7     Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania

Agency Outline

The Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania provides services focused on delivering a sustainable Tasmania. This is achieved through actions to protect and enhance Tasmania’s cultural and natural values and places, facilitating productive and sustainable industries and through promoting the sustainable use, presentation, and enjoyment of our cultural and natural values. The Department’s vision is a Tasmania where our natural resources, cultural values and environment are recognised and used sustainably to support our future prosperity.

The Department’s strategic priorities are to:

·       enable business and employment through sustainable growth of Tasmania’s productive industries;

·       deliver best practice legislative and regulatory systems and support programs;

·       put Tasmanian Aboriginal people at the heart of managing land, sea and Country;

·       protect and strengthen Tasmania’s cultural and natural values;

·       enable authentic and rewarding experiences of Tasmania; and

·       build a high performance department, driven by its people and systems.

The Department has four key organisational groups: Environment, Heritage and Land; the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service; Primary Industries and Water; and Strategy and Business Services.

The Department provides portfolio support to the following Ministers:

·       the Minister for Environment and Climate Change and the Minister for Parks, Hon Roger Jaensch MP;

·       the Minister for Heritage and the Minister for Racing, Hon Madeleine Ogilvie MP;

·       the Minister for Local Government, Hon Nic Street MP;

·       the Minister for Primary Industries and Water, Hon Jo Palmer MLC; and

·       the Minister for Resources, Hon Felix Ellis MP.

This chapter provides the Department’s financial information for 2023‑24 and the Forward Estimates (2024‑25 to 2026‑27). Further information on the Department is provided at www.nre.tas.gov.au.

Key Deliverables

Table 7.1 provides a summary of the Budget and Forward Estimates allocations for key deliverables being undertaken by the Department.

Table 7.1:         Key Deliverables Statement

 

2023-24

 

Budget

2024-25

Forward

Estimate

2025-26

Forward

Estimate

2026-27

Forward

Estimate

 

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

 

 

 

 

 

Abalone Industry Reinvestment Fund

1 000 

1 000 

.... 

.... 

Apiary Biosecurity (Protection against Varroa Mite)

125 

125 

125 

125 

Bushfire Management Capacity

300 

300 

.... 

.... 

Cape Bruny Car Park and Access Upgrade1

15 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Circular Economy

1 130 

1 000 

.... 

.... 

Cockle Creek Camping and Access Upgrade1

125 

125 

.... 

.... 

Critical Irrigation Repairs and Heritage Wall Repairs2

325 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Emergency Animal Disease Risk Fund

490 

700 

700 

700 

Fisheries Digital Transition Project (Stage 2)1,3

1 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Flathead Recovery Program

500 

500 

.... 

.... 

Flinders Island Camping Upgrades and RV Access1

65 

65 

65 

.... 

Freycinet Peninsula Wastewater1

370 

1 500 

.... 

.... 

Hastings Thermal Pool Revitalisation1

150 

250 

.... 

.... 

Maria Island Jetty

900 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Modernising Tasmania’s Water Information Management System

(Phase 1)4

200 

400 

 

.... 

 

.... 

Mt Field National Park New Arrival Concourse1

50 

50 

150 

.... 

North East Parks and Reserves Upgrades1

550 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Orange‑bellied Parrot Migration and Tracking5

950 

350 

.... 

.... 

Recreational Fishing ‑ Improved Boat and Trailer Parking1

125 

.... 

.... 

.... 

PWS Statewide Booking System4

250 

250 

.... 

.... 

Salmon Plan

450 

200 

200 

.... 

Supporting Tasmania’s Built Heritage

1 500 

1 500 

1 500 

.... 

Sustainable Renewal and Maintenance of PWS Critical Roads

2 000 

2 000 

.... 

.... 

Tamar Island Wetlands Boardwalk Replacement1

190 

190 

190 

.... 

Tasman Arch and Devils Kitchen Revitalisation1

50 

50 

50 

.... 

Tasmanian Agricultural Precinct Preparedness

500 

1 500 

2 000 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This item reflects additional funding for an existing project. A description of this item is included in the Capital Investment Program section of this chapter.

2.    This initiative will be delivered by the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens. Refer to chapter 25 of this Budget Paper for more information.

3.    This item reflects additional funding for an existing project, provided through the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program within Finance‑General.

4.    This item will be funded through the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program within Finance‑General.

5.    This initiative includes both capital services and operating services allocations.

Abalone Industry Reinvestment Fund

This funding will continue initiatives to enhance abalone stocks, particularly in Eastern Tasmania and expand control of the invasive Long‑spined sea urchin, to enable recovery of once productive East Coast fisheries and habitats to support valuable commercial, recreational and Aboriginal fisheries.

Apiary Biosecurity (Protection against Varroa Mite)

This initiative will support an additional Apiary Officer in the North of the State to support the plant and apiary industries in Tasmania.

Bushfire Management Capacity

This initiative will see the replacement of tanker units that are fitted to operational vehicles during the fire season, to help maintain bushfire management capacity in the face of climate change.

Circular Economy

The Circular Economy initiative has leveraged significant industry and Australian Government investment in the State through the delivery of Organics Waste Processing, Levy Readiness and Regional and Remote Grants. This additional funding will support an industry partner to build a crumbed rubber plant and provide a sustainable solution for recovery of end‑of‑life waste tyres in Tasmania.

Emergency Animal Disease Risk Fund

This initiative will support border personnel and industry engagement, along with traceability planning, supply chain engagement and emergency animal disease risk preparedness activities.

Flathead Recovery Program

This initiative will support urgent action required to support the recovery of flathead stock, an important fish for recreational fishers. Funding will be utilised for research initiatives in partnership with the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and targeted fisher education programs in partnership with the Tasmanian Association for Recreational Fishing Inc (TARFish).

Maria Island Jetty

Funding is provided for urgent repairs and critical maintenance to ensure the continued safe operation of the Maria Island jetty. The jetty is relied upon for the safe transfer of passengers and loading and unloading of essential supplies, equipment and materials to support operations at Maria Island.

Modernising Tasmania’s Water Information Management System (Phase 1)

Funding is provided for a business case and detailed concept plan for renewal of the current Water Information Management System and to inform the next stage of development for the project. WIMS is Tasmania’s system for managing water licence and dam permit information.

Orange‑bellied Parrot Migration and Tracking

Funding is provided to build on existing proof‑of‑concept trials to develop a tracking program for the critically endangered Orange‑bellied Parrot, increasing knowledge of the species migratory pathways and opportunities to mitigate risks to its recovery.

Support will also be provided to the captive breeding program at Five Mile Beach Wildlife Management Facility through investment in asset maintenance and improvements to support the effective functioning of the facility.

PWS Statewide Booking System

This initiative will deliver the specifications and requirements for a contemporary booking solution to enable the sale of Park entry permits and products, providing an enhanced customer experience.

Salmon Plan

Funding is provided to support the implementation of key strategic initiatives identified under the Tasmanian Salmon Industry Plan 2023.

Supporting Tasmania’s Built Heritage

Funding is provided to support Tasmania’s iconic heritage assets and their important contribution to the economy in driving visitation to the State.

Sustainable Renewal and Maintenance of PWS Critical Roads

Roads and bridges are an important asset managed by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service, with over 1 152km of managed roads across the State. Funding is provided for the renewal, replacement and maintenance costs associated with key sections of this road network.

Tasmanian Agricultural Precinct Preparedness

This initiative will support the development of a Tasmanian Agricultural Precinct, incorporating an assessment of, and investment into, Tasmania’s research and laboratory facilities.


 

Output Group Restructure

In February 2022, the Government announced that the Department of Communities Tasmania would be restructured and abolished, with the restructure undertaken in accordance with State Service Restructuring Orders made during 2022‑23. This included the restructure of Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania from the Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania to the Department of Premier and Cabinet as part of the establishment of an Aboriginal Affairs whole‑of‑government division.

At an output level, the restructure resulted in the transfer of former Output 6.2 Aboriginal Heritage and Land to the Department of Premier and Cabinet. Chapter 1 of this Budget Paper provides further information on the restructure of the former Department of Communities Tasmania.

Output Information

Outputs of the Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania are provided under the following Output Groups:

·       Output Group 1 ‑ Land Tasmania;

·       Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries and Water;

·       Output Group 3 ‑ Biosecurity;

·       Output Group 4 ‑ Parks;

·       Output Group 5 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy;

·       Output Group 6 ‑ Heritage;

·       Output Group 7 ‑ Environment; and

·       Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery.

Table 7.2 provides an Output Group Expense Summary for the Department.

Table 7.2:         Output Group Expense Summary

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Primary Industries1

12 251 

15 364 

11 978 

8 936 

8 517 

2.2 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops

759 

716 

731 

748 

761 

2.3 Water Resources Management2

8 792 

8 942 

9 114 

7 999 

8 142 

2.4 Marine Resources3

20 333 

21 130 

19 812 

17 023 

16 752 

 

42 135 

46 152 

41 635 

34 706 

34 172 


Table 7.2:         Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 3 ‑ Biosecurity

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Biosecurity and Product Integrity4

41 638 

37 670 

35 497 

33 665 

33 996 

 

41 638 

37 670 

35 497 

33 665 

33 996 

Output Group 7 ‑ Environment

 

 

 

 

 

7.3 Natural Values Management5

13 124 

13 346 

13 487 

12 287 

12 270 

 

13 124 

13 346 

13 487 

12 287 

12 270 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.2 Seafood Industry Growth and Recovery

165 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

165 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

6 803 

6 619 

6 646 

6 279 

6 307 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

2.5 Forest Policy6

2 605 

2 255 

2 241 

2 184 

1 177 

 

2 605 

2 255 

2 241 

2 184 

1 177 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

11 340 

11 402 

11 700 

11 774 

11 850 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 6 ‑ Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

6.2 Aboriginal Heritage and Land7

548 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

548 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 6 ‑ Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Historic Heritage8

4 160 

4 607 

4 621 

4 690 

3 260 

 

4 160 

4 607 

4 621 

4 690 

3 260 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

4 283 

4 386 

4 456 

4 545 

4 636 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 7.2:         Output Group Expense Summary (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Parks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Land Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

15 348 

15 559 

15 550 

15 219 

15 491 

1.2 Valuation Services

6 673 

6 962 

7 032 

7 165 

7 259 

 

22 021 

22 521 

22 582 

22 384 

22 750 

Output Group 4 ‑ Parks

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Parks

80 533 

83 225 

83 840 

83 373 

81 835 

4.2 Crown Land Services

12 354 

12 652 

12 521 

12 629 

12 731 

 

92 887 

95 877 

96 361 

96 002 

94 566 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.5 Improving Crown Lands Transaction Turnaround Time9

650 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

650 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

3 986 

4 173 

4 024 

4 001 

4 080 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

556 

556 

556 

556 

556 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Racing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Racing Regulation and Policy

5 809 

5 970 

6 098 

5 861 

5 988 

 

5 809 

5 970 

6 098 

5 861 

5 988 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

33 277 

32 977 

32 977 

32 477 

32 477 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment and Climate Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 7 ‑ Environment

 

 

 

 

 

7.1 Environmental Management10

8 166 

17 030 

18 927 

17 714 

17 743 

7.2 Analytical Services11

6 140 

7 477 

7 567 

7 674 

7 761 

7.4 Threatened Species12

4 608 

6 080 

5 545 

4 908 

5 019 

 

18 914 

30 587 

32 039 

30 296 

30 523 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

304 901 

319 098 

314 920 

301 707 

298 608 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Primary Industries in 2023‑24 reflects Australian Government funding for the Horticulture Netting Trial Scheme and increases in existing initiatives including the Agricultural Development Fund, Farm Business Resilience Package, Implementation of Wild Fallow Deer Management and the Strategic Industry Partnership Program. The decrease in 2024‑25 reflects the funding profiles of these same initiatives and the completion of the Dairy Farm Extension, Red Meat Livestock Production Strategies and Stock Underpass Program initiatives. The decrease in 2025‑26 reflects completion of the Agricultural Development Fund, Agricultural Innovation Fund Farm Business Resilience Package and Strategic Industry Partnership Program initiatives.

2.    The decrease in Water Resources Management in 2025‑26 primarily reflects the completion of prior year Budget initiatives for the Rural Water Use Strategy Implementation initiative, the National Water Grid Authority Science Program and Modernising Tasmania’s Water Information Management System (Phase 1).

3.    The decrease in Marine Resources in 2024‑25 primarily reflects decreases in funding for the Industry Led Abalone Industry Development Fund, Salmon Plan and Supporting Recreational Sea Fishing in Local Communities initiatives. The further decrease in 2025‑26 reflects completion of prior year Budget initiatives for Industry Led Abalone Industry Development Fund, Abalone Industry Reinvestment Fund and Flathead Recovery initiatives funding in this Budget.

4.    The decrease in Biosecurity and Product Integrity in 2023‑24 primarily reflects the completion of the Border and Biosecurity Control Costs and Flinders Island Veterinarian Accommodation and Equipment initiatives. The decrease in 2024‑25 reflects a decrease in Australian Government funding for the Fruit Fly Fund, Securing Our Borders and Weed Action Fund initiatives. The decrease in 2025‑26 reflects the completion of the Weed Action Fund initiative and further movement in the Securing Our Borders initiative.

5.    The decrease in Natural Values Management in 2025‑26 reflects the completion of the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Bodies initiative.

6.    The decrease in Forest Policy in 2023‑24 reflects a decrease in funding for the Timber Promotions Board. The decrease in 2026‑27 reflects the completion of the On-island Processing and Value Adding initiative.

7.    The decrease in Aboriginal Heritage and Land in 2023‑24 reflects the restructure of these functions to the Department of Premier and Cabinet during 2022‑23.

8.    The increase in Historic Heritage in 2023‑24 reflects funding for the Supporting Tasmania’s Built Heritage initiative, offset by the completion of the Port Arthur Convict Heritage Hub Penitentiary initiative. The decrease in 2026‑27 reflects completion of the Supporting Tasmania’s Built Heritage initiative.

9.    Funding in 2023‑24 and 2024‑25 for Improving Crown Lands Transaction Turnaround Time has been allocated to Output Group 4 ‑ Parks, upon cessation of the COVID‑19 Response and Recovery Output Group.

10.  The increase in Environmental Management in 2023‑24 reflects the commencement of the Landfill Levy. The increase in 2024‑25 reflects the full implementation of the Landfill Levy, partially offset by a decrease in the Circular Economy initiative and completion of the Waste Action Plan ‑ Recycling Infrastructure Grant Program initiative. The decrease in 2025‑26 reflects the completion of the Circular Economy initiative.

11.  The increase in Analytical Services in 2023‑24 reflects additional laboratory operating expenditure.

12.  The increase in Threatened Species in 2023‑24 reflects funding for the Orange‑bellied Parrot Migration and Tracking initiative and additional funding received as part of the Threatened Species Strategy and Swift Parrot Recovery initiatives. The decrease across 2024‑25 and 2025‑26 reflects completion of these initiatives.


 

Output Group 1:    Land Tasmania

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

This Output provides a secure land titling system, an effective policy and legislative framework for land administration and services that underpin land management and support the development of Tasmania’s spatial data infrastructure. This Output also produces, maintains and integrates a wide range of land information data sets, which are easily accessible through the Land Information System Tasmania web interface and TASMAP products.

1.2 Valuation Services

This Output provides an authoritative valuation service for Government on acquisition, purchase, sale and rental of property, including quality control of statutory property valuations. This Output also administers and delivers a uniform and consistent valuation system to support rating and taxing in Tasmania. Supplementary valuation services for municipal areas in Tasmania are also either undertaken by the Office of the Valuer‑General or subcontracted to valuation firms.

Table 7.3:         Performance Information - Output Group 1

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality of Tasmania’s land survey and valuation services

 

 

 

 

 

Complying surveys lodged1

%

96

92

94

90

Objections resulting in an amended valuation2

%

0.07

0.11

<2.00

<2.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of land registration processes

 

 

 

 

 

Sealed plans lodged in compliance with the Priority Final Plan Scheme registered within the statutory timeframe3

%

100

99

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of quality land information to support decision making

 

 

 

 

 

Number of land related data sets available via the LIST4

Number of data sets

2 731

2 970

3 100

3 250

Availability of LIST website and LIST services to government, industry and public5

%

99

99

99

99

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level of government, industry and public use of LIST

 

 

 

 

 

Level of government, industry and public use of LIST website6

Number sessions

(million)

2.86

2.91

3.0

3.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2023‑24 target has been reduced due to how requisitions are processed and reported in the Land Titles Office under the Priority Final Plan Scheme.

2.    This measure represents the percentage of total valuation notices issued in a financial year that have an amended valuation following the lodgement of an objection. It reflects the quality and consistency of valuations completed.

3.    The Early Issue Scheme was replaced with the Building and Construction (Regulatory Reform Amendments) Act (No. 2) 2020 Priority Final Plan Scheme. The new Scheme commenced operation on 30 November 2020.

4.    This measure reflects the number of layers available via LISTmap and includes layers secured and accessible by specific clients such as emergency service organisations. Operational responses to biosecurity incidents, integration of layers from ABS and other government data projects has resulted in the year on year increases to the available LISTmap layers.

5.    This is a measure of the overall annual (24/7/365) system availability of the LIST website and LIST services relevant to outages within the control of the Department.

6.    This measure captures the volume of client web sessions (i.e. numbers of times clients access the LIST website and its components) using standard web browsers.

Output Group 2:    Primary Industries and Water

2.1 Primary Industries

This Output supports the Government’s commitment to grow the value of the agricultural sector in Tasmania tenfold to $10 billion by 2050. It oversees the delivery of Tasmania’s Sustainable Agri‑Food Plan 2019‑23. The majority of the agricultural research, development and extension services delivered via the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture are reflected in this Output. It also includes Game Services Tasmania, which delivers game and browsing animal management services to landholders, farmers and hunters.

2.2 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops

This Output aims to maintain a securely regulated poppy industry through responsibility for the licensing, inspection, supervision and management of poppy crops. This Output ensures that the cultivation of poppy crops is performed in accordance with the Poisons Act 1971, ensuring policy coordination and preparation of advice to the Government and liaison with private enterprise, government agencies, growers and other stakeholder bodies.

The Output is also responsible for ensuring the licensing, inspection and testing of all industrial hemp crops is undertaken in accordance with the Industrial Hemp Act 2015 and Regulations.

2.3 Water Resources Management

This Output develops and implements a range of legislation and policies for water management to ensure the equitable, efficient and sustainable allocation and use of surface and ground‑water resources and the safety of dams. It supports the development and coordination of policies relating to the regulation of the urban water and sewerage industry. It also provides services to assess, monitor, report and provide advice on the health, condition and state of Tasmania’s water resources for the community, industry and Government.

2.4 Marine Resources

This Output supports the orderly and sustainable development and management of the Tasmanian aquaculture industry and develops and implements management policies and plans for Tasmania’s commercial, recreational and Aboriginal cultural fisheries.

2.5 Forest Policy

This Output provides high level support on forestry resource policy and management issues including strategic policy projects and program delivery relating to forestry policy and programs. It has a focus on forest policy projects of strategic importance as well as delivery of specific programs to assist the development and growth of the forest industry.

Table 7.4:         Performance Information - Output Group 2

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value of primary industries sector

 

 

 

 

 

Gross value of agricultural and fish production

 

 

 

 

 

  Wild fisheries1

$ million

123.9

118.9

120

120

  Aquaculture2

$ million

1 060

1 190

1 287

1 397

  Agriculture3

$ million

2 113

na

2 116

2 241

Food production value added4

$ million

5 618

na

6 435

6 980

Exports of food, agriculture and fisheries

 

 

 

 

 

  Overseas exports5

$ million

874

983

980

1 070

  Interstate food trade6

$ million

3 753

na

4 130

4 540

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timber production7

 

 

 

 

 

Volume of total timber produced in public and private forests8

Tonnes

'000

5 049

5 275

5 300

5 400

Percentage of timber processed in Tasmania9

%

89.21

93.11

90.0

90.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of fishers’ licensing processes

 

 

 

 

 

Fishers’ licensing transaction times10

% completed in 3 working days

95

95

95

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

External funds leveraged from Government investment in primary industries research11

 

 

 

 

 

External funds received by TIA12

$ million

6.18

12.19

8

8

External funds received by IMAS‑SMRCA13

$ million

6.47

5.0

3.5

3.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of information to support farmers to run their businesses

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of emails or calls to FarmPoint responded to within 1 business day14

%

95

98

98

98

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of Poppy Advisory Control Board per licence issued15

$

1 721

2 126

2 092

2 092

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support for GMO moratorium

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of former GM canola sites monitored or audited16

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 7.4:         Performance Information - Output Group 2 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amount of water available for irrigation

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total volume of water licensed for irrigation17

Megalitres (ML)

'000

922

934

1 000

1 000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficiency of dam permit processing18

 

 

 

 

 

Average time for processing applications for Division 4 dam works permit approvals

Days

9

3

14

14

Average time for processing applications for Division 3 dam works permit approvals

Days

43

37

84

84

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality of water information

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of streamflow sites that meet quality assurance standards19

%

99.4

99.2

95

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Targets for this measure can vary as they are based on the total allowable commercial catches, set for the relevant licensing years, which do not coincide with financial years. Similarly, actuals relate to the licensing year ending in the relevant financial year. The downward trend for 2020‑21 and the 2021‑22 actuals for wild fisheries is largely due to COVID‑19 impacts on domestic and international markets and the ongoing closure of the Chinese market to rock lobster imports from Tasmania.

2.    The 2022‑23 Target has been revised to reflect updated estimates.

3.    This measure includes food and non‑food agricultural production. The targets assume a growth rate from 2012‑13 that results in the gross value reaching $10 billion by 2050, consistent with the Tasmanian Government’s AgriVision 2050 target. This measure is sourced from the ABS Agricultural Commodities data released annually. The 2020‑21 actual has been updated to reflect the figure published in the Department’s 2021‑22 Annual Report. The 2021‑22 Report did not include an overall value figure for agricultural production or sufficient detail to derive one given a change in methodology by the ABS. It is anticipated future releases of data will include an annual production figure.

4.    This measure is reported in the Tasmanian Agri‑Food ScoreCard, which is published by the Department. It is calculated from data sourced from the ABS, the Department, primary producers, industry bodies and major food processors. The 2021‑22 value is not yet available and will be noted in the Department’s 2022‑23 Annual Report.

5.    This measure is sourced from ABS overseas export data and incorporates meat, dairy, fish, and fruit and vegetables. Targets assume conformity with long‑term production trends and no significant change in the value of the Australian dollar. The 2020‑21 actual has been updated to reflect the figure published in the Department’s 2021‑22 Annual Report.

6.    The net value of interstate trade is calculated by the Department and reported in the Tasmanian Agri-Food ScoreCard. It is the residual value of food production value added after overseas exports and Tasmanian consumption are accounted for. The 2020‑21 Actual has been updated to reflect the figure published in the Department’s 2021‑22 Annual Report. The 2021‑22 Actual is not yet available and will be noted in the Department’s 2022‑23 Annual Report.

7.    These are new measures from 2023‑24.

8.    This measure is the total volume of timber products produced in Tasmania from private hardwood and softwood plantations, private and public native forests.

9.    This measure reflects the proportion of total volume of timber harvested that undergoes some form of processing within the State.

10.  This measure reflects the response time for processing of routine applications.

11.  The funds received by the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture and the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies - Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration Agreement are calculated on a calendar year basis. For example, the 2021‑22 Actual refers to the total amount of funds received during the 2021 calendar year. These measures exclude the contribution by the University of Tasmania.

12.  This measure is only one measure of the success of the Joint Venture Agreement with the TIA. The TIA Strategic Plan identifies the priorities for the Institute, including supporting the Government’s plan to increase the contribution of agriculture to the Tasmanian economy.

13.  Target funding for SMRCA external funding is designed to match the approximate level of State Government contributions annually, which is around $3.5 million in 2022‑23. IMAS has historically exceeded that target.

14.  FarmPoint provides easy access to information to support farmers to run their business. The measure is based on response times to calls and emails received through FarmPoint.

15.  This is a measure of the total costs of the Poppy Advisory Control Board per annum divided by the number of licences issued and/or active in that year. The 2020‑21 Actual has been updated to reflect a correction. The increase over recent years in cost per licence issued or active is primarily the result of a reduction in the number of poppy growers in Tasmania in response to stable global stocks and the need to balance supply and demand. The cost of the PACB is primarily a fixed cost and is borne by Government. Poppy cultivation licences are no longer issued annually, but for a period of up to five years.

16.  All former GM canola trial sites are routinely monitored, and any volunteer plants are destroyed in accordance with the State’s GMO policy.

17.  This measure refers to the volume of water licensed and should be read as a cumulative total. A further approximately 130 000 ML is available through other statutory water entitlements, which are not recorded on the Department’s register. The target for this measure is indicative only.

18.  The statutory timeframe for processing Division 3 dam applications under the Water Management Act 1999 is 84 days. The legislation provides 14 days for a decision on whether an application is accepted as a Division 4 dam or whether the risk is high and an application is required under the Division 3 process.

19.  The targets for this measure are set to the nationally accepted benchmark of 95 per cent.

Output Group 3:    Biosecurity

3.1 Biosecurity and Product Integrity

This Output provides scientific risk‑based systems to exclude, eradicate or effectively manage pests and diseases that jeopardise the relative pest and disease‑free status of Tasmania. The Output:

·       delivers diagnostic services to support sustainable pest and disease control measures and to validate the State’s relative pest and disease‑free status with scientific evidence;

·       ensures animal welfare practices are consistent with legislative requirements and community expectations;

·       provides a framework to regulate and manage food safety in the primary production and processing sectors and to identify and trace the movement of livestock; and

·       includes services aimed at ensuring that agricultural chemical use is consistent with legislative requirements and community expectations.

Table 7.5:         Performance Information - Output Group 3

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriateness of import requirements for plants and animals

 

 

 

 

 

Current and relevant import requirements in place for plants and plant products1

%

100

100

100

100

Import permits and conditions for animals and animal products reviewed2

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Responses to notifications of weeds, pests and diseases are undertaken in accordance with State and national protocols

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of notifications requiring further regulatory action ‑ weeds3

%

<1

<1

<1

<1

Proportion of notifications followed up ‑ pests and diseases4

%

100

100

100

100

Compliance with response protocols5

%

100

100

100

100

 

Table 7.5:   Performance Information - Output Group 3 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effectiveness of Diagnostic Services

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with the relevant International Standard as applied to veterinary and plant testing laboratories6

Yes/No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barrier inspections conducted to appropriate standards

 

 

 

 

 

Effective screening of all passenger transfers from Bass Strait ferries and major airports7

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effective Approved Quarantine Places

 

 

 

 

 

Fully compliant Approved Quarantine Places8

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with food safety standards by primary producers and processors

 

 

 

 

 

Eligible primary producers/processors accredited annually by NRE Tas ‑ cumulative9

Number

276

265

270

265

Audits of high‑risk food safety areas without significant findings10

%

99

99

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with animal welfare standards

 

 

 

 

 

Audits of high‑risk animal use undertaken without significant findings11

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliance with chemical usage legislation

 

 

 

 

 

Audits of agricultural and veterinary chemical usage without significant findings12

%

100

100

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This measure refers to the percentage of import requirements that are current and relevant. The requirements are reviewed as required.

2.    For this measure, requirements are reviewed within three years according to program specifications.

3.    This measure is calculated on the number of regulatory follow‑ups, such as requirement notices and infringement notices, required once a landowner has been formally notified that they have a declared weed on their property and should begin action to control it. It is calculated as the total number of enforcement actions (requirement or infringement notices) as a percentage of the total number of Weed Management Act 1999 compliance activities. The lower the percentage of required follow-ups, the higher the proportion of compliance.

4.    The biosecurity system includes processes to follow‑up notifications of quarantine plant pests and diseases and notifiable animal diseases. This occurs as a result of public or industry reports and detections and diagnostic investigations in the Tasmanian biosecurity laboratories. This measure reports the percentage of notifications that were followed up.

5.    Plant and animal biosecurity response protocols apply at state and national levels and are used in the event of a detection of a quarantine plant or animal pest or disease. This measure reports compliance with these response protocols.

6.    For plant health laboratories, this measure applies to the plant virology laboratory only. Entomology, plant pathology and molecular laboratories are currently working towards meeting the international standard as part of a long‑term strategy of laboratory modernisation.

7.    This measure describes contemporary biosecurity approaches to the screening of passengers and goods. ‘Effective screening’ may include both pre‑border and border activities to reduce the risk of the introduction of pests and diseases via ferry and airplane passengers. The target of 100 per cent relates to the results of audits and checks of internal processes and systems rather than 100 per cent of individual passengers.

8.    This measure describes the proportion of the Registered Quarantine Places (currently registered under the Plant Quarantine Act 1997 but in future under the Biosecurity Act 2019) for quarantining biosecurity matter, which are compliant with conditions of registration.

9.    All primary producers of regulated produce must be accredited by the Department and comply with the requirements of the applicable Food Safety Scheme under the Primary Produce Safety Act 2011. This is a measure of the number of eligible primary producers required to comply with the standard.

10.  High‑risk areas relate to aspects of primary food production that, if not controlled adequately by the operator, are likely to present a food safety risk to consumers. A significant finding is a contravention on the part of a producer that presents an imminent and serious risk to the safety of primary produce intended for sale, or that would cause significant unsuitability of the primary produce. During an audit, minor non‑compliances may be detected, and corrective action taken. Such non-compliances do not represent a significant risk to food safety.

11.  High‑risk animal use refers to intensive terrestrial species farming activities that, if not controlled adequately and in accordance with standards, can present an animal welfare risk.

12.  A risk‑based audit program is in place to ensure controls on the handling and use of agricultural chemicals are being complied with.

Output Group 4:    Parks

4.1 Parks

This Output aims to protect, promote and manage Tasmania’s world‑renowned parks and reserve system. These areas provide significant environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits and experiences. This Output provides for their sustainable use through maintenance, appropriate infrastructure, high‑quality visitor experiences and a culture that promotes visitor safety. It also manages significant biodiversity restoration programs complemented by the development and implementation of enhanced biosecurity measures.

4.2 Crown Land Services

This Output manages Crown land, ensuring its suitable use and development. It also provides specialist Crown land property‑related advice to Government and the private sector.

Table 7.6:         Performance Information - Output Group 4

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management Plans

 

 

 

 

 

Protected land covered by approved management plans1

%

65

65

65

65

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level of volunteer support

 

 

 

 

 

Registered community volunteer organisations2

Number

17

94

80

110

Volunteer attendance (hours volunteered) with the Parks and Wildlife Service3

Hours

na

25 529

37 650

30 250

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 7.6:         Performance Information - Output Group 4 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visitor numbers4

 

 

 

 

 

Cradle Mountain

'000

170

186

199

292

Freycinet

'000

265

251

270

338

Gordon River

'000

44

68

55

86

Lake St Clair

'000

72

78

78

93

Mole Creek Caves

'000

25

31

44

61

Mt Field

'000

159

182

177

212

Narawntapu

'000

61

58

59

59

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property Services

 

 

 

 

 

Value of sales completed per year5

$ million

1.18

3.3

1.0

1.7

Number of lease and licence agreements issued6

Number

 

317

576

400

500

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This measure refers to protected land managed under the National Parks and Reserves Management Act 2002 by the Parks and Wildlife Service. It does not include private sanctuaries or private nature reserves. It also does not include the Port Arthur or Coal Mines Historic Sites, which have a management plan in place but are managed by another authority. Protected land includes both reserved inland and marine waters.

2.    The Parks framework for managing community volunteer organisations was revised in 2019‑20. To implement the revised framework, all active volunteer community group organisations are required to register within the newly introduced volunteer software. This process commenced in late 2020‑21. This measure will continue to ensure all active volunteering organisations are captured. The increase in the 2023‑24 Target is based on the current trends in engagement between the PWS and volunteer organisations, noting the number of registered organisations is subject to change as some organisations cease and others commence.

3.    This is a new measure from 2021‑22, with volunteer hours data not previously captured. The hours volunteered more accurately reflects the efforts and services provided by volunteers and is a measure that can be positively influenced by PWS engagement. The decrease in the target for 2023‑24 is based on the information collected since 2021‑22 regarding volunteer activity within Parks and Reserves and better reflects the expected level of engagement and effort from these groups.

4.    The PWS does not count visitors to every National Park or Reserve. An estimate is made of the number of visitors to selected sites, including those in the table. Data for some sites may not be available at the time of reporting. Where this occurs an estimate will be reported based on data available at the time. These estimates may then be revised in subsequent reporting periods based on actual data becoming available. All targets are subject to unknown and unpredictable changes in travel and park visitation that continue to be experienced. Whilst 2020‑21 saw decreased visitation due to COVID‑19, visitor numbers have begun to increase in 2021‑22 and are expected to increase further in 2022‑23 and 2023‑24.

5.    This measure is a combination of sales of Crown land properties identified as surplus by PWS Property Services through the Public Sales Program as well as those properties sold as a result of direct applications to purchase received from the public. Sales revenue fluctuates depending on market conditions and the number of applications received. The higher than target 2021‑22 Actual mainly reflects three large Application sales with a combined value of $1.29 million. The 2022‑23 Target has been increased to reflect the additional funding directed to Property Services through the Crown Land Transaction Turnaround Time initiative which aims to increase activity in this area.

6.    This measure includes lease and licence agreements relating to Crown Land that are either new, conversion, transfer, renewal, variation, or transfer and conversion. The increased transactions in 2021‑22 can be attributed to increased capacity following commencement of the Crown Land Transaction Turnaround Time Budget initiative.


 

Output Group 5:    Racing Regulation and Policy

5.1 Racing Regulation and Policy

This Output delivers probity and integrity services to the Tasmanian racing industry through the Office of Racing Integrity. This is achieved by:

·       registering race clubs;

·       licensing and registering industry participants and racing animals;

·       providing handicapping and grading services;

·       providing stipendiary stewards;

·       enforcing national and local rules of racing for each racing code;

·       registering and regulating on‑course bookmakers and their agents;

·       setting the integrity conditions applicable to all Tasmanian race field information publication approvals;

·       providing administrative support to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board;

·       undertaking high‑level research and analysis on a range of issues relating to the Tasmanian racing industry;

·       developing, implementing and evaluating racing policy in Tasmania, with reference to local and national developments in the sector;

·       representing the State and the local racing industry on national bodies and in national forums, in relation to racing integrity and related matters; and

·       ensuring compliance with the requirements of the Racing Regulation Act 2004.

Table 7.7:         Performance Information - Output Group 5

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drug Detection1

 

 

 

 

 

Swabs taken by stewards

Number

4 249

4 078

3 500

3 500

Positive swabs to swabs taken

%

0.31

0.34

0.30

0.30

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suspensions, disqualifications, fines and appeals2

 

 

 

 

 

Suspensions, disqualifications and fines imposed by stewards on licensed persons

Number

544

370

450

450

Suspensions, disqualifications and fines appealed to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board

Number

20

16

20

20

Appeals to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board where appeal upheld

%

15

6

15

15


 

Table 7.7:         Performance Information - Output Group 5 (continued)

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appeals to the Tasmanian Racing Appeal Board where penalty varied

%

45

31

30

30

 

 

 

 

 

 


Licensing and Registration

 

 

 

 

 

Licences issued3

Number

1 341

1 330

1 450

1 450

Licence and registration applications (not referred to Licensing Panel) approved within 14 days

%

100

98

100

100

Licencing and registration decisions appealed to the Tasmania Racing Appeal Board

Number

2

1

0

0

Appeals to the Tasmanian Racing Appeals Board where licensing or registration appeal is upheld

Number

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Handicapping4

 

 

 

 

 

Races handicapped

Number

724

742

770

770

Races handicapped requiring a redraw after publication of the fields, due to errors

%

2.49

2.15

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grading4

 

 

 

 

 

Races graded

Number

1 558

1 539

1 650

1 650

Races graded requiring a redraw after publication of the fields, due to errors

%

0.32

0.58

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Swabs include both animals and humans.

2.    These measures are difficult to forecast and largely beyond the control of the Office of Racing Integrity, although ORI continues to communicate and work with licence holders in an effort to minimise non‑compliances.

3.    This measure captures applications approved to persons to participate in Thoroughbred, Harness or Greyhound racing.

4.    The total number of races conducted is determined by Tasracing. The harness races are handicapped, and the greyhound races are graded by ORI.

Output Group 6:    Heritage

6.1 Historic Heritage

This Output works to recognise, protect and ensure the sound statutory management of places of historic cultural heritage significance to Tasmania. Assistance and advice is provided to the Tasmanian Heritage Council to administer the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995, to all three levels of government and to heritage property owners, site managers, and sector organisations. It aims to facilitate the sustainable use, development adaptive reuse and interpretation of places of State heritage significance and an understanding and appreciation of the social, economic and environmental benefits of historic heritage to Tasmania and the visitor economy.

Table 7.8:         Performance Information - Output Group 6

Performance Measure

Unit of

 Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historic Heritage Services

 

 

 

 

 

Number of places permanently entered on the Tasmanian Heritage Register1

Number

5 003

5 004

5 000

4 950

Percentage of places on the Tasmanian Heritage Register actively managed2

%

20

18

12

12

Proportion of development applications determined within the statutory timeframe3

%

99

96

100

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    This measure reflects the number of places permanently entered on the Tasmanian Heritage Register, subject to the works approval process in Part 6 of the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995. Fluctuation in the number of places entered on the Register reflects the Heritage Council’s strategic focus on adding, reviewing, amending, removing and replacing existing entries. This includes the introduction of single consolidated replacement entries for places that extend over multiple titles, where each individual title has previously been separately entered on the Register.

2.    This measure reflects the percentage of places on the Register where Heritage Tasmania had an active role in the management during the reporting period. These are places where a statutory decision was made in the registration or works areas or where a grant is being actively managed by Heritage Tasmania. It does not recognise the non‑statutory effort this work entails, including pre‑lodgement advice on proposed developments, the provision of pre‑purchase advice, pre‑statutory engagement in the registration program or the review and assessment of Heritage entries.

3.    This measure tracks the Heritage Council’s ability to determine a discretionary permit application within the statutory timeframes prescribed in Part 6 of the Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995.

Output Group 7:    Environment

7.1 Environmental Management

This Output undertakes activities to develop and manage a high quality, contemporary legislative framework (the Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994) and policies and strategies for the protection and management of the environment.

7.2 Analytical Services

This Output focuses on providing a range of scientific and analytical services in order to support the delivery of best practice environmental management and the management of environmental incidents.

7.3 Natural Values Management

This Output provides for the conservation and sustainable use of Tasmania’s natural values and land resources. The Output manages the State’s terrestrial and marine natural values to ensure their sustainable use and conservation.

7.4 Threatened Species

This Output provides for the management and protection of Tasmania’s threatened flora and fauna species, including marine mammals. It aims to ensure that threatened species are protected and retained in the wild and to prevent further species becoming threatened.

Table 7.9:         Performance Information - Output Group 7

Performance Measure

Unit of

Measure

2020-21 Actual

2021-22 Actual

2022-23 Target

2023-24 Target

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analytical Services Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

Number of analyses performed1

'000

281

273

265

265

Jobs reported on time

%

83.4

85.8

88

88

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proportion of Tasmanian land reserved

 

 

 

 

 

Land protected either by legislation or by contract in conservation reserves, under covenant or heritage regimes2

%

50.3

50.3

50.4

50.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area of Tasmanian private land reserved for a nature conservation purpose

 

 

 

 

 

Private land covered by voluntary binding conservation agreements3

Hectares

 '000

105.9

106.2

107.4

109.9

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility of information to support natural resource management and development decisions

 

 

 

 

 

Level of use of the Natural Values Atlas (page hits)4

Pages

'000

268

252

250

250

Total number of downloads from Natural Values Atlas5

Number

6 022

6 773

6 500

6 500

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment of threatened species status

 

 

 

 

 

The number of species for which the Scientific Advisory Committee (Threatened Species) has made a final recommendation on listing status to the Minister6

Number

7

6

7

7

Percentage of threatened species covered by a listing statement7

 

%

47

47

48

49

 

 

 

 

 

 

Genetic diversity of the Tasmanian devil

 

 

 

 

 

Extent of genetic diversity of the Tasmanian devil insurance population8

%

98.56

98.35

>95

>95

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2022‑23 Target has been updated to reflect the Department’s 2021‑22 Annual Report.

2.    The land protected by legislation or contract is based on the preliminary Tasmanian Reserve Estate layer, which consists of current formal and private reserves and informal reserves from the best available data. The total land area of Tasmania used is 6.8 million hectares, based on the mean high‑water mark. This includes Macquarie Island and other Tasmanian offshore islands. Only the terrestrial portion of reserves is reported on. The use of the preliminary Tasmanian Reserve Estate layer may result in slight variances in the annual figures quoted as they are subject to revision based on the final reserve data.

3.    Voluntary binding conservation agreements include both conservation covenants and management agreements, except for offset and compensation covenants. The measure represents the cumulative total for reservation.

4.    These are the number of page requests from the Natural Values Atlas website. In recent years NVA data is also being accessed through other channels such as the LIST and the Threatened Species Link and the Atlas of Living Australia which do not register as NVA page hits.

5.    This measure is an indicator of people using the NVA to download information. It is the sum of the total number of exports of raw data and reports run from the NVA but does not include NVA information downloaded through the LIST.

6.    This measure demonstrates that the Department is providing administrative and specialist support to the Threatened Species Scientific Advisory Committee, ensuring it meets regularly to consider nominations and provide recommendations to the Minister regarding threatened species listing status changes, and thereby delivering obligations under the Threatened Species Protection Act 1995.

7.    This measure indicates the availability of information to support decisions about threatened species management and recovery. It includes approved Listing Statements as well as more comprehensive Recovery Plans. It does not include species information contained in note sheets and other media.

8.    This measure is aimed at assessing the extent of genetic variation within the Tasmanian devil insurance population. Maintaining 95 per cent genetic diversity is considered desirable to minimise the likelihood of inbreeding within the population and to ensure that animals remain fit for release at a later date, as and if required. The assessment is done annually after the breeding season. It examines the genetic characteristics of the insurance population compared with the founder insurance animals. The actual figures are sourced from the Zoo and Aquarium Association’s Annual Reports. Note that this does not reflect genetic diversity in the wild but rather is a measure of the genetic diversity of the original founders represented within the contemporary captive population.


 

Capital Investment Program

Table 7.10 provides financial information for the Department’s Capital Investment Program. More information on the Capital Investment Program is provided in chapter 6 of The Budget Budget Paper No 1.

Table 7.10:       Capital Investment Program

 

Estimated 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Projects1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment and Climate Change

 

 

 

 

 

Orange‑bellied Parrot Migration and Tracking

400 

300 

100 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Parks

 

 

 

 

 

Bushfire Management Capacity

600 

300 

300 

.... 

.... 

Maria Island Jetty

900 

900 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Sustainable Renewal and Maintenance of PWS Critical Roads

4 000 

2 000 

2 000 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

Tasmanian Agricultural Precinct Preparedness

4 000 

500 

1 500 

2 000 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Existing Projects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment and Climate Change

 

 

 

 

 

Waste Action Implementation

1 000 

425 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Parks

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur Pieman Conservation Area

10 000 

1 000 

4 000 

3 000 

.... 

Ben Lomond ‑ A Year Round Destination

2 800 

319 

800 

600 

800 

Cape Bruny Car Park and Access Upgrade2

1 715 

1 565 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Cockle Creek Camping and Access Upgrade2

3 250 

1 705 

1 125 

320 

.... 

Cradle Mountain Experience3

61 040 

12 200 

11 000 

34 850 

.... 

Crown Land Services ‑ Structural Asset Upgrades4

Ongoing 

556 

556 

556 

556 

Edge of the World Revitalisation

2 750 

150 

750 

1 000 

850 

Flinders Island Camping Upgrades and RV Access2

1 095 

190 

465 

365 

.... 

Freycinet National Park New Visitor Gateway

14 000 

.... 

7 000 

7 000 

.... 

Freycinet Peninsula Wastewater2

10 270 

5 235 

4 070 

.... 

.... 

Freycinet Tourism Icons Project3

7 200 

300 

4 850 

.... 

.... 

Hastings Thermal Pool Revitalisation2

3 400 

1 050 

2 250 

.... 

.... 

Maria Island Re‑discovered Project

6 800 

4 348 

2 000 

.... 

.... 

Table 7.10:       Capital Investment Program (continued)

 

Estimated 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

Total 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Cost 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mt Field National Park New Arrival Concourse2

2 050 

150 

150 

950 

800 

National Parks ‑ Maintenance Boost4

Ongoing 

1 000 

1 000 

1 000 

1 000 

Next Iconic Walk4

40 000 

2 925 

4 700 

10 700 

10 000 

North East Parks and Reserves Upgrades2

1 015 

850 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Recreational Fishing ‑ Improved Boat and Trailer Parking2

2 325 

625 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Tamar Island Wetlands Boardwalk Replacement2

3 370 

290 

1 090 

1 490 

500 

Tasman Arch and Devils Kitchen Revitalisation2

1 650 

150 

350 

1 050 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

Biosecurity Risk Management and Truck And Machinery Washes

2 000 

315 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Fisheries Digital Transition Project (Stage 2)5

6 150 

285 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Implementing the Bee Industry Futures Report

500 

286 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Modernise Our Research Farms

7 000 

1 950 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total CIP Allocations

 

41 869 

50 056 

64 881 

14 506 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    Descriptions of new infrastructure projects are provided in the Key Deliverables section of this chapter.

2.    This item includes additional funding provided for this project as noted in the Key Deliverables section of this chapter.

3.    This item includes Australian Government funding.

4.    This project includes funding beyond the 2023‑24 Budget and Forward Estimates.

5.    This item includes additional funding provided through the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program within Finance General.

Arthur‑Pieman Conservation Area

In recognition of the increasing demand for recreational and four‑wheel drive opportunities within the Arthur‑Pieman Conservation Area and surrounding West Coast areas, and the significant natural and cultural heritage values of these areas, funding has been provided for upgrades and maintenance of existing tracks, the planning of future initiatives and amenities, and the ongoing protection of significant Aboriginal cultural values within the APCA. Investment will be guided by a new access and management strategy and implementation plan, which is currently under development.

Ben Lomond ‑ A Year Round Destination

This project will deliver a contemporary Management Plan for the Ben Lomond National Park that has a focus on year‑round activities, which includes a feasibility study on snow making. In addition, priority on‑ground works are to be undertaken on both existing and new walking track infrastructure and assets to promote year‑round activities.

Biosecurity Risk Management and Truck and Machinery Washes

This initiative will enhance the network of truck and machinery wash down stations to be delivered in partnerships with farmers, agribusiness, non‑government organisations and local government. The network will contribute to improvements in biosecurity and farm hygiene.

Cape Bruny Car Park and Access Upgrade

This initiative supports the continuation of the Cape Bruny project to improve vehicle access and car parking facilities with upgrades to day use areas, and finalisation of a site plan in support of visitors and commercial operators.

Cockle Creek Camping and Access Upgrade

This initiative supports Stage 2 of the Cockle Creek Gateway project, which will deliver a road realignment and new camping areas for motor homes, caravans and camping trailers.

Cradle Mountain Experience

Investment provided by the State and Australian Governments aligns with the Cradle Mountain Experience Master Plan and builds on the popularity of Cradle Mountain as an iconic destination. This initiative will facilitate the development of a Cradle Valley cableway, ensuring visitors have all‑year, all‑weather access to Dove Lake, with a minimal environmental footprint. This initiative also provides support for the development of a sensitive and appropriate iconic tourism experience in partnership with the private sector, on Crown land adjacent to the World Heritage Area.

Crown Land Services ‑ Structural Asset Upgrades

Ongoing funding is provided for the removal or remediation of physical structures and land that present public liability risks, for statutory maintenance and for essential and preventative maintenance to buildings.

Edge of the World Revitalisation

The Government has committed to revitalising the ‘Edge of the World’ experience at the mouth of the Arthur River. The project will redevelop the Edge of the World visitor site as a visitor destination on the West Coast, consisting of a new visitor shelter, interpretation, car parking, toilets and amenity improvements.

Fisheries Digital Transition Project (Stage 2)

The Fisheries Digital Transition Project (Stage 2) will support the ongoing transition of Tasmanian commercial wild‑capture fisheries to digital platforms. Revision of all catch and effort reporting forms used in commercial fisheries in Tasmania has been completed and legislation is in place to support digital licensing. The first phase of the project is scheduled to finish in June 2023, with further reporting apps and licensing technology improvements to continue to be rolled out over the next three years and will expand to include recreational fisheries and aquaculture applications. Additional funding in relation to this project is being provided from the Digital Transformation Priority Expenditure Program within Finance‑General in 2023‑24.

Flinders Island Camping Upgrades and RV Access

This project provides for the upgrade of campground facilities and access improvements for recreational vehicles. The project also provided for replacement stairs for access to Trousers Point Beach, which were completed in 2021‑22.

Freycinet National Park New Visitor Gateway

This funding provides for the ongoing development of the Freycinet Visitor Gateway, in addition to funding from the Australian Government. Planning has commenced with proposed works to include a new Visitor Gateway and transport hub, with a shuttle bus service to the Wineglass Bay Car Park to minimise traffic and parking issues.

Freycinet Peninsula Wastewater

The Freycinet Peninsula Master Plan highlighted wastewater as a priority issue facing the area. Funding is provided to mitigate the issues within the National Park that were identified in the Master Plan. The project will enable the construction of a new sewage pumping station and rising main to transfer sewage from the Wineglass Bay Trailhead to the sewage treatment lagoons, which have now been de‑sludged along with other upgrades to improve functionality. The funding has also provided the local council with the ability to increase its existing Environmental Health Office resources.

Freycinet Tourism Icons Project

In 2019‑20, the Australian Government committed funding for sustainable visitor infrastructure that enhances tourism facilities, amenities and experiences at Freycinet. Works completed to date include a second lookout over Wineglass Bay, a new foreshore walk connecting Coles Bay to the National Park and ongoing implementation of an Aboriginal education program that assists Tasmanian Aboriginal communities to increase the cultural understanding of visitors and tourism providers. This investment also includes funding for a new Visitor Gateway and transport hub.

Hastings Thermal Pool Revitalisation

This initiative will deliver improvements to the Hastings thermal pool to create a contemporary visitor facility.

Implementing the Bee Industry Futures Report

This initiative is supporting the implementation of priorities identified in the Government’s Bee Industry Futures Report, by delivering selected infrastructure upgrades to maintain access to floral resources for beekeepers.

Maria Island Re‑discovered Project

This initiative will deliver Stage 3 of the Maria Island Re‑discovered project to improve amenities for visitors as well as commercial operators.

Modernise Our Research Farms

This initiative is supporting the modernisation of Crown and Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture research farm assets and making our research farms the centre of excellence for practical research and demonstration, aligned with industry needs.

Mt Field National Park New Arrival Concourse

Funding has been provided for the Mt Field National Park to create a new arrival concourse.

National Parks ‑ Maintenance Boost

The Parks and Wildlife Service manages a significant portfolio of assets that service visitor needs and experiences within parks and reserves across the State. This initiative provides ongoing funding for the maintenance of this asset portfolio.

Next Iconic Walk

This initiative will deliver Tasmania’s next iconic multi‑day, hut‑based walk. The Tyndall Range has been selected out of 35 sites as the preferred location and a feasibility study was conducted to maximise the economic and community benefits for Tasmanians. Additional funding provided beyond the Forward Estimates will enable the delivery of this $40 million project, including the planning stage to develop the visitor experience, and the delivery stage to construct the infrastructure, market the experience to visitors and set up the enterprise to operate this walk.

North East Parks and Reserves Upgrades

This initiative supports the upgrade of assets within National Parks and Reserves across the north east of the State.

Recreational Fishing ‑ Improved Boat and Trailer Parking

To support recreational fishing, in conjunction with local councils, the Government is providing funding for upgrades to current parking facilities at key boat ramps, including overflow parking opportunities for these sites. Works completed to date include new boat parking facilities and supporting infrastructure at Coles Bay, additional boat parking on the road to Pirates Bay boat ramp on the Tasman Peninsula and expansion of the boat trailer parking along the foreshore at Swansea. Work is ongoing for the formalisation and hardening of boat trailer parking areas at Burns Bay near St Helens.

Tamar Island Wetlands Boardwalk Replacement

This initiative will improve visitor infrastructure including replacement of existing boardwalk, bird hide and bridges at the Tamar Island Wetlands.

Tasman Arch and Devils Kitchen Revitalisation

Funding has been provided towards the Tasman Arch and Devils Kitchen Stage 2 Project, including an iconic suspension bridge across the chasm. The Government is seeking an Australian Government contribution for the remaining funding for this project.

Waste Action Implementation

This project will provide for waste data infrastructure that will support the Government’s strategic investment in waste management and resource recovery.


 

Detailed Budget Statements

Table 7.11:       Statement of Comprehensive Income

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue ‑ operating1,2

163 274 

169 437 

160 502 

149 839 

150 593 

Appropriation revenue ‑ capital3

21 771 

34 869 

38 906 

44 881 

13 506 

Other revenue from government

4 384 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants4

15 195 

18 225 

20 156 

26 821 

7 697 

Sales of goods and services

32 770 

33 850 

34 358 

34 816 

35 270 

Fees and fines5

15 404 

24 213 

31 264 

31 320 

31 378 

Interest

Other revenue

4 273 

4 436 

4 436 

4 436 

4 436 

Total revenue

257 078 

285 036 

289 628 

292 119 

242 886 

Net gain/(loss) on non‑financial assets

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

Total income

259 392 

287 350 

291 942 

294 433 

245 200 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

133 282 

138 406 

137 868 

136 748 

138 759 

Depreciation and amortisation

13 613 

13 604 

13 314 

13 314 

13 314 

Supplies and consumables

58 973 

60 944 

60 437 

57 752 

55 495 

Grants and subsidies6

35 129 

40 355 

37 259 

28 564 

25 425 

Other expenses7

4 465 

6 232 

6 239 

6 253 

6 265 

Total expenses

245 462 

259 541 

255 117 

242 631 

239 258 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net result

13 930 

27 809 

36 825 

51 802 

5 942 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

Other movements taken directly to equity

(77)

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Total other comprehensive income

2 183 

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

2 260 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive result

16 113 

30 069 

39 085 

54 062 

8 202 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating in 2023‑24 primarily reflects new funding for Budget initiatives detailed in the Key Deliverables Statement. The variation over the Forward Estimates reflects the funding profile of both new and existing Budget initiatives.

2.    The increase in Appropriation revenue ‑ operating in 2026‑27 reflects additional appropriation for expenditure associated with the 27th pay occurring in that financial year.

3.    The variation in Appropriation revenue ‑ capital reflects the timing of funding provided for projects in the Department’s Capital Investment Program.

4.    The variation in Grants reflects the timing of Australian Government funding for capital projects including National and World Heritage Projects, the Cradle Mountain Experience, and the Freycinet Tourism Icon Package.

5.    The increase in Fees and fines in 2023‑24 reflects the recognition of the Landfill Levy from 1 July 2022. The increase in 2024‑25 reflects the full implementation of the Landfill Levy.

6.    The increase in Grants and subsidies in 2023‑24 relates to grant payments as part of the implementation of the Landfill Levy. The decrease in 2024‑25 reflects the expenditure profiles for the Circular Economy and Agriculture Development Fund initiatives. The decrease in 2025‑26 reflects the completion of these same initiatives, as well as the Agricultural Innovation Fund, Strategic Industry Partnership Program and Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Bodies initiatives. The decrease in 2026‑27 primarily reflects the completion of the On‑island Processing and Value Adding and Supporting Tasmania’s Built Heritage initiatives.

7.    The increase in Other expenses from 2023‑24 reflects the disbursement of levies as part of the Waste and Resource Recovery Act 2022.

Table 7.12:       Statement of Comprehensive Income ‑ Administered

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered revenue and other income

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation revenue - operating

59 439 

59 557 

59 803 

59 076 

59 350 

Sales of goods and services

21 063 

21 590 

22 131 

22 684 

23 250 

Fees and fines

15 811 

16 111 

16 497 

16 894 

17 299 

Other revenue

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

Total administered revenue

103 635 

104 580 

105 753 

105 976 

107 221 

Total administered income

103 635 

104 580 

105 753 

105 976 

107 221 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered expenses

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies

59 439 

59 557 

59 803 

59 076 

59 350 

Transfers to the Public Account

44 196 

45 023 

45 950 

46 900 

47 871 

Total administered expenses

103 635 

104 580 

105 753 

105 976 

107 221 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered net result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administered comprehensive result

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 7.13:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output1

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

2.1 Primary Industries2

11 367 

13 975 

11 584 

8 508 

8 277 

2.2 Supervision of Poppy and Hemp Crops

743 

700 

715 

732 

771 

2.3 Water Resources Management3

7 193 

7 143 

7 115 

6 400 

6 741 

2.4 Marine Resources4

10 613 

11 401 

10 083 

7 294 

7 196 

 

29 916 

33 219 

29 497 

22 934 

22 985 

Output Group 3 ‑ Biosecurity

 

 

 

 

 

3.1 Biosecurity and Product Integrity5

30 418 

28 343 

27 574 

27 128 

28 253 

 

30 418 

28 343 

27 574 

27 128 

28 253 

Output Group 7 ‑ Environment

 

 

 

 

 

7.3 Natural Values Management6

10 991 

11 189 

11 375 

10 182 

10 428 

 

10 991 

11 189 

11 375 

10 182 

10 428 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.2 Seafood Industry Growth and Recovery

165 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

165 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

6 803 

6 619 

6 646 

6 279 

6 307 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

5 400 

3 336 

1 500 

2 000 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

78 293 

79 370 

75 092 

66 523 

67 973 

Capital Services

5 400 

3 336 

1 500 

2 000 

.... 

 

83 693 

82 706 

76 592 

68 523 

67 973 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries and Water

 

 

 

 

 

2.5 Forest Policy7

2 550 

2 250 

2 236 

2 179 

1 213 

 

2 550 

2 250 

2 236 

2 179 

1 213 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

11 340 

11 402 

11 700 

11 774 

11 850 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

13 890 

13 652 

13 936 

13 953 

13 063 

 

13 890 

13 652 

13 936 

13 953 

13 063 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 7.13:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output1 (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 6 ‑ Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

6.2 Aboriginal Heritage and Land8

349 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

349 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

349 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

349 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 6 ‑ Heritage

 

 

 

 

 

6.1 Historic Heritage9

4 018 

4 465 

4 479 

4 548 

3 210 

 

4 018 

4 465 

4 479 

4 548 

3 210 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

4 283 

4 386 

4 456 

4 545 

4 636 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

8 301 

8 851 

8 935 

9 093 

7 846 

 

8 301 

8 851 

8 935 

9 093 

7 846 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Parks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 1 ‑ Land Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

1.1 Land Titles, Survey and Mapping Services

12 705 

12 916 

12 907 

12 576 

13 236 

1.2 Valuation Services

4 444 

4 713 

4 803 

4 916 

5 149 

 

17 149 

17 629 

17 710 

17 492 

18 385 

Output Group 4 ‑ Parks

 

 

 

 

 

4.1 Parks

40 544 

43 061 

43 907 

43 450 

43 207 

4.2 Crown Land Services

4 376 

4 674 

4 543 

4 651 

4 857 

 

44 920 

47 735 

48 450 

48 101 

48 064 

Output Group 90 ‑ COVID‑19 Response and Recovery

 

 

 

 

 

90.5 Improving Crown Lands Transaction Turnaround Time10

650 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

650 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

3 986 

4 173 

4 024 

4 001 

4 080 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 7.13:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output1 (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

15 571 

31 808 

38 306 

43 881 

14 506 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

66 705 

69 537 

70 184 

69 594 

70 529 

Capital Services

15 571 

31 808 

38 306 

43 881 

14 506 

 

82 276 

101 345 

108 490 

113 475 

85 035 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Racing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 5 ‑ Racing Regulation and Policy

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 Racing Regulation and Policy

5 560 

5 721 

5 849 

5 612 

5 886 

 

5 560 

5 721 

5 849 

5 612 

5 886 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

33 277 

32 977 

32 977 

32 477 

32 477 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

38 837 

38 698 

38 826 

38 089 

38 363 

 

38 837 

38 698 

38 826 

38 089 

38 363 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minister for Environment and Climate Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Output Group 7 ‑ Environment

 

 

 

 

 

7.1 Environmental Management11

8 166 

7 995 

2 886 

1 673 

1 737 

7.2 Analytical Services

3 685 

3 914 

4 004 

4 111 

4 303 

7.4 Threatened Species12

4 487 

5 977 

5 442 

4 879 

5 129 

 

16 338 

17 886 

12 332 

10 663 

11 169 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Investment Program

800 

725 

100 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Services

16 338 

17 886 

12 332 

10 663 

11 169 

Capital Services

800 

725 

100 

.... 

.... 

 

17 138 

18 611 

12 432 

10 663 

11 169 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania

 

 

 

 

 

Total Operating Services

222 713 

227 994 

219 305 

207 915 

208 943 

Total Capital Services

21 771 

35 869 

39 906 

45 881 

14 506 

 

244 484 

263 863 

259 211 

253 796 

223 449 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation Rollover

4 384 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 7.13:       Revenue from Appropriation by Output1 (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue from Appropriation

248 868 

263 863 

259 211 

253 796 

223 449 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Controlled Revenue from Appropriation

189 429 

204 306 

199 408 

194 720 

164 099 

Administered Revenue from Appropriation

59 439 

59 557 

59 803 

59 076 

59 350 

 

248 868 

263 863 

259 211 

253 796 

223 449 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The 2026‑27 Budget estimate includes an additional appropriation for expenditure associated with the 27th pay occurring in that financial year.

2.    The increase in Primary Industries in 2023‑24 reflects additional funding for existing initiatives including the Agricultural Development Fund, Farm Business Resilience Package, Implementation of Wild Fallow Deer Management and the Strategic Industry Partnership Program. The decrease in 2024‑25 primarily reflects the completion of these initiatives.

3.    The decrease in Water Resources Management in 2025‑26 primarily reflects the completion of the Rural Water Use Strategy Implementation initiative and the National Water Grid Authority Science Program.

4.    The increase in Marine Resources in 2023‑24 primarily reflects new funding for the Abalone Industry Reinvestment Fund, Flathead Recovery Program and Salmon Plan initiatives. The variation across the Forward Estimates reflects the funding profiles for the Industry Led Abalone Productivity Improvement Program, Salmon Plan, Supporting Recreational Sea Fishing in Local Communities initiatives, Abalone Industry Reinvestment Fund and Flathead Recovery initiatives.

5.    The decrease in Biosecurity and Product Integrity in 2023‑24 primarily reflects the completion of the Border and Biosecurity Control Costs and Flinders Island Veterinarian Accommodation and Equipment initiatives. This is offset by new funding for the Emergency Animal Disease Risk Fund and Apiary Biosecurity initiatives and the funding profile for the Weed Action Fund. The decrease in 2024‑25 primarily reflects the completion of the Weed Action Fund initiative.

6.    The decrease in Natural Values Management in 2025‑26 primarily reflects the completion of the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Bodies initiative.

7.    The decrease in Forest Policy in 2023‑24 reflects a decrease in funding for the Timber Promotions Board. The decrease in 2026‑27 reflects the completion of the On-island Processing and Value Adding initiative.

8.    The decrease in Aboriginal Heritage and Land in 2023‑24 reflects the restructure of these functions to the Department of Premier and Cabinet during 2022‑23.

9.    The increase in Historic Heritage in 2023‑24 reflects funding for the Supporting Tasmania’s Built Heritage initiative, offset by the completion of the Port Arthur Convict Heritage Hub Penitentiary initiative. The decrease in 2026‑27 reflects completion of the Supporting Tasmania’s Built Heritage initiative.

10.  Funding for Improving Crown Lands Transaction Turnaround Time is now allocated to Output Group 4 ‑ Parks, upon cessation of the COVID‑19 Response and Recovery Output Group.

11.  The decrease in Environmental Management in 2024‑25 reflects the profile of funding for the Circular Economy initiative and the completion of the Container Refund Scheme and Waste Action Plan ‑ Recycling Infrastructure Grant Program initiatives. The decrease in 2025‑26 reflects the completion of the Circular Economy initiative.

12.  The increase in Threatened Species in 2023‑24 reflects funding for the Orange‑bellied Parrot Migration and Tracking initiative and additional funding received as part of the Threatened species strategy and Swift Parrot Recovery initiatives. The decrease across 2024‑25 and 2025‑26 reflects completion of these initiatives.


 

Table 7.14:       Administered Revenue

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue Collected on Behalf of the Public Account

 

 

 

 

 

Abalone Licences

6 586 

6 751 

6 920 

7 093 

7 270 

Land Information Charges

107 

110 

113 

116 

118 

Lands Titles Office Dealings

19 650 

20 141 

20 645 

21 161 

21 690 

Marine Farms Fees and Recoveries

1 306 

1 339 

1 373 

1 407 

1 442 

Other Regulatory Fees

5 486 

5 599 

5 722 

5 849 

5 979 

Other Revenue

5 000 

5 000 

5 000 

5 000 

5 000 

Quarantine Fees

1 509 

1 475 

1 512 

1 550 

1 588 

Royalty Income

2 322 

2 322 

2 322 

2 322 

2 322 

Water Licence Fees

2 230 

2 286 

2 343 

2 402 

2 462 

 

44 196 

45 023 

45 950 

46 900 

47 871 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue from Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Appropriation

59 439 

59 557 

59 803 

59 076 

59 350 

 

59 439 

59 557 

59 803 

59 076 

59 350 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Revenue

103 635 

104 580 

105 753 

105 976 

107 221 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 7.15:       Administered Expenses

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

Contribution to Commonwealth, State and Industry Organisations1

470 

595 

595 

470 

470 

Forest Practices Authority

1 626 

1 657 

1 802 

1 838 

1 875 

Grant to Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies2

2 905 

2 605 

2 605 

2 605 

2 605 

Grant to Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture

1 958 

1 958 

1 958 

1 958 

1 958 

Inland Fisheries Service ‑ Government Contribution3

1 220 

1 461 

1 488 

1 246 

1 274 

Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority

4 283 

4 386 

4 456 

4 545 

4 636 

Private Forests Tasmania

1 714 

1 745 

1 898 

1 936 

1 975 

Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

3 605 

3 789 

3 537 

3 612 

3 688 

Sustainable Timber Tasmania

8 000 

8 000 

8 000 

8 000 

8 000 

Tasmanian Racing Assistance

33 277 

32 977 

32 977 

32 477 

32 477 

Wellington Park Contribution

381 

384 

487 

389 

392 

 

59 439 

59 557 

59 803 

59 076 

59 350 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transfers to the Public Account

44 196 

45 023 

45 950 

46 900 

47 871 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Administered Expenses

103 635 

104 580 

105 753 

105 976 

107 221 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The increase in Contribution to Commonwealth, State and Industry Organisations in 2023‑24 reflects additional funding received to mitigate higher costs associated with nationally agreed cost sharing arrangements with the Commonwealth and other States and Territories.

2.    The decrease in the Grant to Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies in 2023‑24 reflects the completion of the fishing and marine farming industries and ongoing support for the assessment of new and sustainable fisheries opportunities initiative.

3.    The increase in the Inland Fisheries Service ‑ Government Contribution in 2023‑24 reflects the reclassification of the Investing in Improved Facilities for Recreational Fishers and Local Communities initiative as an Administered payment. The decrease in 2025‑26 reflects the completion of this initiative and the Anglers Access Program and Cheaper To Go Trout Fishing initiatives.

Contribution to Commonwealth, State and Industry Organisations

This funding is the State’s contribution to cost sharing arrangements, as agreed at meetings of the Agriculture Ministers’ Forum and in relation to nationally agreed initiatives, particularly for biosecurity programs and projects. The funding contributes to activities under Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries and Water, Output Group 3 ‑ Biosecurity and Output Group 7 ‑ Environment.

Forest Practices Authority

This payment represents the Government’s contribution to the Forest Practices Authority. The FPA’s key role is as an independent regulator of Tasmania’s forest practices system. The system regulates the management of forest and threatened non‑forest vegetation on both public and private land.

Grant to the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies

In 2010, the Department entered into the Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration Agreement with the University of Tasmania’s Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, to assist aquaculture and fisheries research. The Government provides its contribution to the joint venture by way of an annual grant. Activities of IMAS contribute to Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries and Water.

Grant to the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture

The Department and the University of Tasmania have an agreement in place for the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture to undertake agricultural research, development, extension and education. The activities of TIA contribute to Output Group 2 ‑ Primary Industries and Water and the balance of Government funding is reflected in that Output.

Inland Fisheries Service ‑ Government Contribution

This funding represents the community service functions of the Inland Fisheries Service in relation to the conservation, protection and management of Tasmania’s native freshwater fauna and the carp management program. Further information is provided in chapter 23 of this Budget Paper.

Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority

This funding represents the Government’s contribution to the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority to support the agreed conservation funding program for the Port Arthur, Coal Mines and Cascades Female Factory Historic Sites.

Private Forests Tasmania

This payment represents the Government’s contribution to Private Forests Tasmania. The role of PFT is to facilitate and expand the development of the private forest resource in Tasmania in a manner that is consistent with sound forest land management practice.

Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

This payment represents the Government’s contribution towards the operation of the Gardens and supports the management, conservation and enhancement of the Gardens, in accordance with the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens Act 2002. Further information is provided in chapter 25 of this Budget Paper.

Sustainable Timber Tasmania

This provision will ensure that permanent timber production zone land continues to be managed and is accessible and available for multiple uses. It includes funding for maintenance of the forestry road network to allow for continued community, tourism and firefighting access management of public recreation sites, provision of forest education activities, special species timber management and ongoing facilitation of forestry research.


 

Tasmanian Racing Assistance

The Government separately funds the Tasmanian Racing Industry under a deed which provides secure funding and creates certainty for the Industry. The annual funding allocation allows Tasracing Pty Ltd to facilitate key administration roles and functions, including the responsibility for the corporate governance, strategic direction and funding of the Tasmanian Racing Industry. It also allows for the ratification of national rules, the making of local rules and the setting of licence standards and criteria.

Wellington Park Contribution

The allocation represents the Government’s contribution to the cost of administering Wellington Park through a grant to the Wellington Park Management Trust.

Table 7.16:       Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June

 

2023 

2024 

2025 

2026 

2027 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1

70 311 

92 682 

92 422 

92 598 

93 154 

Receivables2

12 748 

7 297 

7 366 

7 435 

7 504 

Equity investments1

3 106 

2 771 

2 771 

2 771 

2 771 

Other financial assets3

2 582 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

88 747 

102 750 

102 559 

102 804 

103 429 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non‑financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories

939 

960 

995 

1 030 

1 065 

Assets held for sale4

.... 

2 237 

2 237 

2 237 

2 237 

Property, plant and equipment1

1 421 478 

1 685 594 

1 686 292 

1 685 981 

1 682 670 

Infrastructure5

361 490 

388 888 

427 880 

482 422 

489 586 

Heritage and cultural assets

15 658 

15 658 

15 883 

16 108 

16 333 

Intangibles1

12 732 

13 950 

13 686 

13 422 

13 158 

Other assets1

18 486 

16 998 

17 032 

17 066 

17 100 

 

1 830 783 

2 124 285 

2 164 005 

2 218 266 

2 222 149 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

1 919 530 

2 227 035 

2 266 564 

2 321 070 

2 325 578 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables1

3 438 

3 019 

3 136 

3 253 

3 370 

Interest bearing liabilities1

17 156 

15 319 

15 319 

15 319 

15 319 

Provisions

87 

58 

58 

58 

58 

Employee benefits6

34 684 

33 605 

33 931 

34 257 

30 445 

Other liabilities1

7 367 

9 433 

9 434 

9 435 

9 436 

Total liabilities

62 732 

61 434 

61 878 

62 322 

58 628 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

1 856 798 

2 165 601 

2 204 686 

2 258 748 

2 266 950 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Contributed capital7

(77)

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Reserves

684 487 

987 769 

990 029 

992 289 

994 549 

Accumulated funds

254 781 

268 496 

305 321 

357 123 

363 065 

Other Equity

917 607 

909 336 

909 336 

909 336 

909 336 

Total equity

1 856 798 

2 165 601 

2 204 686 

2 258 748 

2 266 950 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in these items in 2024 reflects updated estimates based on the 30 June 2022 actuals.

2.    The decrease in Receivables in 2024 reflects updated estimates based on the 30 June 2022 actuals, in particular the loan receivable from Grange Resources which transferred to the Environment Protection Authority upon the EPA’s separation from the Department in 2021‑22, partially offset by the reclassification of accrued revenue to this category.

3.    The decrease in Other financial assets in 2024 reflects a change in financial treatment of accrued revenue, now reflected in Receivables.

4.    The increase in Assets held for sale in 2024 reflects the recognition of parcels of Crown land approved for sale under the public sale program that are not yet under contract and Crown land sales agreements with sale not finalised.

5.    The increase in Infrastructure across the Forward Estimates reflects the Department’s Capital Investment Program projects.

6.    The decrease in Employee benefits in 2027 recognises the payment of the 27th pay in 2026‑27 and the reduction in the associated liability accrued over prior years for this purpose.

7.    Contributed capital in 2024 reflects the restructure of Output 7.4 Aboriginal Heritage and Land to the Department of Premier and Cabinet on 1 September 2022.


8.     

Table 7.17:       Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June ‑ Administered

 

2023 

2024 

2025 

2026 

2027 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits1,2

2 510 

123 

123 

123 

123 

Investments2

1 000 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Receivables1

1 599 

853 

853 

853 

853 

Other financial assets

2 374 

2 372 

2 372 

2 372 

2 372 

 

7 483 

3 348 

3 348 

3 348 

3 348 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non‑financial assets

 

 

 

 

 

Property, plant and equipment2

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Other assets2

284 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

289 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

7 772 

3 348 

3 348 

3 348 

3 348 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Payables1

1 449 

2 720 

2 720 

2 720 

2 720 

Interest bearing liabilities2

251 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Employee benefits2

425 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Other liabilities1

2 282 

628 

628 

628 

628 

Total liabilities

4 407 

3 348 

3 348 

3 348 

3 348 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets (liabilities)

3 365 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated funds2

3 365 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Total equity

3 365 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in these items in 2024 reflects updated estimates based on the 30 June 2022 actuals.

2.    The decrease in these items in 2024 reflects a change in accounting treatment of the net assets transferred from the Department of State Growth in relation to the Forest Practices Authority, as part of its restructure.


 

Table 7.18:       Statement of Cash Flows

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - operating

163 274 

169 437 

160 502 

149 839 

150 593 

Appropriation receipts - capital

21 771 

34 869 

38 906 

44 881 

13 506 

Appropriation receipts - other

4 384 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Grants

15 195 

18 225 

20 156 

26 821 

7 697 

Sales of goods and services

32 770 

33 850 

34 358 

34 816 

35 270 

Fees and fines

15 404 

24 213 

31 264 

31 320 

31 378 

GST receipts

14 868 

14 972 

14 972 

14 972 

14 972 

Interest received

Other cash receipts

4 204 

4 367 

4 367 

4 367 

4 367 

Total cash inflows

271 877 

299 939 

304 531 

307 022 

257 789 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Employee benefits

(117 791)

(122 270)

(121 645)

(120 360)

(125 727)

Superannuation

(15 166)

(15 811)

(15 898)

(16 063)

(16 845)

GST payments

(14 868)

(14 972)

(14 972)

(14 972)

(14 972)

Grants and subsidies

(35 129)

(40 355)

(37 259)

(28 564)

(25 425)

Supplies and consumables

(58 973)

(60 944)

(60 437)

(57 752)

(55 495)

Other cash payments

(4 415)

(6 182)

(6 189)

(6 203)

(6 215)

Total cash outflows

(246 342)

(260 534)

(256 400)

(243 914)

(244 679)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash from (used by) operating activities

25 535 

39 405 

48 131 

63 108 

13 110 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets1

(29 364)

(43 513)

(50 705)

(65 246)

(14 868)

Proceeds from the disposal of non‑financial assets

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

2 314 

Equity injections and cash flows from restructuring

(88)

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

Net cash from (used by) investing activities

(27 138)

(41 199)

(48 391)

(62 932)

(12 554)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

Net borrowings2

(306)

(311)

.... 

.... 

.... 

Net cash from (used by) financing activities

(306)

(311)

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

(1 909)

(2 105)

(260)

176 

556 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 7.18:       Statement of Cash Flows (continued)

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period

72 220 

94 787 

92 682 

92 422 

92 598 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period

70 311 

92 682 

92 422 

92 598 

93 154 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

1.    The variation in Payments for acquisition of non‑financial assets reflects the timing of capital projects in the Department’s Capital Investment Program.

2.    The variation in Net borrowings reflects the accounting treatment for the recognition of leases for regional office buildings and plant and equipment embedded in service agreements.


 

Table 7.19:       Statement of Cash Flows ‑ Administered

 

2022‑23 

2023‑24 

2024‑25 

2025‑26 

2026‑27 

 

 

 

Forward 

Forward 

Forward 

 

Budget 

Budget 

Estimate 

Estimate 

Estimate 

 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

$'000 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

Cash inflows

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriation receipts - operating

59 439 

59 557 

59 803 

59 076 

59 350 

Sales of goods and services

21 063 

21 590 

22 131 

22 684 

23 250 

Fees and fines

15 811 

16 111 

16 497 

16 894 

17 299 

Other cash receipts

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

7 322 

Total cash inflows

103 635 

104 580 

105 753 

105 976 

107 221 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash outflows

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and subsidies

(59 439)

(59 557)

(59 803)

(59 076)

(59 350)

Transfers to the Public Account

(44 196)

(45 023)

(45 950)

(46 900)

(47 871)

Total cash outflows

(103 635)

(104 580)

(105 753)

(105 976)

(107 221)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

.... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and deposits at the beginning of the reporting period1

2 510 

123 

123 

123 

123 

Cash and deposits at the end of the reporting period1

2 510 

123 

123 

123 

123 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:

1.    The decrease in Cash and deposits in 2023‑24 reflects a change in accounting treatment of Cash and deposits transferred from the Department of State Growth in relation to the Forest Practices Authority, as part of its restructure.