcomes under the Strong Families Safe Kids Child Safety Redesign. This initiative includes additional front line workers in both the Advice and Referral Line and the Child Safety Service.

Intensive Family Engagement Service

Funding is provided to continue the Intensive Family Engagement Service to help children remain with their families and prevent them from entering statutory care. The specific funding allocation for this service will be based on demand. The Department is currently assessing the appropriate model for the allocation of long‑term funding.

School Lunch Program Extension

Ongoing funding is provided for the School Lunch program. The program will provide grants to schools to purchase kitchen equipment and expand base funding for food security organisations. Funding will also be provided to School Food Matters to support schools to develop their own food plans and implement a healthy lunch program.

Supporting Targeted School Improvement

Funding is provided to support school improvement and better learner outcomes by providing increased senior leadership.

Tasmanian Autism Diagnostic Service ‑ Provider Panel

Funding is provided in 2023‑24 for additional resources to meet the demand of cases requiring autism diagnosis.

Tasmanian Autism Diagnostic Service

Funding has been provided in 2025‑26 to the Tasmanian Autism Diagnostic Service, which will be used to continue to employ three additional assessors to meet demand.

Teacher Attraction and Retention

Recognising that, after parents and carers, teachers have the biggest influence on learner outcomes, additional funding is allocated to support quality teaching, effective leadership and school improvement and support in government schools. This includes addressing agreed priority areas from the National Teacher Workforce Action Plan and the finalisation of the 2023 Teacher Wage Agreement. The initiative includes improved support for early career teachers, continuing to build on the Education Support Specialist career pathway for Teacher Assistants, maximising the time to teach and reducing teacher workload, building on existing incentives for teachers in isolated schools, and addressing teacher workload issues.


 

Transition to Independence (T2i)

Funding is provided in 2024‑25 to continue to support young people exiting care to build independence skills and maintain engagement in education and learning as a pathway for improved life outcomes. The specific funding allocation for these services will be based on demand. The Department is currently assessing the appropriate model for the allocation of long‑term funding.

Universal Access to Early Learning for Three Year-Olds

The Tasmanian Government is committed to providing universal access to pre‑school, in the year before kindergarten, for every child, to help set them up for a great start in life and learning. In 2024, the Government will complement the delivery of Working Together with funding for three-year-old children to access early learning that is responsive to community needs.

Ongoing Key Deliverables

In addition to the key deliverables identified above, ongoing key deliverables for the Department include:

Safeguarding Children and Young People

A critical priority for the Department is to continue to address risks to the safety of children and young people, leading a culture of putting the child, their rights and their safety at the centre of all decisions and protecting children and young people from child sexual abuse. During 2023 and 2024, this will be achieved by supporting the Governmentís response to the Commission of Inquiry into the Tasmanian Governmentís Responses to Child Sexual Abuse in Institutional Settings, together with continued implementation of the recommendations from the Independent Inquiry into the Department of Educationís Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

To date, the Department has delivered on key recommendations from the Departmentís Independent Inquiry, including:

       establishing a Safeguarding Lead in all government schools, supporting the Principal to plan and implement school strategies that support the safety and wellbeing of all students;

       rolling out compulsory inductions and annual training for all departmental staff that includes information about understanding, preventing, identifying, reporting and responding to sexual abuse (now being rolled out to volunteers in schools); and

       appointing additional professional support staff to provide support for children and young people affected by harmful sexual behaviours.

The Department recognises there is still a substantial amount of work to do in keeping children and young people safe from child sexual abuse and will continue to implement recommendations in the coming year to successfully achieve this outcome.


 

Student Systems Renewal ‑ Phase Two

This initiative builds on funding allocated for the systems program of work to replace, consolidate and modernise the Departmentís student and school administration systems and improve the integration of its core business systems. The overarching initiative seeks to deliver data and information that allows staff to better understand children and young people; support collaboration and improved decision making across the Department and reduce workloads in schools; and improve the way the Department manages and interprets information.

Output Group Restructure

In February 2022, the Government announced that the Department of Communities Tasmania would be restructured and abolished. The restructure was undertaken in accordance with State Service Restructuring Orders made during 2022 and resulted in the progressive transfer of functions from the former Department of Communities Tasmania to a number of other departments and to the newly established Homes Tasmania. On 1 October 2022, major functions pertaining to Children and Young People transferred to the Department of Education, which has been renamed the Department for Education, Children and Young People.

A new output group, Output Group 4 ‑ Children Services, has been created within the Department to reflect these changes. Chapter 1 of this Budget Paper provides further information on the restructure of the former Department of Communities Tasmania.

Output Information

Outputs of the Department for Education, Children and Young People are provided under the following Output Groups:

       Output Group 1 ‑ Education;

       Output Group 2 ‑ Libraries Tasmania;

       Output Group 3 ‑ Education Regulation;

       Output Group 4 ‑ Children Services;

       Output Group 5 ‑ Independent Childrenís and Young Personsí Review Service; and

       Output Group 89 ‑ Public Building Maintenance Program.

Table 2.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department.


 

Table 2.2:†††††††† Output Group Expense Summary

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget1 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education, Children and Youth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Education

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 In School Education2

1 257 326 

1 318 589 

1 366 989 

1 411 725 

1 454 947 

1.2 Early Learning3

22 714 

26 509 

27 983 

28 658 

29 012 

 

1 280 040 

1 345 098 

1 394 972 

1 440 383 

1 483 959 

Output Group 2 ‑ Libraries Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Libraries Tasmania

45 425 

46 927 

47 981 

49 079 

50 052 

 

45 425 

46 927 

47 981 

49 079 

50 052 

Output Group 3 ‑ Education Regulation

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Education Regulation

11 331 

11 352 

11 173 

11 437 

11 636 

 

11 331 

11 352 

11 173 

11 437 

11 636 

Output Group 4 ‑ Children Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Services for Children and Families4

79 557 

151 155 

147 570 

138 365 

140 525 

4.2 Services for Youth Justice

12 769 

17 632 

17 398 

17 780 

18 210 

 

92 326 

168 787 

164 968 

156 145 

158 735 

Output Group 5 ‑ Independent Children's and Young Persons' Review Service

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People5

1 219 

1 981 

1 947 

1 658 

1 697 

 

1 219 

1 981 

1 947 

1 658 

1 697 

Output Group 89 ‑ Public Building Maintenance Program

 

 

 

 

 

89.1 Public Building Maintenance Program6

978 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

978 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

478 387 

510 021 

531 053 

549 190 

562 559 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

12 000 

8 500 

2 000 

2 000 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

1 921 706 

2 092 666 

2 154 094 

2 209 892 

2 268 638 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2022-23 Budget has been restructured and reflects the impacts of the transfer of part year funding from the former Department of Communities Tasmania to the Department for Education, Children and Young People as at the date that functions were transferred. The 2023-24 Budget and Forward Estimates reflect full year funding allocations for these functions.

2.    The increase in In School Education reflects growth in State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Agreement, together with supplementary funding to support wage agreement outcomes.

3.    The increase in Early Learning in 2023‑24 and across the Forward Estimates reflects the timing of funding for the Working Together initiative and operating resources allocated for the Six New Child and Family Learning Centres.

4.    The variation in Services for Children and Families primarily reflects the profile of funding for a number of time-limited funding arrangements, including the Response to the Many Colours One Direction Program Review, Youth Housing initiatives ‑ U16 Lighthouse Project, Tasmanian-Based Therapeutic Program for Young People, After Hours Response Service, Stable Permanent Placements Support, Intensive Family Engagement Service and Transition to Independence (T2i) initiatives.

5.    The variation in this Output reflects additional funding in 2023‑24 and 2024‑25 for the Participation for Children and Young People initiative, funded through the Child and Youth Wellbeing Strategy initiative managed by the Department of Premier and Cabinet.

6.    The decrease in Public Building Maintenance Program in 2023‑24 reflects the completion of funding allocated to the Department for school maintenance projects.

Output Group 1:††† Education

1.1 In School Education

The services provided under this Output focus on the delivery of education to students in schools enrolled in classes from Kindergarten to Year 12. While most of the funding within this Output is allocated to government schools, it also includes funding for policy and regulatory work within the Department that supports education across all sectors (such as the administration of the Education Act 2016).

The purpose of this Output is to provide a range of educational services that will inspire and support all learners to succeed as connected, resilient, creative and curious thinkers. The services provided under this Output are crucial to ensure that Tasmaniaís young people obtain the knowledge, skills, behaviour and dispositions necessary to continue their education and training, become job‑ready and lead happy and fulfilling lives.

1.2 Early Learning

This Output has three focus areas. The first, through the Education and Care Unit, is for approving and regulating education and care services (long day care, outside school hours care and family day care) under national legislation. It is also responsible for the licensing and monitoring of all other childcare services under the Child Care Act 2001. Grant funds are provided to eligible service providers as a contribution towards operating expenses and capital upgrades through the Education and Care Grants Program. The second focus of this Output relates to services delivered through Child and Family Learning Centres. The third focus area of this Output is the Working Together initiative with the Early Childhood Education and Care Sector to support free pre‑school for children who are the most disadvantaged or vulnerable.

Table 2.3:†††††††† Performance Information ‑ Output Group 11

Performance Measure

Unit of

†Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Government Sector

 

 

 

 

 

Learners are achieving appropriate outcomes

 

 

 

 

 

Students Prep to Year 10 achieve year‑level appropriate literacy standards (reading)2

%

na

na

na

+1pp

Students Prep to Year 10 achieve year‑level appropriate numeracy standards2

%

na

na

na

+1pp

Students attain a senior‑secondary qualification3

%

na

na

na

na


 

Table 2.3:†††††††† Performance Information ‑ Output Group1 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

†Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children are developing as learners and communicators

 

 

 

 

 

Students achieve developmental markers in the Kindergarten Development Check4

%

75.9

78.1

76.8

+1pp

Learners are actively engaging and participating in learning

 

 

 

 

 

Students are cognitively engaged with learning5

%

81.7

81.0

80.7

Maintain

Students attend school 9 out of 10 days (Prep‑6)6

%

53.6

63.4

45.1

+10pp

Students attend school 9 out of 10 days (7‑10)6

%

37.8

43.4

28.0

+10pp

Students are directly retained to Year 127

%

66.0

66.4

63.2

+1pp

 

 

 

 

 

 

All Education Sectors

 

 

 

 

 

Literacy and Numeracy8

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading

 

 

 

 

 

Reading rates against National Minimum Standard Year 3

% of students at or above the NMS

 

94.7

 

93.8

 

96.0

 

na

Reading rates against NMS Year 5

%

93.5

93.7

95.1

na

Reading rates against NMS Year 7

%

90.6

92.9

93.0

na

Reading rates against NMS Year 9

%

86.6

86.7

90.0

na

Numeracy

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 3

% of students at or above the NMS

 

95.7

 

94.0

 

96.8

 

na

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 5

%

93.7

93.8

95.3

na

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 7

%

90.0

90.0

92.5

na

Numeracy rates against NMS Year 9

%

93.1

93.5

94.8

na

Retention and Attainment9

 

 

 

 

 

Apparent retention rate Years 10‑1210

Rate

73.9

74.5

75

75

Tasmanian Certificate of Education

%

59.6

59.0

62

62

Australian Tertiary Admission Rank

%

33.2

33.5

35

35

Education and Care11

 

 

 

 

 

Service quality assessment visits12

Number

61

31

70

103

Visits to approved or licensed education and child care services13

Number

579

216

450

450

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources: Department of Education Annual Report 2021‑22; and Departmental records.

National Quality Agenda Information Technology System.

National Assessment Program: Literacy and Numeracy reported at https://reports.acara.edu.au/Home/TimeSeries

Attendance and apparent retention reported at

† †https://www.acara.edu.au/reporting/national‑report‑on‑schooling‑in‑australia/national‑report‑on‑schooling‑in‑australia‑data‑portal

Office of Tasmanian Assessment, Standards & Certification reported at

†††https://www.tasc.tas.gov.au/about/reports‑and‑publications/strategy‑and‑reporting

Notes:

1.     The Department has reviewed and revised its Output Group 1 performance measures in the 2023-24 Budget to provide performance indicators with a government sector and an all-education sector focus that better aligns to the Departmentís internal performance measures and targets. Actuals for 2021‑22 for the government sector are based on outcomes obtained in late 2021. Targets for 2023‑24 are percentage point growth targets from 2022‑23 actuals. The Tasmanian Autism Diagnostic Service measure is currently under review and will be updated for the 2024‑25 Budget.

2.     Literacy and numeracy standards are based on Progressive Achievement Tests Reading and Mathematics for end of year assessments undertaken by schools. Participation in PAT was optional up until 2021, and 2022 reflects the first year of robust baseline PAT data. The percentage of students meeting the standard for reading in 2022‑23 was 77.9 per cent, and 77.6 per cent for numeracy.

3.     The Department is currently working with the Office of Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification to develop a measure of senior‑secondary attainment that is inclusive of both Tasmanian Certificate of Education and Vocational Education and Training certification. Data and targets will be reflected in future Budgets in this table once the measure has been finalised.

4.     Proportion of students achieving 20 markers or above in the Kindergarten Development Check. The 2022‑23 target of 76.8 per cent represents the actual outcome for the measure (as measured at the end of 2022).

5.     This measure represents the proportion of Year 4‑12 students indicating medium or high levels of cognitive engagement in the annual Student Wellbeing Survey. The 2022‑23 proportion of 80.7 per cent represents an actual measure (as measured by the survey in the second half of 2022).

6.     This measure represents the proportion of full‑time students whose attendance rate was 90 per cent or greater across the school year. This differs from national reporting and previous Budget targets, which are based on Semester 1 only. The revised indicator is more reflective of the overall school year. The 2022‑23 target of 45.1 per cent for Prep to Year 6, and 28.0 per cent for Years 7 to 10 represents the actual outcome for the measure (as measured for the 2022 school year). COVID‑19 had a significant impact on student attendance in 2022.

7.     This measure represents the proportion of Year 10 students in Tasmanian government schools at mid‑year census (Census 2, August) directly retained to Year 12 at Census 2 in Tasmanian government schools. The 2022‑23 target of 63.2 per cent represents the actual outcome for the measure (measured at Census 2, 2022).

8.     Literacy and Numeracy performance measures are based on national minimum standards in NAPLAN assessments. The 2021‑22 Actual values are based on assessments in May 2022 and are an update to the measures reflected in the 2021‑22 Annual Report that were based on preliminary values. From 2023, NAPLAN is administered earlier in the school year, in March. New national proficiency standards have been announced by Education Ministers for reporting in 2023, replacing previous minimum standards. Future Budgets, including targets, will report NAPLAN against these new standards.

9.     Attainment measures are based on calendar years: 2021‑22 Actual values are based on attainment at the end of 2021. Attainment percentages are an important way to monitor the level of qualifications that young people are achieving. There are many qualifications and certificates that young people can pursue and achieve depending on their interests and planned future pathway. Observations on attainment should also consider achievement of the Qualifications Certificate (issued at the end of senior secondary studies) and VET attainment (particularly Certificate III and above).

-       Previous indicators for VET in Budget Papers showed numbers of students completing credit points and attaining some VET. These have been removed as setting targets for numbers when cohorts change in size from year to year can be misleading. TASC publicly reports these numbers elsewhere.

-       The proportions of students who attained a Tasmanian Certificate of Education and/or Australian Tertiary Admission Rank are based on the ABS estimates for the number of persons aged 15‑19 years in Tasmania, age‑weighted to those in their final year of school.

10.   Apparent retention rates for Years 10‑12 measure the number of Year 12 students in Tasmanian schools divided by the number of Year 10 students in Tasmanian schools two years prior, without tracking individual students. The proportion for retention for 2022‑23 (based on the cohort from Year 10, 2020 to Year 12, 2022) is 71.7 per cent. Figures relate to full‑time school students at both year levels. The ABS notes that care should be exercised in the interpretation of apparent retention rates as the method of calculation does not take into account a range of factors, such as interstate and international migration.

11.   The Department is responsive to emergent issues within the education and care sector in accordance with the principles of best practice regulation. The number of visits represents some of the Departmentís interactions with services to promote and improve the quality of education and care. However, as mitigating the impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic was a primary issue between April to September 2020 and November 2021 to March 2022, visits to services were minimised and resources diverted, and where appropriate, conducted virtually. The targets for 2022‑23 and 2023‑24 differ from 2021‑22 because of the introduction of a revised approach to regulating. A more proactive approach to monitoring quality and compliance will increase visit numbers.

12.   Visits to services for quality assessment are prioritised using a risk‑based approach. Services with higher risk require reassessment more frequently. Services are assessed using the seven Quality Areas, 15 standards and 40 elements of the National Quality Standard. The impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic is evident in the differences between target and actual visits for 2021‑22.

13.   The number of visits to approved or licensed services has a compliance focus and is separate from service quality assessment visits. Due to the COVID‑19 pandemic, visits to services were lowest between November 2021 and March 2022. Education and Care Unit resources were reallocated to actively respond to emerging issues in the sector, particularly to assist with COVID‑19 pandemic related enquiries and management. Virtual visits enabled strong connections with services to be maintained ‑ these visits are included in the data. The targets for 2022‑23 and 2023‑24 reflect an intention to rebalance the workload.

Output Group 2:††† Libraries Tasmania

2.1 Libraries Tasmania

This Output provides for the lifelong learning of all Tasmanians through the delivery of information, education and training, literacy support and other community services through the Libraries Tasmania network, and focuses on the provision of Tasmanian Information Services.

This Output also includes the management of Tasmaniaís Archival and Heritage Collection.

Table 2.4:†††††††† Performance Information ‑ Output Group 21

Performance Measure

Unit of

†Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of people satisfied with Libraries Tasmania services

%

95.2

93.1

 

95.0

 

95.0

Percentage of people who used Libraries Tasmania services and programs in the last 12 months2

%

na

na

na

35.0

Percentage of people who found what they were looking for in Libraries Tasmania collections3

%

92.6

92.6

na

 

93.0

Percentage of people who found the information they were looking for using Libraries Tasmaniaís information service4

%

na

na

na

 

75.0

Percentage of people who learnt something new after receiving support or participating in library programs5

%

na

na

na

75.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Libraries Tasmania has reviewed and revised its performance measures in the 2023‑24 Budget to better provide annual accountability reporting against its user‑centred strategic priorities. This change supports a recommendation in the 2016 Auditor‑Generalís Assessment of Performance Measures report to the former Department of Education to move away from activity measures and towards outcome measures. All five measures are survey‑based ensuring Libraries Tasmania performance is centred on user experience.

2.    This is a new measure from 2022-23. This measure is an indicator of user engagement with Libraries Tasmania services and programs in the past 12 months, based on a population survey. The 35 per cent target is based on responses from a 2022 pilot survey.

3.    This is a new measure from 2022-23. The measure is an indicator of the effectiveness of Libraries Tasmania in providing access to collections that meet the needs of users. The target is based on survey responses collected in 2020‑21 and 2021‑22.

4.    This is a new measure from 2022-23. The measure indicates the effectiveness of Libraries Tasmania in responding to general, research and reference user enquiries as well as enquiries about learning opportunities.

5.    This is a new measure from 2022-23. The measure is an indicator of how effectively Libraries Tasmania has supported users to gain new skills and knowledge.


 

Output Group 3:††† Education Regulation

3.1 Education Regulation

This Output provides for the operation of the independent regulatory authorities for education including: the Teacherís Registration Board; Office of Tasmanian Assessment Standards and Certification; the Office of the Education Registrar; and the Non‑Government Schools Registration Board. These authorities regulate and drive quality in the Tasmanian education system across all sectors including: government; Catholic; independent school sectors; some parts of the Vocational Education and Training sector; and Home Education.

The regulators impact: the quality of teaching that learners experience; how student learning is assessed and recognised; the quality and safety of learning environments; and the extent to which students are participating and engaged in learning pathways.

Performance measures will be developed for this new Output and reported in future publications as part of the implementation of the new regulatory arrangements.

Output Group 4:††† Children Services

4.1 Services for Children and Families

This Output provides services to children, young people and their families through a range of programs within the Strong Families Safe Kids Advice and Referral Line, the Child Safety Service, and Out of Home Care.

4.2 Services for Youth Justice

This Output provides services to children, young people and their families through a range of community youth justice and custodial youth justice programs, including the operations of the Ashley Youth Detention Centre.

Table 2.5:†††††††† Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4

Performance Measure

Unit of

†Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Services for Children and Families

 

 

 

 

 

Contacts to the Strong Families Safe Kids Advice and Referral Line1,2

Number

14 111

15 039

18 000

19 000

Children in notifications (per 1 000 of population)1,2

Rate

15.8

15.5

19.2

20.0

Contacts to the Advice and Referral Line resolved with a referral to family support or other services1,2

Number

1 141

1 025††

1 200

1 300

Referrals to the Child Safety Service for Assessment1,2,3

Number

855

717

1 040

1 050

Average daily children pending Child Safety Service assessment4

Number

54.4

87.6

≤60.0

≤60.0

Table 2.5:†††††††† Performance Information ‑ Output Group 4 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

†Measure

2020‑21 Actual

2021‑22 Actual

2022‑23 Target

2023‑24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Services for Children and Families (continued)

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment outcome determined within 28 days5

%

13.7

12.6

≥15.0

≥16.0

Children who were the subject of a substantiation during the previous year, who were the subject of a subsequent substantiation within 12 months

%

16.3

11.9

≤16.0

≤15.0

Average daily children in Out of Home Care6

Number

1 086.4

1 049.4

1 007.0

966.0

Children with approved case and care plans

%

98.3

96.7

≥95.0

≥95.0

Foster care households with five or more foster children7

%

4.8

4.7

≤3.5

≤3.5

Children in out of home care who had 3+ non‑respite placements in the last 12 months

%

4.0

3.5

≤4.0

≤4.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Services for Youth Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Custodial Youth Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Average daily young people in Youth Justice detention1,8

Number

9.4

9.1

12.0

12.0

Distinct number of young people in Youth Justice detention1,8

Number

47

43

60

60

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Youth Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Average daily young people in Community Youth Justice1,9

Number

156.4

145.1

150.0

150.0

Distinct number of young people in Community Youth Justice1,9

Number

360

347

350

350

Community Service Orders completed before the statutory expiry date

†%

93.2

92.5

≥90.0

≥90.0

Youth Justice Community conferences held within six weeks of receipt of referral for conference

†%

77.2

70.5

≥90.0

≥90.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2022‑23 and 2023‑24 targets for these measures are a projection rather than a target, reflecting the different processes including trend analysis, which were used for some measures to identify relevant values.

2.    There has been an update to the 2022-23 projection arising from an increase in projected contacts to the Advice and Referral Line, primarily due to increased safeguarding awareness through reviews and initiatives, and increased scope of services provided. This measure also reflects an increase in Children in notifications; and Referrals to the Child Safety Service for assessment.

3.    This measure is the number of referrals from the ARL to the Child Safety Service for a Child Safety Assessment.

4.    Fluctuations occur in the Average daily children pending Child Safety Service for Assessment due to changes in service demand, and staff workloads.

5.    From 2020‑21, this performance measure only calculates time taken to complete an assessment once the matter has been referred to the Child Safety Service for a full child safety assessment.

6.    A reduction in Average daily children in Out of Home Care reflects the effect of permanency reforms.

7.    The target for this measure corresponds to the national average of 3.5 per cent for 2019‑20. Foster care households with five or more foster children are reported as at 30 June of the given financial year.

8.    These projections have been updated to reflect a higher level of young people being admitted to custody after relatively low numbers during 2020‑21 and 2021‑22. These projections are not inconsistent with projections from previous years.

9.    This measure differs from nationally published figures due to the inclusion of young people with pre‑sentence reports, bail support plans, community conferences or community service undertakings.

Performance Information Comments

Children Services

The Strong Families Safe Kids reform represents the Tasmanian Governmentís long‑term commitment to prioritise the safety and wellbeing of children and young people in Tasmania. Investments in the Advice and Referral Line, intensive family engagement and early intervention, a focus on permanency and stability for children and young people in out of home care and cross agency collaboration is delivering improved outcomes for children, young people and their families.

Youth Justice

The number of young people engaged with Community or Custodial Youth Justice Services is predominantly influenced by external services. The factors affecting activity levels include referral practices and diversionary programs implemented by Tasmania Police, as well as the effectiveness of prosecutions and sentencing options selected by the Courts.

Output Group 5:††† Independent Childrenís and Young Personsí Review Service

5.1 Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People

The Commissioner for Children and Young People is an independent statutory office established under the Commissioner for Children and Young People Act 2016. Activities provided in this Output include promoting the rights and wellbeing of children and young people and examining the policies, practices and services provided for children and any law affecting the health, welfare, care, protection and development of children.

Performance Information Comments

The Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People is an independent, statutory office responsible to the Parliament of Tasmania. Details of the Commissioner for Children and Young Peopleís activities are available in the Commissionerís Annual Reports, which can be accessed from its website at www.childcomm.tas.gov.au.


 

Capital Investment Program

Table 2.6 provides financial information for the Departmentís Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 2.6:†††††††† Capital Investment Program1

 

Estimated 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education, Children and Youth

 

 

 

 

 

Bothwell District School ‑ Agriculture in Schools

2 000 

1 625 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Cambridge Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

15 100 

3 920 

4 000 

7 000 

.... 

Campbell Town District School ‑ Agriculture in Schools

2 000 

1 500 

400 

.... 

.... 

Contemporary Classrooms

10 000 

2 050 

2 000 

2 000 

3 000 

Eastern Shore Multi‑Sports Facility

8 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

8 000 

Electrical Switchboard Maintenance

8 000 

3 500 

2 000 

2 000 

.... 

Exeter High School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

11 000 

3 850 

6 600 

.... 

.... 

Glen Dhu Pool

3 450 

1 700 

1 700 

.... 

.... 

Hobart City High School (Ogilvie and New Town Campuses)

21 600 

1 000 

4 650 

7 000 

7 000 

Lauderdale Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

6 500 

5 000 

1 070 

.... 

.... 

Legana Primary School2

35 320 

14 650 

13 810 

780 

.... 

Montello Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

7 100 

5 750 

1 000 

.... 

.... 

Mt Nelson School Oval

50 

50 

.... 

.... 

.... 

New Brighton High School2

73 980 

20 910 

42 680 

.... 

.... 

New K‑12 Penguin School

20 000 

400 

.... 

.... 

.... 

New K‑12 Sorell School

22 000 

8 500 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Outdoor Learning Areas

10 000 

5 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Renewable Energy Schools Program

5 000 

1 300 

1 280 

1 000 

750 

Revitalising Cosgrove High School

20 000 

8 000 

10 300 

.... 

.... 

Six New Child and Family Learning Centres

28 000 

13 958 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Springfield Gardens Primary School

1 450 

430 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Support School Package including North West School

20 000 

1 500 

3 300 

12 150 

.... 

Supporting Safer Schools

6 300 

1 200 

1 300 

1 300 

1 000 

 


 

Table 2.6:†††††††† Capital Investment Program1 (continued)

 

Estimated 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Woodbridge School Oval

40 

40 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Youth Justice Facilities2

50 000 

3 000 

17 000 

19 000 

10 000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

108 833 

113 090 

52 230 

29 750 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    For more information regarding the Capital Investment Program, refer to chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

2.    This item includes an additional allocation of funding in this Budget.

Bothwell District School and Campbell Town District School ‑ Agriculture in Schools

Agricultural facilities at Bothwell and Campbell Town District Schools will be upgraded and consolidated to enable these schools to increase and expand their agricultural VET programs, which are continuing to grow in popularity.

Cambridge Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

This project will provide Cambridge Primary School with additional contemporary learning environments, associated support spaces and amenities for a gymnasium, and traffic and car parking improvements.

Contemporary Classrooms

This project continues the $10 million investment over five years for the commencement of a co‑ordinated statewide program to renew and upgrade outdated classrooms, with a focus on schools in low socio‑economic areas. Contemporary learning spaces are larger and have much greater functionality and flexibility.

Schools that will benefit from upgraded contemporary learning spaces include: South George Town Primary School; East Derwent Primary School; Dodges Ferry Primary School; Mowbray Heights Primary School; Lilydale District School; Glen Dhu Primary School; Ringarooma Primary School; Port Dalrymple School; Risdon Vale Primary School; Campbell Town District School; Havenview Primary School; and Rosetta Primary School.

Eastern Shore Multi‑Sports Facility

Funding of $8 million is allocated for a new multi‑sports facility to be built at Bayview Secondary College, Rokeby on the Eastern Shore of Hobart. This investment is dependent upon obtaining agreement for matched funding from Local Government and the Australian Government.

Electrical Switchboard Maintenance

Funding continues in 2023‑24 for this initiative to upgrade ageing electrical switchboard infrastructure within schools.

Exeter High School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

This project will provide Exeter High School with contemporary learning spaces, associated support spaces and amenities, and specialist facilities such as kitchens, library and arts facilities.

Glen Dhu Pool

This initiative provides for the upgrade and reopening of the Glen Dhu pool.

Hobart City High School (Ogilvie and New Town Campuses)

This commitment allocates funding for co‑education high school facilities in Hobart, with the establishment of Hobart City High School with Ogilvie and New Town campuses that commenced for the 2022 school year.

Funding of $1.6 million was allocated for immediate requirements such as new bathroom amenities and learning area upgrades, with $20 million allocated towards further priority infrastructure requirements identified through the Hobart City High School masterplan, which was released for public comment in March 2022. This investment will provide for future growth and ensure that students can enjoy new state of the art facilities.

Lauderdale Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

Significant capital works will be undertaken at Lauderdale Primary School, including the provision of additional contemporary learning spaces, associated support spaces and amenities, and the redevelopment of outdoor play areas.

Legana Primary School

This project continues the investment to build a new primary school in Legana. Additional funding was allocated to this project during 2022‑23 to increase the project budget to $35.3 million.

Montello Primary School ‑ Major School Redevelopment

Montello Primary School will be redeveloped to provide students with contemporary learning environments, associated support spaces and amenities.

Mt Nelson School Oval

This project provides for the upgrade of the Mt Nelson school oval.

New Brighton High School

This project continues the investment to build a new Years 7‑12 High School at Brighton. Additional funding was allocated to this project during 2022‑23 to increase the project budget to $74 million.

New K‑12 Penguin District School

This project continues the $20 million redevelopment of Penguin District School to a Kindergarten to Year 12 school. This project will consolidate the current two campuses on a single site.

New K‑12 Sorell School

This project continues a $25.8 million investment in the Sorell School to consolidate the school and create state of the art Kindergarten to Year 12 learning facilities. This project includes $22 million for the redevelopment of the school and $3.8 million funded in previous Budgets to provide contemporary learning areas at the school.

Outdoor Learning Areas

Funding was allocated in 2022‑23 to implement a range of Outdoor Learning initiatives to assist in responding to the COVID‑19 pandemic following the re‑opening of the Stateís borders in December 2021. The program will enhance outdoor learning spaces to assist schools to provide rich outdoor learning experiences.

Renewable Energy Schools Program

Funding is allocated to deliver a new Renewable Energy Schools program that will roll out solar panels in over 100 government schools. Installation works commenced in 2022‑23, with the scheme to roll out over a four year period. Savings in energy bills will be used to make the program self‑sustaining, through re‑investment back into the Renewable Energy Schools Fund.

Revitalising Cosgrove High School

This project continues a $20 million investment to revitalise Cosgrove High School, creating a contemporary school providing education to Year 12.

Six New Child and Family Learning Centres

Funding of $28 million was committed for the construction of six new Child and Family Learning Centres.

The new centres will be located in the Sorell, Kingborough, Glenorchy, East Tamar, West Ulverstone and Waratah‑Wynyard communities. They will provide a one‑stop shop for services to families with young children. Services at the Child and Family Learning Centres will include health, support and outreach. Ongoing funding is provided to ensure that the new centres are appropriately resourced.

Springfield Gardens Primary

This project continues a $1.5 million extension to the multi‑purpose hall and support services at Springfield Gardens Primary School.

Support School Package including North West School

The 2021‑22 Budget allocated funding for works at the Southern Support School and North West Support School. With the outcome for the Southern Support School achieved, the remaining allocation relates to capital development for the North West Support School to support students across the region. Specific details are being developed as part of the outcome of the community consultation process.

Supporting Safer Schools

This program of works provides for anti‑bullying measures, with the upgrade of toilets at 42 High Schools and District School sites improving the safety of student bathrooms.

Woodbridge School Oval

This project will upgrade drainage at the Woodbridge District School oval.

Youth Justice Facilities

Additional funding of $10 million is provided in 2026‑27 to increase the total budget to $50 million to progress the delivery of new fit for purpose youth justice facilities.


 

Detailed Budget Statements

Table 2.7:†††††††† Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget1 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating2

1 279 432 

1 421 510 

1 469 251 

1 507 690 

1 608 647 

Appropriation revenue ‑ capital

63 915 

93 785 

113 090 

52 230 

29 750 

Other revenue from government

12 578 

19 373 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants3

15 949 

16 333 

15 191 

13 903 

13 903 

Sales of goods and services

49 843 

50 029 

50 788 

51 544 

52 264 

Interest

159 

151 

145 

139 

133 

Other revenue

24 598 

21 568 

23 478 

23 646 

24 075 

Total revenue

1 446 474 

1 622 749 

1 671 943 

1 649 152 

1 728 772 

Net gain/(loss) on non‑financial assets

255 

243 

243 

243 

243 

Total income

1 446 729 

1 622 992 

1 672 186 

1 649 395 

1 729 015 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits4

1 059 805 

1 146 587 

1 187 586 

1 235 248 

1 275 334 

Depreciation and amortisation

63 411 

63 999 

63 865 

63 731 

63 597 

Supplies and consumables

296 170 

294 275 

294 483 

294 042 

298 705 

Grants and subsidies5

10 284 

62 968 

62 296 

52 852 

53 597 

Borrowing costs

68 

60 

39 

39 

39 

Other expenses

13 581 

14 756 

14 772 

14 790 

14 807 

Total expenses

1 443 319 

1 582 645 

1 623 041 

1 660 702 

1 706 079 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

3 410 

40 347 

49 145 

(11 307)

22 936 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

55 434 

43 954 

43 954 

43 954 

43 954 

Other movements taken directly to equity6

(4 064)

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Total other comprehensive income

51 370 

43 954 

43 954 

43 954 

43 954 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

54 780 

84 301 

93 099 

32 647 

66 890 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2022-23 Budget has been restructured and reflects the impact of the transfer of part year funding from the former Department of Communities Tasmania to the Department for Education, Children and Young People as at the date the functions were transferred. The 2023-24 Budget and Forward Estimates reflect full year funding allocations for these functions.

2.    The increase in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating reflects growth in State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Agreement, together with supplementary funding to support wage agreement outcomes. The increase in 2026‑27 reflects additional appropriation for expenditure associated with the 27th pay occurring in that financial year.

3.    The decrease in Grants in 2024-25 and 2025-26 primarily reflects the completion of the Integrated Client Information Program project, which is funded from the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program within Finance-General.

4.    The increase in Employee Benefits reflects growth in State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Agreement.

5.    The variation in Grants and subsidies across the Forward Estimates primarily reflects the profile of funding for Intensive Family Engagement Service and Transition to Independence (T2i) initiatives.

6.    Other movements taken directly to equity in 2022‑23 reflects the transfer of functions from the former Department of Communities Tasmania and reflects minor differences that existed at an Output level in the former Departmentís Budget as at the time of the restructure.

Table 2.8:†††††††† Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating1

478 387 

510 021 

531 053 

549 190 

562 559 

Sales of goods and services

434 

445 

456 

468 

479 

Total administered revenue

478 821 

510 466 

531 509 

549 658 

563 038 

Total administered income

478 821 

510 466 

531 509 

549 658 

563 038 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies1

478 387 

510 021 

531 053 

549 190 

562 559 

Transfers to the Public Account

434 

445 

456 

468 

479 

Total administered expenses

478 821 

510 466 

531 509 

549 658 

563 038 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered net result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered comprehensive result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The increase in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating and Grants and subsidies reflects additional funding for, and payment of, grants to non‑government schools including Australian Government funded grants, State-funded capital assistance, and State‑funded general education grants under the National School Reform Agreement.


 

Table 2.9:†††††††† Revenue from Appropriation by Output1

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget2 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Education, Children and Youth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Education

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 In School Education3

1 114 280 

1 178 623 

1 224 278 

1 269 355 

1 362 217 

1.2 Early Learning4

21 652 

26 318 

27 046 

27 717 

28 585 

 

1 135 932 

1 204 941 

1 251 324 

1 297 072 

1 390 802 

Output Group 2 ‑ Libraries Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Libraries Tasmania

40 271 

41 846 

42 906 

43 925 

46 128 

 

40 271 

41 846 

42 906 

43 925 

46 128 

Output Group 3 ‑ Education Regulation

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Education Regulation

10 165 

10 173 

9 994 

10 258 

10 676 

 

10 165 

10 173 

9 994 

10 258 

10 676 

Output Group 4 ‑ Children Services

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Services for Children and Families5

79 676 

145 545 

146 284 

137 338 

140 919 

4.2 Services for Youth Justice

12 172 

17 297 

17 063 

17 445 

18 382 

 

91 848 

162 842 

163 347 

154 783 

159 301 

Output Group 5 ‑ Independent Children's and Young Persons' Review Service

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young People6

1 216 

1 708 

1 680 

1 652 

1 740 

 

1 216 

1 708 

1 680 

1 652 

1 740 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

478 387 

510 021 

531 053 

549 190 

562 559 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

63 915 

93 785 

113 090 

52 230 

29 750 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

1 757 819 

1 931 531 

2 000 304 

2 056 880 

2 171 206 

Capital Services

63 915 

93 785 

113 090 

52 230 

29 750 

 

1 821 734 

2 025 316 

2 113 394 

2 109 110 

2 200 956 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department for Education, Children and Young People

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Rollover

12 578 

19 373 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

1 834 312 

2 044 689 

2 113 394 

2 109 110 

2 200 956 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 2.9:†††††††† Revenue from Appropriation by Output1 (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

1 355 925 

1 534 668 

1 582 341 

1 559 920 

1 638 397 

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

478 387 

510 021 

531 053 

549 190 

562 559 

 

1 834 312 

2 044 689 

2 113 394 

2 109 110 

2 200 956 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2026-27 Budget estimate includes an additional appropriation for expenditure associated with the 27th pay occurring in that financial year.

2.    The 2022-23 Budget has been restructured and reflects the impact of the transfer of part year funding from the former Department of Communities Tasmania to the Department for Education, Children and Young People as at the date that functions were transferred. The 2023-24 Budget and Forward Estimates reflect full year funding allocations for these functions.

3.    The increase in In School Education reflects growth in State and Australian Government funding under the National School Reform Agreement, together with supplementary funding to support wage agreement outcomes.

4.    The increase in Early Learning in 2023‑24 reflects the timing of funding for the Working Together initiative and operating resources allocated for the Six New Child and Family Learning Centres.

5.    The variation in Services for Children and Families primarily reflects the profile of funding for a number of time-limited funding arrangements, including the Intensive Family Engagement Service and Transition to Independence (T2i) initiatives.

6.    The variation in this Output reflects additional funding in 2023‑24 and 2024‑25 for the Participation for Children and Young People initiative funded through the Child and Youth Wellbeing Strategy initiative managed by the Department of Premier and Cabinet.


 

Table 2.10:†††††† Administered Revenue

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Public Account

 

 

 

 

 

Other Sales of Services

434 

445 

456 

468 

479 

 

434 

445 

456 

468 

479 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation1

478 387 

510 021 

531 053 

549 190 

562 559 

 

478 387 

510 021 

531 053 

549 190 

562 559 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

478 821 

510 466 

531 509 

549 658 

563 038 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The increase in Annual Appropriation reflects additional funding for grants to non‑government schools, including Australian Government funded grants, State‑funded capital assistance, and State-funded general education grants under the National School Reform Agreement.

Table 2.11:†††††† Administered Expenses

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Non‑government schools: Australian Government funded

Grants1

387 825 

416 800 

434 280 

449 570 

459 986 

Non‑government schools: State-funded capital assistance

1 173 

1 173 

1 173 

1 173 

1 173 

Non‑government schools: State-funded general education

Grants2

89 389 

92 048 

95 600 

98 447 

101 400 

 

478 387 

510 021 

531 053 

549 190 

562 559 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfers to the Public Account

434 

445 

456 

468 

479 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

478 821 

510 466 

531 509 

549 658 

563 038 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase reflects Australian Government funded grants to non‑government schools under the National School Reform Agreement.

2.    The increase reflects State Government funded grants to non‑government schools under the National School Reform Agreement.


 

Table 2.12:†††††† Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2023 

2024 

2025 

2026 

2027 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

83 625 

107 110 

105 664 

105 331 

106 075 

Receivables1

10 153 

8 998 

8 757 

8 706 

8 655 

Other financial assets1

6 107 

9 381 

9 381 

9 381 

9 381 

 

99 885 

125 489 

123 802 

123 418 

124 111 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non‑financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories1

2 048 

3 193 

3 193 

3 193 

3 193 

Assets held for sale

307 

4 261 

5 337 

3 677 

3 242 

Property, plant and equipment2

1 788 874 

2 018 854 

2 120 608 

2 164 238 

2 186 163 

Infrastructure1

147 659 

163 141 

163 141 

163 141 

163 141 

Heritage and cultural assets1

47 539 

73 695 

75 555 

77 415 

79 275 

Intangibles

8 471 

8 796 

8 666 

7 507 

6 348 

Other assets3

12 941 

9 727 

6 860 

4 127 

1 528 

 

2 007 839 

2 281 667 

2 383 360 

2 423 298 

2 442 890 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

2 107 724 

2 407 156 

2 507 162 

2 546 716 

2 567 001 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables1

11 462 

17 386 

17 757 

18 128 

18 499 

Interest bearing liabilities1

7 957 

5 797 

4 564 

3 331 

2 098 

Employee benefits4

226 986 

225 957 

233 732 

241 507 

195 770 

Other liabilities

6 817 

6 603 

6 597 

6 591 

6 585 

Total liabilities

253 222 

255 743 

262 650 

269 557 

222 952 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

1 854 502 

2 151 413 

2 244 512 

2 277 159 

2 344 049 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Contributed capital5

(4 064)

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Reserves

778 009 

1 013 109 

1 057 063 

1 101 017 

1 144 971 

Accumulated funds

1 080 557 

1 138 304 

1 187 449 

1 176 142 

1 199 078 

Total equity

1 854 502 

2 151 413 

2 244 512 

2 277 159 

2 344 049 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in this item in 2023‑24 primarily reflects revised estimates based on 30 June 2022 actuals.

2.    The increase in Property, plant and equipment reflects further capital investment in schools and Youth Justice Facilities, and the estimated indexation of the asset value base less depreciation.

3.    The movement in Other assets reflects the continued amortisation and depreciation of leased assets and other non‑financial assets.

4.    The decrease in Employee benefits in 2027 recognises the payment of the 27th pay in 2026-27 and the reduction in the associated liability accrued over prior years for this purpose.

5.    Contributed capital in 2022‑23 reflects Budget estimates restructured from the former Department of Communities Tasmania, including minor differences that existed at an Output level in the former Departmentís Budget at the time of the restructure.


6.     

Table 2.13:†††††† Statement of Cash Flows

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ operating

1 279 432 

1 421 510 

1 469 251 

1 507 690 

1 608 647 

Appropriation receipts ‑ capital

63 915 

93 785 

113 090 

52 230 

29 750 

Appropriation receipts ‑ other

12 578 

19 373 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants

15 949 

16 333 

15 191 

13 903 

13 903 

Sales of goods and services

48 574 

48 760 

49 519 

50 275 

50 995 

GST receipts

40 046 

40 046 

40 046 

40 046 

40 046 

Interest received

159 

151 

145 

139 

133 

Other cash receipts

23 598 

20 568 

22 478 

22 646 

23 075 

Total cash inflows

1 484 251 

1 660 526 

1 709 720 

1 686 929 

1 766 549 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

(926 621)

(1 001 555)

(1 034 415)

(1 073 169)

(1 155 740)

Superannuation

(122 839)

(134 339)

(142 478)

(151 386)

(162 413)

Borrowing costs

(68)

(60)

(39)

(39)

(39)

GST payments

(40 640)

(40 640)

(40 640)

(40 640)

(40 640)

Grants and subsidies

(10 284)

(62 968)

(62 296)

(52 852)

(53 597)

Supplies and consumables

(304 492)

(302 463)

(302 399)

(302 148)

(306 811)

Other cash payments

(13 590)

(14 765)

(14 781)

(14 799)

(14 816)

Total cash outflows

(1 418 534)

(1 556 790)

(1 597 048)

(1 635 033)

(1 734 056)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

65 717 

103 736 

112 672 

51 896 

32 493 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets

(64 669)

(103 419)

(113 433)

(51 544)

(31 064)

Proceeds from the disposal of non‑financial assets

12 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(64 657)

(103 419)

(113 433)

(51 544)

(31 064)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings

(1 193)

(1 195)

(685)

(685)

(685)

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

(1 193)

(1 195)

(685)

(685)

(685)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(133)

(878)

(1 446)

(333)

744 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

83 758 

107 988 

107 110 

105 664 

105 331 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

83 625 

107 110 

105 664 

105 331 

106 075 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2.14:†††††† Statement of Cash Flows - Administered

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts ‑ operating

478 387 

510 021 

531 053 

549 190 

562 559 

Sales of goods and services

434 

445 

456 

468 

479 

Total cash inflows

478 821 

510 466 

531 509 

549 658 

563 038 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies

(478 387)

(510 021)

(531 053)

(549 190)

(562 559)

Transfers to the Public Account

(434)

(445)

(456)

(468)

(479)

Total cash outflows

(478 821)

(510 466)

(531 509)

(549 658)

(563 038)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

held

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting

period

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

....